(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Duluth Herald"

I 




I 

r- 



-rl 







THE DULUTH HERALD 



VOLUME XXVIII— NO. 143. 



THURSDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 22, 1910. 



' HlOtUr^ftFteO CENTS. 



HGHT FOR PHYSICAL 
VALUA 






^ OF ROADS 
GUN BY STUBBS 



Kansas Governor Proclaims 

Platform Meeting in 

Topeka. 

Says Public Demands Such 
Action— Arraigns Rail- 
road Policies. 




Dlinois Men Claim Missouri 

Rate Case Injunction 

Is Violated. 











'i 


V 


*> 






1 










/^if^amiiliamam^ 


^^^*^^^ 




■■■' 


.- 





Topckfi Sept. 22. — Governor W. 

R. Stubl- . ,,.nsiis outlined the pur- 
poses "f the iiafi itate rate conference, 
•which he caUed. in a speech at the open- 
ing ui" the session here today. 

The govern^ir said the railroads of 
the coun''^ ' '■! '■•■iiiliined to advance 
freight ; ale never before 

known, lie taid ilu railroads, of their 
own initiatives, had opened up the 
whole question of ascertaining the 
physcal valuation of their pruperties by 
the testimony l)y their officials before i 
ernnmerce commission, j 
itiba also deplored tlie ' 
ilroads to lavor large | 
djusiment of freight 
ining tlie purposes of 

,^ the governor said: 

"This conference was called to dis- 
cuss the ways rind means to protect 

pri'duoer. consumer, 
'lie generally in the 
i the advance in 
> ed in the most im- 
portant casi .as ever been lieard 
Dv the iiiit commerce com.nis 



the Inierstaie 

Govern 
tendenci 
cities •• 
rat«.^ 
the 




the interest 
shipper and 
Middle Wt 
freight rati 

ortani casi 

y the uii< 
sion. 

VaUintion of Property. 
'Thf public Uoiuunds nothing short 
of a bone flde valuation of al! railroad 
property, and j'Ublic ofiicials who rep- 
resent the consumer, producer, ship- 
per and general public, will be crimin- 
ally negllgint if they do not avail 



Albany, N. Y., Sept. 22. — W. W. Cole 
is one of the witnesses appearing 
before the legislative committee in- 
vestigating Albany graft, which is sit- 
ting in Xew York. Mr. Cole was treas- 
urer of the street railway association, 
which according to the testimony or 
the witnesses contributed largely to 
the campaign funds of political par- 
ties and to the pocketbooks of tlie 
members of the state legislature. 



PRAISES THE 
"LATE^EMY" 

Van Sant Pays Tribute to 

Confederates at G. A. R. 

Meeting. 

Federal Incorporation of 

Grand Army Urged in 

His Report. 



Atlantic City. N. J.. Sept. 22. — With 
a fine tribute to the old soldiers of 
tlie Confederacy, Commander-in-Chief 
S. II. Van Sant of Minnesota today 
formally opened the business session of 
the national encampment of the Grand 
Army of the Republic on the Steel Pier. 
The commander spoke earnestly as he 
expressed his gratitication at the in- 
creasing fraternization of the "Blue" 
and the "Gray." When he said that 
no braver troops were ever marshalled 
for conrlict tiian the Southern soldiers 
and that the Union veterans now re- 
alize tiiat no men ever n.ade greater 
sacrifices for what they believed to be 
right than their former foes, ilie com- 
mander was applauded. 

Comprehensively reviewing the work 
of tlie Grand Army for the year dur- 
ing which he lias acted as its head, 
("oniniander-in-Chief Van Sant ad- 
dressed the delegates with an eye to 
tlie future good that the great organl- 
zat4on might accomplish as well as 
upon the notable acliievements of its 
past. 

\%'oaId Keep Rolls Filled. 
While the roll of the Grand Army 
is steadily shortening, the commander- 
in-chief urged tliat every effort be 
made to keep the organization up to 
its fullest possible strength. He 
quoted figures sliowing that the G. A. 



GARDNER ON 
STAND_AGA1N 

Shippers' Attorneys Qinz Vice 

President of the 

Northwestern. 



TWO CRIES 
END GAY DAY 

Woman Is Shot and Assailant 
Hangs Self in Cleve- 
land Jail. 



-^f 



GILPIN IN THE LEAD; 
WILL PROBABLY WIN; 
NORTON SURE WINNER 



themselves 
to bed roci-. 
commerce v 
Ing and exl 
to dctermii. 
the railroaii 
•■Congress: 



'' i~ opportunity to go 
vssist the interstate 
'.on to make a .search- 
investigation so as 
actual value of all 
<■■ United States. 
1 immediately enact 




law providing for the physical val- 
CCoDlinue d on page 4, third column.^ 

ONCE RICH MAN 
PENNILESS SUICIDE 

Frank Reiger, Former New 

York Clothier, Dead in 

Chicago. 

Chicago. Sr}t. 22. — Frank Keiger, 
formerly a New York clothier and 
once reputed to be worth J125,000, died 
today from the effects of poison, whicli 
he swallowed here Tuesday with sui- 
cidal intent. Ileiger, who was CO 
years old. had become penniless. 

TENDERLOIN RAID 
IS SPECTACULAR 

Grand Jury Evidence Secured 

in Action By New York 

Police. 



Indiana Authorities Are In- 
vestigating Horror on 
Interurban. 

Thirty-Nine Are Dead and 

Others May Not Survive 

Injuries. 



New York, Sept. 22. — A police descent 
on the Ten.N: :<.in early today was fea- 
■ if the most spectacu- 
\.Hr8 on alleged illegal 



tured by >■ 
lar raiils i 
resorts. 

The activities of the official force 
caused intense excitement In the Ten- 
derloin. Agents of Raymond Fosdick, 
commissioner of accounts, whose in- 
vestigation 'T Ttnderioin conditions 
brought ai.> Lii Acting Mayor Mitchel's 
recent complaint against i'olice Com- 
missioner Baker, were out in numbers 
following the « ourse of the police and 
seeking evidence for the grand jury 
probing of gambling and vice condi- 
tions now In progress. 

It was expected that Commissioner 
Baker would be one of the witnesses 
called by the g randjury toda y. 

ODD FELLOWS IN 
FINAL SESSIONS 

Conferring of Grand Decora- 
lion of Chivalry Feature 
of Meeting. 

Atlanta, Ga., Sept. 22.— The eighty- 
sixth annual session of the sovereign 
grand lodge. Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows comes to a close today witii 
the election of the 1911 convention city. 
Buffalo. Toronto and Los Angeles are 
trying hard to .secure it. 

An Interesting feature of last night's 
program at the Auditorium Armory 
previous «a the opening of the grand 
ball, was the conferring of the grand 
decoration of chivalry upon Uen. Fred 
W Davis, Detroit; MaJ. D. E. Bird, 
Kan-sas City; Maj. John A. Wild. De- 
troll Col. Isaac G Reynolds, .Vnn Ar- 
bor- Col. Peter Bttzing, Flint, Mi'h.; 
Capt J. W. Wilkerson, St. l.ouis; Capt. 
A «■ Hartley, Kansas City; Capt. Fred 
E:! Pierce, Los AugeltB, and Capt. ix. C 
Hall. Atlanta. 



Fort Wayne, Ind.. Sept. 22.— Thirty- 
nine is the toll of the dead in the Fort 
Wayne-Bluffton Interurban disaster 
yesterday, so far as the check made 
I his morning shows. 

While the officials of the company 
refuse to give out their opinion as to 
where the responsibility lies, rumor 
fixes the blame with the crew of the 
"special" which was speeding south 
from Fort Wayne, empty. The crew, 
knowing the "local" was ten or more 
minutes late, it is said, look chances 
on making a siding and failed. 

There still is some confusion as to 
the names of tiie dead. There are in 
the hosiiiials in Fort Wayne si.\ in- 
jured. These are: 

Mrs. W. D. Burgan, Bluffton. 

Miss -Margaret Tribolet, Bluffton. 

.S. A. Parkhi:rst, UlulYton. 

C. M. Brown, Wan en. Ind. 

B. F. Corkwell, motorman "special" 
train. 

A." Ellenshergor. Berne, Ind. 

Holiday Thruug Strlvken. 

Practically all of the dead were per- 
sons Ii\ing in tlie \icinity of Bluffton. 
It wa? a holiday throng bound for Fort 
Wayne to attend the state fair. The 
"local" was filled to the last seat and 
there were many persons in the aisles 
or oa the platforms. 

The crash was without warning- 

(Continued on page 7, fourth column.) 

WAR RISK FOUGHT 
BY INSURANCE FIRM 

Unique Case Wii! Be Heard 

in the Supreme 

Court. 

Washington. Sept. 22. — An odd tale 
of adventure including an unusual in- 
surance risk Is to be laid before the 
supreme court of tlie United States 
next month, when that tribunal will 
be asked to decide whether an insur- 
ance company is liable on a policy 
taken upon a steamer against the per- 
ils of capture on a \ oyage from San 
Francisco to Vladivostok during tlie 
Russo-Japanese war. 

The vessel in question was the Brit- 
isli ship M. S. Dollar. Late in 1904 it 
was desired to send the stean.er to 
Vladivostok with a cargo, and in order 
to protect the owners from loss by 
capture, they took out a policy against 
this peril with the Maritime Insurance 
company, Ltd., a British corporation. 
, SeUeil Off Japanese Coaftt. 

The vessel was seized off tlic coast 
of Japan about four days' sail from 
Vladivostok and subsequently was con- 
demned. 

It is claimed by the Insurance com- 
pany that It is not liable, because the 
vessel not only carried papers sliowing 
Vladivostok as her real destination, 
but also another set of papers showing 
Mojl, Japan, as the destination. 

The circuit court of appeals for the 
Ninth circuit decided that the company 
'vas liable. On account of the conllict 
of law on the subject the supreme 
court will be asked to direct the cir- 
cuit court of appeals to send the case 
to it for review. 



(Continued on page 4, second column. 

MAKING WAR ON 
INFANT PARALYSIS 

New York Stale Health Com- 
missioner Has Begun 
Campaign. 

Albany. Sept. 22. — A systematic study 
of infantile paralysis In this state is 
being made by State Health Commis- 
sioner I'orter. He has been watching 
the prevalence of the disease and says 
he is fully satisfied that a number of 
cases exist in the state. 

•Willie recent investigations, sajs 
a statement from the state health de- 
partment today, "establish beyond a 
reasonable doubt that this is a com- 
municable disease, it has not as yet 
been positively determined by what 
means it is transmitted from one per- 
son to another. Recognizing, however, 
its accepted transmissibility, the state 
health department has put it on the 
list of quarantinable diseases and now 
requires It to be reported and quaran- 
tined for a period of twenty-one days." 

With a view of systematically study- 
ing the cause and prevalence of this 
disease. Commissioner Porter has re- 
cently placed In the hands of every 
piiyslclan in the state blanks on which 
he urges a detailed report of every 
case, which has arisen since Jan. 1, 
1910. 

The state healtli department urges 
united co-operation of citizens in its 
combat against the disease. 



Remarkable Financial Re- 
turns Revealed in Rate 
Hearing. 

Chicago, Sept. 22. — Today's session of 
the railroad rate hearing before the 
Interstate commerce commission was 
expected to be devoted largely to cross- 
examination by attorneys for the snip- 
pers of witnesses of the Chicago, Mil- 
waukee & St. Paul and the Chicago & 
Northwestern railroads, who on airect 
examination testified they believed an 
increase in railway rates necessary to 
maintain the financial integrity of their 
properties. 

W. A. Gardner, vice president of the 
Northwestern line, was the first wit- 
ness subjected to questions by Attor- 
ney Clifford Thorne, who represents 
livestock shippers in twenty-t.wo states. 
Mr. Thome's qusetions were intended 
to bring from the w^itness admission 
that his company liad made enough 
net earnings to rebuild the road, had 
they been so applied. 

Dividends Not Affected. 

The attorney maintained that the 
company liad kept up its right-of-way 
and equipment by the use only of earn- 
ings without affecting the dividends in 
years when the income apparently was 
light as well as other years. 

Other roads which will present tes- 

(Continued on page 4, third column.) 

PRIEST BLOWS 
CUT HIS BRAINS 

Kills Himself When Caught 

By Uncle of Runaway 

Girl. 



Man Is BeHeved to Be Bur- 



ton W. Yates 
Detroit. 



of 




"THREE TIME WINNER" 
AS COUNTY ATTORNEY 



Cleveland, Ohio, Sept. 22. — A man be- 
lieved to be Burton W. Yates, a Detroit 
business man, committed suicide by 
hanging In the county Jail today, an 
hour after he had been lodged there 
for shooting a woman identified as 
Mrs. Fred Singer of Cleveland, former- 
ly of Detroit, in a road house at Rocky 
River. 

Left alone while commitment papers 
were being made out, Yates hurried into 
the washroom, tied his handkerchief 
around his neck, attaclied it to an Iron 
bar and strangled himself. When the 
guards returned they found him dead 

The woman was taken to a hospital. 
It Is believed she will live. 

FoIIo^ved Day of Gayety. 

The shooting followed a day ofau- 



(Coiitinued on page 4, third column.) 

ELLSWORTH WINS 
IN THE SECOND 

Ward Concedes St. James 

Man's Nomination for 

Congress. 

Sn. Paul, Minn., Sept. 22.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Figures from the county 
auditors in every county of the Second 
district show that I-'rank F. Ellsworth 
of Ht. James was named as the Repub- 
lican candidate for congress by a ma- 
jority of 299, with two small pre- 
cincts missing. A. L. Ward of Fair- 
mont conceded the nomination of Ells- 




MiddlecoffHasFifty-OneVotes 

to Gain in Gilpin 

Territory. 

Range Man Is Likely to Be 
Nominee for Judge- 
ship. 

Norton Continues to Gain as 

the Later Returns 

Come In. 



Madrid, Sept. 22. — Father Novedo, a 
professor in a Capucine college, blew 
out his brafhs today when overtaken 
at I^orca by the uncle of a woman with 
whom the priest wae said to have 
eloped. 



GIVES POPULATION OF | 
THREE MORE CITIES 



worth today. 



AVaftbinirfon, Sept. 22. — PopiiTo- 
tlou statlstlcti for the thirteenth 
een.siiM »vere made public todn}r 
by the ceuxiin bureau for the fol- 
luwlug eitiejtt 

Mauohowter, N. H., 70.003, an 
InereaHe of 13.070, or 22.9 per 
cent, or o«,«S7 iu 11M)0. 

Aurora, 111., 21>,M)7, an luereaHe 
of ."S,e«0, or 23.4 per cent, over 
24,147 iu l«O0. « 

fellKln, 111., 25,976, an Increase « 
of 3,."i45, or 13.8 per cent, over ^ 
22.433 iu IJKM). f 



^ -^ ^ "^ -T^ ^ 'T» "^ 



y^ ^ ^' ffi i^ ^ i^" ^ y)"* ?p 



ILK HOSIERY 
PLANT RAIDED 

Tvfenty Men Arrested Under 

the Alien Contract 

Labcr Law. 

New York, teept. 22. — Five govern- 
ment inspectors of the department of 
commerce and labor, with the assist- 
ance of a special agent from the de- 
partment of justice, raided a silk 
hosiery factory al Dover, N. J., yes- 
terday and arrested twenty men who 
were emploved as weavers, on war- 
rants issued at Washington, D. C. 
charging them with violating contract 
labor laws. Tlie penalty for each con- 
viction is $1,000 fine for the importer 
and deportation of the workmen. 



JOHN H. NORTON, 

Who Is Again Victorious Over 

Charles E. /idams. 



BOLD THIEF 
MAKES HAUL 

Diamonds Valued at $2,000 

Stolen From Keystone 

Loan Company. 

Tray Taken From Window 

While Evening Crowds 

Pass liy. 



It looks like Gilpin for judge of 
probate, and its practically certain that 
Norton has again captured the nomina- 
tion for county attorney on the Re- 
publican ticket. 

With twelve precincts to be heard 
from, John H. Norton has a net plural- 
ity of 16!>- There is small cnance of 
that lead being overcome. 

With the saute precincts not reported, 
S. W. Gilpin has a net plurality of 51, 
and there is no particular reason to ex- 
pect that tills lead will be lost when 
all the rtiurns are in, althougii both 
sides are exceedingly anxious to learn 
what sort of dope fate has been mixing; 
up for them in these voting divisions. 
They are claimed to be Gilpin territory 
chiefly. 

E. A. Dyer of liibbing has apparently 
a safe lead in the surveyorship fignt, 
which became interesting as the battle 
progres-ed. Tiiere were three candi- 
dates in the field. Andrew Anderson, 
Lyonel Avres and Dyer. Ayres, the in- 
cumbent, is second in the race. 
I All dav the candidates for tne two 
i places in doubt have been on the anxl- 
I ous seat. , ..... 

Throughout the day the liveliest In- 
terest has been mani fested in the de- 

j (Continue d on page 3, first column.). 

WEYMAN TRIES 
OUT HIS MOTOR 

Aviators Are on Watch for 
Chance to Cross the 




**** 



I 'LONG 'BOUT THIS TIME 0' YE/kR. | 



K (wiuth\)B/^\ 




TIME TO SHED THg OLD 
STRAW BONNBy, WTH TH6. 

6i.oe ribboaj on «t- 







The boldest theft of months was per- 
petrated last evening when a tray 
holding twenty dian onds, valued at 
$2,000, was stolen from the window of 
the Keystone Loan company at 22 West 
Superior street. 

The jewels were talten in broad day- 
light at 6 o'clock, ^nhen the evening 
throngs were iiurryini? along the city's 
m.ain street, passing the window by 
the score every niinu e. 

J. D. Segal, the proprietor, did not 
discover his loss until tliis morning, 
when he reported it io the police. He 
was unable to give any adequate de- 
scription of the thief and the authori- 
ties liave small hopes of apprehending 
him. , , 

It is believed that two men worked 
the game. One of t lem engaged Air. 
Segal in the rear of the store, where 
ne bargained for so;ne time over an 
overcoat. In the meantime it is al- 
most certain tiiat his confederate 
walked behind the c lunter and up to 
the window in whi-h the diamonds 
were being exhibited. Without arous- 
ing Ihe suspicions of the proprietor he 
slipped them in his pocket and waike.l 

The valuables in the store were put 
in the safe last night when they closed 
by Segal's son. The young man did 
not notice the absence of the tray of 
diamonds. But when the owner went 
to the strong box this morning he im- 
mediately noticed that they were miss- 
ing and notified headquarters. 

FOUR ARE KILLED 
BY LIGHTNING 

Two Women and Two Men 
Are Victims of Color- 
ado Storm. 

Colorado Springs, Colo., Sept. 22. — 
Lightning killed fovr persons during 
a storm near Eastonvllle and Elbert, 
twenty-five miles northeast of here, 
last niglit. The dead: 

MRS. GUS KROTZE, Elbert. Colo. 

MRS. JULIUS TROTZY. Kiowa, Colo. 

JAMES BLAND, Plattsburg. Mo. 

W'lLLIAM LOLCj«.MA, Eastonvllle, 
Colo. 

horsemaler'is . 
killed by engine 

W. B. Davis Loses life in 

Yards at Devils Lake, 
N.1). 

Devils Lake, N. 1).. Sept. 22.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald ) — W. B. Davis, 
aged 40 years, whose last residence 
was Fosston, Minn., but whose family 
Is now in Fargo, N D.. was killed by 
a Great Northern switch engine in the 
yards some time last night. His 
mangled remains were found on th>! 
track at 3:30 this morning by the 
switch crew. Davit was a horse deal- 
er. There will be no inquest. 



Alps. 



M CC; 



■«P? ■ 



U 



I 



Brig. Switzerland, Sept. 22.— The 
weather was clear but cold today and 
a strong wind blew over the Simplon 
pass. It was hoped that before even- 
ing Mr. Wevman, the American, and 
George Chavez, the Peruvian, aviators, 
would find a favorable time to attempt 
the cross-Alps competition flight from 
here to Milan, Italy. 

During the morning Weyman made 
three trial liights to test his motor, 
but he at no time reached a height 
greater than 4,a00 feet. To clear the 
mountains an altitude of some i,oOO 
feet must be maintained during thm 
first half hour o f the trip. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 
DEMOCRATS MEET 

Platform Is All They Can 

Consider Under New 

Primary Law. 

Concord, N. H.. Sept. 22.— The party 
convention provisions for the new di- 
rect primary law in New Hampshire 
were tested for the first time today 
when the Democratic state convention 
was held in this city. Under tne new 
law the candidates of bffth the Repub- 
lican and Democratic parties for state 
and county offices and congressmen 
were chosen at the joint primaries held 
Sept 6. The only thing left for the 
Democratic state convention today ano 
the RepublJkcan state convention Sept. 
27 was the adoption of party platforms. 
The ratification of the direct nomina- 
tions is not required. 

Eugene E. Reed, mayor of Manches- 
ter and the Democratic nominee for 
congress fr-om the First district, was 
the presiding officer. 

HAS BUREAU TO 
TREAT WITH MEN 

international Paper Company 

Takes Step to End 

Labor Troubles. 

Albany, N. Y., Sept. 22— John Lund- 
rigan of Buffalo has resigned as chair- 
man of the state board of mediation 
and arbitration to become general su- 
perintendent of the industrial depart- 
ment of the International Paper corn- 
pan v, which has its main offices in 
New York citv. The creation of an 
industrial bureau where the ihousanda 
of employes of the corporation can 
have their differences discussed and 
adjusted is looked upon as a novel 

scheme. . ., , , , 

Under his new duties Mr. Lundrigan 
will be the mediator and arbitrator 
between the men and the company in 
all of its disputes. During his twelve 
years of service as deputy state 'Com- 
missioner of labor he has urged the 
creation of similar industrial depart- 
ments beUeving they would result Iu 
reduciug Um number of strikes. 



■ i-j 



W^^ 



« 




1 DEFECTIVE PAGE 

' — ■ I IT r 




2 



Thursday, 



THE DULtjTH HERALD. 



September 22, 1910. 



DISTRICT IS 
PROSPEROUS 

Superintendent Copper Makes 

Report for Du- 

luth. 



Methodists Listen to Vari- 
ous District Re- 
ports. 



Fergus Fa. n., Sept. 22. — (vSpe- 

Clal to Tlie Harai.l > — The Methodist 
annual conference continued Its busi- 
ness session this morning at 9 o'clock, 
Bishop Hamilton presiding. The most 
Interesting Item of the morning ses- 
Blon was the reading of tha district 
superintendent report.^. Rev. Dr. E. K. 
Copper read a splendid report. The 
•'ork on the Duluth distrl.^t has been 



prosecuted with great vigor and suc- 

CtJ.i.l. 

^ew churches have been built this 
yea;- at Chishulm, costing $6,000; Ta- 
conite, 11,600; Hill City, $3,000; and 
about $10,000 has been expended In 
cliuroh improvement and about the 
same amount paid on old Indebtedness. 
Benevolent collections in the city 
ihurches have been more than doubled 
over last year, due in part to the In- 
lluenc? of the laymen's missionary 
movement. 

Yesterday afternoon address were 
made for the .Methodist brotherhood. 
Tifv. yi. E. TindoU of Alexandria pre- 
sided at the anniversary of the Freed- 
man's Aid society. President J. S. Hall 
gave a graphic account of Methodist 
work among the colored and poor white 
people of the Soutli. 

Rev. Andrew Gillies, pastor of Hen- 
nepin Avenue church of Minneapolis, 
spoke at the evening session of the 
conference. The cliurch was crowded. 
Mr. Gillies' subject was Methodism and 
world evangelization and an adequate 
theology. Its spiritual, dynamic and 
personal e.xperience and spiritual de- 
mocracy, and Its vicarious offerings 
and concrete victorj- in the missionary 
field. He paid a glowing tribute to for- 
eign mls.sions and missionaries and at- 
tacked vigorously missionary critics. 

Judge Charles A. Pollock of Fargo, 
N. D., was loU'ily applauded by the 
preacaers wlien he spoke on the advan- 
tages of prohibition for North Dakota. 
He pleaded for the clergymen to get 
together on temperance legislation. 

Memorial services for the dead 
preachers was announced for Sunday 
afternoon, aUo consecration of deacon- 
esses and deacons and elders. The 
conference expects to adjourn Monday 
noon. 



gent of Persia, Azad Ul Mulk. died in 
this city today. 

TWO POLES HELD 
AS BAD MONEY MEN 



sythe of La*c. ir«r auditor; H. A. Cof- 
fin of Sheri.dan,_Xor superintendent of 
public instficiiiri 

The candfciai* ifor governor always 



has been a Republican, but he is bit 
terly opposeB t 
can organ Izatio 



terly opposef td the present Republi- 
iojr.of W 



yoming. 



Counterfeit Two-Dollar Sil- 
ver Certificates Are 
Found. 

New Bedford, Ma.ss., Sept. 22. — An- 
tone Krol and Joseph Shezuszowski, 
Poles, arrested last night charged with 
having in their possession and attempt- 
ing to pass counterfeit money, were 
each h'ald in bond of $2,500 for a con- 
tinued hearing Sept. 26 by United 
States Commissioner Goodspeed today. 
It Is alleged that the men were en- 
gaged in circulating counterfeit silver 
certificates of the $2 denomination. 

WYOMING DEMOCRATS 

NOMINATE REPUBLICAN. 



ENGLISHMEN WILL 
INSIST ON STAND 



American Banks Must Guar- 
antee Cotton Bills of 
Lading. 

London, Sept. 22. — The European 
bankers interested in preventing; fraud- 
ulent bills of lading in th<e snipraent 
of American cotton decided not to re- 
cede from their position, and indorsed 
the action of the recent general bank- 
ing conference in demanding guaran- 
tees from the American banking 
houses. 



Persian Ke>{;rnt Dead. 

Teheran, Persia, Sept. 22. — The 



re- 



Sherldan, Wyo., Sept. 22. — The 
Democratic state convention nomin- 
ated the following ticket: John M. 
Carry of Cheyenne for governor; F. L. 
Houx of Cody, for secretary of state; 
Dr. Earl Whedan of Sheridan, for 
treasurer; W. B. Ross of Cheyenne, 
for member of congress; G. C. For- 



SEXTON FALLS FROM CAR 

AND FRACTURES SKULL. 



JURY FINDS 
FORJASSER 

Verdict for $913.62 Is Re- 
turned Against Wall in 
Stock Case. 

Award Is Reduced on Sec- 
ond Trial of the 
Case. 



Ashland, Wis., Sept. 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Herman Lindsay, city 
sexton, fell off a street car while on 
the way to the cemetery last night, 
fracturing his skull and dying a few 
hours later. 



Weather — Showers 
tonight and possibly 
Friday; cooler; mod- 
erate to brisk wlnd.s, 
southerly shfftirm' to 
northwesterly early 
Friday. 





CopTTlght 1910 
The Houae of Kuppenheimer 

Chicago 



Th^ 




m 

ao Wlho Kno'ws Clotlhi< 



Firads a Lot ©f 
latisf action Here 





0¥EiCOM 








Oak Hall Building, 

Superior Street at 

Second Ave, West, 




u 



Home of-^ 

Kuppenheimer Clothes, 
Knox Hats and Regal 
Shoes. 




A Jury In the district court this 
moraing brought in a verdict of $91;}.«2 
in favor of M. M. Gasser, the plaintifl: 
in tie action against J. J. Wall. 

It was the second trial of the case. 
Mr. Gasser claimed that in 1907 he was 
induced by Mr. Wall to purchase a half 
interest in 10,000 shares of stock of 
the Consolidated Copper company of 
Parry Sound. The .«tock was purchased 
from C. O. Baldwin and the purchase 
pricij waii said to have been $o,000. 

In his complaint Mr. Gasser states 
that Mr. Wall told him the stock was a 
snap at that price, as local stock 
brokers were selling the same stock 
at $1 a share. M%-. Gasser agreed to 
the purchase and gave Mr. Wall a note 
for $1,500, his share of the purchase 
pric'j in the transaction, he asserted. 

Later he claims to have discovered 
that $l,5uO was the whole of the pur- 
chase price and that he, while only re- 
ceiving a half interest, had paid all the 
money. He brought suit ior the full 
amount in district court, and a jury 
awarded liim something over that 
amount. Mr. Gasser appealed the case 
and the supreme court decided that 
Mr. Gasser could nut recover an 
amount as great as that named in tiie 
verdict. 



YANNUTELLI 



VISITS OMAHA 



HE can verify values, satisfy his highest ideals in fine fabrics, prove for 
himself every detail of tailoring and fit. 

He who knows clothes is glad to see our styles — to note how every line falls 
as it should — their perfection of drape and balance. 

And no matter how exacting he may be, he'll find just the style that was 
madey^^r him in the latest models from 

Tlhe HoiLsse of KoppemlbeiinnieiP 

They offer the choicest selection of seasonable good clothes to be found anywhere — not 
a commonplace model in the lot ; but every style in good taste and a splendid value — all 
pure virgin wooL 

A great variety of e^lusive weaves and designs. You'll be surprised to see what a stylish, 
well-made, fine quality Suit or Overcoat you can get here at a most reasonable cost. 



Cai'dinal Is the Guest There 

of Bishop Scan- 

nell. 

Omaha, Neb., Sept. 22. — Cardinal 
Vannutelli, papal delegate at the 
Eucharistic congress at Montreal, ar- 
rived here accompanied by a party of 

distinguished ecelesiasticals this morn- 
ing. A committee of fifty met the vis- 
itors at the dei>ot and escorted the 
cardinal to the residence of Bishop 
Scannell. and his party to a hotel. 

Today's program of entertainment 
for the visiting paity includes a tour 
of the various CatJiolic institutions in 
the city, Itincheon at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. E. A. Cudahy, and a banquet 
and public reception af the Paxton 
iiotel this evening. 

Governor Shallenherger and staiY, 
judges of the federal and state courts. 
Congressmen Hitchcock and Maguire 
and otliers prominent will attend. 

EUROPE'S HOPE 
IN JAMES' THEORY 

Italian's Tribute to American 

Printed in Paris 

Journal. 

Paris, Sept. 22.— The Figaro today 
prints a tribute to the late Prof. Will- 
iam James of Harvard university from 
the pen of Qugliemo Ferrero. In the 
courje of his article, the Italian his- 
torian expresses the opinion that the 
American philosopher's "progmatism — 
a now name for some old ways of 
thinking," offers Europe the first prac- 
tical grounds for the conciliation of 
the present religious, philosophic and 
scientific strife. 

MEN WHO STOLE 
FAIR FUND CAUGHT 

Fourteen Hundred Dollars of 

the Loot Regained— One 

Thief Missing. 

Biddeford. Me.. Sept. 22. — Three of 

the four men who yesterday stole a 

box containing »2,238, the day's re- 

. celpt.3 at the Cumberland County Agri- 

1 cultural society fair at Gorhani. wore 

• captured near here early today Four- 

• teen hundred dollars of the money was 
. ^ouml upon them. The men gave their 

names as John Morgan. James K. Mil- 
ler and Georg.^^' x Kiiia. 

TO RAISE MONEY FOR 

TUBERCULOSIS PATIENTS. 

Tho Lennean branch will give an en- 
tertainment tomorrow evening in the 
Maccabee hall, 25 Lake avenue north 
the iroceeds to go into a fund for tu- 
bercular patients. The program to be 
giver, is as follows: 

"Maiden All Forlorn," comedy In 
three acts to be given by six young 
ladie:4 of the branch. 

Musical selection. 

Piano solo. Miss Elfa Smith. 

Reading, Miss Ruth Stewart. 

Piano solo. Miss Josephine Sanders 

Vocal solo, MIs.s Clalr Mulloy 

Vlclin solo, Oliver Colbentson. 

Vooa solo, A. R. Bjorquist. 

Piano duet. Misses Josephine and 
Mabel Sanders. 

Acc^ompanists, ML-^s Edna Harris and 
Miss Frida Roecker. 

TO DISCUSS PLANS 

f OR COUNTY SANATORIUM. 

This afternoon at 5 o'clock there 
will be a meeting of the St. Louis 
county tuberculosis sanatorium com- 
mission. The members of the commls- 
, .sion will discuss the plans for the new 
tuberculosis sanatorium with Architect 
Scopes of Saranac Lake. N. Y., who is 
here looking over the site selected by 
the ommission. 



to The Herald.) — Joha Christianson, 
age 22, a farmer near Maple Valley, 
Wis., and Miss Gussie Mass, 18 years 
of age, of Underhill, Wis., came to 



Menominee and were married. They j south at 1:15. 



arrived on the 11:50 train and Imme- 
diately took a hack and drove to the 
court house and secured tlie requred 
license. They were married by Jus- 
tice John E. Jones and took the train 




" Correct Dress for Tt o/nen." 




Qwn 




are occupying a far more 
prominent position at 
the Giddmg store this 
season than ever before. 

The nev; costume rootn^ where one 
may try on gotcns at leisure, is a 
bright and cheerful place^ offering 
the savie privacy as one's own 
boudoir. Large mirrors are ad- 
vaiitageously placed at either side 
of the room so as to afford good 
view with excellent lighti?ig, 

Giddmg Gown Selections 
are now broader and better 
seleded than Duluth has ever 
afforded — embracing simple 
and elaborate styles suited to 
any occasion. The designs 
are such as show style and 
refinement that would do 
credit to any wearer for 
any function. 

Tailored Street Dresses, 
Trott^ur, Bridge and Dinner 
Frocks, and beautiful Even- 
ing Gowns — Prices $19.50 to 
$175.00. 

Also Luxurious Evening Wraps and 
Rich Coats of Fur, Velvety Velour or 
Cloth, suitable for day or evening wear, 

^^The Gidding Corner — First Avenue West and Superior Street.** 



D. H., Sept. 22, Ulu. 



Uniforms for 

American Boy Scouts 

as designated by the Xew York Headquarters of 
this great movement, v/hich has just reached Du- 
luth, the uniform of the An-berican Boy Scout must 
consist of coat, trousers, leggins, knapsack and hat 
—all made of regulation Army Khaki. Each part 
pf tliie official uniform must have the registered 
"A. B. S." emblem and the outfit must be sold in 
the entire country at the same low price of $3.25. 

Being deeply interested in this novel Boys' or- 
ganization, our Buyer secured the Duluth agency 
for the uniforms when in New York this month. 
The first shipment is here and samples are now ex- 
hibited in our second window on Third Avenue 
West. 



The Columbia 

The Boys' Favorite Store. 



n 



Nortbflcld Bauker Applies. 

Washington. Sept. 'Zl. — (Special to 
The JieraiJ.) — J. D. Schmidt, presiden*^ 
Of th} Northfteld National bank, today 
filed a request that his bank be ap- 
polnt'jd as a postal savings depository. 

Married la Miohlsaiu 

Meiiomiued, Mich., Sept. 22. — (Special 



WeTreatMenAJone 



Men, if you are effected with 
any disease of a special nature, 
come to us knowing tliat we 
have successfully treated case 
after case exactly like your own. 
Feel certain that ve understand 
your disorder thorotghly and that 
we will make no misstep in its 
care. 

Our reliability and skill protects 
you against incon-petent treat- 
ments and dishonest methods. Our 
success is due to the careful at- 
tention we give to each individual 
case. 

Our treatments ;ire sure and 
safe, for we use the combined 
curative powers of medicine an'd 
elocticity combined. 

We only accept cases we know 
can be cured, and ^f every case 
we accept we issue a written 




guarantee t o 
cure. We have 
every known 
remedy appli- 
ance for treat- 
ing men. Our 
success is 
great and var- 
ied and covers _ ^ ,^ 
a period of twenty-five y'ears.'*' No 
disease of men is new to us. 

The sooner you see us the 
quicker and surer will the cure 
be. Furthermore, quick cures hap- 
pen when the disease has not yet 
become firmly rooted and broken 
down the physical condition. So 
if you wish a quick cure you must 
see us soon. Call today. Consul- 
tations are free. Out-of-town pa- 
tients should send for free symp- 
tom blank. 



Progressive Medical Association 

Office Hours: <> a. m. to 8 p. m.; Sundays, 10 a. m. to 1 p. m. 
NO 1 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



■ 



"*«- 






i . 

^ r 



-i 



t~1 



m>*m 



,m>n. 



I 



r 



— «4U& 



cc 



II 




^ 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH, HERALD 



September 22, 1910. 



r*" 



GILPIN IN THK LEAD; 
MILL PRdBABLY WIN; 
NORTON SIRE WINNER 



(Continued from page 1.) 



■n - 



vtlopmcnts of the count of the votes 
cast in tne prlmiirks!, and compara- 
tively early it came to be an accepted 
thing that Norttin was tlie winner in 
the attoriioyslilp struggle. Adams men 
reluctantly gave up hope of any other 
terminal ion, and Nurton.s friends 
evin:ed less and less interest, as It be- 
came more and more apparent that 
their candidates was reasonably safe. 
The CluMeat Itiioe. 
As to thf judgesiiip. tlie feeling was 
notably different. Until far into tho 
afternoon inquiries poured in at all 
places where the count was being com. 
piled, and the hopes of the adherent.«« 
of the respective candidate.^ rose and 
fell with spasmodic irregularity. 

Notlilng certain can be ssaid as to the i been 
probable outcome of this contest- It 
may oe that the deciding returns will 
nut be in hand until the official canva.ss ! 
of the ballots is completed at the court- 
house. 

Judge Middlecoff. who Is a candidate 
for renominati<tn. has held the office of 
judge at probate for ten years, eight 
of them consecutive. He is opposed by 
e. \y. Oilpin of Virginia, who has been 
County -superintendent of schools, and 
who has been taking a course of law 
at the I'nlversity of Minnesota that he 
mitjiit be adequately trainetl for the 
duties of the office. Mr. CJiUiin has not 



and 
oth- 



sheiiff. 
the city; 



been adamitted to the bar, but Is quali- 
fied to pass the required examination* 
at any time, it Is said. 

The Norton-Adams feud is one oi 
long standing, but it is a friendly one 
and has a bearing only on the desire 
of each man to serve the people of M. 
Louis county as county attorney, ims 
Is their third contest for the Repub 
llcan nomination for that ottice, 
it has terminated just as have the 
ers in which they have been rivals 

John K. Melning. nominee for 
had a plurality of 1,946 In Hoard 

the rest of the county so far as heard 
from, gives him an additional lead ol 

217, making a total Pl"/^'' >' «/. -/|^Ve 
Meining's many friends In t>"l"^*^,,!'^_).^ 
been exulting a whole |ot s>nce the re 
turn.s began to point to the certainty 
of his nomination, and Mr. ^leinin« 
himself has ^-een showered with con 
gratulations on having ac'ne\ed fcuc 
cess In a direction that ^f^ attracted 
him strongly for years. This is Aiein 
ruPs tl ird run for the Republican nom- 
natlon for "herlff. Each time he has 
"candidate his opponent has been 
William J Bates, the incumbent, whoin 
he defeated Tuesday. Many traveling 
men took part in Meining's campaign 
this vear and assisted materially in 
bringing their fellow-traveler favor- 
ably to the attention of the voters, es- 
pecially on the range. 

Boyle'n Great Kace. 
The senatorial tight in the Forty- 
ninth brought out a vote that must be 
a great sutpri.5e to the Vail men, who 
before election day were aggressively 
optimistic, declaring that no one could 
defeat Vail if he did not so will it. 
And Vail has not willed that he give 



hard. 




/F- 



=^ 



Our Store is Now Open Sa.urday Alternoons and Evenings. 




.. Second Avenue East and Superior Street. 



Duluth, Minn. 



« 



"The Finest in the Art 
of Stove Making' 




Moore's Latest Triumph 



We illustrate herewith a range 
that has been pronounced •'the fin- 
est in the art of stove making" by 
stove experts. It is the latest 
type of Moore Steel Rinige. the 
stove that has more features of 
real help and convenience than 
any other range made, no matter 
what the name or who sells it. It 
makes all the other yoort stoves 
look tame by comparison, and no 
woman who has examined a 
MtK>re will be quite content with 
any other good stove. 

Now listen — 

1. The Glass Oven Door — 

2. The Everlasting Fire Back — 

3. The Anti-Scorch Lid— 

4. The Controlei^ Damper — 
6. The Hinge Top — 

6. Mrs. Rorer's Thermometer 
Guild- 
There is an array of features 
that no other good stove hasi As 
to fOii.«truc'tioii, the Moore is built 
of as tine materials as enter into 
the making of any stove and bet- 
ter than most of them. 

The Moore comes in a long line 
of different sizes at different prices. 



up his senate seat. "He worked 
but apparently Mr. Boyle's methods of 
campaigning made the more favorable 
impression on tlie public mind. 

All the way down the column of 
returns the Boyle landslide is apparent. 
In some precincts even Raab got more 
voles than did Vail, but Raaba total 
Is very small. 

Tiiat Boyle would win his supporters 
had no doubt, but that the redoubtable 
Virginian would be beaten so badly 
wa-s hardly hoped by even the most 
extravagantly optimistic of Boyle s 
friends. 

Returns on the contest in the Forty- 
ninth legislative district for seats in 
tlie lower house show that the range 
has appropriated to itself all the three 
places of that district's delegation. 
With Boyle of Eveleth named for the 
senate, the range, having the right 
and the votes, nominated Knapp of 
Chisholm and Healy of Hibbing for 
the house places. These nominations 
are equivalent to election, as the nom- 
inees have little opposition, the otiier 
candidates being prohibitionists. 

TJie figures to date show that Knapp 
and Healy ran far ahead of the other 
two candidates, Healy getting the big- 
ge.= t vote — sixteen more than Knapp, 
who was more than a thousand votes 
ahead of McClean, while Sulcove 
I'rought up thy rear with 400 less than 
McClean. 

The small vote given Sulcove is 
readily explained. He did not make an 
aggressive campaign, but where he is 
best known he received a good vote. 
That is in the West end of the city, 
where he led all the candidates. But 
he was comparatively unknown on tiie 
range and the appeal of the successful 
Hibbing candidate for range support 
for a range man was heeded and Sul- 
cove was the sufferer by that fact. 

Dr. A. J. McOuen's victory in the 
race for nomination for coroner was a 
foregone conclusion, but it is demon- 
strated by the returns that Helps of 
Eveleth, liis opponent, was given a 
very good complimentary vote on the 
range. 

Friends of Democratic candidates for 
legislature and county offices as well 
as tliose who are most deeply interest- 
ed in the candidacy of Judge Jaijues for 
congress, are examining the returns 
with care and with an eye to the polls 
Nov. 8. 

As to the county attorneyship, they 
say that Walter F. Dacey should have 
a very good chance to beat the Repub- 
lican nominee. This view of the sit- 
uation is based on the theory that if 
the voters of the county find so little 
reason for choice between the two Re- 
publicans who have been fighting for 
the nomination, the Democrat, com- 
irg in as a tliird choice, although run- 
ning against but one of the Republican 
aspirants, might get a bulk of the votes 
of those balloted against the loser In 
the primaries, together with those of 
the solid Democratic organization and 
ilie young men's vote, which is counted 
upon to be for Dacey. 

Tuoinas J. .McKeon returned today 
from a trip which he made with Mr.s. 
M Keon to lake points, and he said he 
was readv to lake off his coat and get 
rigiit into the thick of the battle. He 
feels confident that lils nomination for 
the office of Judge of probate by the 
Democrats is but the prelude to his 
election. 

E. A. Dindgren, Democratic candidate 
for treasurer, and Charles Jesmore of 
Kveleth. candidate for sheriff on the 
l-iemocratic ticket, are not in the city. 




)|()|(Mj|(j)()^)|(Jit <^^^ )((j|.J(tj^j|(o|()!(l|CJ?.*-^.^r 



TOTAL VOTE WITH FIFTEEN PRECINCTS, 

ALL OUTSIDE TIIE^CITY, TO COME 

N 1( 
I 



aty. 

.2,819 
.4,016 

. 3ia 



Congres.? — 
McKnigh 

Miller I . . . ^ . . , 

Taylor *■ • ,L. . . 

Miller's pltiraUty 3,090. 

Sheriff- 
Bates • 3 0»0 

Meining . . . ^. . 4,936 

Meining's plurality 2,163. 

Atiditor — 

Halden 3.879 

Kaitowsky 3,296 

Maiden's phiralityy 3,247. 
Coroner — 

Helps 

McCuen . 

McCuen's plurality 3,576. 
Surveyoi — 

Aiitlcrson 

Ayrcs ^'3^? 

Dyer 

Dyer's plurality over Ayers 
Representative Forty-ninth DisU-ic 

Heiily 

]inii|jp • •• 

McClean 

SuU'ovc 

Senator Forty-ninth District — 

Boyle .... • I'J^J 

Vail *l^ 

Raab • ■ • »i*» 

Boyle's plurality over Vail 2,607. 
Superintendent of Schools — 

Young 

Graham 

Young'8 plurality 1,667. 



County. 
1.950 
3,843 
536 



Grant! 

Total. 

4,769 

7,8.'>9 

848 



.1.430 
.5,421 



1,608 



2,124 
252. 

. 581 

, 4!»0 

. 6;!1 



3.374 
3,591 



4.374 
1,710 



3.160 
2,615 



1,404 
1,348 
2,334 



2.713 

2.802 

1,442 

922 

3.256 

1,305 

818 



6,384 
8,547 



8,253 
6,006 



4,590 
8,066 



3,012 
4.206 
4,458 



3.294 
3,330 
1.941 
1,543 

4,391 

1,784 
506 



.4.215 
,2.558. 



county, with eleven precincts missing, 
the totals are: Erickson, 1,365; Alder- 
man, 1,233. For representatives, the 
Crow Wing countv vott is: I. W. 
Bouck, f.30; C. W. feouck, 704: Mile N. 
Young, 3S7; Elmer A. Kli'ig, 557; L. D. 
Brown, 454. Adding Morrison county. 
C. W. Bouck leads witli 1,20.: votes, 
and Brown is second with 1,03S. They 
are jirobably elected. 

The following Republicans are nom- 
inated for county officers: Auditor, S. 
F. Smart; treasurer, S. R. Adair; regis- 
ter of deeds, A. G. Trommald; sheriff, 
F. J. Reid; judge of probate, J. T. San- 
born; county attorney. W. A. Fleming; 
surveyor, L. E. GarrisDn; clerk of 
court, W. A. M. Johnston superintend- 
ent of schools, J. A. Wilson; coroner, 
B. C. McNamara, probablj ; county com- 
missioners, C. A. Krech and probably 
H. Foppenberg. 

m .. 

Kew Rural Carrier*. 

Washington, Sept. 22.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The following rural car- 
riers were appointed today: Oslo, 
Rente 2, Xeider Urdahl. carrier and 
Carl Nordgren. substitutt ; Browerville, 
Route 1, Frank Gollgovvski, carrier; 
John A. Goligowski, sub'Stitute. 



To Women 
Who Dread 
Motherhood! 

■V, 

InfoT'iiiatioii How They May Giv« 

Birth to Happ7. Healthy Chil- 

dreu Absoliittly \\ ithoiit 

Pain. Sent Free. 

No women need any longer dread tn« 
pains of childbirth, or remain childless. 
Dr. J. H. Dye has devoted his life to 
relieving the sorrows of women. Ho 
has proved that all pain at childbirth 
may be entirely banished, and he will 
gladlv tell you how it may be done ab- 
solutely free of charge. Send your 
name and address to Dr. J. H. Dye, 600 
Lewis Block. Buffalo, N. Y., and h© 
will send you, postpaid, his wonderful 
book which tells how to give birth to 
happy, healthy children. absolutely 
without pain; also how to cure steril- 
ity. Do not delay but write today. 



<!IS 



Raincoats: Special Values! 



m 



j|HMBNHNr »»»» :»»»:»»»»» ^ij 



4 

13 
7 



clncts 1, 
missing) 



>^; 



SOLD ON VERY EASY PAYMENTS. 



:^ 



FOR PROBATE JUDGE. 



City totals 



Gilpin. 

.2,832 



Middle- 
coff. Whitely. 
3,6b2 b85 



Leidlng .... 

Angora .... 

69-;;l 

Hibbing, pre 
( Stevenson 

Twin Lakes 

Kugler .... 

Breitung .... 

Mesaba .... 

Frtdenberg . 

57-12 

Virginia .... 

Colvin 

Great Scott 

Cotton •. • • 1- • 

Missing Hibbing precinct.. 

Mis.sabe Mountain, 5 

Herman ■ 

Prairie Lake •• 

65 and 60-21 v* • 

Fern • 

56-16 '•• ■ 

Fayal - • • • 

Costin ? • • • 

60-19 "••• 

Northland 

Wourl 

Pike 

Ault 

Rice Lake ■ • •.; -. • ■ 

Palo. Dist. No. 2 of ^^ hite 

Van Buren 

50 and 51-19 

fil-16 

Cedar Valley 

Buvck 

63-21 

55 and 5C-21 

Alango ? 

Realty .,^ 

Field ... ** 



.717 
4 
8 
. 23 
6 
. 8 
8 
.401 
13 
. 50 
. 20 
. 62 
. S4 
. 69 
. 
. 34 
. 1 
. 18 
. 55 
. 7 
. 1 
. 9 
. 9 
. 17 
. 8 
. 27 
16 
12 
9 
9 
12 
1 
8 
2 
4 



8 



OUTSIDE TOWNS 

Alborn 17 

Biookston 12 

Biwabik 97 

Canosia 17 

Culver 10 

Clinton 24 

Chisholm, 5 pet. .283 

Embarrass 51 

Fall Lake 13 

Floodwood 34 

Gnesen 35 

Grand Lake 14 

Industrial 23 

Morse 19 



HAVE YOU SEEN 

THOSE NEW 

BACHELOR APART 

MENTS IN THE 

SHERWOOD 

BUIlDiNG 




AUaolutcly fireproof.. Ju«l 
ivhut yflii ^vnut— i'omfort, 
•lepant tub baths and show- 
er bathM. Best of service, 
(on-.eulent and liixurioutt. 
Kvery room elegantly fur- 
itUbed.. Terms ?;»S to $30. 
Apply at lis Mauhattan 
Uuildiue.. UotU 'Phones, 
22^. 



SHERWOOD 
&C0. 





Midway 
Missabe 
Missabe 
Mi.ssabe 
-Missabe 
.Missabe 
Missabe 



Mtn, 

Mtn, 

Mtn, 

Mtn, 

Mtn, 

Mtn, 
Mountain Iron 
New Independence 



1. 

2 . 
5". 
4. 
6. 

7. 



16 
37 
17 
27 
47 
21 
21 
43 
10 



PROMINENT 
PRAISES 



DOCTOR 
BAKE OVEN 



ADVISES SUFFERERS TO TAKE TREATMENT 




DK. F. S. GKOVEIl. 



ic 



Dr. Grover says: Drs. Loughney 
& Loughney are curing people of 
rheumatism and kindred ailments 
every day with their curious Bake 
Ovens. I went to them with rheu- 
matism and it is truly wonderful 
how quickly they cured me. I have 
treated a great many people for 
rheumatism myself, and applied in 
my own case the different medi- 
cines considered the best by the 
medical profession, but I desire to 
state that the Bake Oven beats any- 
thing ever before used to relieve 
pain and cure Rheumatism. If you 
are a sufferer from Sprains, Syno- 
vitis, Rheumatism, Gout, Arthritis, 
Neuralgia Lumbago, Gangrene, 

Phlebitis, Ankylosis, Indolent ulcers 
and infected sores. Uremia or Obes- 
ity, the Bake Oven eclipses all other 
treatments. The immediate local ef- 
fects on the Joints are at once ob- 
vious, especially In Chronic Rheu- 



matism and Gout. They become less 
painful and much more movable 
after the first treatment, and con- 
tinue to improve with subsequent 
treatment. The action is through 
active Hyperaemla, thereby explain- 
ing the cure, which is bound to fol- 
low the treatment. Loughney & 
Loughney Bake Ovens beats all the 
medicines in this wide world. It also 
beats mud baths or hot springs and 
all other rheumatic treatments, and, 
in fact, all doctors know, if they 
would only own up, that the Bake 
Oven treatment, with temperature 
from 3 50 to 500 degrees Fahren- 
heit, has no equal for relieving and 
curing the ailments I have men- 
tioned in this letter to your paper. 
I am not prejudiced against any new 
treatment that has merit, as a great 
many doctors are, and I consider it 
only just to Loughney & Loughney 
to give them the credit they deserve. 
Some of my medical friends and as- 
sociates have tried to call me down 
for acknowledging that the Bake 
Oven cured me and that it Is such 
a great boon to suffering mankind, 
but I do not consider any doctor that 
will not recognize any other 
style of treatment but his own, 
either broad-minded or fair — 
Loughney & Loughney are making 
the cures and they deserve all kinds 
of credit. I strongly advise all who 
are afflicted with the above men- 
tioned aliments to take Bake Oven 
treatments, and there can be no bad 
effects even in severe cases of or- 
ganic or functional heart trouble. 
It takes the burden off of the over- 
worked heart and in just that re- 
spect does even heart trouble good. 
(Signed) DR. F. S. GROVER. 
Address, 1317% East Olive St., Se- 
attle, Wash. 

The above Is an extract from the 
Seattle Daily Times. Dr. Grover Is a 
resident of Seajttle, and enjoys a large 
practice. 

Loughney & Loughney are effect- 
ing remarkable cures in their Duluth 
offices. They occupy all of the of- 
fices on tho third flor of the 
Christie Bldg., on Fourth avenue 
west bc-tween First and Second 
streets. Their hours are 8 a. m. to 
7 p. m. Sundays 9 to 12 only. 

They give consultation free to all 
who come. 



Proctor 72 

St. Louis 16 

White 51 

63-19 10 

Lt iding 33 

Angora 20 

6;t-21 2 

Hibbing, precincts 
1, 2, 3, (Ste- 
venson misslng)409 
ytevenson prec't. . 28 

Twin Lakes 7 

Kugler 14 

Breitung 43 

54-20 17 

Eveleth 342 

Meadowlands ... 15 

Kelsey 8 

Elv 138 

McDavitt 31 

Sol way 18 

Tower 81 

Wourl 21 

I'ike 46 

Mef=aba 10 

Fredenberg 10 

57-12 8 

Virginia 660 

Colvin 27 

Cotton 24 

Great Scott 33 

Rice Lake 30 

Herman 33 

Pajo, Dist. 2 of 
White 



5 

17 

75 

17 

13 

10 

212 

14 

14 

36 

12 

11 

10 

19 

28 

15 

5 

20 

6 

14 

15 

25 

12 

85 

4 

65 
5 
1 
8 
1 



711 

42 

7 



21 
•> 

281 

13 

4 

100 

11 

17 

47 

7 

2 

13 

4 



270 

3 

20 

52 

13 

67 




1 

20 
3 
4 
7 

85 

7 
6 
2 
5 
3 
5 
7 
8 
4 
9 
4 
5 

5 
3 

27 

4 

14 

3 



o 

6 



177 

10 



12 

3 

113 

4 

1 

43 
4 

11 

21 
5 
1 
2 
2 


95 
9 
2 

14 
7 

14 



County totals 3,629 

Norton's plurality in 
Norton's plurality in 



30 

12 

2 

523 

10 

4 

58 

21 

8 



492 

27 

50 

26 

17 

206 

39 

11 

18 

6 

23 

57 



7 
16 
19 
17 
25 
82 



7 

17 
6 

10 

12 
5 

85 
9 

37 

3,604 



f ilHMHMHlt-*^**** *^^ it******i 



vote of Isanti county: For congress — 
Miller, 825; McKnight, 371; Taylor, 74. 
For representative— Davis, 846; Dunn, 
839; Goodwin. b90; White, 552; Wyman, 
609. One small precinct to hear from. 

m » ' 

TcHld County. 

Long Prairie, Minn., Sept. 22. — (Spe- 
cial 1,0 The Herald.) — The almost com- 
plete returns received indicate that 
James Johnson has defeated Rudolph 
Lee. county option candidate for the 
senate, by aboirt fifty votes. Mark, 
county optionist, is nominated an.l 
Itice, anti-county opiionist, also wlii.s 
for representative. Lindberg carried 
Todd county by over 700. 
<i » " ■ 

\%'adena Cotinty. 

Wadena. Minn, t^ept. '^2. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — With two precincts in 
Todd county, four in ^Vadena, anil 
four in Hubbard to hear from, James 
Johnson wins for state senator from 
this district over Rudolph Lee by nine- 
ty-four votes. The winners for repre- 
sentative are: Dr. W. T. Stone, a 
county option man, and L. H. Rico. 
Congressman Lindbergh received the 
nomination in this county over Mc- 
(ilariy by a four to one vote. 



county to 

city 94 



Norton's total plurality •-.■•l^O 

Precincts to be heard from— Kinney 

mine precinct of Great Scott, French. 

Halden, Lakewood, Lavell, Linden 

Grove Morcom, Normanna, Nichols, 

Sturgeon, 61-13, 64-21. 



SIXTH 



UOMMISSIONKU 

Carl- 



DISTRICT. 



neltraml County. 

Bemidji, Minn., Sept. 22. — (Special to 
The Herald. J — .\s a result of the prim- 
ary election here Tuesday the follow- 
ing Reiuiblicans were nominated for 
com ty office: Auditor, R. C. Hayner, 
ireasurer, George H. French; register 
of deeds. J. O. Harris; sheriff, A. B. 
HaZ'Mi; judge of jirobate, M. A. Clark; 
countv attorney. Henry Funkley; 
county commissioners, A. B. Rako and 
L. O. Myhre. With the exception of 
the office of county commissioner there 
wer«j no Democratic candidates in the 
field. There if? nearly a complete list 
of JPubllc Ownership candidates, and 
the successful Republican nominees 
will also find opposition in candidates 
who will file independently. 



Cravenette Rain Capes, full length with military collars, 
blues and blacks, at ^19.50. 

Coats of reg liar Cravenette Cloth, in grays and tans, semi- 
fitting, button up front with turn-over collar, military styles: 
black Moires— fancv striped Silk Coats, in blue, black and green, 
at ^15, ^17.50 and ^19.50. 

Grey cravenetted-\vor,steds— finely tailored, semi-fitting, with pleat* 
on side and large flap pockets, at $25.00. 

S. & B. Rain Coats are devoid of the draw backs that char- 
acterize "the big majority"— being made by the one or two 
thoroly reliable rain coat houses in the country. 

Plenty of other styles, including cloth, silk and motor cloth. j 

Hosiery: Underwear- -Ready ! 

We have (displayed a few pieces in our west win- 
dows to help emphas'ize the readiness. A\'e wish to call 
your attention to a few of our leading lines. 

STERLING Underwear— Its merits are ' '^ 
and magazines. 



-P-. >- 



told of in leading journals 



Special line Mercerized Union 
Suits at $3.00, also one at $2.50. 



Fine Silk and V/'ool Union Suits 
^In two t-tylci., ;ct $4.50 and also 
one at $4.00'. 

MERODE Underwear— Form-fitting, called the best underwear 

all America. 

Silk and Wool Union Suits at 
$2.50. 

Two Special Fleece-lined num- 
bers at $1.00 and $1.25. _^^ 
^ COMPLETE SHOWING OF CHILDREN'S UNDERWEAR. 

Fleece-lined at 35c garment; merino, 65c each. 



m 



Fine Merino Union Suits at 
$1.75 and $1.50. 

Women's Separate Garments— 

Pricc^^ ruTi fi<«m 5Gc np- 



HOSIERY 

to $1.00 a pair. Lisle and Cotton 



from 35c up. 
Silk Hosiery at inexpensive and higher prices. 



Biwabik . • . . 

Clinton 

Embarrass . . 
Missabe Mtn 
Missabe Mtn 
Missabe Mtn 
Missabe Mtn 
Missabe Mtn 
Missabe Mtn 



son. 

43 
9 
7 

16 
6 
5 
8 
4 
. 6 



St. Louis 4 

White 13 

Eveleth ''2 

McDavitt 14 

Wuorl 13 

Pike 40 

Mesaba 4 

57-12 1 

Virginia 405 

Colvin 31 

Fayal ° 

Totals 719 



Cos- 
grove. 
50 

6 
46 

8 

4 
16 

8 
31 

3 

19 

C3 

143 

3 
11 

4 
11 

1 
96 

4 
10 

637 



Mc- 

Innls. 

96 

26 

12 

36 

14 

8 

42 

7 

30 

3 

50 

651 

86 

10 

8 

9 

6 

294 

3 

102 



1.343 



17 

Fern 1 

Van Buren 7 

50 and 51-19 7 

61-16 23 

Cedar Valley .... 8 

Prairie Lake 9 

65 and 66-21 50 

Missabe Mtn, 5. . .1S6 

Nortliland 8 

60-19 10 

Oostin 4 

Fayal 18 

56-16 14 

Field 5a 

C:<-l.'l 14 

Buvck 7 

Beatty 7 

Alango 28 

55 and 56-21 2 



24 


8 


6 





8 


2 


6 


2 


1 


3 


12 











2 





54 





8 


1 








7 


2 


82 


13 


12 


14 


4 


8 


4 


1 


3 





5 





7 





3 






County totals. 3, 610 
Gilplns plurality in 
Middlecoffs plurality 



2 709 
county . . . 
In city. . 



STEPHENS HAS 
178 MAJORITY 

Polk County Senator Wins 

Over Representative John 

Saugstad. 

Crookston, Minn., Sept. 22.— tSpecial 
to The Herald ) — Alter one of the most 
bitter campaigns ever waged in Polk 
. ounty, the county option forces failed 
to defeat Senator A. D. Stephens for 
renomJnation, the complete returns re- 
ceived last evening giving Stephens 
178 niijonty o.e iiis opponent, Uep- 
resentatlvc John Saugstad. 

.lohn Holton w.is noniinaletl 
representative with a big 
the second place is still 
Knute Aker leading, O 
end, and W. A. Marin a 
(itleen precincts to bo 

The county officers 
as follows: Auditor, 
treasurer, George 



Clearwater County. 

Bagley, Minn., Sept. 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Clearwater county was 
oarj'led by Congressman Halvor Steen- 
erson by about COO majority; senator, 
A. ]j Hanson, optionist, bv 600; repre- 
.seni;atlvo D. P. ONeil, optionist, by 400 
majority. 

Stearnx County. 

St. Cloud. Minn., Sept. 22. — County 
officers who were nominated at the 
primaries in Stearns county on the 
Democratic ticket are: W. A. Boerger, 
^superintendent of schools: Cliris 
.Schmitt, county treasurer; Henry I- 
Liniperich, clerk of court; John Lang, 
register of deeds; J. B. Himsi, county 
attijmey; J. H. Klasen, judge of pro- 
bate; B. J. Morit;£, sheriff, and John 
Rau, county auditor. 

• » - • 

Crow AVing County. 

Hrainerd, Minn., Sept. 22. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The primary election 
returns of Crow Wing county, with 
se^•eral small country precincts miss- 
ing, gives Lindbergh 801 and McGarry 
448 for congressman. The vote on 
ste.te senator is: O. P. Erickson. 7S4; 
.'^. F Alderman, 760. Adding Morrison 



Wool Hose— 35c 

Ultra-large stock of 

We sell ONLY Hosiery that is qiiatlruple (and more than 
that in some instances) thread at heel and toe, and that will giv« 
as good satisfaction as any hose made here or abroad. 

If yon ha\e never worn S. & B. Hosiery and Underwear, 
and don't get 
other kinds — wear 
trouble ends. 



.*_« 
I 



the satisfaction your money entitles you to from 
S. & B. brands — satisfaction begins and 




Cure Your 
Rheumatism 



50,000 BOXES FREE 



9-'10 



Your crown — a 



,901 
.850 



Gilpin's net plurality 51 

Precincts to be heard from — Kinney 
mine precinct of Great Scott, French, 
Halden, Lakewood, Lavell, Linden 
(Jrove, Morcom, Normanna, Nichols, 
Sturgeon. 61-13. 64-21. 

COUNTY ATTORNEY. 



City 



Adams 
totals 3,785 



Norton. 

3.879 



TOWNS. 

12 



7 
81 
, 14 
, 19 
, 19 
,389 
. 3S 
. 23 
. 2S 
. 31 



OUTSIDE! 

Alborn 

Brookston 

Biwabik 

Canosia 

Culver 

Clinton 

Chisholm, 5 precincts 

Embarrass 

Fall Lake 

Floodwood . . t 

Gnesen 

Grand Lake }j- 

Industrial 1| 

Morse J^ 

Midway 33 

Mis.sabe Mountain, 1 29 

Migsabe Mountain, 2 8 

Missabe Mountain, 3 27 

Missabe Mountain, 4 49 

Missabe Mountain, 6 26 

Mis.'^abe Mountain, 7 25 

Mountain Iron 54 

New Independence 12 

Proctor 101 

St. Louis 19 

White 56 

Tower ^9 

Solway 19 

McDavitt 27 

Ely 153 

Kelsey . . . » 

Meadowlands }f 

54-20 ^15 

Eveleth 3^5 

63-19 6 



11 
30 

115 

23 

8 

22 

246 
22 
12 
48 
21 
18 
19 
27 
20 
36 
17 
24 
8 
14 
12 
22 
13 
82 
9 
75 

105 

28 

16 

128 

6 

19 

8 

412 

16 



as one 
majority, but 
In doubt with 
N. Lindh sec- 
close third, and 
heard from, 
nominated are 
Henry Weltc; 
Flaten; clerk of 
court, W. A. Lanctot; register of deeds, 
Theodore Thompson; judge of proba.e, 
T T Merken; superintendent or 
schools. N. A. Thorson; county attor- 
ney, E. O. Hagen. All are the present 
Incumbents. Judges Watts and Grinde- 
land were renominated without opposi- 

^For congress Halvor Steenerson was 
renominated over Bjorge by a major- 
ity of i:.500 In Polk county and 8,000 
In the district, carrying every county 
excepting Becker which Bjorge carried 
by 250 approximately. 

* — '■ — 

Cos* County. . , *„ 

Walker, Minn., Sept. 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.)— With thirty out of forty- 
five precincts heard from, the follow- 
ing county ticket appears to be nom- 
inated In Cass county: 1. P. B>nre, 
auditor; W. T. McKeown, treasurer; 
Bert Jamison, judge of probate; N. J. 
Parlmer, clerk of court; Odln Naust- 
vold. register of deeds; Robert, De 
Lury, sheriff; J. S. Scribner, county at- 
torney; J. W euro, surveyor; E,. b. 
Holman, coroner. J. W. Huffman, com- 
missioner, First district; B L. Perry 
commissioner. Third ^'f Jl"'<^t; ,„^,'',':'^ 
Burns commissioner, Fifth dlstiict. 
La Du and W^arner lead in the county 
for the legislature and P. H McGarry 
gets a small majority as candiuate for 
congress. 




rear of the first 
West and en- 
iii 
of 



Kanabec C'onnty. 

Mora, Minn.. Sept. 22.— Kanabec coun- 
tv complete gives Miller 704. McKnight 
2"70 Taylor 47. The following are nom- 
inated on the Republican ticket for 
county offices: Auditor, Anton Peter- 
son- treasurer, Charles J. Erickson; 
reKi'>»ter of deeds, A. M. Anderson; 
sheriff, Otto Allman; judge of probate, 
O P Vlctorien; county attorney, P. o. 
oisen; county surveyor, John Nelson; 
commissioners, C. W. Holmes and Mar- 
tin Nystrom. 

■ • " - 
Isanti Connly. 
Cambridge, Minn., Sept 22. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Following the 



I>erorinlty of the Hands to General, Cl>ron!ei 
Articular UlieumatUm. 

Rheumatism, Lumbago, Sciatica, 
Fain in the back have been cured, in 
tne real meaning of the word, by a 
Ittle StlUlngia, Iodide of Potassium, 
Poke Root, Gualac Resin and Sarsa- 
pariUa. Any person can take these 
remedies in any reasonable amount 
v/lth perfect safety, and the results 
Lave been found to be astonishing. It 
las been proven that this combination 
makes up the best rheumatsm remedy 
in existence, having actually cured 
raany stubborn cases of over 30 and 40 
jears* standing — even in persons of 
old age. 

The five Ingredients mentioned 
above prepared wlth^ great accuracy 
f*nd skill not only fll regard to pro- 
jKirtion, but also In selecting the best 
material, have been put up In com- 
jiressed tablet form, and are called 

••GLOKIA TOMC," and 
llfty tbouiinnd boxen are offered tree 
re. introduce It. 

If vou suffer from any form of uric 
acid "in the blood, and nave Rheuma- 
Ism, Gout, Lumbago, Sciatica, this Is 
■he way to drive it out of your sys- 
tem in quick time. Simply send your 
name and address, encIoslniBc thl« «d- 
vertUement, to JOHN A. SMITH, 5829 
Smith Building, Milwaukee, W'ls., and 
by return mail you will receive the 
box absolutely free. It Is only In 
"Gloria Tonic" that you can get the 
above combination ready for usa. 



Columbia Shoes 
Are Better 



Our shoes are made to our order by the foremost 
wholesale shoe-makers in the country. No jobbers 
sell shoes to us, nor do we buy shoes returned by 
dealers who refuse to accept them because they are 
not worth rhe price demanded. 

COLUMBIA SHOES are perfect and in Al 
condition. " 

Our Shoe Department is in the 
floor with entrance on Third Ave. 
tails very light store expense. This difference 
actual cost goes to our customers in the shape ^ 
the highest quality at any given price— $2.50, 
$3.50, $4 or more. 

The Columbia $3.50 Shoe satisfies every inch 
of the foot— here for men and women — absolutely 
the best $2.50 Shoe on Superior street. 

The Columbia De Luxe at $4 is made especial- 
ly for young men who want something snappy and 
advanced in stvle. Among the latest lasts for Fall 
are the O-U-KID, the KNOCKER, the SPY and 
the CHIEF, made in Gun Metal Calf, Box Calf, 
Russia Calf and viscolized Tan Calf, Blucher and 
Button style. 

Our Hanan Shoes for men and women, from 
$5 up, are worn from Maine to California by the 
best dressed city people. 

' The Columbia 

At Third Avenue West. 



t 



a DEFECTIVE PAGE 



I. 



— ^r 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 22, 1910. 



l»MN^»^»^i^>^«i»N^^^rfS*>»^ « « 



WEST END 

CHURCH TO BE 

REMODELED 



Contract Let for Improve- 
ments to Swedish Epis- 
copal Edifice. 

McKcnzle fc M'alker, local contrac- 
tors, were ty awarded the con- 
tract for t; Iclins of St. Peter's 
Swcdl-^h E; church, Twenty- 
eighth avci ^t and First street. 
About IS.Ou'i . , : e expended on fixing 
up the stru •: c 

The contractors will start a crew 

of men at work on the job at once 
It Is expected that the niatorial will 
be on ihrt grounds by the tirst of the 
week so that optrations may he started 
without further delay. 

The t>dtnco will be remodeled and en- 
lar^.»d tliroughout and a stone base- 
ment built under it. The basement 
rooms ;vm he Uirsed for Sunday scliool 
woi k. a kitchen and choir roon.s. The 
Interior of the church will be redec- 
orated and " - hancel will be en- 
larged. M- :n will be afforded 
as ar- ■ ' ■ i;i be built at tlie 
rear 

Tl ...J . .g, which have been 

outlined b> lurch officials is a 

result of ti., ;i of the St. Peter's 

Swedish E:>is.-opal and St. Luke's Epis- 
copal churche .«of the West end. The 
St. Luke'.s buiMini^r will be abandoned 
and there i- r .t\» a deal on for the 
sale of the ; ty. The St. Peter's 

ohurch. wli . lode'.ed. will house 

both congre - comfortably. 

RECEPTKInI'O P.\STOR. 



and has spent the most of his time 
at Litchfield. 



Annual Meeting. 

The Ladies' Aid Society of the First 
Xorweerlan-Danish M. E. church Is 
holding Its annual meeting and elec- 
tion of officers this afternoon at the 
home of Mrs. P. George Hanson of 
2217 West Third street. Reports which 
were read, siiowed the society to be 
in a nourishing condition. 

West End Shortrails. 

Misses Helga and Hulda Halgren of 
Virginia, who have been in the city 
lor tlie past few days, guests at the 
liome of Mr. and Mrs. G. M. Wahl- 
strom of 2T0S West Helm street, have 
returned to tlieir home. 

Miss Hannah Liden of 2029 West 
Third street has returned from a camp- 
ing rrip on Lake Pokegama. 

The choir of the First .Swedish M. E. 
church will meet at the church, Twen- 
tieth avenue west and Third street, to- 
morrow evening for practice. 

Miss Alice OToole, daughter of P. J. 
O'Toole of 3802 West ^eventli street, is 
reported to be seriously ill of typlioid 
fever. 

Miss Lydia Olesen of 320 North Nine- 
teenth avenue west, who underwent an 
operation Tuesday at the Mayo hos- 
pital, Rochester. Minn., is reported to 
be recovering nicely, dhe will return 
in a few days. 

Dr. and Mrs. Adolph Olson of 321 
North Twenty-third avenue west have 
left for Niagara, N. D.. where Dr. Olson 
will have his annual hunting trip. 

The Luther League of Bethany Swed- 
isii Lutheran church will meet this 
evening at tiie church parlors, Twenty- 
third avenue west and Third street. A 
short business session will be held. 

A. M. Ferguson of Winnipeg, Man., 
is in the West end today on a business 
visit. 



Your kidney trouble may be of long 
standing, it may be either acute or 
chronic, but whatever It is, Foley's 
Remedy will aid you to get rid of it 
quickly and restore your natural 
health and vigor. "One bottle of Foley's 
Kidney Remedy made me well," said J. 
SibbuU of Grand View. Wis. Commence 
takir.g it now. Sold by all druggists. 



PRAISES THE 'LATE ENEMY 



Ml 



Rev. Ednard Eriokson Welcomed 
ou Return to Duluth for Year. 

A reception v us held last evening 



at the Fir^i- 
churcii for 
Erickson, w 
the annual cnij 



•^gian- Danish M. E. 
.ind Mrs. Edward 
ntly returned from 
■r>-nce in Chicago, at 



which Rev. Erickson was returned to 
the looal pastofiite for another year. 
John J Mj\ former alderman, made 
a speech of welcome on behalf of the 
congregation and there were several 
oth.T short speeches and musical num- 
bers. Rev. Eriek.snn responded, thank- 
ing the congres ition. 

Pa'^toi' on Vaeation. 

Rev .J ;i .^ and Mr.s. Daniels 

are expected to return today from 
Litchfield. Minn . where Mr. Daniels 
has been si>en<iing liis vacation. He 
was recently granted a two weeks' 
leave of absence by the congregation 
of the Swedis!'. Mission church. Twen- 
ty-rlrst a\ei.ut' west and Second street. 



PROGRESSIVE FIRMS 
THAT BO S ST THE 
WEST EWD— gl^^lf. 

«^— aiM^i^^MiBKiiB vvno will 

till >'our 
orders promptlv with re- 
liable uooUs and first 
class workmanship: 

ILOTHLNG. '^^^ 



BL'V YOUR CLOTHES AT WELL- 
bergs, the quality store. This is the 
store wliere you get something tor 
your money. Just received a full line 
of clotliing and nun's furnishings. 
Iv2 7 West Superior street. 



ELECTUiC SUPPLIES. 

"i'ou'll not l»e shocked at your electrical 
bill and supplies if bought at Peicr- 
feon'j Klec Co.. 2-Ii) W. Sup. St. 



HKE LNSLKA.NCE. 

Protect you: ..-;;. in companies that 
pay losses promptly. Wo have them. 
\\ estern Realty Co., l'J22 W. Sup. St. 



OUUCEHS. 



VIREN & SWAInSO.,, fine GR .»CER- 
ie», j.rompL delivery. 2IJ0 W . 3rd St. 

L>av;d-son Ji Oisot;, dealers in staple and 
fancy gioceries; lull line fruits and 
veg-T-iolcs. Iil4 i'ied. Av. Zen. 214.'<. 



HARDWARE. 



JOHiN'SuN il: ._..:RS0N, BUILDERS' 

hariwarj; iuu line carpenter tools. 

Forsberg-Henry Co., dealers in build- 
ers' hardware and tools. Cor. 2i*th 
Ave. W. and 3rd St. Zen. 114i-Y. 



LUNCH ROOM. 

TRY MY LUNCH— JUST LIKE MOTH- 

ers. 200a W. Sup. St. upoti ail night. 



MUSIC. 

riANOS. ORG.VNS, MUSICAL MER- 
chaiidise; Victor, Edison grapho- 
phones. A. F. Lundholm, i!*28 W. Sup. 

B. Jentoft. musical instruments and 
f urnishing.'j; repairing a specialty. 
210;j \Vest Superior street. 



MEAT DEALER. 



FOR FRESH AND SALT MEATS CALL 
at Trousdal, 2103 West Third street. 
Both phones. 



A. BROMAN, FRESH AND S.'VLTED 
meals; deliveries promptly. Zen. 16yi; 
Mel. 1044-L. 19-J2 West First street. 



BUY YOUR FRESH AND SALT MEATS 
at Larson -iros., 2>5th Ave. W. and 
Third St. Zen. 1462; old. Melrose 3Si. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING. 

JAMES GORMA.V— YOUR PL'JMBER 
estimates furnished; Jobbing work 
promptly attended to. The shop 
where prices are right. 1 Twenty- 
third avenue west. Zen. phone 607 



PHOTOGRAPHERS. 

I MAKE A SPECLA.LTY OF FINE 
camera portraits enlarging views. I 
also handle a full line of frames O 
E. Moilan, 2302 VV, Sup. St.; Zenltti 
phone 1529-D. 

'riTofingV coItnice and" sky-" 

LIGHTS. 

ROOFING AND SHEET IaetTI, 
work, tin Jin<l coppersmiths. C L 
Burman. Zenith phone 424-A; old 3899 
Melrose. 20o5 West First street 



RESTAURANTS. 



TRY ONE OF OUR SQUARE ME.\LS. 
Open all hours. Twentieth Avenue 
cafe. 



SHOES. 



IF YOU WANT QUALITY, BUY YOUR 
shoes at Jutin's, 2013 West. Sup. St. 



< Continued from page 1.) 

K. at the beginning of the present year 
had still :ii3,901 members in good 
standing, as against 220,600 at the be- 
ginning of 1909. The loss during the 
year was 6,781. of which r>.323 was by 
deatli. The commander urged that re- 
cruiting measures be taken up among 
the large number of former Union sol- 
diers who are not enrolled as Grand 
Army members. 

The speaker noted a better general 
observance of Memorial day than for- 
merly. 

"Let us insist and do all in our 
pojver," he said, "tliat Memorial day 
shall be devoted solely and only to the 
purpose for which It was created. Let 
it be the one day of the year devoted 
to honoring our deatliless dead,' for 
in tliat way we will teach the rising 
gti-eration love of country, without 
wiiicli our nation cannot long survive." 

He also urged the general co-oper- 
ation of G. A. R. members In Inducing 
a general observance of Hag day. 

Praise for AuxJUurlea. 

Commander-in-Chief Van Sant had 
commendation for the work of all tlie 
G A. R. auxiliaries, praising tlie ex- 
cellent work being done by tlie Wom- 
an's Relief corps, Ladies of the G. A. 
R., Sons of Veterans and Daughters of 
Veterans. Of tiie Sons of Veterans, he 
bald : 

"Tins can be made a still grander or- 
ganization. It Is constantly Increasing 
in riumbers and Inlluence. The Sons 
of Veterans, with proper encourage- 
ment, should soon be the largest pa- 
triotic body of men In tiie world. That 
It may be such is my earnest wish. 
The Sons of Veterans sliould hawe all 
tlie encouragement possible from the 
Grand Army of the Republic. It is a 
matter of great satisfaction that the 
Sons meet with us this year. I trust 
our national encampments may in the 
future be held at the same time and 
In tlie same place." 

Of the more liberal pension legisla- 
tion recommended by the last annual 
encampment and urged at Washing- 
ton by its committee, Commander-in- 
Ciiief Van Sant said: 

"I regret that nothing was accom- 
plished, but it was no fault of tlie 
ci^mmittee. Congress would not pass 
any general pension legislation. How- 
ever, some 6,000 private pension bills 
were enacted. 

Keep up Pension Work. 

"The committee canvassed the mat- 
ter industriously with senators and 
representatives, but to no purpose. The 
government was facing a deficiency in 
its revenues and retrenchment and the 
strictest economy was the watchword 
This was the reason given for non-ac- 
tion. In my judgment, in view of the 
changed conditions in our country's 
financial affairs, if this encampment 
slu.-uld again recommend this measure 
It would likely psis.s. 

"Tiie Grand .Vrniy of the Republic 
has ever stood for the recognition of 
the services of its members, regardless 
of length of service — tlie ninety-dav 
man as well as the veteran who served 
llirougliout the war. If tlie former did 
not stand In line of battle, he stood in 
thj line of duty, and sliould have Just 
consideration." 

The commander-in-chief e.vpressed 
himself as particularly gratified at the 
Increasing fraternaizatlon of the "Blue 
and the Gray." He voiced his pleasure 
at the cordial reception given him 
during his recent ofticial visit to the 
Southern departments, not only from 
tiie former Union soldiers, but IVom ex- 
Confederates. 

Hliie and Gray Reunions. 

"In aU cities, when possible," he 
said. "I urged Joint meetings of the 
BlUf and the Gray. We had many gath- 
ei'ings of this character, and no more 
loyal and patriotic sentiments were 
ever uttered than by the men who 
fought on the other side. 

"Are you not pleased to learn that 
our comrades are living in peace and 
harmony with our late enemies? This Is 
as It should be. Both armies were 
composed of brave men and they should 
and do mutually respect each other We 
of the North can te.stlfy that no braver 
troops were ever marshalled for con- 
flict than our late enemies — and we 
now leallze that no men ever made 
greater sacrifices for what they be- 
lieved to be right than our former 
foes. 

"Comrades, we were the victors and 
we can afford to be magnanimous to 
our old foes. It is easy for the victor to 
forgive, hut when the vanquished ab- 
solves himself from all bitterness he 
nas truly gained the most cherished 
trait of a noble cliaracter. 

VIotor anil Vauquished. 

"We won— they lost. We returned to 
our homes with the shouts of victory 
ringing in our ears — our cause tri- 
umphant. They were defeated, their 
cause lost, and th.ey returned to homes 
destroyed, barn.'? emptv, money worth- 
less, slaves free and ruin all about 
them. Any but a brave people would 
have yielded to these adverse condi- 
tions — not so with them. Bravely as 
thpy fought during the war, they now 
fought the battles of life, and the 
splendid growth' and development of 
the South since the close of the war Is 
the oouth's grandest and most endur- 
ing monument. 

"United as we are now, our country 
la destined to make a new era of prog- 
ress. We have by our united efforts 
advanced to the highest pinnacle of 
fame, and become a mighty world 
power with our Influence everywhere 
potential. Who does not rejoice that 
oiir Union Is one and Indivisible, and 
will remain so forever." 

No Siiflrrrlng From March. 

The veterans did not show any 111 
effects of yesterday's long march' and 
were about bright and early. Those 
not called into the business session of 
the encampment planned to spend the 
day in enjoying the many attractions of 
the city. Beautiful weather again fa- 
vored the veterans. 

Many matters affecting the welfare 
of the Grand Army veterans will come 
before the encampment. The question 
of pensions will come up, the veterans 
urging that the lowest pensions grant- 
ed be considerably Increased. From 
latest information there are about 
562,000 names on the pension rolls. The 
government estimates there are 65,000 
Union niea not drawing penBions, mak- 



ing the total number of survivors 
627,000. 

When the representatives of the vet- 
erans went into executive session there 
appeared to be no doubt that John E. 
Oilman of Boston would be elected 
commander-in-chief. 

The matter of incorporating the j 
Grand Army of the Republic will prob- i 
ably come before the encampment. The I 
commander recommends in his report | 
tliat the national organization be in- 
corporated under federal laws. 

Lincoln's Name In ".Vnierlea." 
The department of Kentucky wants 
tlie national hymn "America" to in- 
clude the name of Lincoln. It has pro- 
posed as an amendment to the rules 
and regulations of the organization 
that the following lines be used in pa- 
triotic and memorial exercises in sing- 
ing "America": 

"A leunited land, 

'Neat Lincoln's guiding hand, 

Our love we give; 

Land tyranny defied, 

I..and war can ne'er divide, 

1-and soldiers glorified. 

For thee we live." 
The Women's Relief Corps, Ladies of 
the Grand Army of the Republic, Army 
Nurses and Daughters of Veterans 
hold business meetings today. 

FIGHT FOR PHYSKIAL 
VALUATION OF ROADS 
IS BEGUN BY STUBBS 



(Continued from page 1.) 



uatlon of railroads by the interstate 
commerce commission, and thi.s should 
be done bofore any general reason why 
badly managed, bady constructerd, poor- 
ly located and over-capitalized roads 
should prosper than a badly managed 
business of any kind. 

"The general policies of the railroads 
throughout the United States to favor 
large centers and build up great cities 
at the expense of the rural communi- 
ty. Is little less than a crime against 
civilization." 

Court Order Dlsresrarded. 

A charge that Western railroads 
have violated the famous injunction 
secured by the government in the 
trans-Missouri rate case is made by 
Illinois delegates to the conference. 
The will urge the adoption of resolu- 
tions calling for the prosecution of the 
alleged offenders for contempt of court. 
The Illinois delegates are: U. G. Orr- 
dorrf, A. J. Street, C. B. Fox, H. C. Bar- 
nard, C. B. Gregory, J. B. Bartholo- 
mew, A. R. Elbi and John M. Glenn 
(secretary). The resolutions brought 
with the delegation were drawn by 
Clifford Thorne. attorney for the Na- 
tional Livestock association, the Corn 
Belt Meat Producers' association and 
other similar organizations. 

The injunction referred to was is- 
sued in the case of the United States 
against tlie Trans-Missouri Freight as- 
sociation In the United States circuit 
court, Eighth district. Kansas, its is- 
suance being upon direct mandate of 
the supreme court of the United 
States. It sought to enjoin the rail- 
roads of the Trans-Missouri Freight 
association from conspiring together 
or agreeing to fix freight rates. 

GARDNER OX 'sTAND AGAIN 




Large Size Splint 
Clothes Baskets 

(Not like 
cut); regu- 
lar 60c val- 
ue; special. 



"\ 



Lake Avenue, Michigan and Superior Stre«U. 



39c 




It. . !• 



Friday Basement Bargains ! 

That Are Too Good For Any Woman To Miss! 



New Dinner Ware 



(Continued from page 1.) 

timony in support of their contention 
that a raise of rates is needed at tins 
time are the Chicago, Burlington & 
Quincy, Iowa Central, Minneapolis & 
.St. Louis, Chicago & Alton, Missouri 
Pacific, the Omaha road and the ureat 
Western. 

The remarkable financial returns of 
the Cliicago & Northwestern railroad 
in the last ten years were brought out 
yesterday and additional testimony of 
a startling nature was adduced. The 
witness was Vice President Gardner. 
Returned More Tban Stock. 

His testimony, elicted by cross-ex- 
amination by Attorney Frank Lyon 
for the commission, was in short, that 
the company thought itself entitled 
to raise freight cliarges now in spile 
of the fact that in ten years it had 
returned to its stockholders in direct 
dividends and in unappropriated sur- 
plus more than the amount of capital 
stock. 

The witness also controverted testl- 
niony of Illinois Central officers pre 
viously given, that the increase 




Ready with a complete line of new 
Dinaerw^are. French, German, Eng- 
lish and American ware. 

Newest shapes and designs, all 
sold in open stock patterns. 



Sale Of Steinjield Food 
Chopper!^ 98c 



Suction Washers 

Special Friday 



5()'c Fancy 
Plates ^.__ 



25c 



7^' M 



'-^'^o^'^.yC^fy^nX^"*':^ ^'^^y ^°^^" ^^"^y F^"'t Plates- 
Decorations: Fruit and flower pat- 
terns; good 50c value, special for 25c. 





The Steinfeld 
Food Chopper 
is 3ne of the 
make that sells 
regular 1 y for 
$1.:)0 — special 
for Friday — 



98c 



Specials in 

Cut Glass 




75c 



Washes the finest ma- 
terials and laces with- 
out tearing; sold by 
canvassers as high as 
$5.00 — special here 

Friday — 



75c 



Laundry Soap Special 



8-inch Cut Glass Bowls— New 
signs; good $5.00 value, 
special 



de- 



Cut Glass Olive Dishes — 

Regular $1.25 value, for 



$2.9S 
98c 



Armour's Sail Laundry 
Soap-Special Friday~10 
Bars for 



Pressed Glass Water t . 
Sets-Special 
Tomorrow . . . 



Limit — 50c worth to customer. 



75c 



25cl 



Regular $1.(X) value, 
six tumblers-to match. 



Pitcher and 



Galvanized Garbage Cans 

$1.10 



Good size, with covers; regular $1.75 value, special 
Friday 



Clearance of 

Go-Carts 

Just six left; marked for quick clear- 
ance to less than cost. 

$5.00 Go-Carts...$2.88 
$6.00 Go-Carts...$3.48 
$14.50 Go-Carts $7.4S 

Positively No 'Plione 
Orders on Tliese Friday 
Specials. 



Cast Iron Mail Boxes 

'""'....33c 



Regular 50c 
for 



6-5-4 stove Polish 

Regular price 25c, spe- 4 ff ^ 
cia! at Xtl^ 



Candle Sticks 

Complete with shade, candle 
and holder; regular 50c OAT^ 
value, special for MfMK, 



Gilt Edge ToUel Paper 

$1.00 



Regular 10c a roll, 
.special 15 rolls for, . 




anSrine avenue we.st, hts vrite and J dramatization of Richard Harding 
farailj^ wer^ overwhelmed 5y the ro- Davis' well known novel "Soldieis of 



Yates left 
ere early io the week for a business 
trip to Canada and his family under- 
stood that he wbuld stop at Cleveland 
before retaining-. 

Had Attempted Snlrlde. 
The mental coindltion of Burton W. I 



Fortune" will be the offering. 

All of the above mentioned pieces 
will be presented with the exact re- 
plicas of the original s>:-enic production. 



Yates had be*n cau.slng his relatives 

and friends considerable anxiety for 

six months. About two months ago he 

*" threatened to commit suicide in the 



ticket office of the Pere Marquette 



cost of operation and maintenance was 
In a large measure due to higher cost 
of materials. Mr. Gardner's opinion 
was that the increase in cost of labor, 
and the restrictions put upon work- 
men by recent efforts of the unions, 
were the largest factors In cutting 
down net profits 

What Shippers Should Pay. 
Mr. Gardner did agree however, with property^'aiid not"of the"pfincTpal 
!^«^ P»-fvious rai road officials who tea- had lumber land Interests in Ca 
tlfied that a railroad ought to be per 



a 
niltted to charge shippers enough to 
pay dividends, fixed charges, cost of 
operation and maintenance, and In ad- 
dition to return a yearly surplus. He, 
like they, believed that the surplus 
expended In Improvements would in- 
crease the attractiveness of the In- 
vestment. 

"The Northwestern line will not go 
into bankruptcy next year, or the year 
after, or the one after that, unle.ss It 
now raises rates," began Mr. Garner, 
touching upon this subject, "but I do 
say that regulation by the commission 
does not control the commercial condi- 
tions under which we get money, and 
unless we soon may get higher rates, 
we will, in the future, have to run out 
the red flag. We must be allowed a 
satisfactory cash 8uri>lus above everj'- 
thlng each year, as a barometer of our 
surety for credit." 

Revenue Estlma'teH L>o\t. 

Attorneys for the shippers expressed 
surprise that railroads' estimates of 
the Increase In revenue called for by 
the advances scheduled and which have, 
because of their suspension bj- the 
commission, brought about this hear- 
ing, should be so small. The Illinois 
Central's estimate of Its gain had the 
rates been made effective was approx- 
imately $37,000. that of the Chicago, 
Milwaukee & St. Paul road, wag ?567,- 
990 for the coming year. 

In a discussion it was explained by 
attorneys for these' roads that while 
the present controversy hinges on pro- 
posed Increases on only a few com- 
modities, the roads were endeavoring 
to make It a broader question — one. In 
fact, that would embrace a general In- 
crease on all commodities because of 
the alleged poor flhanclal condltlDn 
Into which the railroads claim they 
are drifting. 

It was decided that this broader 
question would- be entertained; that 
railroads snould present testimony to 
this end. and that then the specific 
raises be considered. 

More TralnH and HlKh Wage*. 

Asked about the nature of the com- 
pany's freight. Mr. Gardner said the 
average train tonnage was low because 
of the large quantity of merchandise, 
or less than carload freight handled. 
He added that death and liability 
claims had Increased agaln.st the road 
yearly, and tlie tonnage cost of trans- 
portation had grown, due. chletlj', he 
thought, to wages In the last Instance, 
and to greater number of trains In the 
flrsjt. 

Coal for fuel, costing the company 
$1.98 at the firebox, was a serious 
problem, he said, but he agreed It was 
not a cause which would so Increase 
expenses as to form a basis for added 
freight rates. 



city t 

railroad here, but was overpowered by 
H. F. Meeller. general passenger agent 
of the, railroad, who took Yates' revol- 
ver away from him. 

Yates is said to have been left a 
fortune of nearly |500,OO0 by his father, 
but under conditions that gave him 
control only of the income from the 

- He 

Canada 
and Ohio and among other business in- 
terests was secretary of the Point Aux 
Ba-sques Resort assocoatlon, which 
owns a summer resort on Lake Huron. 
In athletics he was well known as an 
enthusiastic curler. 



IVhyT 

From a small beginning the sale and 
use of Chamberlain's Cough Remedy 
has extended to all parts of the United 
Stales and to many foreign countries. 
Why'f Because It has proved especially 



valuable for eouglis 
sale by all druggists. 



and colds. 



For 



DIRECTORY OF 
AMUSEMENTS 



WHERE TO GO TONIGHT. 



LYCFUM — Jeffries- Johnson 

tures. 
ORPHEirM— Vaudeville. 

BIJOU — Vaudeville. 



fight pic- 



TWO CRIMES END GAY DAY 

(Continued from page 1.) 

tomobtle riding and visits to wine 
rooms. The couple arrived at the road- 
house stiortly after midnight. 

Mrs. Singer was identified through 
her attorney, Frank Billman. who said 
that she had come to Cleveland from 
Detroit two weeks ago In order to es- 
cape Yates. 

Until she is able to talk, the cause 
that led to the shooting will remain 
a mystery. At the jail the man gave 
his name as B. W. Yates. 



Son to Identify Him. 

Detroit, Mich., Sept. 22. — A son of 
Burton W. Yates, a well-known busl- J Johnson 
ness man here, arranged today to leave 
at once for Cleveland to learn If the 
man who committed sulolde In the Jail 
there was his father. 

Burton W. Yates ha.i a wife and a 
grown family, one of his sons having 
ju.st graduated from the University of 
Michl^aJi. At his resideac«^ 48 Alex- 



OLD SOLDIERS NIGHT. 

Many to Attend Event in Honor of 
Fiddiers at the Orpheum Theater. 

Tonight win be Old Soldiers' night 
at the Orpheum theater the affair being 
planned In comiWiment to the Old 
Soldiers' Fiddlers, who are appearing 
on the bin this week and of the mem- 
bers of Gorman and J. B. Culver poAt 
of this city. The fife and drum corps 
of the Gorman post will be the com- 
plimentary guests of the theater man- 
agement and nearly 100 members of the 
two posts have made arrangements to 
attend. The old soldiers will be es- 
corted from the hotel by the fife and 
drum corps and there Is much Interest 
being shown In the event. 

The theater will be decorated In flags 
and the national colors and the spirit 
of the entire evening will be happily 
patriotic. The old soldiers of the city 
in whom the spark of patriotism burns 
a bit more brightly than perhaps Is 
true of the younger generation, wel- 
come an opportunity of seeing the 
spirit of patriotism they so cherish 
being emp'aaslzed. 

The pleasure of the evening can not 
but communicate Itself and the Or- 
pheum bill tonight promises to be one 
of particular pleasure to the audience 
and the iierformers. 

PIERCE PLAYERSTo 

RETURN TO LYCEUM. 



IMPROVED BILL 

PLEASES PATRONS. 




ateh 



I he I orner 




indows 



T'le Improved bill, the first under 
the new system in vogue at the Bijou, 
is meeting with favor from the pa- 
tror.s of the house. Every performance 
has been well attended this week and, 
judging from the comment made, tiie 
innovation will meet with success. The 
Heim children are favorites with this 
week's crowds and the act is consid- 
ered one of the beat the vaudeville 
houae has had in many months. 



ANNUAL MEETING 
OF Y. M. C. A MEN 



Employed Officers of North- 
ern Minnesota Associations 
Hold Session. 

Yesterday at the Duluth Y. M. C. A. 
the annual meeting of the employed 
officers of the Young Men's Christian 
association of Northern Minnesota was 
held. This Includes Bralnerd, Cloquet. 
Proctor, Two Harbors and Duluth. 

Thoje In attendance from out of town 
wer.i as follows: E. L. Ludwlg. gen- 
eral secretary of the Y. M. C. A., Braln- 
erd; H. L. Maxell, general secretary of 
the Y. M. C. A.. Cloquet; M. Earl, phys- 
ical director of the Y. M. C. A.. Clo- 
quet.; Mr. Gross, bovs' secretary of 
the Y. M. C. A., Cloquet; E. S. Davis, 
general secretary of the Y. M. C. A,. 
Proctor; J. G. Hamaker, general secre- 
tary of the Y. M. C. A., Two Harbors; 



J. C. Manville, physical director of the 
Y. M. C. A., Two Harbors; State Sec- 
retary E. W. Peck of Iklinneapolis. 

The program as cairled out was as 
follows: 

Devotional exercise 

J. A. McGauhey. 

Prayer 

Introductions 

N. D. McLeod. 

"Echoes" (three minutes) 

LAke Geneva Delegates and Sliver Bay 
Delegat'is. 

"What Is Your Probi 3m" 

H. L. Ml>ell. 
"The A La Carte Syistem of Mem- 
bership" 

Phil Bevls 

"Co-operation and Loyalty" 

E. W. Peck. 
The program lasted through the en- 
tire day and the repo'ts of all of the 
associations show a very prosperous 
condition, with a sple idld outlook for 
this fall and winter. 



ARRESTED ON A 
FRAUD CHARGE 



TAFT TO MEET 
OHIO POLITICIANS 



An announcement that will carry a 
considerable degree of pleasure to a 
number of patrons of the drama la to 
the effect that the Pierce Players, who 
established themselves firmly with lo- 
cal theater goers by their presentations 
of "Strongheart" and "The Squaw Man" 
at the Lyceum recently, are to return 
here for an engagement of six nights" 
duration, opening Tuesday, Sept. 27. 
During that tliive they will present 
three well known, high class royalty 
bills. Opening Tuesday and continuing 
Wednesday, they will present Rida 
Young's comedy of military 
life, "The Boys of Company B." in 
which Jack Barrymore appeared with 
considerable success. Thursday and 
Friday they will offer Edward E. 
Rose's dramatization of Anthgny Hope's 
famous masterpiece. "The Prisoner of 
Zenda." For the concluding two nights 
I of the eagasemeut Augustus Thomas' 



Piles Quickly 
Cured at Home 



InMtant Relief, Permanent Cure — Trial 

Package Mailed Free to All 

in Plain Wrapper. 




The Pyramid Smile. 

Many cases of piles have been cured 
by I trial package of Pyramid Pile 
Cure without further treatment. When 
It proves its value to you, get mora 
from your druggist at 50c a box and be 
sure you get the kind you ask for. 
Simply fill out free coupon below and 
mall today. Save yourself from the 
surgeon's knife and Its torture, the 
doctDr and his bills. 



FREE PACKAGE COUPON 

PYRAMID DRUG COMPANY. 266 
Pyramid Bid., M;irshall, Mich. Knld- 
ly jend me a sample of Pyramid Pile 
Cure, at once by mail. FREE, in 
plain wrapper. 



Name. 



Street. 



City. 



.State., 



Golf and Dinner With the 

Longworths 4lso on 

His Program. 

Cincinnati. Ohio. Sept. 22. — President 
Taft win receive todf.y a number of j 
Republican party leaders, who are { 
anxious to consult hlri regarding the! 
political situation In the state. A 
round of golf and dinner with Con- 
gressman and Mrs. Loiigworth will oc- 
cupy the remainder ol the day. | 

Among the political leaders whom 

the president will meet are United 

States Senator Theodore Burton and 
Louis C. Laylin. chalrrian of the Ohio 
Republican executive committee. 

After the political conference the 
president will be the guest of J. C. 
Schmldlapp, a friend of long standing, 
with whom he will play golf. In tr.e 
evening he will dine w'th Congressman 
and Mrs. Nicholas Lonjrworth. 



Ashiand Men Accused of 

Working Insurance 

Game. 

Ashland, Wis.. Sept. 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — J. V. Smeaton of Marsh- 
field. Or., and Tom Lloyd of Ashland 
were arrested today on complaint of 
Assistant Marshal Flarln. charged wltli 
conspiring to defraud fire Insurance 
companies. Their bonJs were fixed at 
$2,000 each. Lloyd Is an Insurance 
agent and Smeaton was manager of 
the Lake Superior Lumber & Box com- 
pany. The plant burned a year ago. 
The two men were accused of fixing 
up a $12,000 policy after the fire, from 
wlilch they obtained $11,676. Smeaton 
came from Oregon to meet the charges 
and both men voluntarily appeared In 
court and surrendered themselves. 
Preliminary examination will be held 
tomorrow. 



BEGIN WORK ON 
LORIMER INQUIRY 

Senate Committee! Lays Plans 

for Conductiing the 

Proceedings. 

Chicago, Sept. 22. — The first open 
session of the sub-committee on 
privileges and elections of the United 
States senate was expected to be oc- 
cupied today in determining the man- 
ner of procedure in the hearing in 
the charges of alleged bribery and cor- 
ruption into the election of United 
States Senator William Lorlmer by 
the Illinois leglsiature. It was ex- 
pected to be determined whether at- 
torneys for those who have made the 
charges would be alloved to question 
the witnesses called or whether this 
be done entirely by tlie senators. In 
addition the number ind Identity of 
the witnesses to be called, it was ex- 
pected, would be determined. 

Senator I*orlmer ana his attorney. 
Elbrldge Hanecy. and Attorney CllT- 
ford W. Barnes of the Legislative 
V^oters' league were pn^sent this morn- 
ing when the sessioa liegan. 



ONE DOSE MAKES 
INDIGESTION GO 

- I 

fleartborn, Gas, Headaches; 
and Other Stomach Mis- 
ery Vanishes. 1 



If your meals don't fit comfortably, 
or you feel bloated after eating and 
you believe It is the food which fills 
you; if what little you eat lies like a, 
lump of lead on your stomach; if 
there Is difficulty in breathing after 
eating, eructations of sour, undigested 
food ajid acid, heartburn, brash or a 
belching of gas, you can make up your 
mind that you need something to 
Btop food fermentation and cure Indi- 
gestion. 

To make every bite of food you eat 
aid In the nourishment and strength 
of your body, you must rid your Stom- 
ach of poisons, excessive acid and 
stomach gas which sours your entir© 
meal — interferes with dlgeatlon and 
causes so many sufferers of Dyspepsia, 
Sick Headache. Biliousness, Constipa- 
tion. Griping, etc. Your case is no 
different — you are a stomach sufferer, 
tliough vou may call it by some other 
name; your real and only trouble b» 
that which you eat does not digest, 
but Quickly ferments and soura, pro- 
ducing almost any unhealthy condi- 
tion. 

A case of Pape's Dlapepsin will cost 
nfty cents at any Pharmacy here, and 
will convince any stomach sufferer «flve 
minutes after taking a single dos* 
that Pel-mentation and Sour Stomach 
is causing the misery of Indigestion. 

No matter If you call your trouble 
v,atarrh of the Stomach. Nervousness 
or Gastritis, or by any other name — - 
always remember that a certain cure 
is waiting at any drug store the mo- 
ment you decide to begin its use. 

Pape's Dlapepsin will regulate any 
out-of-order Stomach within five min- 
utes, and digest promptly, without any 
fcss or discomfort all of any kind o| 
food Yita Mt, 



aaifaiMOak. 



-^. 



-I— . 



^^M 



Oiri I 



- ■■ 



•^ •. 






4 



f 




— 



t 




XKe Myopic Scnool Girl 



By CARA REESE. 



i^AN. 



Of course, It's all right for everyone 
to make .1 fair living, and the design- 
ers and artists and tilings, of course, 
have to change the styles, but when it 
comes to getting into your new au- 
tumn gowns by first applying talcum 
powder and then using a ehoe horn, 
haven't things gone far enough? 

There are plenty of people who can 
respond with fervor in their tones, 
"I guess yes." Most heartily do they 

gues-P yes 

Wt-altly has woman contributed her 
share toward Increasing the prosperity 
of the world. She has purchased hair 
when it made her esthetic soul shiver 
as she temporarily sculped lierseif 
every night. And why, forsooth? Be- 
cause everyone expected it and when 
■he appeared chaste and severely sim- 
ple in nothing but her own locks, 
Bome male relation with the disarming 
frankness of male relations, inquired, 
"Why don't you fix your hair in some 
simple classy style like that," while 
he points out a billowy mass of pur- 
chased puffs that adorn a most arti- 
ficial foundation even. But K-i it pa.«s. 

After weakly looking at the adver- 
tisements of the portion of attire that 
Is always spoken of in the plural and 
which comes in boxes about twu feet 
long. Instruments of torture that com- 
prejis and ."^ubdue, inventions that have 
made the sitting down a matter. In 
many cases, of a sudden rising up 
again; even this has been tolerated, 
but think of the bolster gown. 

Words fail, hope expires, ambition 
ceases, independence dies when the 
bt'lstf'r gown is contemplated. It is 
like unto the doll clothts of long ago, 
mailf by amateur lingers, stralgnt and 
fihapfk'ss, th# same size from neck to 
ankles with no material wasted in giv- 
ing loose lines. Do you know what's 
going to happen when you attempt to 
■ it down in a btdster gown? 

If you don't know, can't you guess? 

HARVEST 'festival. 



Splendid Exhibit at the Glen 
Avon Church. 

A harvest home festival was held last 
•vening at the Glen Avon Presbyterian 
church ard all of the members of the 
ot'inmunity, where the avocation of 
everyone Is growing such fruit and 
vegetablfS as can not be grown in any 
other portion of the city, according to 
the gardeners, brought samples of their 
season's work for exhibition. The 
whole exhibit was so praiseworthy that 
It was purchased by the men guests 
and will be turned over to the Com- 
mercial club for exhibition in the cen- 
tral part of the city that no one need 
remain in Ignorance of the results that 
can be obtained from Hunter's Park 
soil. 

Supper was served and covers were 
laid for 250 of the enthusiastic garden- 
ers. Rev. J. C Faries presided as 
trastmaster and he gave away the 
Hunters Park secret of growing po- 
tatoes in a dry season such as the 
last one has been. "Plant onions with 
the potatoes." said Mr. Fairies, "and 
the close proximity of the onion will 
make the potatoes eyes water and the 
problem Is solved." There was informal 
toasts by William Pryor. Arthur Han- 
ford, W. J. Mc'^abe and .1. A. McOaug- 
hev, and they were much enjoyed. 

"The exhibit, which will be turned over 
to the children's home after it has 
been on display through the efforts of 
the Commercial club, includes almost 
every variety of fruit and vegetable 

frown In St. Louis county. There are 
Ine specimens of potatoes, Hubbard 
BQuash. pumpkins. tomatoes, cauli- 
flower, cabbage, beets, turnips, par- 
■ nlps. apples, grapes, wonder 
plums, celery and cantaloupes. 

There were exhibits from 
^dens of Mrs. John MacLeod, C. E. 
B E. Denfeld, George M. Simth, 
Jessie Macfarlane. Lucius ^^h--^^ 
Como Pantllana, W. C. Sherwood. II. \\ . 
Coffin. E. F. Alford. John W angensteln, 
•W A. McGonagle. Henry Nolte, Mrs, J, 
Fraser. Luther Mendenhall and .lames 
A. Ferguson, Among the exhibitors 
of flowers were Mrs. C. C. Staacke, 
Mrs. Luther Mendenhall and Mrs. Oscar 
Lonegren. . , „^, 

Sunflowers, towering twelve and 
fourteen feet high, were the special of- 
ferings of R. E. Denfeld anS George 
M Smith; luclous corn and tomatoes 
were from the gardtn of Lucius 
Whipple, and the largest P"'npl«5" 
■hown was from the garden of Albert 
onus. A fine. Hubbard squash came 
from the garden of Mts. .lohn McLeoa. 
and Italian squash In a fine specimen 
was exhibited by Como 




berries 

the gar- 
Roe. 
Miss 
pple. 



Pontliana. 




off eHn V o1*^e' F, Alford. ^ , 

The gardens of John Wangensteln 
-eat pumpkins. cucumbers, onions, 
cabbage and potatoes, and cranberO 
beans came from the garden of Mrs, 
W A McGonagle; large t'-^atoes were 
the particular offering of Henry Nolte. 
and mushrooms were grown by Mrs. J. 
Fraser. Luthern Mendenhall sent a 
fint assortment of vegetables, and 
jinles FergiTson sent apples and grape.s. 
The exhibit will be shown 1" some 
store m the central part of the cu> 
that the products of local gardens may 
be seen and admired by e veryone. 

MISSIONARY MEETING. 

Members Will Elect Officers 
for the Year. 

The annual meeting of the mission- 
ary socletv of the First Christian 
church will be held tomorrow after- 
noon at 2:30 o'clock at the home of 
Mrs. J. S. Kby of 30.') Isanti street. The 
annual reports of the officers will be 

Jiresented and the election of officers 
or the ensuing year will be held. 
«. — 

Church Wedding. 

The marriage of Miss IMby H. .\nc- 
tn daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. Anctll 
of this city, and J. N. Bogan of De- 
troit, took place yesterday at the Ger- 
man Catholic church. Father Hufnagel 
read the service. The bride wore a 
pretty gown of white French serge 
and her bouquet was of bride roses. 
Her maid of honor was Miss Anna 
Congl. who was gowned In cream 
serge and carried pfnk roses. Mr. Bo- 




INTEBiOR DECORATIOHS and 
.^ FURNITURE 

A choice col- 

f.,:^^ lection of deco- 
rative novelties 
•^ are awaiting 

your inspection 
at our show 
rooms. They will interest you. 



531 E. SUPERIOR ST. 




back to their studies, out Uje boys are 
not really myopica, fop thar have cer- 
tain well defined ideas conclrning their 
own future. They want wages and 
jobs. With th^ myopic girls the case 



She belongs to the •^ybpics," That , eager to attain to a pictured future or 
Is where the trouble lie^""- with the j for"ei^«eal. but the conditions are such 
, , . , , , ^ . _ ... I that there must be inaction, Ihe my- 

school girl who does not want to re- , <-,pic tjpe is of another sort entirely, 
turn to school. | It dea'ls with the present and never 

The psychologists he^fe betn at work takes into consideration its own capa- 
on the type for some: tlnife past and bilities or responsibilities. It is a short- 
have now classified or grouped under a sighted, inefficient type, 
heading these sort of children. There 1 And the myopics do not include 
are lots of boys who c|p not care to go school girls only. They are found 

re I among the newly weds. They have 
given no thought to the cares and re- 
sponsibilities of a married life; they 
have n-ade no preparation; they are in- 
capablo of rearing offspring or making 
is different. They toil not. nor spin, ja home; they hang as an incubus about 
nor dream of a future; It is coiffure, some good partner's neck. The my- 
i candy or chewing gum and nothing opies rever have a bank account; tliey 
i doing in kitchen or to eke out the fam- j never make an Investment; they never 
ily income. | look ahead and they never plan futures 

The myopic girl Is the girl who is ! for th<jir family nor build up nor In- 
never equal to an occasion, who plays spire toward broader outU'Ok and far- 
sick at examination time, who gives ■ reaching inlluence. They eat, drink 
no thought of the future and lules corrected by proper measures the my- 
away the precious training which ' the condition is hereditary. Unless 
might become capital. The myopic girl correce^td by proper measures the my- 
rarely sees beyond her own nose, she ! oplc transmits the short-sightedness 
stands in her own light, her mental ! from generation to generation, 
vision is 'short sight." The myopic i Now, this does not mean that a girl 
girl shirks school tasks and home 1 should be literally forced to a school 
tasks. There is no effort made toward | room to which she has taken an un- 
perfecting a training and raising val- i accountable dislike. It does not mean 
ues. domestic or commercial. There is ! a case where there is a possible physi- 
no ambition. It is all a case of "uear i cal ailment which dulls ambition and 
sightednegs," of sitting around or of 1 foresh.)rtens the outlook. It does not 
aimless Inattention. : mean the healthy, willful girl in the 

None of this applies to girls who early teens who is unwilling to submit 
have certain circumstances thrust upon ! to any discipline and who insists on 
them. There is many an ambitious [ recklessly ignoring advantages that 
maiden who would gladly "take 1 mav r.ever come again and who oas 
charge" of home and kitchen, or who not the slightest idea of self-helptul- 
would joyously accept the advantages ' ness. Should the future bring even or- 
offered by a good education or who la ] dlnary trials, alas for Miss Myopic, 



\Vhat Every Husband Knows 



By POLLY PAGET. 



That it isn't safe for him to invite any old college chum home to dinner 
without sparring for time and the privlege a week or so ahead. 

That it is wonderful how even the simplest gown has advanced in price, 
compared with what it wa.s last year. 

That it isn't safe to -nention, even in a whisper, the altogether desirable 
and inexpensive place he has selected on his own account to have the family 
go this summer. 

That it takes only one to make a quarrel. 

That the day Is coming when he will rise up in his might and assert him- 
self, not suddenly and di^rnifiedly, but calmly and permanently. , ». . i. 

That the household e.vpenses could easly be cut in half If he only had tne- 
time to put his gigantic intellect and business experience upon them. 

That one and one makes four or five, . . _ 

That there is always one room in the house that simply cannot wait any 
longer to be decorated. . . , .. ^ • .. j, _ ___ 

That the "little affali" In which a "few friends" are to be invited mean*' 
in the end about two weeks' hard work, a house full of people, and an expendi- 
ture of many dollars. , ^ j. 1 »«. 

That his own Ideas about disciplining children are always too radical ta 

be carried out. „ „ ,. 

That everybody gets 1 he best of father. 



-jrja T I ■: , a. 





Scnool Frocks 



GEORGE BRANDT WINTHROP. 



CHILDREN OF THE CROWN PRINCE OF GERMANY. 
Prince Wilhelm and Prince Louis Ferdinand of Prussiau 




"School outfits" is a legend promi- 
nently displayed at the ptfesent time 
In shop windows — a timely reminder to 
parents of the passing of the holiday 
season and the necessity of over-haul- 
ing their daughters' wardrobes and 
supplying them with the outfit that Is 
to do duty until the Christamas holi- 
days. 

It iB practically a new outfit from 
head to foot that the school girl needs 
for the winter term. Not only has she 
outgrown her summer clothes, but she 
requires to be fitted with warm win- 
ter clothing. , , , . 

Simplicity is the distinguishing fea- 
ture of the school outfit of the pres- 
ent day. Extravagance in dress ia 



san. have gone to Lime Springs, Iowa, 
for a visit with relatives and friends. 

• • * 

Mr, and Mrs. A. Earl Stumpf and 
familv of Milwaukee, who have been 
visiting In this city for the last ten 
days, returned home yesterday. 

• * • 

Dr. and Mrs. Morris Thomas have 
gone to Cedar Lake for a two weeks' 
trip. 

• * • 

Miss Laura Waggoner has returned 
from a three weeks' visit at Grand 
Marais. 



spec „ „, 

their densities or weights. Those 
thirtv-three bodies of which ihe 
weights are equal have their specific 
gravities inversely as their magnitudes 
while those having their specific gravi- 
ties equal have their weights as their 
magnitudes. 

Consequently the weigits of bodies 
to each other must be In compound 
ratio of tlieir specific gravities and 
magnitudes. It follows therefore that 
if any two of these three — weight, mag. 
nitude, specific gravity — tan be ascer- 
tained, the other can always be found, 
be it of a body close at band or of a 
distant star like the sun. 

Instruments of known power of mag- 
nification enable the investigator to 
judge of size; others give substance, 
character, and so on, frcm which are 
calculated weight, distance, gravity, etc. 
with an accuracy little short of won- 
derful. , , 

Thus from a average sample of 



attraction on other worlds, and much 
that makes the mind marvel. All this 
may be obtained in various ways ana 
compared for confirmation, so that a. 
correct result is reached. 

It is obvious that neither this nor 
any other planet or star can be 
we'lghed In balance, yet so accuraely 
is this done in effect by the scientist 
tliat wen- it possible to weigh any ot 
them the difference between the actual 
and calculated weights would almost 
certainly be comparatively trlning. 

Special novelties include amber ef- 
fects in artificial silk laces. Embroid- 
ery is used on light colored waists an* 
costumes. 

• • ♦ 

Leather belts are much seen but th»- 
belt of the nuiterutl of the l^rfs* 
matching it or contrasting U. is th»- 
favorite. 



CHICKEN PIE 



sternly discountenanced by girls' 
schools of the best class and whatever 
might be the personal Incliration of 
mothers it is kept in check by the de- 
cree of the principal. Elaborate clothes, 
they know, would be sent back. One 
might say the more fashionable the 
fchool the simpler the outfit. Frilled 
and lace-trimmed lingerie is not en- 
couraged and rustling iilk linings are 
tabooed. 

One or more semi-evening dresses 
are required, which means an evening 
cloak and evening shoes. A gym- 
nasium costume is essential; sometimes 
a swimming costume is needed, and at 
schools where gardening is included in 
the curriculum a gardening costume — 
a short-skirted overall — La worn. 



the right foot — now what's the matter 
with that man?" 

"That man" — Jorkings — a nervous, 
bewildered look on his pale face, was 
holding up a rather ashamed-looking 
hand as a schoolboy does in class. 

"Ploase, sir," he faltered, "may I ex- 
plain?" 

Exi'laln? Nol" thundered the ex- 
asperated sergeant major. "I can do 
all the explaining without your help. 
You'll get yourself into trouble If 1 
have much more of it. As you were, 
form fours. " 

The Sandow-like being gave Jor- 
kings a shove backwards and behind 
him "Buck up, ' he growled softly. 

"There's a man out of his place 
down there." said the sergeant major, 
walking toward the end of the line. 

The instant his back was turned, 
Jorkings darted out of his jdace and 




orncr 



w 



indows 



F 



SYTn¥^W^V^ AT THE PILGRIM 
I I W^ r^ ■* . K COKGREGATIONAL , ^ade "a" dash'Tor" an "opening marked 
^y M, JIL a_J&^ nHIIRP.H— "Exit." 

But "the major 



CHURCH 

Lake avenue and Second street, Fri- 
day evening, Sept. 23rd. at 6:15. Price 
50 cents. Everybody welcome. 




How Jorkings Joined 



By William Pollock. 



heard him. Turn- 
ing round and striding rapidly after 
him, he roared: "Halt! Stop that 
man there." 

Two men who were looking on at 
the drill Immediately barred the way 
of tho terrified Jorkings. 

"How dare you, sir? What d'you 
mean by falling out without permit* 
sion? D'you think you're playing at 
soldiering? Did you join for a game?" 
bello^ved the sergeant major. 

"But — but I haven't joined," stuttered 
Jorkings. almost W3eping. 

"Haven't joined? Then what are 
yovi doing here?" 

"I came to have a drink with a 
friend in the canteen, but I don't see 
him about," explained Jorkings, des- 
perately. "That's all." 



PRINCE LUITPOLD OF BAVARIA. 



These little princes have a good 
time in spite of their restrictions. 
Other children might think It was all 
very fine to be princes of a reigning 
house or even heir of a grand duke. 
But not all royal houses are wealthy 
and little princes do not necessarily 
have all that their hearts crave. 

Prince Wilhelm Frledrlch and Prince 
Ludwlg Ferdinand of Germany prob- 
ably lack for few of the toys whi:h 
please the childish heart and little 



gan was attended by Frank Fielder. 
After the ceremony the wedding 
breakfast was served at the former 
home of the bride, 206 East First 
street. The decorations were In pink 
and white. Among the out of town 
guests was H. H. Bobbins of Minne- 
apolis. After a short trip Mr. and 
Mrs, Bogan will be at home at 2729 
Minnesota avenue. 



Prince Johann Leopold of Saxe-Co- 
bourg-Gotha has a pony. Prince Leo- 
pold of Belgium, the heir to the 
throne, may sail a boat when he 
chooses and Prince Luitpold of Ba- 
varia, who is the great grandson of 
the regent, enjoys life much like other 
children of his age. Little princes do 
not mingle miich with other little boys 
and it is probably the lack of com- 
panionship which narrow^a their lives 
more than the lack of other oppor- 
tunities. 



program. The members of the church 
and their friends are invited to at- 
tend. 



Informal Party. 

Mrs. Thomas J. Watts of 1114 West 
Second street entertained in compli- 
ment to her aunt, Mrs. George Sim- 
mons of London, Eng. The guests 
were: 
Me.«srs. and Mesdamea — 

Charles A, Older, J. E. Watts. 

J. J. Whitehouae, 
Mesdames — 

William Watts, 

George Spearin, 
Misses — 

Dorothy Older, 



Personal Mention. 

Miss Maude Mattison left yesterday 
for New York, where she will study 
music during the winter. 
♦ • * 
Henrietta Bancroft, who was | anything 



I. Ridge. 



Agnes Rhodes. 



Miss 
the guest at the local deaconess home 
has gone to Fergus Falls. 
* • • 

Miss Clara Thomas, who has been 
the guest of her sister. Mrs. Rene 
Hugo, for two weeks, will leave to- 
morrow for her home at Minneapolis. 
■ » « 

Mrs. H. O, Lovell and daughter, Su- 



Precisely at 7 o'clock the sergeant 
major's stentorian voice resounded 
through the big drill hall: 
"Recruits, fall in!" 

The babble of forty tongues Instantly 
ceased, and there was a quick, solid 
movement towards the midde of the 
hall. For two desperate seconds a 
youth made frantic courts to force his 
way out of the alert, hustling throng of 
recruits. • 

"Excuse me," he gasped , tq one in 
particular, swaying first toi right and 
then to left. 

"This way, you ass!" hissed a stern- 
faoed, Sandow-like being, giving him a 
poke in the small of the back. 

"Fall in their, smarter, and stand 
still," roared the sergeant major, eye- 
ing the double line fiercely. 

The meek-looking youth made a half 
step out of the place into which the 
Sandow-like being had pushed him. 
hesitated, shuffled his feet nervously, 
and blushed. 

The sergeant major glared at him. 
"Didn't you hear what 1 said? Fall 
In! • 

There was a half-suppressed snicker 
from the squad as the meek-looking 
youth, obviously sorely embarrassed 
and ill at ease, got into line. 

" 'Shun, as you were. Smarter now. 
'Shun; that's more like it. I'll take 
the roll," said the sergeant major. 

About the middle of the rank he 
came to the meek-looking youth. 
"Yes," he said shortly. 

"I — I," began the meek-looking 
youth. 

••I — what?" snapped the sergeant- 
major. "Hurry up. man." 
"I — I only wanted to say — " 
The sergeant major tapped his book 
Impatiently with his pencil. "I've no 
time to listen to anything now; see me 
after parade. Come on, name, out witli 
it." 

The meek-looking youth made an- 
other brave effort at conversation 
"But, really, if you will excuse me — " 
"Excuse you," cried the sergeant 
major angrily. I won't excuse you 
It's time you learned that 




Before any computation can be made 
as to the character of a substance its 
specific gravity must be ascertained, 
and reference is often made to the 
specific gravity of a body without a 
clear understanding of -the meaning of 
the r.erm. 

Everything must be arrived at by 
comparison, and we only learn with 
certainty that such an object is that 
which we take it to be from actual 
experience of objects which are dif- 
ferent, and a comparison, of the dif- 
ferences enables U3 to be certain of 
our suppositions. 

Therefore if we wish to determine 
the weight of a body we can only do 
so by taking a second body the weight 
of which is known and by comparing 
the two in a form of simple rule-of- 
three, such as by counterpoising It 
with known weights in a balance, ob- 



Annual Meeting. 

The annual business meeting of the 

Ladles' Literature class will be held 

Tuesday afternoon of next week at the 

home of the president, Mrs. L. W. 

Kline of 1931 East Fifth street. 
« 

Chicken Pie Supper. 

The Ladles' Union of the Pilgrim 
Congregational church will serve a 
chlcKen pie supper tomorrow evening 
at the church. There will be pumpkin 
pie for dessert. After the supper, the 
annual reception for the congregation 
will be held and there will be a musical 



A Skhk of Beauty U a Joy ForevT| 

DR. T. FELIX OOURAUD'S 
Oriental Qroam or 
Magical Beautlftor. 



the first duty of a soldier Is obedience 
What's your name?" 

"Jorkings." said the youth, rather 
indignantly. 

I Jorkings," repeated the sergeant 
major, writing It down. 

'■^'ext." ^ ^^ - . 

He finished the roll, and then faced 
the squad, mostly composed of first 
fortnight ""rookies." ^, ,. , 

"Shun. Front rank. Number, from 
right to left— and keep your heads 
Btlll, Number." ., * .1, 

"One, two, three." snapped out the 
front rank, and "Nine, said the San- 
dow-like being in his turn. Jorkings 
had his mouth partly open, but re- 

pmoye,T.=T.mple,,rr.«k. jn^^l^e^ Tou Wlot.' whispered the San- 

'"• ''''^i/Ti^i:i,.^:^}'^lV.6io^-n^eone between his teeth, giving 

"oiemiih CO twKutr, •»! d. him a surreptitious dig with his elbow. 

je4d.i4.tioB. 11 ij»s »toou "But I'm — " began Jorkings. 

j.ih«t^ofto>Mr», tndUM ; .."^^ y^^ were!" roared the sergeant 

major, "fixing a ferocious eye upon him. 
"The same man at it again. Num- 
ber " 

This time Jorkings managed to bleat 
out a protesting sort of "ten," 

"Now we'll go on to forming fours, 
.»m« .'v,.n. rorw.. sald the Sergeant major. "On the corn- 
to W'j;ur.p/p.n\: i mand, 'Form fours,' the odd numbers 
CTcoJ. 6,»V( !• At Uclt-ta I of each rank stand still, the even num- 
•utB., c«ii»<j»tttd iuioj>». , ^jgrs take a pace to the rear with the 
|«rdiT,BliUM.Fnff«l7Crwli«MSt,N<wYwl|ileft foot and a pace to thQ right with 



ONLY TWO MORE 
LECTURES 



HoiLSCAvlves Get Vahiablo Information 
Free at >lrs. Briggs' SchooL 



RIDAY morning The Great Corner Win- 
dows [lhe Hub of phenomenal bargains] 
will be -aivv^eiled and the good people of Du- 
Jiith will be formally introduced to our merchan- 
dising innovg.tion — a departure that bids fair to 
revolutionize netailing methods. 

Already the large department stores in the 
big cities have adopted and are successfully 
working this, new advertising system. Under 
this new plan from 25 to 75 per cent of the 
amount previously spent for printer's ink is di- 
Tert.ed into another channel— co-operative in its 
nature and distributing moneys that heretofore 
have gone to one or two publishers among the 
store's thousands of patrons. 

This is done by selling certain merchandise 
at less than actual cost, and charging the loss to 
the advertising account. The goods so offered 
are displayed in the stores' most prominent win- 
(jows— but other than directing the general at- 
tention to the windows, the special values are not 
advertised. No specific quotations of items or 
prices are made through the press. The good 
bargain news is disseminated abroad by the pub- 
He, which is kept agog with interest by the phe- 
nomenal bargains offered. By word of mouth, 
the masses publish the gladsome news far and 
near, with g:'eater effect and at less expense than 
we could do it with printers' ink. 

The workings of this plan will be forcibly 
demonstrated in a practical way Friday morning 
by the throngs of eager buyers that will fill this 
store in response to the wonderful values offered 
for the day. 

Get inti the economv crowd — WATCH 
THE CORNER WINDOWS. 






New Shipment of Gold Fish, 10c 

Live Pet Department— Basement. 



.*i- 




ii| 



1 




/ hKrmUM w* •»•(« U to b4 
■ur« ft li p'op^'iv n>»<f«. Ac- 
capira countsrftV vfilniliu 
nama. Dr. L. A 3kyrt mM 
to ( l*4v it tb* hautlcn (» 
pMientji "A* vou adlc* will 
u(s thrn. I rtcoRini'nd 
•COURAUO'8 CR-HAM' »t 
lhe Ickst humful of 4II ttiri 
tkin Its. »r»'.i'>n«. " Vsr »«i« 



The golden opportunity is now, to 
secure much valuable Information 
free of charge. One might pay many 
dollars and not receive instructions of 
such vital importance and worth to 
every housewife in Duluth and vicin- 
ity. Mrs. Briggs, at the free baking 
school, K. P. Hall, teaches the essen- 
tial principles of good baking, which 
are applicable in different .ways and 
in every instance the observance of 
the.se essentials secure, inevitably, the 
perfect results you desire. Don't 
neglect attending the baking school; 
you will miss the chance of learning 
much that will enable you to do more 
successful and economoical baking If 
you do. You owe it to yourself to se- 
cure this knowledge which will en- 
able you to reduce the problem of 
your baking troubles to a minimum — 
besides securing the fUest results you 
ever enjoyed. At Saturday's class 
MrH. Briggs will bake and serve to 
vou the following things to eat: 
Chocker board cake, doughnuts and 
jumbles. 

"Xou will enjoy the talks by Mrs. 
Briggs, they are of the finest instruc- 
tiv« value. Don't miss seeing her Il- 
lustrate. Please bring in your cer- 
tifloate from the 25c can of K C 
Baking Powder before too late. 

Saturday's class the last. Ladies 
unable to attend may mail their cer- 
tiflMites to Mrs. Briggs, car« K. P. ball. 



DULUTH FUR CO. 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS 




We make up fur 
Karments that are 
•Ight In price, 
right In iityle and 
right In quallt}-. 
Satlafactlon goea 
with every order 
placed with u». 





Trade Mark. 



R e d y e Ins, re- 
pairing and re- 
modeling ot old 
fur garmentii made 
to the newest 
KtyleH receives the 
name careful «t- 
tenlloD aa new 
work. 



WHEN BUflKG FURS "BEU III MIHD" RElMBILITy 



325 WEST FIRST ST. 



Duluth Phone Melrose 4836 

Zenith Phone 624. 

Open Evenings Until 9. 







i 


i 


- 








, 










1 

1 

t 






1 \ 




i 









I' 




Thursday, 



THji DULUTH HERALD. 



September 22, 1910. 



NEWS OF THE NORTHWEST 



MANY TO BE 
PROSECUTED 

Attorney General Takes Hand 

in Devils Lake 

Trouble. 



Prominent Officials Are Said 
to Be Impli- 
cated. 



Devils r iT.-.> V !>., Sept. 22. — (Special 
to The — Atioiuey General 

Andrew Muloi has taken a hand in 
the proso.-'itiim of the several cases 

■latlons brought 

• udut in the raids 

iielfurd and a posse 

. ly morning, at the 

Pan V. lirennan, a 

'•M movement, was 

vvoitld-be assas- 



of allt- 
promineii' . 
made by > 
of citiZ'--- 
close 
leader 
made I 
Bin's bu..v , 

Tlie attorney general of the state 
arrived on tl»e ground yesterday and 
has been conducting a very thorough 
lnve.stiKLiti.il. ••; ti.e situation. He is 
satistie.i s sufficient evi- 

dence - 'ase the cliarges 

that ha preferred aganst at 

least a Liie men accused of 

•wrong doing and will remain on the 
grround to pro-«e>'ute the actions, as- 



llsling tlie 
For soni 
Devils Lak. 
open" piai. 
not been < 
law enfon 
Tiie luatlet 



itfiicials. 

it Is claimed that 

en run on the "wide 
t l:e conditions have 

satisfactory to tlie 
-.ciuls of the state. 

brought to public 



noth-e Just a day prior to the raids 

! »->Ti<, through resolu- 

e liastors of the 

, le city, in which 

unst a continuation 

ation 

prosecutions to 
itt.irney general 
.ncertain, but it is 
vagnet may get cer- 
tain promiiietu oiticials. 

Dan Br.'nnan. th»» young newspaper 



made by th-» 
tlons draw I 
leading •': 
they pr 
of the ; 

Just 
be lauii 
will exien . 
clamed tha 



publl.she- 
bullet It; 
has ' 

SUCC' 

very ;?!. 
"Was he! 
Quite la 
master 
uninjur. 
maile th 
was t'.ru . .. 
missing hi- 
Since tliit 
with a I 
his offl. 
not hes. 



wounded by a 

owing the raids, 

lim of three un- 

(.-n.pts within a 

one occasion he 

;ng to his home 

t iie proved tlie 

nt and escaped 

■»ck ago he was 

.eavy stone tliat 

I he dark, it only 

V a few In'-hes. 

? iias been armed 

d when attacked in 

esdav morning did 

e It.' 



was being shipped frotn Montana to 
South St. Paul, and was unloaded In 
Dickinson for the purpose of grazing 
for a short time. At this point Merry 
is alleged to have reloaded the sheep, 
shipping them out under a bill of lad- 
ing showing the property as his own, 
and it was not until the train iiad 
passed St. I'aul that it was stopi)ed 
and the rightful owners gained posses- 
sion. He had billed the sheep through 
to Chicago. 

RACES WILL BE 
THE BIG FEATURE 

Many Entries Made for the 

Richland County 

Fair. 

Wahpeton. N. D., Sept. 22. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Races will be a big 
feature of the annual fair of the Rich- 
land County Fair association which 
will be opened in Wahpeton on 
Wednesday and continue until Friday. 
The entries in the several events fol- 
low: 

Wednesdu}, Sept. 2S. 

2:15 pace and :.':10 trot — Lotheart. 
liaumont. Hummer, Sheldon, Commo- 
dore. Ideal G., Idle Times and War 
Kells. 

2:ao pace and 2:25 trot — Amy G., Fos- 
tena, Wanda A., Princess Oratoris, 
Daisy C, Dell S., Lady Storm, Bonnie 
Lou, Luzella and Diadell. 

Tbunday, .Sept. 2H. 

2:22 pace and 2:17 trot — Vera Vapo, 
Amy G., Sweet Child, Fostena, The 
Muccasin, Bonnie Lou, Ore Zinc, Jolin 
Ht-nry, Beechcr and Grace Red. 
Friday, Sept. 2». 

Free-for-all — Red King, Luke Ver- 
non, Bob Roy, Hummer, Slieldon, Com- 
moder and Idle Times. 

2:2j pace and 2:15 trot — War Bells, 
Grace Red, Ideal G.. Baumont, Beech- 
er, Wanda A., Lotheart, Princess Ora- 
toris, The Moccasin, John Henry, Sweet 
Olilld, Diadell, Ore Zinc and Vera Vapo. 



BURKE'S TOUR A 
SUCCESSFUL ONE 

Governor Well Received in 

Cass County, 

N. D. 

Casselton, N. D., Sept. 22.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — Governor John Burke 
Will complete the first step of his 
campaign for re-election In Casselton 
tonight, having made a four-day to\ir 
of Cass county with cuusiderable suc- 
cess. A ral of the towns the 
gov«?r:ic: i^.-t-n made the honor 
Kuest ai la:. i^ie's given by his en- 
thusta-stlc Democratic admirers, prahie 
chicken menus prevailing. 

Tile governor exprt^sses himself as 
helng well pU-'a^ed with the conditions 
in Cass county. 

MERRY'S CAREER A 
CHECKERED ONE 

Attempted to Steal Trainload 

of Sheep at One 

Time. 

Hettinger, N. D.. Sept. 22. — (Special 
. to The Herald.) — Charles F. Merry, 
now in the custody of the Adams coun- 
ty officials to serve a sentence of 
eight months imposed on itlm In the 
dl.itrict court and affirmed by the su- 
preme court, will liave a long time to 
wait for freedom If the plans of the 
authorities in several other counties in 
this state and In South Dakota are 
carried out. The present plan of action 
Is to re-firre^-t Merry the moment he 
conclu'i sentence In this county 

and th- charges against him will 

ti.en be .slkL>%ed, and should he be con- 
victed. It will be a long time before 
he win be clear of the prison walls. 

T'.ie prisoner, who was convlcte.d 
here of fraudulent dealings, and who 
eeemingly is entangled In much the 
game manner In other places, has had 
a decldediy che« kered career within 
the past few years. One of the most 
specta' ular stunts that he was ever 
charged wirii pulling off was a few 
years ago wlien lie was accused of at- 
tempting to steal an entire trainload 
of sheep. 

The trainload of sheep In question 



DISPLAYS GREAT iNERVE. 

Boy Drives to Hospital After Being 
BadI) Hurt. 

Upham, N. D., Sept. 22 — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Although one cheek had 
been almost entirely cut off, and with 
his jaw b«ie exposed for about two 
inches, Oscar Thorderson, aged 14 
years, did not Icse his nerve or pres- 
ence of mind, but instead made haste 
to catch a team of runaway horses that 
Lad caused the injury, hitched them to 
a buggy and drove to town, entering 
the local hospital, where he fell ex- 
iiausti-d to the lloor from the loss of 
Idood. The lad had been engaged In 
plowing wlien the accident happened, 
being caught under the plow wlien the 
team ran away. One cheek was aln.ost 
entirely slashed off, a large piece of it 
being torn out. 

TWO CHILDREN HURT 

BY DYNAMITE CAPS. 



Wheelock, N. D., Sept. 22. — (Special 
to Tlie Herald.) — While playing with 
dynamite caps which they had found 
on tlie railroad right-of-way, Edward 
Crowe and Margorie Raymond were 
badly Injured, the caps being exploded 
when he laid a hammer on them just 
to "lind out what they were made of." 
The Crowe boy liad one hand within 
two or three Inches of the cap, and his 
thumb and forefinger were torn off, 
while the little girl was some dl.stance 
away and received a bad wound in 
one knee. 



HIT BY BLASTED ROCK. 

Soo Lad Struck While Looking 
From Refuge Behind Post. 

Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., Sept. 22. — 
Fred Santimo, 14 years old, was per- 
haps fatally injured by a rock hurled 
by a blast from the Marsch-Robbins 
contract on the third lock of the Soo 
Canal. Santimo was on Portage ave- 
nue when he heard warning whistles 
and got beJilnd a telephone post. He 
was looking from behind the post 
when struck by a rock weighing about 
a pound, which was thrown across two 
ship canals and the canal park. 

CHARGED WITH MURDER. 



ostensibly for Valley City, about two 
weeks ago. A letter from relatives in 
Colgate states that she went from her 
home at Colgate to Verndale, Minn., 
where she visited for a time witii rela- 
tives. She then announced her inten- 
tion of coming to Valley City to seek 
employment. .Since that time she has 
not been heard from. 

Courtney, N. D. — Farmers of this dis- 
trict who have from two to five quar- 
ter sections of land which they are 
farming now, have decided on going 
into business on the intensified plan, 
and with the idea In view of getting 
new men into the country, they have 
pooled their Interests and will sell 
their spare land at an auction sale to 
be held some time in October. 

Bismarck, N. D. — While attempting 
to get three horses out of a burning 
barn at Hartford Monday night, Mrs. 
Ben Greer was fatally burned and 
crushed. Boys playing with matches 
started the fire, and wlien Mrs. Greer 
arrived she went into the burning 
i)uilding and loosened three horses. 
The animals became frigiitened while 
backing out of the stall and squeezed 
Mr.s. Greer and lield her while tlie 
flames spread all around. 

Minot. N. D. — A Canadian officer was 
in the city endeavoring to locate W. J. 
Nelson, who is wanted for horse steal- 
ing in Canada. Nelson is charged with 
stealing a horse and buggy at Carnduft 
last Thursday from a livery stable 
there. The officers have traced him as 
far as Sherwood. 

Fargo, N. D. — A novel by Henry Clay 
Hansbrough, who for several years 
represented North Dakota in the United 
States senate, will be given to tlie 
publishers within a month. It deals 
with political life, and Hansbrough 
says he has tried to picture truthfully 
the "inside" of state and national 
affairs. The tariff, the progressive 
movement, the primary election law 
and other sulijects of national interest 
are dealt with. 

Minot, N. D. — Completely veiled by 
an air of mystery that local news- 
paper men found impossible to pene- 
trate, Count Gerald Badow, who re- 
ceived his title from the Prussian gov- 
ernment, has visited Minot, evidently 
secured liis information, and departed 
with the statement that he may return 
at a later date, as the only clew to 
satisfy the curiosity of those who met 
liim. 

Grand Forks — Friends of George L. 
Bonney, who for many years was su- 
perintendent of diners and sleepers on 
tlie Great Northern, will be interested 
in learning that he is again with the 
CJreat Norlliern and back in his old 
position. Mr. Bonney has been in the 
employ of the Missouri Pacific for sev- 
eral years. 

Minot, N. D. — Joe Miller, a local 
chauffeur, while driving Monday morn- 
ing, narrowly escaped death when the 
chain broke, precipitating the machine 
over a bank 200 feet high. Miller 
jumped and the car was hurled to the 
bottom of the ravine, where the tank 
exploded and it was destroyed by fire. 

Minot. N. D. — Mrs. John Wolfe and 
her affinity. Emmett Lapp, who eloped 
from Winnipeg last week, have been 
captured at Great Falls after es- 
caping from the irate husband here. 
The matter has been taketi up by the 
immigration autliorities. 



MINNESOTA BRIEFS 



Plerz — While hunting Eddie Froeh- 
lich, 16-year-old son of Joseph Froeh- 
lich of New Pierz, accidentally shot 
himself in the right arm. He was 
climbing an embankment, pulling the 
him. when it was dis- 



Mix, 12 years 
right leg be- 
huntlng late 
gun by tlie 
stock to draw 
The gun was 



E, ANGERIVIEIER 




Two Men Held in Upper Peninsula 
Jails for Trial 

Marquette, Mich., Sept. 22. — Charged 
with murder, Samuel Robinson of 
Northland is in the Marquette county 
jail, awaiting trial In the circuit court. 
He Is alleged to have shot and killed 
Clement Smith, a neighboring home- 
steader. The tragedy was the outcome 
of a drunken quarrel. 

Murder also is the charge against 
Guiseppl Sprgarelli, who is lodged in 
the Dickinson county Jail at Iron 
Mountain. The victim in this case was 
Gust Johnson. The two men were 
miners and while waiting to be con- 
veyed down the l'ewal>ic shaft had in- 
volved In a scuflle. Johnson wa.s Im- 
paled with a candlestick and died 
shortly. 

FINDS WIFE DEAD. 

Michigan Man Has Strauge Dream 
With Startling Results. 

Marquette, Mich., Sept. 22. — A re- 
markable story comes from Munislng, 
Alger county. Along about 2 o'clock 
In the morning, it appears, Martin .*-n- 
derson, a well known citizen, dreamed 
that his father, who has been dead 
many years, approached the bed and 
reached out and grasped the hand of 
his sleeping son. The touch awoke the 
man. So vivid did the dream appear 
that Anderson turned to his Wiie to 
tell her of the vision. He found me 
woman dead. She had retired the 
previous evening apparently In the 
best of health. Physicians summoned, 
pronounced the demise due to heart 
disease. 



gun after 
charged. 

Waseca — A boy named 
old, shot himself in the 
low the knee while out 
Tuesday. Holding his 
muzzle, he used tiie gun 
a tloatlng board to him. 
discharged directly into his leg. tearing 
away the flesh and several Inches of 
the bone. Amputation below the knee 
may bo necessary. 

St. Charles — Mrs. Margaret Teahen 
died Monday night at her home in 
Qulncy township, seven miles north of 
St. Charles. She had attained the age of 
102 years. Death was duo to a general 
decline. Until two years ago last Octo- 
ber, Mrs. Teahen scarcely knew a sick 
ilay, having been strong and robust all 
her'llfe. 

Comfrey — Burglars broke In to the 
store of H. N. Turbls. Dotson, Sunday 
night and secured $800 in cash. The 
thieves gained entrance to the store 
through a rear window, and located the 
moniy which had been kept in a trunk, 
the proprietor having neglected to 
make customary deposits at the bank. 
No one slept in the building, and tlie 
visit oi the burglars was not known 
until Mr. Turbis opened the store Mon- 
day morning. While search for the 
robbers is being vigorously made, no 
clew has been obtained. 

Lambert(.n — Charles Adams, charged 
with robbing the Security State Bank 
of Seaforth last April, was given hie 
preliminary hearing befoje Justice 
Zindel yesterday. Adams was located 
at Fond du Lac, Wis., last week, and 
brought to this city by Sheriff Schuel- 
ler, from whom he escaped shortly 
after the robbery. He was bound over 
to the grand Jury which meets in No- 
vember. 

Fergus Falls — The contract for erec- 
tion of the new Elks' hall was let to 
John Laurltzen, a local contractor, the 
contract price being |1S,300. The hall 
will be a handsome building. Work Is 
to begin at once and is to be com- 
pleted by Jan. 1. 

Fergus Falls — Mrs. Olaf Ofstad and 
her 3-year-old daughter died from ty- 
phoid fever. Several cases are re- 
ported in this vicinity, owing to the 
low stage of the water, but none have 
developed In the city, except one or 
two at the Insane hospital 




Are you the 
business manager 
of the home? 







i-» 



•< 



r 
f 



Are you managing that home as your husband manages his business ? 
If not, you are missing something of success — ease — satisfaction. 

Your husband has trade journals, financial newspapers, law reports 
to help him in his business, according to what his business is. 

Just as your husband buys and studies the best publications he can 
find on his work so you should buy and study the best publication you 
can find on yours. 

That publication is the WOMAN'S HOME COMPANION. 

The October Number 

contains sixty-two features which are sixty-two reasons \<'hy every woman 
needs it. Nine of them are stories for your entertainment; seven of them 
are articles for your instruction, and forty-six of them are specific depart- 
ments to help you in your work — the business management of your home. 



I 



As the men say: ''Business is business." **Do it now. 



» » 



WOMATSf'S HOME 
COM£A^IOTvi 



'«^ ^ 



MADISON SQUARE. NEW YORK 



On all News-stands 



1 



r^^mfi^^f^^aB^ 



-] 



PENINSULA BRIEFS 



for many years had been a resident ot 
this part of the country. 

Calumet — Articles of association of 
the Calumet Store company were filed 
with County Clerk Richardson. The 
concern is capitalized at $50,000 divided 
Into 5,000 shares at ?10 each. The 
amount of cash paid in is $29,6.50 and 
the rest Includes stock and other 
property. The Calumet Store company 
succeeds I. Miller & Co. of Calumet. 

Hancock — Henry Savela of Hancock 
was fined $25 and the costs for shoot- 
ing partildge out of season. Savela went 
Into the woods Sunday with a gun and 
could not resist the temptation to have 
a little sport. County Game Warden 
Wlllson captured him and Justice Oliv- 
ier of Hancock imposed the penalty. 

Hancock — Abram Hendrlckson, alias 
Abram Makl. was arraigned before 
Justice Olivier on a charge of taking 
$^30 and a gold watch valued at $25 
from the person of John Makl of 
Franklin township. The alleged theft is 
claimed to have taken place last night 
In a Ripley boarding house, In which 
Makl and Hendrlckson occupied the 
same bed and were roommates. 



Hancock — Tlie coke shed and ware- 
house of the Portage Lake Foundary & 
Machinery company were burned Sun- 
day nln-ht. Loss Is $16,000. 

Calumet — Richard Thomas, one df 
the oldest miners In the employ of the 
Calumet & Hecla Mining company, was 
killed Monday morning while at work 
at the thirty-seventh level pump stat- 
ion. No. 5 shaft, Calumet branch of tlie 
Calumet & Hecla. It Is said that while 
he was "pinching out" some rock a 
mass broke away and fell upon him, 
killing him Instantly. Coroner William 
T. Fisher will conduct the luQuest. 

Houghton — ^Hurontown and the Port- 
age lake district lost one of the oldest 
If not zhelr oldest resident when Wolf- 
bod Karl expired at his home In Hur. 
ontown. He was 93 years of age and 




DAKOTA BRIEFS 



Discoverer of Herbaqyeen Remedies. 
A Feeling of Security 

^ou ti&tiir»liv (et) secure wtigj yuu knfcw that 
lp« m^iloljj* ^ou art »bout ft tak* It aUp- 
('Aclf fUre ar)i1 contulni hd hinural pr tiabit- 
t)rodu«ai« (lru|». 

olL'l'l *..„#'!'''''* •» HERBAQUEEN, THE 
flPI»*T CORE t'jt IridDey. liter. WuUUef; iiom- 
•CTV ooncera, tuajonj and (em#l9 ^ dj^^wM. 
ft tf ||»(ur«'» |reut h«lp»f and h««f»r. 

Xf\X If AND BE CONVINCED. 

^11 31 East SuiMriw Strtet. 



Mandan, N. D. — A record for quick 
prosecution of a criminal was accom- 
plished by the Morton county Judiciary 
when an absconding forger and thief 
was convicted and started serving his 
sentence in the penitentiary three 
davs after he had committed the crime. 
The forger did hl.s work at Glen Ullin 
by forging a check on Barnes & Nel- 
son for $5 and Incidentally stealing a 
suit of clothes. 

Medora, N. D. — L. F. Martin, father 
of State Senator Martin, died very 
.-suddenly at Sentinel, Butte. The re- 
mains were taken to Little Falls. 
Min., where the family formerly re- 
sided. He was 70 years old and had 
been in feeble health for a long time. 

Fargo, N. D. — Herman Koch the de- 
mented lad from Valley City, has been 
adjudged Insane by the insanity board 
of Barnes county, and has been taken 
to the asylum at Jamestown. 

Valley City, N. D.— Police of the 
principal cities of the state are search- 
ing for Orphia Pulver. a young girl 
from Colgate, N. D., who left there. 




CLIFTON, 2| in. kifb BEDFORD. 2i in. kich 

Arrow 

MofcA COLLARS 

Sit snugly to the neck, the tops meet 
in front and there is ample space 
for the cravat. 

" 15c,2 t9f 25c Uu«tm>6a|^y ^ Qo„lAak»n 



JanesvlUe — Detectives are investl- 

fatlng the mysterious shooting of Mrs. 
ohn Myers, 35 years old, a wealthy 
widow, who was shot down when she 
stepped from her home. Mrs. Myers' 
condition is pronounced critical, the 
bullet having severed an artery in her 
right arm. A search revealed no clue 
of the bullett's source. 

Marinette — The use of a gun as a 
cane in scrambling over windfalls, 
cost the life of John Garb, 26 years 
old, resident of Maple Grove, Mich., 
twenty miles north of Marinette. A 
searching party came on Garp's body 
after It had been missing three days. 
The imprint of a gun trigger was 
found on the windfall near the body. 
Most of the head was shot away. 

Chippewa Falls — W'hlle the balloonist 
was making ready to go up at the 
Northern Wisconsin state fair, a de- 
plorable accident took place, which 
furnished an Interesting spectacle for 
the big crowd. The big bag was being 
blown up, when a rope gave way or 
someone Interfered and the blaze from 
the fire caught the material and away 
It went. It burned nicely until tiie 
final collapse. 

Marinette — Edwin Ulseth, prominent 
inercliant of Calumet, Mich., won a race 
against death from Marinette to his 
home Monday night. Ulseth was there 
on business when he received word 
that his wife was dying. With but 
five minutes to catch the regular 
Northwestern northbound train, he 
managed fo engage a special from Es- 
oanaba to Negaunee to connect with 
the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic. 
He reached the bedside of his wife at 
10 o'clock. She recognized him and 
died a few minutes later. 

Fok Lake — Justice Parkinson of this 
village Wednesday issued a warrant 
for the arrest of Dr. William Hecker 
of Watseka, 111., on the charge of mur- 
dering his wife by drowning In Fox 
lake Aug. 25. 

Stoughton — The Cincinnati Construc- 
tion company is endeavoring by the 
performance ot unimportant work to 
retain a traachlse for aa Interurban 



road at Stoughton. Th© mayor Insists 
that the work shall not be begun 
ur.less there is good reason to believe 
that It will be prosecuted to a finish. 

Marinette — Joseph Goodreau of Ni- 
agara, near Marinette, in an appllca- 
tiim for a hunting license, gave his 
height as 6 feet 8 Inches and his weight 
155 pounds. 

Milwaukee — When a Milwaukee al- 
derman at large, Martin Goreckl, of 
Greek nativity, was sworn in court it 
was necessary to take Ills testimony 
through an Interpreter. 

DWIGHT WILL SIDE 

WITH COL. ROOSEVELT. 



Oyster Bay. L. L, Sept. 22.— The Re- 
publican whip of the house. Represen- 
tative John Dwight of Binghampton, N. 
Y. made his first visit to Sagamore 
Hill last night, to tell Mr. Roosevelt 
that he was with him in his fight for 
the control of the Republican state 
convention next week. 

Postmaster E. W. Vorhees of Brook- 
lyn and Michael J. Dady, also of Brook- 
lyn Republican leader of the First as- 
sembly district of Kings county, also 
visited Col. Roosevelt. 

Col. Roosevelt, Representative W. W. 
Cocks and Mr. Dwight did some close 
fig-uring on the chances for victory at 
Saratoga, in the light of returns from 
the primaries. The colonel had not a 
word to say as to what he thought of 
his prospects, now that the primaries 
w«^re over but from what Mr. Dwight 
ard Mr. Cocks said, it was gathered 
that they were alI_hopeful. 

STEPHENS IS NAMED 

FOR COLORADO GOVERNOR. 

Colorado Springs, Colo., Sept. 22. — 
State Senator John B. Stephens of El 
Pi.so county was nominated for gov- 
ernor bv the Republican state conven- 
tion, defeating Merle D. Vincent of 
Delta by a vote of 931 to 36. Vincent 
was the progressive caandidate. The 
progressive Republicans won a victory 
In the platform, however. In one of the 
sharpest fights In the history of the 
party in this state they prevented the 
adoption of a resolution condemning the 
Initiative and referendum, securing in- 
st'jad a plank favoring its submission 
to the people and commending the act- 
ion of Republican legislators who 
voted for such^ submls.slon. 

ONE KILLED IN WRECK. 




orncr 




indows 



DILLTH NEGROES TO 

HOLD CELEBRATION. 



Negroes at the Head of the Lakes 
will celebrate the forty-seventh anni- 
versary of the signing of the emanci- 
pation proclamation by Abraham Lin- 
coln oy a program which will be given 
in Folz hall tonight. 

The prognun fo lows: Overture, 
medley of patriotic airs; Introductory 
remarks, Lieut. Geoi-ge B. Kelly; .ad- 
dress of welcome, Mayor M. B. Cullum; 
"Sketch of Lincoln's Life," Mrs. H. E. 
Johnson; violin soh:, James Mackey; 
address, A. P. Cook; Mrs. Lena Daw- 
son; reading of emancipation procla- 



mation, H. S. Merry; reading of Lin- 
coln's favorite poem. "Why Should tha 
Spirit of Mortal Be Proud? Miss Home; 

finale, "Star Spangled Banner." 

m ■- 

A iipraiued Aukle. 

As usually treated a sprained ankle 
will disable the injured pereon for a 
month or more, but by applying Cham- 
berlain's Liniment and observing the 
directions with each bottle faithfully, a 
cure may, In most cases, be effected In 
less than one week's time. This lini- 
ment is a most reniarkable prepara- 
tion; try It for a sprain or a bruise, or 
when laid up with chronic or muscular 
rheumatism, and you are certain to be 
delighted with the prompt relief which 
it affords. For sale by all druggists. 



M m'« ' I I m^mt 



^-^^ 



Twenty-Five Other Persons Are In- 
jured in Ohio. 

Lima. Ohio, Sept. 22. — ^The Chicago & 
Erie railroad fast train No. 4, east- 
bound, was wrecked near Conant, nine 
miles west of here, at 4:30 o'clock yester- 
d£ky afternoon, killing an aged woman 
and injuring twenty-five persons. The 
srnoker, day coach and two Pullmans 
left the track and were overturned 
in a ditch twenty feet deep. The track, 
at the point where ttie wreck occurred, 
bad recently been raised several inches. 
Mrs. Strailer of Brooklyn, N. Y., was 
instantly killed, while her son, seated 
bv her side, escaped Injury. 

The cars were badly crushed, and 
fioin their position In the ditch the 
ff.Vt that only fatality is recorded is 
rosarded as miraculous. 




MOTHER 



Tomorrow, Friday, September 23rd, all day, 
you may come in and select any boys' Knick- 
erbocker Or Sailor Suit representing our all- 
wool, blue serges, fancy brown, and gray chevi- 
ots or worsteds, or any fall or winter Over- 
coat, regardless of price. 

From 5 Years of Age to 16. 

.^, Syifti kum $2.85 yp ft© $8.50 
'^"* 0@iiti ?r@iniii $2.50 up S@ $13.50 

—For— 

$1 Down and $1 Per Week 

Mothers— Conpare fabric, tailoring and price, and be convinced. 

This Offer is Good 



On fnizji Only, 
September 23rd. 



^H 8 E. Superior Street. 



^' 




-^ 



-1 




Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



September 22, 1910. 



-r 



r^ 



r 



- 



.jk. 



""'^^^^'SIO''^^^^^ 



^^t^t^t^t^t^^N 






RANGES 




SPECIAL MEETING 
OF GILBERT COUNCIL 



EXHIBITS AT THE ITASCA COUNTY FAIR, NOW BEp HELD 



Board of Health Reports 

Epidemic of Typhoid 

Fever. 

Gilbert, Minn.. Sept. 22.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — At a special meeting of 
the city council last evening L.azaru8 
Ruhenstein was appointed a member 
of the light and wattr commission to 
Bucceed E. A. Haenke. who has re- 
elg-ned. Tiie council drew up bonds 
for 520.000 that are to be voted on 
Tue.sday at special election, wiilcii will 
deteiinine whether a sewage system 
will he installed liere this fall. 

The iioard of health whir:h consists 
of Dr. Francis, David M. Mouser. and 
Prof. Charles L. Newberry, appeared 
before the council and reported the 
town was in the midst of a typhoid 
fever epidemic and that five cases were 
now belne treated. The board recom- 
mended that strenuou.s steps be taken 
to prevent the spread of the disea'<o, 
and residents who fail to clean up 
their premises, and merchants who al- 
low their stocks to remain in an un- 
Banltary condition, will be arrested. 

The bonds of David M. Mouser. who 
has been appointed lity clerk, suc- 
ceeding Clyde M. Campbell, who lias 
re.sl;<ned. were accepted. They are ft)r 
$3,000. Mr. Mouser will take cargo of 
the office Oct. 1. 





SENT TO JAIL FOR 
BEATING HIS WIFE 



John Baka of Hibbing Not 

Given Option of a 

Fine. 

Hlbblng, Minn., Sept. 22. — (STpeclal to 
The Herald.) — Patrick Murphy, who 
has been up before Judge Brady four 
or Ave times on the charge of being 
drunk was elven one more chance 
Tuesday to straighten up and go to 
work. 

Joo Smith was arrested on the charge 
of vagrancy and after being severely 
lectured was given tv.enty-four hours 
In which to leave town. 

John Haka, a Pine street saloon 
keeper now residing at the Mahoning 
location, was arrested on tlie charge 
Of being drunk and disorderly, and 
beating his wife. He was given thirty 
days in the county jail at Duluth with- 
out the cujtoniary option of a tine. 
This la Backa's fourth or fifth time be, 
fore the court on il;e .'^ajne charge and 
this accounts for the severity of the 
sentence. 

Frank Stabo, who has been making 
his home with Alex Ltscsky at Carson 
Lake was brought in today by Officer 
Cole charged with blind pigging. Le- 
sesky is at the i)resent time out on 
ball. hlm.self charged with the same 
offense. The men have betn a great 
■ ource of nuisance to the Carson Lakj 
re3ld-;nts during the past six months 
ftnd it is the intention of tlie police to 
break up this manner of selling liquor 
In this district. 




THINGS YOU NEED FOR THE HOME CAN BE FOUND 
HERE AT SMALL PRICES 

You will find things here that 3'ou doa't find in the ordinary store — a larger, 
better, assortm«ent of the "quality" kind — they last longer and give better service — 
your neighbors trade here — you'll find it to your advantage — we will be glad to open 
an account with you. 

No Telephone Orders — Please do not telephone for special goods — we cannot 
send them out on approval — addresses ar(; often wrongly received; please come 
yourself or send — we'll glady fill the orders that way. 



Just Righf Carpet Whip 7e. 

The handle won't come loose — you 
won't knock the skin all off your 
knuckles, because the handl'e Is 
raised. Some Ptores ask 10c for this 
"special." Our prices are always 
louver. 




Sleeve Boards lOc 

Made of good we, i -seasoned mate- 
rial, strongly put together. These 
Sleeve Boards sell In ordinary stores 
for 20c. 




Different from the cheap 10-cent 
kind, becau.'Je it's larger and Ifelter 
made — has strong cast iron frame. 



'0«. 



MIXER BREAKS LEG. 

Falls While fioing Down Ladder ia 
Pettit -Mine. 

Gilbert. Minn , Sept. 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Peter Alden. a resident 
of this city, who is employed at the 
Pettit mine, while at work Tuesday In 
the act of descending the mine ladder 
■With some dynamite, lost his balance 
ani had his foot caught between the 
rungs. His weight fell on the leg and 
broke It above the thigh. He managed 
to extricate himself from the rather 
precarious position but medical aid was 
necessary and he was taken to the Gil- 
bert hospital and wa.s later removed to 
the More hospital at Eveleth where he 
is now being treated. 



PORTION OF SCHOOL CHILDREN'S EXHIBIT. ITASCA COUNTY FAIR, IN THE BUILDING 
ERECTED ESPECIALLY FOR THAT PURPOSE LAST YEAR. MUCH INTEREST IS TAKEN IN 
THIS DEPARTMENT, AND MANY SCHOOLS ARE REPRESENTED THIS YEAR AT THE FAIR 
FROM SEPT. 22, 23 AND 24. 




A Good Reii- 
c.^cr^able Scale 78c 

24 Lbs. 

BY oz. Hoinvthing every 
_ kitchen should 

.'have — weigns up 
o 24 lbs — la ac- 
curate, well-made 
iind handso m e 1 y 
fin i s h e d — has 
slanting dial, easy 
to read. Special 

re?iu': 780 

WashBoilersBSc 

Made of extra heavy 
tin — copper bottom, 
with good, strong 
handlies. 



WASH BOARDS 22o. 

A good, heavy Wash 
Board — zinc rubbing sur- 
face. 

UL.IiSS WASH HOARDS, 
38f. 

Rubbing surface of extra 
heavy glass. Xo rust- 
Bt.'tined clothes possible. 



COPPER OR 

NICKLE- 

PLATED PER. 

COLATOR 

$4.75 

One of the 
greatvst values 
ever offered in 
a high - grade 
Coffee Perco- 
lator. These 
articles gener- 
ally sell for $8 
or $10. This 
one has a good 
alcohol lamp — 
nakes ideal 
richly flavored 
coffee, right at 
the table. 



Home Comfort Bread & Cake Box 



4 






rfcTjiM. IX. M. 



Is ventilated — 
keeps bread and 
cake moist and 
frtsh for days. 
Easily cleaned and 
perfectly sanitary. 



60 Faet of 
Clothes Line for 

I5c 

The kind you gener- 
ally pay 25c for. 
Good, strong, lieavy 
line. 



BLUE INim^G B8WLS 



EVELETH LODGE PLANS 

FOR A .NOVEL COMEST. 



Eveleth, Minn.. Sept. 22. — (.Special to 
The Herald.j — Plans on a novel con- 
test are now being formulated by mem- 
bers of the Pilot lodge. The plans will 
be completed Monday and the first 
match of the contest will occur a week 
from Monday at the Runeberg hall, the 
regular meeting place of the organiza- 
tion. The members of tlie lodge will be 
divided Into two factions one to be led 
by Mrs. W. M. Matters and the other 
by Ferdinand Klang. 

The contest will continue until Jan. 
1, and the side securing the largest 
number of points through dramatic 
and musical ability, will be honored by 
a supper to be given them bv the losers 
Programs will be given everv Monday 
evenli.g by the sides, and Judges will 



SOME OF THE ITASCA COUNTY PUMPKINS. SQUASH, CABBAGES, ETC. 

FAIR, SEPT. 22, 23 AND 24. 



AT ITASCA COUNTY 



be appointed to vote on the merits of 
llie various contestants. The contest is 
for tl'.e purpose of developing interest 
in the organization and already much 
enthusia.'^m is -being displayed by the 
memb 3ra. 



noon. Interment being at Two Harbors 
cemetery. The body of Ingvald Aron- 
sen, who drowned with the above two, 
has not as yet been found, although 
parties have been searching for the 
past few day.s.' 



FOWLER MAY GET 
THE NOMINATION 



MANY WOMEN VOTE IN 

(JREENWAY TOWNSHIP. 



HILL CLIMBING. 
Food Thut Makes It a Pleasure. 



"I have a large amount of laborious 
braln-f:itl>?uing work to do,"' writes a 
young lady from Richmond, Va. "Aft- 
er returning from the office, I have 
found myself so completely exhausted 
that I was unable to engage in any 
recreation or amusement. 

"I tried several expensive tonics 
without effect, and finally noticing an 
advertisement of Grape-Xuts as a food 
recommended to brain workers, I 
purchased a package and tried it. 

"I found it extremely palatable, and 
after a week's use- (two meals of It a 
day) I noticed a general Improvement 
In my condition. The feeling of ex- 
treme exhaustion was growing less, 
and strength visibly increased. 

"I began to put on flesh and felt 
ready to enter Into the amusements 
of the other members of the family, 
and now after using the food for 
eleven months, I am like a new per- 
son. 1 do not have the sensation of 
fatigue; my brain is clear; eyes 
bright; skin rosy and healthy and my 
muscles have strengthened to a 
marked degree. 

"I am now able to walk from the 
office home, a distance of 3 \i miles, 
up one of the steepest hilla for which 
our city is famous, and to engage in 
any amusements that may come in 
my way. 

"I am .also u.sing Postum with ex- 
cellent results. My sister-in-law, who 
lives in Norwalk, Conn., writes me 
that she use it also, and has not suf- 
fered from the distressing sick head- 
aches ihe fi>ruierJy had." 

Read "The Road to Wellvllle," 
found In pkgs. "There's a Reason." 
Ever read the above letter. A new 
one appears from time to time. They 
are genuine, true, and full of human 
Interest. 



All Returns of Vole on Rep- 
resentative Not Re- 
ceived. 

Two Harbors, Minn., Sept. 22. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — All the returns 
for the primary election are in with the 
exception of Beaver Bay and the delay 
in receiving the returns from there 
can not be :*c ounted for. In the 
congressman race, C. B. Miller has 
ir.a against McKnight, C. E. Taylor got 
2^, The race for representative from 
Fifty-flrst dibirict on the Republic- 
an ticket Is close. M. S. McMahon Is 
ahead 17 votes, having 265, while B. 
F Fowler has 248. As yet there are 
no returns from Cook county except 
from Grand Marais and there is a 
strong possibility of Fowler securing 
Ihe nominatio n. 

FAIR OPENED THURSDAY. 

Lake Comity's Annnal Exhibition 
Begins at tlie MetropoHtan. 

Two ifarbors, Minn., Sept. 22 — (Spe- 
cial to riie Herald.)— The fourth an- 
nual fair of the Lake County Agricul- 
tural soclfcty openai today at the 
Metropolitan fipera houeo and give:* 
promise of a most successful exhibi- 
tion. L^rge numbers cf tickets have 
been so'.d. and a large attendance is 
expected dally. Several gentlemen con- 
nected with the Ptate agricultural col- 
lege will be In attendance and will de- 
liver lectures, and will also act as 
judges in some of the departments. 

FUNERALS HELD. 



Marble, Minn., Sept. 22. — (.Special to 
Tlie Herald.) — Tl.e election in the 
Greenvvay township held at Marble, 
was quite exciting. The county super- 
intendent of schools was tlie office that 
caused most feeling among the women 
and many turned out to cast their 
votes. Mrs. Wliipple won out here by 
a majority of aO votes, much to the 
surprise of many citizens. Other re- 
sults were as follows: Ed Logan, 1.31 
votes, and A. McWilliam 34, for 
county commissioner. G. E. Godfrey 
58 votes and C. H. Warner 46, for 
Filty-fcecond district representative. 
Glen Strader received 105 votes to K. 
Le Keox 46 for county treasurer. J. 
Le Fever had 82 votes and C. Kearney 
44 for judge of probate. R. A. Stone 
S4 votes to \V. Rossman 34, for county 
attorney. T. T. Klley won out over A. 
Leamari for sheriff by a vote of 14 3 
to 11. 

Congressman Miller held strong here 
although It seemed quite evident be- 
fore election that McKnight would 
win out. C. B. Miller received 86 votes 
to McKnlght's 32. Fully 200 votes 
were cast here and m.any surprises 
were evident when reports were out 
this morning. 

THE HIBBING FIREMEN 

PUT IN A BUSY DAY. 



gulshed with but very little damage. 
The last call was for a small blaze in 
the rear of the Chinese laundry on 
Center street. The fire In this case, 
however, was confined to a fence and 
no damage was done. 



EVELETH MEN ARE WELL 

FAVORED POLITICALLY. 



Eveleth. Minn., Sept. 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Eveleth will be very 
well represented on the political map 
as the result of the favorable outcome 
of the primary election. The local 
men who will probably hold offices as 
the result of the primaries are Assist- 
ant County Attorney James P. Boyle, 
who will be senator from the Forty- 
ninth district; Noah A. Young, who 
will be superintendent of the county 
schools; Neil Mclnnls. who has been 
re-elected county commissioner of the 
Sixth district. At the November elec- 
tion Eveleth will be represented ly 
Charles Jesmore, who is the Demo- 
cratic candidate for sheriff. A total of 
944 votes was cast here and in eacli 
ward the local candidates were given 
largo majorities. 

RIBBING'S SOCIAL SIDE. 




Just like the old- 
fashioned yellow 
bowls — except in 
color. They come in 
the following sizes: 

7>2-I"ch 15c 

.8V2-lu«-l« 20c 

.OVis-lnt-h 2Bc 

lOVz-lnch 30o 

ll'-IncJi '.'.r,o 





an 



NICKEL TLATKO r<UTL:R 
TEA KETTLE. 

A pplendid v.ilue In a 
all-copper tea kettle - 
heavily nickel plated — 

No. 7 Size 7Sc 

Xo. S Slie. OHo 

INVERTED GAS 
LAMP 



for 



SET OF SILVER PLATES 

KNIVES and FORKS 

$1.75 

Heavily pla'.ed — a good, serviceable 
set of knives and forks, made by 
one of the must reliable makere — 
smoothly finished and specially good 
value Friday and Saturday. 




These lamps 
are gener- 
ally sold for 
at least $1.75 
— gives a 
fine, cl e a r 
light. 



HOWARD DUSTLESS 
DUSTERS 



They take up 

the loose dust — t 

are washable — 

most sanitary 

er made. You'll be 
pleased with the 
Howard D u s 1 1 es s 
Duster. because It 
"dusts." 

Office SUc ISc 



Family SIxe. 



Broom Covers. 



Floor Mop». $1.26 





Comb, 
Tumbler 
and Soap 
Holder, Like 
Cut— 

58c 



Short and 
Long Han- 
died Wool 
Dusters... 



Last Sad Rites Over Bodies of Sul 
livan and Strand. 

Tv.-o Harbors, Minn., Sept. 22. — The 
funeral of Roy Sullivan, one of the 
three that were drowned at Llttlo Cas- 
tle Danger early Sunday moining, was 
hold yesteid:iv afternoon from the 
First M. E. church, Rev. J. F. McLeod 
officiating in the absence of Rev. T. S. 
Oadams. The church was filled to over- 
flowing with sorrowing friends, and 
the lloral tributes were many and 
beautiful, showing the esteem in 
which the young man wa.s held in this 
city The Maccabees were in ciiarge 
of the funeral and a large number 
of them attended the funeral and fol- 
lowed the procession to the cemetery, 
and many members of the Machinists' 
union, of which the deceased v.-as a 
member, were In atendance. Edward 
Slgler, Bert Robbins and Elward Lar- 
son of the Maccabees, and Arvid Bo- 
strom, John Wallum and Alfred Eig of 
the machinists acted as pall bearers. 

The funeral of John Strand wa.s 
held from the home yesterday after- 



Hlbblng. Minn., Sept. 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The local fire depart- 
ment had three calls yesterday, the 
first being to the plate formerly occu- 

&led by Fred Powell as a roadhouse at 
el.«on. The building, which was a big 
two-story frame structure, was entirely 
destroyed before the department could 
reach the scene. The home of Dan 
Ankerbrand on Superior street was 
also endangered by a small fire which 
originated in a shed in the rear of the 
building. The fire was Quickly extln- 



WHERE HAIR IS GROWN 



Peru 



Women Vie With Each Other in 
Groulng Hair. 

Washington, D. C, Sept.,— Dr. Har- 
ley Porter, globe trotter and medico- 
scientist, says Peruvian women have 
the most luxuriant hair in the world. 
"Hair below the waist line is a com- 
mon sight among them," said the doc- 
tor, "'and I saw several women whom 
it was claimed had hair seven and 
eight feet In length. That country," 
he added, "would be a poor market 
for switches and 'rats.' 

"On investigation, I found this un- 
usual condition was due to the uni- 
versal uso of beta Qulnol, a Qulnine 
product, which removes dandruff and 
excess oil, and that women vie with 
each other in growing long and glossy 
hair. The tonic is made by mixing a 
half pint each of alcohol and warm 
water, or taking a pint of bay rum 
and adding an ounce of beta quinol. 
When men and women in this country 
realize that beta Quinol can be had 
from their own druggist, baldness 
the use of switches and 'rats' will 
appear." 



i 

} 

t 
» 



Hibbing, Minn., Sept. 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Company M of this city 
win give their first dance of the season 
at the armory Thursday evening. The 
bovs have arranged to make the open- 
ing affair one of great pleasure. The 
Melody orchestra will give a concert 
during the evening. 

Mrs. W. Webb has returned home 
after spending the past two weeks in 
St. Paul with friends. 

R. S. Klrby arrived in this city 
Thursday from Duluth for a few days 
on buslnesf". 

W. J. Power left Thursday for Du- 
luth and Eastern points, where he will 
spend a few days on business. 

L. C. Newcombe is in Duluth for a 
few days on business. 

H. Thompson left for Duluth for a 
days on business. 



Tub Wringer $2.98 

Here is a value ytu will find at this 
store only. A fully jfuaranteed, strong, 
well-made wringer. Easy to operate 
and the latest pattern in Improved 
wringers. For Fridiy and Saturday — 
92.08. 

Fine Bench Wiringer$3.98 

One that stands on a good heavy 
folding bench — strong and well fin- 
ished — the entire outfit folds up and 
mav be put Into a small space. Has 
a good, fully guaranteed wringer — all 
complete, for only 93.U8. 




Heavy Nickle-Plated 

Brass Soap Dish 

48c 

We carrv a fine line of Bath 
Room Fi.xturos, Glass Shelves. Towel 
Rods, Enamel Frame Mirrors. Bath 
Room Stools, Shaving Mirrors, ttc. 
You'll find quality the best and 
prices within easy reach. Com^ In 
and see these two bargains Friday 
and Saturday. The Tumbler Holder 



as shown 
Soap Dish 



for 58o, and Bath 
for 48c. Big values. 



Tub 



" "^ 



C. 
few 



Poardine House Burns. 

Chlsholm, Minn.. Sept. 22. — Fire at 
the Shenango location yesterday de- 
stroyed a large boarding house con- 
ducted by John Mackl and belonging to 
the Shenango Furnace company. The 
building was two miles from the fire 
hall and on account of the distance the 
water pressure was low, handicapping 
the fire department. 



Footltall Uanic Saturday. 

Eveleth. Minn., Sept. 22. — (Special to 
Tne Herald.) — The local football season 
will be opened Saturday when the high 
school football team meets the Biwabik 
high school aggregation, and the sec- 
ond team lines up against the Aurora 
first team. The games will be played 
under the new rules and should prove 
interesting. 



SEEKING TO FIX BLAME 



Interior of the car, seats, lighting fix* 
tures, luggage and the bodies of two- 
score pissengers. 

Were Horribly Mansled. 

The bodies were horrbly mangled. 
Legs and arms were severed, heads 
cut oft and strips torn from the fleah 
of the victims. Of all the sixty in the 
car scarcely one escaped. 

One heroic act which will stand out 
in the annals of the wreck is that 
performed by Conductor Spiller of the 
north-bound car. Though Injured sev- 
erely he staggered back the track and 
flagged the limited only a short dis- 
tance away. 

Ro.ss Nelson, a reporter on the 
Bluffion Banner, was sent out to cov- 
er the wreck. While he knew that 
many Inhabitants of his home town 
were in the ill-fated car, he had no 
knowledge that a relative was In the 
wreck until he uncovered the body of 
his brother Harold, fatally Injured. 
Nelson died while on the way to a 
hospital. Dr. T. H. Cook of Bluffton, 
was one of those summoned to aid the 
injured. In going through the debris 
he came across the corpse of his 
brother, H. D. Cook, a grocer, who 
had been crushed to death. 

State Board Taking; Action. 
Tliat the blame will be placed is 
made apparent by the action of the 
Indiana state board C'f railway com- 
missioners. Within a very short time 
of the accident, Commissioner A. A. 
Shane, who also Is the special investi- 
gator for the board, had reached the 
scene of the wreck and had begun in- 
terrogratlon of traction officials and 
witnepses c^f the crash. This morning 
Mr. Shane declined to make known the 
results of his Investigation, saying 



to be given out by 



(Continued from page 1.) 



and 
dis- 



Runnlns at its highest speed the empty 
"special" sped out from the woods on 
a curve and plunged into the "local." 
which also was running at great speed. 
"Therd was no chance for either motor- 
man to prevent the accident. The local 
was torn apart as one might burst a 
paper bag. 

The south bound car seemed to take 
the right-of-way. Like a giant mippile 
it ploughed Its way through the traffic- 
packed car coming in the opposite di- 
rection. Its heavier frame cut like a 
knife a pathway half the length of the 
opposing vehicle. It cut off seats an 
Inche above the fioor and smashed and 
packed In one ghastly liiass the whole 



PHYSiCiANS ARE NATURALLY PREJUDICED 

against proprietary or advertised med- 
icines, as the sale of these remedies 
decrease their Incomes. 

However this may be, the general 
public Is benefited by the use of such 
standard medicines as Lydia E. Pink- 
ham's Vegetable Compound, with its 
Wonderful record of thousands of 
cures among suffering women. We 
are very glad to say, however, that 
there are hundreds of honest physi- 
cians in the United States who do not 
hesitate to recommend Bucli medi- 
cinea. 



that it would havt 
the state board. 

The schiiols and local courts will be 
closed the rest of the week. 

This morning Superintendent of 
Transportation Frank I. Hardy sat 
heartbroken In nis office in Fori 
Wayne. 

"In a very short time we will be 
able to make a .".tatement," said Mr. 
Hardy, 'placing, sj far as we can de- 
termine it, the bl.ime for the terrible 
wreck. The extent of the accident ap- 
palls us, yet we ire doing everything 
In our power to care for the dead and 
injured and to alleviate so far as we 
may, the anguish of relatives of the 
victims. 

^Vill Decide on ReMponMibillty. 
"We have begui the most carefully 
scrutiny of the irs.ln orders bearing on 
the case and on every bit of evidence 
to fix the blame. The public shall soon 
known where the responsibility lies." 

Around the undertaking establish- 
ments in Bluffton and Fort Wayne and 
at the hospitals In this city this 
morning were gathered anxious men 
and women. Foi the most part the 
bodies have been claimed, but in some 
Instances where mutilation made iden- 
tification difficult, the victim was not 
actually related to any one in the dis- 
trict, there was d-lay and confusion. 

Among the victims of the wreck was 
Miss Pearl Sayler. a daughter of Mrs. 
Clara Sayler of Bluffton and a sister of 
Banker J. B. Sa>ler of Watseka, IlL, 
who was shot and killed by Dr. W. R. 
Miller a year or so ago. For this 
crime, which attracted widespread in- 
terest, Dr. Miller and Mrs. Sayler now 
are serving prison sentences. 
Lint of Dead. 

Following is th«' list of dead: 

W. E. BOWMAN. Bluffton. 

A. E. HYDE, Pcnnvllle. 

e. E. STUCKEY Vert Cruz. 

WILLIAM S. BI:EHS, Bluffton. 

LLOYD BROW^.^ Bluffton. 

L. C. JUSTL'S, Bluffton general man- 
ager, Bluffton, Geneva & Celina Trac- 
tion company. 

S. H. ROBINSO!^. Bluffton. 

H. D. TOOK, Bluffton. 

ERNEST CROZE, Bluffton. 

SILAS THOMAS. Warren. 

RALPH WALSl'^R. Bluffton. 

W. D. BURGA>. Bluffton. 

OSCAR ZIMMER. Bluffton. 

MISS PEARL SATTLER, Bluffton. 

R. F. FOLK. ^A ashington, Ind. 

JACOB SWARTZ. Uniondale. 

F. B. TAMM, Vk'arren, Ind. 

JOHN W. TRIBOLET. Bluflton. 



MRS. GARRETT MAXWELL, Garrett, 
Ind. 

CHARLES REBER. Uniondale. 

BLANCHE ARCHROLD, Osslan. 

THOMAS GORDON. Bluffton. 

FRANK KING and WIFE. Warren. 

SON of Lloyd Brown, Bluffton, about 
18 years old. 

HAROLD NELSON. Bluffton. 

JOHN JOHNSON, Markle. 

JESSE HOFFMAN. Marion. 

DR. S. E. THOMPSON, Ann Arbor, 
Mich. 

MR.S. KiRAM FOLK. Bluffton. 

MRS. MYRTLE HALEY. Bluffton. 

MARY DAL'GHERTY. Bluffton. 

DANIEL DEBACH. Petroleum, Ind. 

J. E. SWARTZ, Bluffion. 

JOSEPH SAWYER. Bluffton. 

JOHN SMITH and WIFE. Montpeller. 

JOHN REED. Battery E, Fifth Ar- 
tillerv. New York. 

J(JSEPH FDENS, Hartford. 

GF:0RGE SEMPTHL'RST. Huron. 

BEN CREMEH. Frankfort. 



And Yet— Woman 

Must Be Beautiful 



(From Woman's National Magazine.) 
"Oh, the bother and trouble that 
accompanios washing the hair! The 
long hours in unpresentable condition 
waiting for It to dry — the danger of 
catching cold — and. most of all. the 
knowledge that too much wetting 
makes hair coarse, dull, dead and 
brittle'. And yet — and yet one must 
get rid of dust and oil and dandruff, 
and keep the hair looking at its very 
best. 

•If you would be beautiful, there Is 
nothing so good as brushing the head 
with therox. It keeps the hair de- 
lightfully lustrous, light and fluffy, 
and promotes its growth. The scalp 
Is made soft and pliant and immacu- 
lately clean. If you want abund.ant, 
glossy hair, mix four ounces of therox 
and four ounces of powdered orris 
root; keep the mixture in a sifter-top 
can, and sprinkle a little (say a table- 
spoonful) upon the head; then brush 
thoroughly through the hair. Do thi» 
once or twice a weelc" 




8 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 22, 1910. 



THE DULUTH HERALD 

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER. 

—ESTABLISHED APRIL 9. 1883— 

Published every evening except Sunday by 

THE HERALD COMPANY, 

Herald Buildlnsr. fniDosito Postofflre Square, 
422 and 424 West First St.. Duluth. Minn., 



Entere<I m •eroad-eUaa mitt*r at the Duluth postofflco under the act of con- 

of Uircli 3. 1879. 



TKLKI'HO.MKS — Bell aad Zenltht 

Business Office. 324. Editorial Rooms, 1126. 



OFFICIAL PAPER CITY OF DU LUTH. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES; 

(By mail payable in advance.) 

Dally, one month 35 I Daily, six months $2.00 

Daily, tl'.ree ni )nth3. .f 1.00 ( Daily, ono year 4.00 

^ntiirduy Ileruld, ono year f i.OO 

U'eeklj Hrruld, one year l-W 

Retnlttmces may be made bj check, postoffloe onler. regLstereJ letter or «- 
prfij ordLT. Miio all niutttanres pajabk' t>' The Herald Compiuy. Glre p^st- 
•fflre aUJres Ift full. Inclujlng j:ate and county. 

BY CARRIER— CITY OR SUBURBS. 

Dally, one week > l^ 

Daily, one month ^^ 

Daily, one year ^-^^^ 

SutKrritwra will confer a favor on the circulatlin department by calling 334. 
•tther 'phori,;. an,! making known any cumplaliit of ser.lce. 

It li Imp nar.t w;»en desiring itjc addrtj^i of your paper changed to give both 
the old a:i I iifW addrSAiea. 



up the rails of the railroads, fill up the channels of their 
waterways, and set fire to their factories. 

The people are going to insist upon a fuller participa 
tion in public affairs. They are going to insist upon 
reasonable regulation of indu.stry. They are going to insist 
lliat people, not property, shall sound the dominant 
note in governmental action. But they are gojng to con- 
serve property interests just as zealously as they ever 
did. The only difference is that they are going to make 
property interests servants to humanity, and not its mas- 
ters. They are going to do all they can to foster every 
industry, but they are going to insist that the prosperity 
that grows out of their efforts shall be more widely dis- 
tributed. Not less prosperity, but more widely dis- 
tributcfl prosperity, is the present aim of the American 
people, and their insistence upon this offers no harm to 
any enterprise. 

There isn't the slightest reason why industry should 
cease or even hesitate. The fear that has made business 
uncertain and slow is a stupid fear. There isn't a thing 
the matter anywhere that should cause any interruption 
in any line of business. The managers of big business 
must reconcile themeslves to the fact that the people 
propose to conduct their own government in their own 
interests, and having mastered that task, they must realize 
that this new birth of government by and for the people 
means no harm to any honest enterprise. 



Ti..> Duluth Herald accepts advertising contracts with 
the distinct guarantee that It has the largest circulation 1 
Of any newspaper published In Minnesota outside the Twin 
Cities. Its value as an advertising medium Is apparent. 



Xove hath blessed alike 

A Martha's household care, 

A Jlary^s cloistered prat/er. 

— I'^nknown Author. 



MINNESOTA IN THE NEXT CONGRESS. 

Minnesota at present has eight Republicans and one 
Democrat in the national house of representatives. 

Of the eight Republicans three are out and above 
board in their stand on the vital issues of the day. 
Tawney is an out-and-out reactionary, and he has been 
defeated at the primaries. Lindbergh and Davis are out- 
and-out insurgents, and they were successful at the 
primaries and will be successful at the polls because they 
have no Democratic opponents. Davis had no opposition 
at the primaries. 

The other five Republican congressmen are Clarence 
B. Miller of the Eighth, F. C. Stevens of the Fifth, F. M. 
Nye of the Fourth, Halvnr Steenerson of the Ninth and 
A. J. Volstead of the Seventh. All of these were re- 
nominated, Volstead without opposition. All but Vol- 
stead have or will have Democratic opponents. The one 
Democratic congressman, Hammond of the Second dis- 
trict, has a Republican opponent, but his re-election is 
pr.ictically certain. 

The five Minnesota Republican congressmen who have 
Bot definitely placed themselves can scarcely be classed 
as either insurgent or reactionary. They will not be in- 
surgents, and they dare not be reactionaries. Yet there 
is doubt in each case as to the probable action of these 
men when issues arise in which the people have much 
at stake. 

Minnesota has, to start with, Hammond, Democrat, 
and Davis and Lindbergh, proved progressives. It has 
defeated Tawney, and his place will be taken by either 
Anderson, insurgent, or Buck, Democrat. That will make 
four out of nine, anyway, that can be counted upon to 
vote with and for the plain people. Volstead is going 
back without opposition, and he must remain where he 
lias placed himself, in the dubious column. 

This leaves Miller, Steenerson, Stevens and Nye to 
work upon. If their places are gained, Minnesota's dele- 
gation in congress will be pretty nearly si:)lid progressive. 
The insurgents have tried for all four of these places, and 
have failed. Steenerson at present has no Democratic 
opposition, but in all probability there will be an inde- 
pendent candidate against him. If there is not, he will 
join Volstead in the doubtful column. 

Stevens is opposed by J. L. Gieske. a live and progres- 
sive Democrat. Nye is opposed by T. B. Dwyer, another 
live and progn'C'sive Democrat. Miller is opposed by 
Alfred Jaques, a good citizen, a square man, and a can- 
didate who will make no promises that he will not 
keep, and break none that he has made. 

The four votes that can be counted upon for govern- 
ment by and for the people — Buck or Anderson in the 
First, Davis in the Third, Lindbergh in the Sixth and 
Hammond in the Second, are so much to the good. In 
the present congress Minnesota has but three dependable 
votes — Hammond, Davis and Lindbergh. Four is bet- 
ter than three, but eight will be better still. 

Nye. Stevens and Miller are able men, but they can- 
not be counted upon at all times. Miller's effusive 
promises have been proved to be broken reeds. He 
"liatened well" as a candidate, but turned out to have 
a poor memory for his promises to the people. PI is re- 
Itotnination was no surprise in the circumstances; his 
re-election would be a great surprise. 



TAWNEY AND THE DEMOCRATS. 

Congressman Tawney, precipitated from his place of 
power in the Cannon organization by the outraged voters 
of his district, picks himself up after his tremendous fall 
and shouts that the Democrats did it, and that the fault 
lies with the primary election system. 

If the primary election resulted in Tawney's defeat 
— which it most assuredly did — that is one long white 
score in favor of the primary election. 

If the Democrats of the First district compassed 
Tawney's defeat — which is exceedingly doubtful — the re- 
sult is a credit to the Democrats. 

But Tawney's e.xcuse for defeat, which blinks alto- 
gether the fact that it was the effect of the same revolt 
against the venal organization of his party that is sweep- 
ing the "old guard" out of power everywhere, does not 
square with the conventional criticism of the primary 
election made by those who long for the old days when 
nominations were made in back rooms and ratified later 
by boss-ridden conventions. That criticism is that the 
minority party goes into the majority party's primaries 
to nominate the weakest man in the hope of making vic- 
tory easier at the polls. If the Democrats of the First 
district had been actuated by that motive, unquestionably 
they would have gone into the Republican primaries and 
voted for Tawne}% because he would have been much 
easier for the Democratic candidate to beat than the in- 
surgent candidate who defeated Tawney. 

If any Democrats blundered into the Republican 
primaries in the First district and voted against Tawney, 
i they did it because they were against him, against his 
methods and principles, and against the system of be- 
trayal of the people for which he stands. 




THE SILLY FEARS OF BUSINESS. 

We are glad James J. Hill read George Harvey's 
article in the North American Review on "The Conserva- 
tion of Common Sense." It was a good article, and it was 
needed. Mr. Hill read it. and it prompted him to give 
out an interview approving it, as The Herald approved it 
several weeks ago, and calling attention to it, as The 
Herald did. As a successful financier and a competent 
manager of big business. Mr. Hill's word carries far, 
and it is to be hoped that it will carry as far as Wall 
Street. 

Says Mr. Hill: "I can see no reason why the business 
men of the country should fear to engage in new enter- 
prises, and no reason for the semi-paralysis that has crept 
over the country. It's only a senseless lack of con- 
fidence. And why this lack of confidence? Some man, 
somewhere, has grown timid over something or other, 
and has cried 'boo!' at his neighbor. His neighbor prob- 
ably jumped and the next fellow took fright without 
knowing why he was frightened. And so on. It's just 
like a flock of sheep. If one starts to run, every sheep 
in the flock will follow, even if they die for it." 

And then Mr. Hill quoted the Harvey article, and 
gave quite a bit of it wide circulation through his inter- 
view. 

There will be folks who will say that Mr. Hill him- 
ielf has cried "boo!" about as loudly as the next one; 
but at any rate it is good to hear him talking such ex- 
cellent common sense and giving reassurance to his 
fellow-managers of big business. 

There isn't, hasn't been and will not be the slightest 
hint of hurt to any legitimate enterprise in this country. 
To expect the American people to do harm to the indus- 
tries that give them sustenance and tiiat develop the 
riches of the nation is to give the people scant credit 
for good sense. There is no more reason to fear that 
the people will harm any legitimate industry than there 
is to fear that they will destroy their own homes, tear 



A PICAYUNE POLICY. 

The threat to reduce the postal carrier service in the 
West end, if carried out, will give Duluth an excellent 
opportunity to judge the policy that prevails in the post- 
office department under Postmaster General Hitchcock. 

For years there has been a deficit in the postoffice de- 
partment. Because too much is paid the railroads for 
carrying the mails, and because the department does 
not count the immense amount of matter carried free 
tor the various departments and for congressmen under 
privileges that are grossly abused, the receipts do not 
meet expenses. 

A plain business man would look into the question of 
costs, in such a case, and overcome the deficit by re 
ducing the rates paid to railroads, by cutting down the 
free mail privileges, and by charging the cost of carry- 
ing its mail to each department. 

But Hitchcock isn't a business man. He is a poli- 
tician, and he looks at such matters in a different light. 
His first idea, and that of President Taft, was to increase 
the cost of the people's reading matter by raising the mail 
lates on newspapers and magazines. That didn't prove 
l;opular, and now he is attacking the postal deficit by 
curtailing the postal service. In order to avoid the ob- 
vious remedies, he is making the postoffice less valuable 
to you and your neighbor than it used to be and than 
it should be. 

Such absurdly unbusinesslike methods should be re 
buked, and somebody with a gleam of business sense 
should be placed at the head of the postoffice department. 



THAT ONEOTA DOCK SITE. 

Even if it should require legislative action to trans 
fer from the state to the city of Duluth the old state 
elevator site on the West end bay front, there shouldn't 
be the slightest difficulty about it, and the state should 
not attempt to make a profit by its sale. 

The fight for a free dock system in Duluth is not a 
fight of the city of Duluth, but of the state of Minnesota. 
The railroads dominate the Great Lakes by their control 
of shipping and docking, and because of that fact every 
man, woman and child in Minnesota pays tribute. 

The redemption of the Great Lakes waterway from 
this unthinkable hold-up — no other word will do — is as 
important to every other part of Minnesota as it is to 
Duluth. 

The state, therefore, should be more willing to sell 
or lease this dock site to the city of Duldth on the most 
favorable terms possible. 



STATE RATE-MAKING POWER ATTACKED. 

In its session of 1907 the Minnesota legislature cut 
the maximum railroad passenger fare from 3 cents to 2 
cents a mile, and reduced freight rates on various bulk 
commodities. The railroads appealed to the Federal 
court, and yesterday the master in chancery to whom 
the cases were referred rendered a sweeping decision 
against the state which, if upheld, practically denies the 
state any power at all to supervise railroad rates. It 
is held that the late laws are unconstitutional because 
they are an interference with interstate commerce, and 
that they are confiscatory and unconstitutional again be- 
cause they deprive the railroads of property rights with- 
out due process of law. 

Of course this decision will be scrutinized by the 
higher courts, and they should consider it deeply. It is 
unthinkable that the courts should grant the railroads 
the right to fix rates without public regulation, and the 
law, whether it is constitutional or statute or judge-made, 
that grants them this privilege to prey, is un-American 
and insufferable. 



Rhode Island is being swept by an epidemic of in- 
fantile paralysis. That is the kind of disease you would 
expect in a state that let Aldrich go back to the senate 
term after term. 



THE Q|>£N court. 

(Readers of The HeialdQro inrtteil to make ffe* um 
of ihU column to exiftesa Their Ideas about the topic* 
of general Interest. Letters should nut exceed 390 
words — the shorter We better. They muat be written 
on one side of the aajjer jjjUy, and they must be ac- 
companied In every case \it the name and address of 
the writer, though Uiese need not t)e publliUed. A 
signed letter Is alvfciys niire effective, liowever.) 



SAYS PROP^RTX OWNERS 

ARE IMPOSED UPON. 



AINTIE DOLEFUL'S VISIT. 



To the Editor of Tfee Herald: 

Referring to the.- action commenced 
against the board of education of the 
city of Duluth and Contractors Pastoret 
& Lawrence Company, in The Herald 
of Sept. 20, under the heading "Pile of 
Dirt Causes Law Suit," only a very in- 
definite idea, if not an entirely erron- 
eous one, is conveyed to the public of 
the character of the work 'which has 
been done, or the magnitude of the 
imposition upon the residents of the 
vicinity of the Neltleto.i school, and 
vvliich has been the cause of the law- 
suit in question. Our contention is 
that while the school board was sleep- 
ing, or at lea.st had only one eye opeii 
the contractor was making hay, and 
that notwithstanding tlie fact that the 
liillside residents were shouting in the 
ears of the school board to wake up 
and open the other eye, no action 
could be secured until the school 
building itself, althougli on one of the 
liighesi points in the city, was in dan- 
ger of being covered. 

The fact that the school grounds had 
been previously piled full of dirt by a 
benevolent contractor who saw virtue 
in a .short haul, or that tliere was no 
wall there to keep it from washing 
down upon the surrounding property, 
seemed to have made no difference; so 
long as a team could climb up with a 
two wheeled scrapper full and do It 
quickly, that was all that was con- 
sidered. There was not any other 
limit to the lielght to which it might 
be piled. 

Perhaps it does not much concern 
the public and that the people of the 
district at large have not much Inter- 
est In the manner of improving the 
school grounds and it may be imma- 
terial to the general tax payers wheth- 
er this half completed pyramid of dirt 
<a monument to Its builder.s) is six 
feet or twenty-six feet, or whether it 
necessitates the expense of a seven- 
foot retaining wall where originally 
only an eighteen-lnch wall was re- 
quired; but we, who reside in its shad- 
ow and suffer from Its presence, would 
be pleased to have it liauled down aiid 
removed. The great Injustice to us 
and the permanent damage to our 
property and to the play grounds and 
surroundings, is so self-evident, that 
It Is only necessary to see the condi- 
tion of the play ground to appreci- 
ate It. 

If the school grounds on the souther- 
ly side of the Central High school, on 
the upper side of Second street were 
piled full of dirt and raised to the 
level of the door step.s, it would give 
some idea of the method employed to 
make a play ground at the Nettleton 
school, where it was only necessary In 
the first In.stanca to spend a day or 
day and a half In grading it down and 
leveling it off. It was wholly unneces- 
sary to import dirt from the grading 
on Sixtli street. 

GEORGE A. PARKER, 
513 rfe-ond Ave. East. 
» ii. 

Birds .\re I'ulilie Svrvauts. 

New York Evening Po.-st; An Ore- 
gon farmer last summer saw a bird 
hopping about on a bed In his vege- 
table garden in wliich a number of 
choice young plants had been de- 
stroyed. He promptly shot tiie bud, 
and then, to make .sure he iiad got the 
real culprit, he cut open its stomach, 
cnly to find thai there was no ve-.je- 
table matter in It at all, wiiile there 
were a number of insects and worms 
\\eli known as garden pests. He con- 
cluded lie would never shoot another 
bird; but he was only one of thou- 
sands of farmers who are not always 
able to distinguish their friends from 
tiieir enemies. In response to numer- 
tions of birds in orchards and vitie- 
.\ards, the department of agriculture 
decided to place Information on this 
piint on an accurate basis bv making 
a .systematic investigation in California 
covering seventy of the most important 
birds of that state, from the farmers" 
and fruit-growers' standpoint. A care- 
tul study of the food habits of these 
birds showed that only four of the sev- 
enty species can be regarded as of 
doubtful utility. They are the linnet, 
California jay, stellar jay, and red- 
breastod sap-sucker; a reasonable re- 
duction in the number of which may 
therefore be permissible wh.-u ail the 
known methods of protecting fruit 
lave been exliausted. Among the other 
.species tliere are some, like tlie swal- 
luus, swifts wrens, and citickadeos, 
wliich arc so strictly Insectivorous tliat 
they are extreniely benc-iicial. Others 
may Injure crops at certain times of 
the year, but the dairage thus dor.e Is 
much smaller than the damage thev 
jjrevent by eating insects. In Bulletin 
No. 34 of the Biological Survey it is 
.suggested that farmers should look on 
birds as servants v.'ho have to be fed 
in return for the useful work they do. 
• ■ 

Apple-l'ree Hall. 
There's an old spreading apple tree, 
gnarly and wide, 

In an orchard (I can't tell you 
where). 
Where Dora and I can curl up side by 
side, 

Anu nobody know we are there. 
We go there on Saturdays — tiiat la If 
it's line, 

And mother Is willing — and all 
Take our dolls and our dishes, and 
there we keep house 

Till tea-time, in Apple-Tree hall. 

There's the loveliest carpet, all wood- 
bmwn and gray, 
And the walls have a pattern of 
green; 
The windows are curtained the coziest 

way 
That ever was thought of or seen; 
And as for the ceiling, it's blue as the 
eky; 
And we've crimson globe-lamps In 
the fall — 
In the spring we have pink, and in 
sutnmer use none 
(Such a saving!; In Apple-Tree hall. 

AH the neighbors are charming — so 
musical, tool 
Madam Thrush has a voice like a 
bird. 
And ttie love Longs she sings (In Ital- 
ian, I think; 
Are the sweetest we ever have heard. 
Then the dryads and wood-nympiis 
dwell close to us, too. 
Tiiough they are too bashful to call. 
The society really Is quite of the best 
When we're living at Apple-Tree hall. 

O, I wish I could tell you one-half of 
our plays. 
And the fine things we plan when 
we're there. .- 
Of the books that we'll write and the 
deeds that we'll do 
In the years that wait, shining and 
fair. 
My mother says, sometimes — and so 
does Aunt Kate — 
That these are tiie best days of all; 
But we tiiink it's just the beginning of 
fun, 
Keeping house here In Apple-Tree 

hall. 
— Elizabeth Roberts MacDonald in 
St. Nicholas. 



Real .4niuseinent. 

The Delineator: Helen, aged 3, 
freshly dre.ssed in white from head to 
toe, was left in her aunts care on the 
piazza, while her mother finished 
(Iressiiig. "Auntie" was interested in 
her sewing, and looked up suddenly to 
find Helen missing. A minute's search 
1 evealed her on the walk, stamping 
her little feet in a shallow puddle left 
by a recent rain. 

"Oh! Helen, Helen,'- exclaimed her 
aunt, horrified, "what are you doing?" 

Without taking iier eyes from the 
puddle, she replied, "I's ju*. making 
the water wiggle." 

With Timber Searoe. 

Puck: Woggs <2009) — The Rich- 
leighs are very lavisii entertainers. 

Boggs — Yes. At the close of their 
l^anquet last evening each i?uest was 
presented witfa a solid wooden tooth- 
pick. 



<By Mary Kyle Dallas.) 

How do you do, Cornelia? I 
you w-?re sick, and I stepped 
cheer up up a little. My friends 
say, "It's such a comfort to see 
Auntie Doleful. You have such a 



heard 

in to 

often 

you, 

flow 



TWEN TY YEARS AGO. 

Taken From the Columns of The Herald of This Date, 1893. 



of conversation, and are so lively." Be- 
sides. I said to mvself as I came jp 
the stairs, "Perhaps it's the last time 
1 11 ever see Cornelia Jane alive." 

You don't mean to die yet, eh! Well, 
now, how do you know? You can't 
tell. You think you are getting bet- 
ter! But there was poor Mrs. Jones 
sitting up, and everyone saving how 
smart ;Jhe was. and all of a sudden she 
was ia.ken with spasms in the heart 
and went off like a flash. But you 
must be careful and not get anxious 
or excited. Keep quite calm and don't 
fret about anything. Of course thinga 
cant go on just as if you were down 
stairs; and I wondered wliether you 
knew your little Billy was sailing 
about In a tub on the mill-pond, and 
that your little Sammy was letting 
your little Jimmy down from the ve- 
randa roof in a clothes basket. 

Gracious goodness? what's the mat- 
ter? I guess Providence will take care 
of em Don't look so. You thouglit 
Bridge; was watching them? Well, no, 
she isr..'t. 1 saw her talking to a man 
at the gate. He looked to me like a 
burgla-. No doubt she let him take 
tile impression of the door-key In wax, 
and then he'll get in and murder you 
all. Taere was a family at Kobble hul 
all killed last week for $50. Now, dont 
fidget .io; it will be bad for the baby. 

Poor little dear! How singular It is, 
to be .sure, that you can't tell whether 
a chilo is blind, or deaf and dumb, or 
a cripple at that age. It might be al.. 
and you'd never know it. 

Most of them that have their senses 
make bad use of them, though; that 
ought to be your comfort, if it does 
turn oat to have anything dreadful the 
matter with It. And more don't live a 
year. I saw a baby's funeral down th.i 
street as I came along. 

How is Mr. Kobble? Well, but finds 
It warm in town, eh? Well I should 
think he would. Tliey are dropping 
down by hundreds there with sun- 
stroke. You must prepare your mind 
to have him brouglit home any day. 
.A.nyliow, a trip on these railroad trai.is 
is jus", risking your life every time 
Back and lorth every 
it's just trilling with 



••♦A. A. Fider. foreman of the News 

bindery and Miss Agnes M. Jolicoeur,. 

were married tliis morniiig by Father 

Le Roy at the St. Jtan Baptisie 
church. 



♦**A ladies' aid societ;: has been 
organized at Endion Bai)tist church, 
v.'ith the following officer s: President, 
Mis. E. S. Uplxam; vice p:^esident, Mrs. 
W. W. Billson; secretary, Mrs. J. J. 
Sh.otwell; treasurer, Mrs. George F. 
Ash. 



Stocker, Totman White. Fraser. Bow- 
man, Flynn. Leland, Wardwell. Hol- 
ston. Paddock. Bell, Dowse, Elder. Sl- 
ti.i'Hds and Hartley, tiie Misses Pattoa, 
Munger, Paddock, Chapin and others. 



•••Mrs. F. G. Stevens and daughter 
have gone to Chicago. The latter goes 
to attend school at Kenosha Wis. 



••••Mrs. Benjamin Heller of 131 West 
Second street entertained last evening 
in honor of her guests. Miss Carrie 
Hofheimer of Norfolk. \ a., and Mrs. 
Aaron Heller of Chippewa Falls, V.'is. 



•**Dr. Llliencrantz, wife and daugh- 
ter of Oakland, Cal., are being entar- 
taihed by Collector ot Customs C. . F. 
Jol.nson. The doctor goes to Now York 
In charge of a wealthy patient, anl 
Mrs. Jonnson and daughter accompany 
tliem for a month's sojourn iti Troy 
and New York. Mrs. Llliencrantz is * 
sister of Mrs. Jolnison. 



•••Among the current 
events was tlie progresslv 
ty given by Mrs. James 
at her residence, 128 Sixth 
Hoare s orchestra discours 
Caterer Dorsey presided 
iieshment board. Among 
were: Mc-sdames Vance, 
water, d'.Vutremont. Lot 



week's social 
e euchre par • 
V. McKlndley 
avenue west, 
ed music and 
over the re- 
tlio.so present 
Upham. By- 
iian, Chapin. 



•••Miss Mitcliell, who Is one of the 
lending teaciiers of the Hardy scliool, 
has arrived in the city, and Frau Shra- 
dei and Miss Brown, teachers of Ger- 
man and art, will arrive this week. 



MINNESOTA OPINIONS. 



•♦•T. H. Jones, manager of the Dle- 
I bold Safe company, has moved liis fam- 
I ily from St. Paul. Tliey will reside at 
' London. 



A MOMENT WITH THE WITS. 



to think whit 
over us all the 



you take one. 
day, as he is. 
danget. 

Dear! dear! now 
dreadful tilings hang 
time! Dear! Dear! 

Scariet fever has broken out in the 
village, Cornelia. Little Isaac Potter 
has it, and 1 saw your Jimmy playing 
with him last Saturday. 

Well, I must be going now. I've got 
another sick friend, and I sha'n't tiiink 
my duty done unless I cheer her uo a 
little before I .sleep. Goodby. How 
pale you look, Cornelia! I don't be- 
lieve jou have a good doctor. Do seivl 
him away and try some one else. Voa 
don't look so well as you did when I 
came in. But if antyhing happens, send 
for m? at once. If I can't do any- 
thing .?ise. 1 •■•m r-i;eer you up a little. 



Kiliiue tlie HIrdN. 

London standard: Tlie havoc that 
Is being wrougiit among birds to sat- 
isfy woman's vanity was pressed home 
oy James Buckland i.i a striking speecli 
at the annual meeting of ti;e S.-lborne 
society. 

"Tlie whole volume of the bird life 
of the world Is being reduced at an 
alarming rate." h© sal.l, and then he 
gave :;he reason — that, to abtain the 
feathers, the birds had to be killed in 
the breeding season. 

At that time birds' natural fear of 
man disappears under the stress of 
providing for and protecting their 
Is under conditions such 
the old birds are slirjt 
their plumes, and the 
die of starvation in the 



young, and it 
as these thait 
and rifled of 
young left to 
nest. 

Thir-.v years 
in the United 
mated 
white 



ago there were heronries 

States whicii were esti- 

to contain about three million 

herons. At tlie same period 



these birds roamed widely over China 
In prodigious multlitudes. But even 
these vast hordes could not withstand 
slaughter during the breeding season 
and now the white lieron is practically 
exterrrdna^ted both in North America 
and in China. Now the same havoc 
is being wrougiit in Soutli America — 
In every country of the world, indeed, 
where the white heron is found. 

The feeding grounds of the Ameri- 
can jabiru, tlie largest but one of the 
storks are also the scenes of slaughter 
during the very period when the birds 
should have respite. Tiiirty thou.sand 
quills of these birds are sold annually 
in London alone, and as the species 
was njver very numerous. It will soon 
be wiped out. 

So wary is the bird that it «.eeps be- 
yond the range of a fowling piece, but 
said M_r. Buckland, the jabiru is shot 
toilay with a softnosed bullet from a 
Mauser rifle — a deadful missile, which 
often tears away a great piece from 
the body of the bird. Even in tliis sick- 
ening condition, unless the multilation 
be such as to prevent tligjlit, the ma- 
jestic creature will take wiiig in one 
last eiTort to escape. Of a sudden it 
falls lifeless to tlie earth — and woman's 
wish Is gratified. 

So tar this year but three plume 
sales have taken place in London, yet 
in those three sales alone there were 
catalo:|;ued the skins of over 25,000 
humming liirds. 

Even the law Is set to defiance by 
the gt-ngs of men who make a liveli- 
hood l:y the slaughter of the birds. Not 
long ago a gang was surprised on one 
of the l.slands which the Unite'l States 
had decreed to be a "bird reservation" 
and tliese men had in their possession 
the plumes of 300,000 birds. 

7'here was no bird in the world to- 
ward which the eyes of the zoologists 
were i.urned in more admiring wonder 
than tliat pride of Australia, the lyre 
bird. Yet the rarer one bird became 
the fiercer grew the competition to se- 
cure l';s tail featiiers, and not long ago 
a party of plume hunters surrounded 
a patuh of scrub In which the birds 
were known to be breeding, and set- 
ting tire to it, shot down the liirds as 
tiiev struggled througli one pitiless 
ring of fire to meet tlielr death in an- 
other. Tiien the tail feathers were cv;t 
off and the bodies left to rot. 

It was decided to organize a crusade 
throughout the country by means 
chieflj- of lantern lectures and stir 
up the public sentiment in favor of tlie 
plumage bill, by which the importa- 
tion of feathers would be prohibited 
bv la^v, and an appeal was made for 
subscriiit i'>ns. 

■ • 

Wliat WtaLsky In. 

M. A. P.; Tlie subject of alcohol and 
Its effect on the human body has long 
been a favorite study of Sir Victor 
HorsUiy, and some years back he point- 
ed oun the little less than extraordin- 
ary way in which milk was taking 
the place of alcohol In the treatment 
of dls'jase at the London hospitals. In 
1862 tir Victor pointed out that seven 
of th.} great London hospitals spent 
£:5,000 on milk and over £8,Oo« on alco- 
hol, v/hile now the amount spent on 
milk reaches the sum which was re- 
cently expended on liquor. 

.\ short time ago a friend waylaid 
Sir Vi:tor Horsley in his club. "Halloa, 
Horsloy " he said, "can you tell us what 
whisky Is yet?" "Tell you what wliisky 
is"" rjplled Sir Victor. "Certainly. It 
Is tlie most popular poison in the world, 
my frien d." 

Correct. 

Popular Magazine: Senator Curtis of 
Kansa.s tells the following story about 
a young nian who sometimes drank 
more whisky than was good for him: 

He had been making a night of it, 
but h.id forsaken hia companions He 
was acquainted witli an undertaker 
named George, and got the crazy no- 
tion at 3 o'clock in the morning that 
he must see tliis particularly man. Ai'- 
cordir.gly, he found George's undertak- 
ing establishment over which George 
had his sleeping apartments. 

Tlie Intoxicated young man rang 
and rang George's bell, and at last 
awok'! him. The undertaker put his 
head out of the third-story window, 
e>pef":ing to find tiiat his funeral serv- 
ices vyere required Inimediately. In- 
"stead, he recognized his friend Frank. 

"WhH, Frank?" lie exclaimed crossly, 
"what do you want?" 

"1 <ust wan' tell you, George," said 
Frank, "that you're the lash man In 
the world 1 wau' to do business with." 



Many Are Pundi 

Winona Independent. P. 
A Dtmocratic congres! 
from the Dingley distri 
Dingley was the apostle 
protection who produced 
best tariff bill with whic 
ever was blessed : 'Tiie pre; 
the best according to tht 
President Taft as express 
nona speech. 



■riuK. 

erlect upon It. 
tnien elected 
ct in Maine- 
>f Republican 
the second 
.1 the country 
lent one being 
authority of 
ed in his Wi- 



Wbo Voted for Hlmf 

Austin Trdns>.rii>i: Can .on says de- 
fiantly that lie will be a candidate for 
congress and evpects t) be elected 
overwhelmingly, whereupon he will 
again be a candidate f (. r speaker of 
the house, and sees no reason why lia 
should not be as successful in that 
candidacy as the other. An additional 
reason wny all his sla\ es and tools 
should be defeated at the coming 
primary. 



Charsed up as l.lc 

Re-I Wiiiji l-lei.>u!iiicuu 
are taking very careful ac 
political stock and it Is s 
many men in xjulilic lit 
been considered vaiuabi 
now being discarded or > 
a liability. At svch a tin 
ways danger iJiat some r 
material may be thrown 
'>ish iieap, althougli the 
a national housecleanlng 
weigii ai;y temporary los; 



hilltlea. 

Tiie jjeople 

count of their 

urprlsing liow 

e, who have 

e assets are 

barged up as 

e. there Is al- 

eally valualde 

into the rub- 

idvantages of 

will far out- 

les. 



Chicago Record Herald: "Pa, what's 
a jeu d'esprit?" 

"Something that most people think 
they are saying when tliey exclaim 
Judas I'riest." " 



McDougall's 
Jones and hi» 
Marseillaise." 

Bocker — Yes, tiiey 
discharge the cook. 



Magazine: Knicker— 
wife are singing 'The 



are bracing up to 



Chicago News: Assistant Editor—^ 
Where is the foreman today? 

Customer — He dropped twenty feet 
from his aeroplane last night and pied 
his form. 



Pele Mele: Customer — I'm going to 
a masked ball, and 1 want something 
tliat will completely disguise me. 

Costumer — Certainly, sir. I will giv« 
you something nice. 



Good FrfendM and True. 

Ortonviile Herald-Slar; There is still 
sometiilng new under tlie political 
h.eavens. A local aspirant has declined 
to be a candidate "at tiie earnest so- 
licitation of friends " 



That Tariff ComiiilNNion. 

R-i3h City Post: All this talk of a 
tariff commission is only a retarder, a 
pu-ting off for a more convenient sea- 
son lor t!i9 nanuiactureis. The people 
say do it now. 



An Extraordinary Retinlt. 

Hallock News; Th.ree >'ew York bal- 
loonlsts have disappeared. Now their 
friends are up in the air. 



Cannon and the Gavel. 

Princeton Union; Mr. Cannon has 
made unequivccal dtclaration that he 
will be a candidate for re-election to 
til 3 speakershij). His n imerous ene- 
mies, including one Nicholas Long- 
worth of Ohio, should not feel too cock- 
sure that he will not land the job. 



And a Ciln.s.sy ."^tare for Some. 

Ogilvie Sentinel: A Ni'w York man 
lias a_jawbone of gold. That is noth 
ing. 
who 



There are politicians in this state 
have ciieeks of bra^s. 



"So E i.sj- Job for Them. 

Mora Times: With Roosevelt as.^um- 
ing tne leadership of l^epubllcanism, 
ably assisted by such man as La Fol- 
lette, B?veridge. Clapp, iDoIllver, Cum- 
mins and otiiers, the present system 
of monopoly control w:ll receive its 
death knell and a government of the 
people by tlie people res ored. 
• 

' A HlKtortc Flirtation. 

Nfw York Mail: It stems an awful 
thing, but here is the cir :'umstances on 
record that Louisa M. Alcnt, the sainted 
author of "Little Wome:i." once pub- 
licly flirted with Edward VII.! The 
fact comes out In Mrs. Belle Mose's 
book. "Louisa May Alcott. Dreamer 
and Workf'r." 

There is a passage in tie book which 
contains Mrs. Alcott's personal account 
of the incident: it refers to the time 
when the late king, then prince of 
Wales, made his famous visit to this 
country. 

"I went to Boston," Miss Alcott re- 
lates, and saw the prin-e of Wales 
trot over the common ^^•ith his train 
at review — a yellow-haired laddie, 
very like !;is mother, Fanny W, and I 
nodded and waved as 1 e passed, and 
he oi>enIy winked his bo>ish eye at us, 
for Fanny, with her yellow curls and 
wild waving, looked rather rowdy, and 
the poor little prince wa ited some fun 
We laugh.ed and tliougli' tha.t we had 
been more distinguished by the saucy 
wink than by a stately bow. Boys are 
always jolly — even princes" 

By tlie way, this incident occurred 
in 1800, when the prince of Wales was 
19 years old. and consequently quite 
a broth of a boy, and consquently quite 
— 'We blush to record it — was 28. 



I . 



The Moral of the Short Ballot. 

Galesburg Mail: Once upon a time 
a Plain Citizen went to tlie polls to 
vote. Tiie ballot contaired the names 
of hundreds or' candidates for scores 
of offices. "That ballot is not for me, " 
said the Plain Citizen. "That ballot 
I is for experts only. I'm a,3 good as 
disfranchised by it!" 

"You ought to go Into politics and 
beoome an expert yourself," said the 



politician. 

"I can't, 
me hard at 
Tiiafs my 



Economic p-essure keeps 
work to support my family, 
first duty. 



Lucky for me!" murmured the poli- 
tician. 

"Why Is politics so complex? Why are 
there so many picayune elective of- 
fices'.'" persisted the citzen. 

"So that you will always need me," 
the politician replied, as Citizen without 
even reading the names of the candi- 
dates, helplessly voted the straight 
ticket. 

Moral — The longer the lallot, the less 
the Plain Citizen counts li politics. The 
"short ballot" used In Des Moinea, Gal- 
veston and abroad, Is the right remedy 
A ''short ballot" carries only a few 
conspicuous offices and the citizens hold 
easy and effective direct, control over 
their government. 



ReflectlouN of a B 

New York Pre,ss: The 
wells the less sincere tli« 

There's hardly anythir 
ated as red hair. 

The most disappoint! 
drawn out of the ballot \ 

The worse a man is hit 
pride he can take in the 
ancestors. 

It would be pretty ha 
mates of an insane asyii 
a few engaged couples % 



aohelor. 

nore the fare- 

: parting. 

g so oplnlon- 

ig lottery is 

)0X. 

ii.self the more 
virtues of his 

rd on the In- 
im to lock up 
^'ith them. 



The Ketort Couileouw. 

Harper's Weekly: 'Now." said tho 
suffragette orator, sweeping the audi- 
ence with her eagle eye, "I see Mr. 
Dobbs sitting down tliere In tlie third 
row — a man who has condescended to 
come uere tonight and listen to our 
aiguments. He has heard what I have 
h.ad to say, and 1 think ve should like 
to hear from him, and get a man's view 
of our cause. Mr. Dobbst, tell us what 
you think of the suffrage ttes." 

"Oh. I c-c-couldn'i -m-m-ma'am." 
stammered Dobbs. 'I rur-really 

c-couldn't. Thu-there are l-1-Iul-ladies 
pup-preseut." 



Kansas City Journal: "The censua 
didn't give I'lunkville borough popula- 
tion. Our congressman oughter git ua 
a recount." 

••He says it can't be did." 

"It must be did. He got himself a 
recount when he was running for tlie 
job.'' 



Louisville Courier Journal: "I once 
saw a couple married In a den of 
lions." 

'Did the groom seem scared?" 
"Not any more than is usually the 
case." 



New York Sun: Maud Muller was 
raking the hay. "The crop will give 
me anotlier motor car," she carelessly 
observed. Herewiili the Judge per- 
ceived that his case was hopeless. 



Puck: Paying Teller — You'll have to 
be identified, sir! Do you know any 
person in this bank? 

Police Captain (In plain clothes, 
dryly) — Sliouldn't be a bit surprised If 
I did. Line 'em up and I'll look 'em 
over! 



Chicago Tribune: "Hello! Is this the 
inf'jrmation editor?" 
"Yes." 
"AVho is the president of Nicaragua?" 

"Wait a minute and I'll " 

"But I want to know who's presi- 
dent now — not who's going to be presi- 
dent a minute from now!" 



Boston Transcript: Singleton — I un- 
dcr.stand you had a pretty lively time 
at the club last night. 

Wedmore — I thought so until I got 
home. 



"Trackless 
In some of 



Chicago Record Herald: 
trolley cars are being used 
the English cities." 

"How do the coal wagon drivers 
manage to keep them blocked?" 



Human Life: Bill — This paper says 
that bees were unknown to the Indi- 
ans. 

Jill — Yes. I believe It was the traders 
wlio used to .sting tliem. 



Pointed I'uragrapbH. 

Chicago News: Every good talker 
carries it too far. 

It doesn't take a brilliant man to 
shine in society. 

Optimism is sometimes due to lack of 
experience. 

Only an active and muscular man can 
afford to lose his temper. 

Many a man gets stalled In business 
because he lacks horse sense. 

A good time doesn't always depend 
on tlie price you pay for it. 

.Shortly after a woman marries her 
Ideal she discovers tliat she didn't. 

Being run over by an automobile Is 
apt to give a man tliat tireil feeling. 

When Eve told Adam just what she 
really thought of him that was the 
original rib roast. 

Don't run for office unless you are 
willing to let the family skeleton es- 
cape from the closet. 

Isn't it queer how the man who 
boasts of his intellectual independence 
invariably agrees with a pretty woman? 



AMUSEMENTS. 



NEW 



Both Phones 241t. 



THEATER 

Ssooiiil Ave. East and Superior 8tr««t 



ADVANCED VAUDEVILLE 


Seats on Sale fpr 

One Week 

Ah sad. 

Matinee 25c 

Except Sundays. 


Old Soldier Fiddler*. 

Onaip. 

Felice Morris &. Co. 

Grant &. Hoag. 

The Mcrati Opera Ce. 

A. 0. Duncaii. 

Forbet II Bowman. 


N.flhts— 15c. 25c. 
50e and 75c. 


The Kinodrotne. 
The Concert Orchestra. 



LYGEUM 



TONIGHT 
KRi. A: SAT. 



TONIGHT at 8:13. The Genuine Moving Pic- 
turea of the 

Jeffries-Johnson 
Figiit Pictures 

Matinees — Children, 25c; adult*. 50o. Night* — 

250. SOc and 75c. 

Lade*' Matinee Saturday. Seat*. 25e. 



Monday. Sept. 26 — The Funnie*t of Funay Show*, 
-THE LOTTERY MAN." Scat* *etling, 25* 

to SI. SO. 



TWENTIETH CENTURY VAUDEVILLE 

BIJOU 

—ALL THIS WEEK— 

LIND— Europe'* Late*t Dancing Sontation. 
HALLEN and FULLER &. CO.— Preaenting "A 

Letson at II p. m." 
HEIM CHILDREN- Youthful Prodlgie*. 
JOHN DILLON— The Mirthful Songster. 
KRETORE— The Mad Musician. 
ROXY and WAYNE— In The Cowboy Fro* 

Texat." 
MOTIOGRAPH— Exelusivs Picture*. 
SCHNEIDER'S ORCHESTRA. 

Matinee svery day. 10 and 20e; Every NIgtit 
at 8 and 9:30. lOc, 1 5c and 25c. 

Order Seats, lioth 'phones, old l9iS: sow I6SS. 



Next Wook— "POLLY PICKEL8' PETS"— 15 
Psapl*. Mostly Oirta— 6 Other Star Attractiwia. 



I 





- 


1 


' 


• 


1 

1 




i B 




.;t 


': 


1 






P 




a 


k 


1 


J 


L 








, 




I 









> 




C 






i 
















\ 


■ 






t ■ 

1 




t 






■ 






























1 


1 










t 

■1 
\ 


1 



1 

1 

t 

■i 
*. 




t' 

f 


*> 




'1 



» I I" « 



■-r^ 



; 1 



Mi^>. 




" ii'' u"""'W i ^ 



-UL^iOU 



' • - m » » 



+ 



nrti -Ti II wr 



as. 



\\ 



•^ra- 



•^ - 



M 



Don't Wear 

A Truss 



Ati^r Thirty Yenrs Kxiierienoe I Hnve 

Produced A.n Ai>plicnti<>a fitr Meu, 

Wumrn or C'lilldrou That 

CuroM Uupture. 




Thursday, 



"DEAR MARIA" 1 official map ot the weather 
COMES BACK 



I Sent It On Tiial. 

If you h»Te tried rii.xt everytlliii eUe. oime to 
ing. Wliere otlum f*ll U where I havo my ureatosl 
■UtX-OMk SwiJ attached ompou today and I will iieud 




Old Roosevelt-Storer Contro- 

troversy Is Revived by 

Public Letter. 



Archbishop Ireland Is Quoted 
to Disprove Ex-Presi- 
dent's Claims. 



pLJt-^^'^ 



The above li C. E. Brook of Marshall, Mich., who 

ha* bwn cuHnf Rupture for over 30 years. If 

Ruptured writ* him today. 

fon free my tnu.-.lraU\l book -n Uupture and Its 
cure. «Ui)wtrirf my Appliance a;il Ktvtng ymi prloes 
atid names "f many pi'iplo whu line tried tt aiid 
*ere oureil. It U Instant rt>Uef »h'<n all i thers fall. 
RememlMtr I \i9« no salves, no liamasa. no Ilea. 

I send on t; ' "vo what I say Is tnie. You 

are th» Jiidk'- « la»l:iij »wt\ my Illustrated 

fc'iok and wa.i .. , will be a.s enlhuilaslio m my 
bundre<U of patlentji whose leuers you fan also read. 
I'Ul oiil fron coup n Uolow and mall today. It's well 
worth your Llmj whether you try my Appliance or not. 



FREE INFORMATION COUPON 

(• h, r.r ;.. "J' lirok* Bldi.. Marshall. Mich. 
P..-.i.,i> .'<'i;l me by mall In plalti wrapper your 
llluiiMaisxl t>ook and fuU tnfonuallon about your 
.Appliances fur the cure of nipture. 



Nam* 



AJdrcM 



i.y State. 



It Is Titxve 




For you to decide on -a 
FaU Su't. Decide on a 
Morrison made suit, tail- 
ored from my new all- 
wool Scotch suitings. 



MORRISON 

MODERN TAILOR. 
8 Lake Avenue South. 




Springfield, Mass., Sept. 22. — ^The Re- 
publican today prints a letter from 
Mrs. Bellamy Storer, written in France 
Sept. 6, reviewing the controversy be- 
tween the Storers and Mr. Roosevelt 
concerning the former president's al- 
leged authorization of the former am- 
bassador to Austria-Hungary to vl.slt 
Pope Pius X, and ask him as a per- 
sonal favor to tho president of the 
United States to make Archbishop Ire- 
land of St i'aul a cardinal. 

In the .stormy controversy of a few 
years ago Mrs. Storer gained consider- 
able notoriety as "Dear Maria," tlie 
name being the form in which Presi- 
dent Ptoosevelt addressed her in sev- 
eral letters he wrote to her. 

Letters written by Archbishop Ire- 
land in 1903 and 1904, hitherto unpub- 
lished, are quoted by Mrs. Storer to 
sliow that at repeated Interviews in the 
Wl'.ite House between the archbishop 
and the president. Mr. Roosevelt ac- 
knowledged that he had commissioned 
Mr. Storer to act as his personal envoy 
at the Vatican in behalf of the arch- 
bishop. 

isliarpeus Iknuc of A'eraoity. 
Mr. Roosevelt has hitherto publicly 
denied that Mr. Storer was ever author- 
ized to represent him in this manner, 
and the Ireland letters now published 
by Mrs. Storer have the effect of mak- 
ing much sharper the issue of veracity 
between tlie Storers and the ex-presi- 
dent. 

Mrs. Storer's letter to the Repub- 
lican also seeks to prove, on the testi- 
mony of Archbishop Ireland, t..at Pres- 
ident Roosevelt promised to make Mr. 
Storer United States ambassador either 
at Paris or London, and there is in- 
cluded still another letter alleged to 
have been written by Mr. Roosevelt to 
Mr Storer just after the presidential 
I election In l>>9t). in which Mr. ivoose- 
t velt asked Mr. Storer to see President- 
I elect McKinley and urge him to ap- 
point Mr. Roosevelt assistant secretary 
iif the navy. This last letter seems to 
confute a recent assertion that Mr. 
Roosevelt never sought a public office, 
except when he sought a presidential 
nomination in 1904. 

The first letter by Archbishop Ireland 
•luoted by Mrs. Storer. written to »vir. 
Storer Nov. 13, 1901, Is in part as fol- 
lows: 

"I have had two most pleasant meet- 
inys witii the j)resident at tlie Wliite 
House. He Is decidedly your friend and 
resolved to glvo you the best there Is. 
'Even' said ho. "if Berlin comes first and 
Bellamy wished it for a little while, 
ponding Choate's retention of London. 
I would give It to him and change him 
shortly afterwards to London. Let him 
trust me.' " 

Told Storer to Speak. 
The next Ireland letter, dated Oct. 23. 
1903, was written to Mrs. Storer In part 
as follows: 

"I was In Washington last week and 




F«. RECAST TII.l, T 
FRIDAY, 

For Duluth, Superior and 
vicinity, including the Me- 
saba and Vermilion iron 
ranges: Showers toni.ght 
and p'Xisibly Friday; cool- 
er; moderate to brisk 
winds, southerly shifting to 
northwesterly early Fri- 
day. 



„,U u-.jt,»n*nl) (01 trro. f'r.jm< 'JO* »n.l Kti* , , ^ 

,U>..lv iplr,.™ (|)-,. (g'r. port «.<•.."? Arr,..(l>w,.:, th...md J--.r»l 
r,g.r. p-.o.'i.ur. «..M i4iw«f rx«i»ll .( .1 r,.,.l- 01 .nch Ih.rd. »..uj 




The weather man 
promised showers 
last night or today 
and he made goo<l 
thi.-^ morning by 
sending a series of 
showers that 
drenched the city. 
The clouds threat- 
en and the weather 
man promises more 
rain toniglit and to- 
morrow. 

A year ago today 
Duluth was recovering from a wet 
spell. 

The sun rose this morning at 5:55 

and It will net at 6:06, giving twelve 

hours and eleven minutes of sunlight. 

Mr. Richardson makes the following 

comment on weather conditions: 

"The low pressure condition central 
^\'ednesday morning over Alberta has 
advanced to the Red River valley. This 
disturbance — In connection with an- 
other which overlle.g the Southwest — 
has caused light to copious rains 
throughout the greater portion of the 
Nortliwest, besides somewhat warmer 
weather over Manitoba, the Eastern 
Dakotas and Western Minnesota. Much 
cooler temperatures have appeared over 
Northern Utah. Idaho. Montana. Sas- 
katchewan and Alberta appending the 
development of a strong high pres- 
sure area over the latter district. This 
cooler condition will probably reach 
the Head of the Lakes Friday morning." 



General Fore4>ant. 

Chicago. Sept. 2;;. — Forecasts for 
twetity-four hours ending at 7 p. 
Friday: 

Upper Michigan — Showers tonlKht 
and Friday; warmer tonight; colder 
Friday. 

Wisconsin — Partly rloudy, with prob- 
ably showers late tonight or Friday; 
Cooler Friday. 

Minnesota — Showers tonight or Fri- 
day; colder. 

Iowa — Unsettled, with probably 
.showers tonight or Friday; cooler 
Friday. 

North Dakota — Showers In East, 
generally fair in we.-^l portion tonight; 
cooler, with prot)ably frost in west 
portion; Friday part cloudy and cooler. 

South Dakota — Showers and cooler 
tonight; Friday part cloudy and 
cooler. 

Montana — Partly cloudy, with prob- 
ably showers in east portion tonight; 
cooler tonight with frosts; Friday 
partly cloudy. 

Upper Lakes — East winds on Supe- 
rior, southeast to south on Michigan 
and Huron, increasing and becoming 
bri.sk tonight and Friday, shifting to 
northwest on Superior Friday; showers 
on Superior tonight and Friday; In- 
creasing cloudiness tonight. with 
showers on Michigan and north por- 
tions of Huron Friday. 

♦ 

Tbe TeiuperatureH. 

Following were the maximum tem- 



poral ures for twenty-four hours and 
the mininum for twelve, ending at 7 
a. m. today; 



Max. MIn 



Allileae 94 

Alpena 'Ji 

Atlantic City . . 78 

B.ittlefonl 70 

Jii^marck 76 

B.)lso C4 

Bwton 78 

IJulTiilo 88 

Oulciry 52 

Ciiarleston 84 

riilcagu 68 

D*nrer 8i)' 

D*s Mlnea 82 

UsvlU Lake T4 

Da<iso 82 

. Dulmque 76 

DULUTH 52 

I Uiirango 7'1 

Eastp rt 86 

Edmonton 5i) 

'Ecciuaba 58 

Oalveston 86 

(irand Haven . .74 
Green Bay ....84 

Kat.ieraa 8«i 

Uavre 82 

lUoletu 72 

lIou^it<)n ■S4 

I iruron 86 

JackjonvlUa eo 

! Kamloopg 34 

I Kansas City 82 

KnuxvUle 84 

La Crosse 78 

li)uL'«i!Ue 82 

Madison 72 

Mamuette 50 

Medicine Hat ...TO 



TO iMempia* 88 

44iMlle» City 78 

58 I Milwaukee 68 

3S ! Minnetlosa 70 

S6 { Mcdttua 78 

4<i ' Moutg mtry 92 

50!-Montr:'al 58 

44 .Mo'irhead 84 

38; New Orleans HI 

74INew York 78 

60 I North PUtte 72 

54;<)klahom» W 

50 Parry Souiid 04 

58 I'lioenlx 102 

68 I P!it.*lmni 78 

52'P')rt .Vrthur 51 

46 Piitland, Or 04 

48 I'rlnoe Albert ... 62 

48JQu'AppelU 70 

3«'Uale!t{h 84 

44 ,Uoswell 92 

74 'St. liouls 82 

46 St. Paul 82 

48 Salt Lake City 74 

72 San Diego 74 

44 [San Fraiirlsco 08 

42 'Sault Sle. Marie... 54 

42 Sheridan 78 

60 '.Shrcvoport 90 

70 Si) ikane 68 

54 Swift Current 70 

>10, Tampa 88 

62 Toledo 78 

50 Wasliington 82 

82 WllU.stua 72 

60 Wlniieraucc* TO 

84 WUmlpeg 70 

46 I 



80 

52 

58 

42 

40 

TO 

42 

58 

71 

58 

60 

72 

3) 

68 

C2 
44 

54 
30 
34 
61 
61 
61 
5>J 
51 
62 
4S 
S8 
52 
6S 
54 
3S 

70 
4S 
80 
40 
40 
52 



Ayers Cherry Pectoral 

Lungs 




OUR LONG SUIT 

Is ev'-'ft work In dentistry. Our 
crov. • bridge work is the 

acnif •'. ijerfe'tion in the science 
of dentistry. If you have neglect- 
ed your teeth and you have roots 
left to crown, we can fill the space 
where your teeth are lacking by 
teeth without plates that look 
perfectly natural. 



STSflER DENTAL CO. 

Cor. 2nil A\f. W. ami Superior St 



After A Hot Day 

Revive Your Energies 



BY BATHING WITH ^ 

HAND 
SAPOLIO 

It cleanses the pores, removes ilead skin, 
invigorates the entire body and leaves 
you delightfully cool and refreshed. 

All Grocers and Druggists 



Delicately 

Formed 

and gently reared, women will find In 
all the seasons of their lives, as maid- 
ens, wives and mothers, that the one 
simple, wholesome laxative remedy, 
which acts gently and pleasantly and 
naturally and which may be taken at 
any time, when the system needs a 
laxative, with perfect safety and real- 
ly beneficial effects, is Syrup of Figs 
and Elixir of Senna. 

It has that true delicacy of flavor 
j which is so refreshing to the taste, 
that warming and grateful toning to 
the stomach which responds so favor- 
ably to its action and the laxative ef- 
fect which is so beneficial to the sys- 
tem when, occasionally, its gentle 
cleansing is required. 

The genuine, always bearing the 
name of the California Fig Syrup Co., 
may be purchased from all leading 
druggists in original packages of one 
uize only, price fifty cents per bottle. 



I 



of course saw the president. I spoke 
with him of Paris and removed from 
his mind all suspicion that a Catholic 
would be there a 'persona non grata' 
as ambassador. He promised me that 
the ne.vi ambassador to Paris would be 
.VIr Storer. and furthermore expressed 
the belief that Gen. Porter would soon 
retire. He also told me that he had 
commissioned Mr. Storer to speak for 
him viva voce at the Vatican. He 
seemed rather proud of having done so." 
A month later Archbishop Ireland 
wrote another letter in which he quoted 
the exact words of the president as to 
Mr. Storer's going- to Rome as follows: 
"The president said to me: 'Mr. Storer 
has told you what I said to him about 
you archbishop?" 

" 'Well,' I replied. 'I do not remem- 
ber.' 'About his going to Rome?' the 
president then asked. I said 'No.' 'Well' 
he said, 'I told him I would not write 
a letter to the pope asking for honors 
for you; but I said that he could go to 
Rome and say — viva voce — to the pope. 
how much I wish you to be cardinal 
and how grateful I personally wotild 
be to him for giving you that honor. 
Sure of the "Words. 
"I am most clear In my memory as 
to every word. I will write about 
American politics to Bellamy. With 
most affectionate regards to him and to 
yourself. I am sincerely . ^r^^ ,. 

"JOHN IRELAND " 
On Feb 2 1904, the archbishop 
wrote to Mr. fetorer: 

"Your two letters were read and 
burned. However, you need have no 
anxiety whatsoever about the whole 
affair, which was the chief subject 
matter of those letters. The president 
has no occasion to feel ruffled in the 
least, but you know his impulsiveness. 
When I saw him he of his own accord 
told me of his writing to you, and 
asked me how publicity was given to 
the matter. I said the Scripps-McRae 
agency had merely made a guess as 
to Mr. Storer's coming to Rome and 
that the few unfavorable comments 
that followed amounted to really noth- 
ing. He calmed down completely, re- 
marked that he had every confidence 



In you and hoped that the outcome of 
your mission would be what all de- 
sired." 

Roc«evelt*fi Letter to Storer. 

Mr. Roosevelt 3 letter to Mr. Storer, 
dated Nov. 17, 1896. concerning the de- 
sired appointment as assistant secre- 
tary of the navy, was as follows: 

■Dear Bellamy: I have been think- 
ing over that business and now will 
you let me write perfectly frankly? If 
you care to say anything for me, old 
fellow, I think yuu could say it better 
a good deal if I were away. So un- 
less you think to the contrary, or un- 
less there Is some reason for change, I 
believe that It would be best for me 
to come and dine with you; and then 
you see McKinley by yourself, If you 
care to do so at all, which I earnestly 
hope you will. Give my best love to 
Mrs. Storer. Faithfully yours. 

•THEODORE ROOSEVELT." 

"P. S. — I hope you won't think this 
Impertinent, I should rather have you 
speak in my behalf than any other In 
the United States — and I think you 
could do most good; but I rather hate 
to go there with you, for somehow, It 
does not seem to me that it would be 
a good thing for you to speak for me 
before me. "T. R." 



Columbia hall 
sum of money 



raised a considerable 
A program of speeches 
and music was given. J. B. Baumann, 
the author of "Dlgte," 'delivered an ad- 
dress on 'Universal Brotherhood." 



A Reliable Medlclne->Not a Narcotic. 

Mrs. F. Marti, St. Joe, Mich., says 
Foley's Honey and Tar saved her little 
boy's life. She writes: "Our little boy 
contracted a severe bronchial trouble 
and as the doctor's medicine did not 
cure him, I gave him Foley's Honey 
and Tar, in which 'I have great faith. 
It cuted the cough as well as the chok- 
ing and gagging spells, and he got well 
in a short time. Foley's Honey and 
Tar has many times saved us much 
trouble and we are never without it in 
the liouse." Sold by all druggists. 



Why I>ru(?Jfl»** Ileconiniend Chanibcr- 

IhIii'm C»»lle fholera mid Ul- 

arrko^u Keiiiedy. 

Mr. Frank C. Hanrahan, a prominent 
druggist of Portsmouth, Va, says: 
"For the past six years 1 have sold and 
tecommended Chamberlain's Colic, 
Cholera and Diarrhoea Remedy. It is 
a great remedy and one of the best 
patent medicines on the market. 1 
liandle some others for the same pur- 
l)oses that pay me a larger profit, but 
this remedy is so sure to effect a cure, 
and my customer so certain to appre- 
cltae my recommending It to him, that 
I give It the preference." For sale by 
all druggists. 



MUCH WORK DONE 
BY THE BETHEL 



Lil^liTED 
AIVIOUNT 

Trea.'^ury Btock of Iron Mountain 
Mining company for sale at par $1 
pt«r share. I'roperty on Mesaba 
Iron range surrounded by three big 
mines. Drilling shows large body 
higli grade ore; for Information ap- 

IRON MOUNTAIN MINING GO. 

417 Torrey llulI«Jlng, Uuluth. 




RF $2.50 SHOE 



LUMBERJACK GETS 
A BULLET IN SIDE 



Free Instruction 
in Roller Sliating 

Given c-vory afleriioon and evening t 
beginners 

at llncoln Park RoUer Rink. 



Hay's BairHealtli 

Never Fails to Restore Gray Hair to Its 
Natural Color .jad Hvauty. stops I'stalllug^ 

cut, and positiTcly removes Dandruff. ISBot a 
Dye. Retune all (iubstitute<!. $1.00 and SO.. 
B«ttlea by Mail or at Druffg-ists. pniMp 
fiend 10c for larg^e sainple Bottle ■ KCE 
l»hi!r Hay Spec Co., Newark, N, J., U. S. A. 




EN 



who want to enjoy life shoald 

bt y a lH,i of NERVK BEANS. 

They relieve nervuuti decline and 

^^^ __ T»e«k"cMi»«; restore strentfth aud 

lad up the arsteiu; rnoet wonderful vitalizing rsuiody 

loryoua^ ana old. Try a. Ijojl »nd ni.to the elfect. f 1 »l 

i;c* JUiua Co.. U8t SuDorlor bt..I>alutli. Mli;ik 



"Trapp" Stewart Shot Dur- 
ing Row in Cass Lake 
Saloon. 

Cass Lake, Minn., Sept. 22. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — "Trapp" Stewart, a 
lumberjack, was shot last evening by 
Fred Golden, during an altercation In 
a local saloon. Stewart Is a well known 
character and when coming to town 
usually makes himself bothersome to 
those he meets. Stewart Is a big man 
an all-round tough when he Is drink- 
ing. He had some words with Golden 
when the latter pulled a gun and shot 
Stewart Just below the right shoulder. 
He was taken to the Bemidji hospital, 
where he is resting easily. He refuses 
to prosecute Golden on the grounds 
that the trouble was brought on by 
himself. 



Statistics Show That Institu- 
tion Has Been Useful 
to Community. 

Some conception of the work done 
at the old Bethel in one year may be 
gathered from a little table gotten up 
to give tlio maximum of Information 
In tiie minimum of space. As a lesson 

In practical helii for men. It is one of 
the most striking "exhibits" In the little 
booklet which is being sent broadcast 
In the interest of the new Bethel build- 
ing fund campaign. 

In the year 254,496 meals were 
served. Lodgings were furnished to 
the total of "37,325. Baths were given 
to the nuiixber of 1,930. 

The attendance in the reading rooms 
ran up to 75,000. 

The Gospel work attracted an at- 



THOMPSON'S ROTURBiNE ENGINE 



An engine that stands the scarchlii^ht oi investigation, and 
a proposition without a NIGGER in the fence. No parts 
that stop and start. Just a rotary motion, ideal as each 
moving part rotates around its own axis, the cylinders rotate 
around the shaft, the pistons rotate around the crank pin, 
and the val\^es rotate around the eccentric. In engines 
where the pistons reciprocate, all of the moving parts stop 
and start twice each revolution, while with the Roturbine 
the shaft sta^ids still and all moving parts rotate. 

A TWENTY-FIVE HORSE POWER ENGINE 

of the Roturbine type occupies a space of 12x24 inches. 
FOR speed, endurance, economy and small space, the 
Roturbine stands in a class by itself. EVERY TWENTY 
CENTS bu} s a share of stock which will in a short time 
sell at par, $:i.00 per share. 

Mail ordi^rs promptly filled. Exhibition room at 
302; East Superior Street, Duluth, Minn. 

INTERNATIONAL ROTURBINE ENGINE GO. «a££.cA 

BOTH PHONES. 




PRESSED HARD. 

Coffee's Weight on Old Age. 



PERSIAN PRINCES 

IN NEW YORK SCHOOL. 



Washington, Sept. 22. — Sent to this 
country by the Persian government to 
receive an American education, three 
little Persian princes have been en- 
rolled as pupils In the Henry D. Cooke 
public school of this city. They are 
Serf Edln Khan, aged 12; Moseffer 
Edln Khan, 15; and Mohammed Ameep 
Khan, aged 16. The boys are living 
with the secretary of the Persian lega- 
tion. 



BACK TO NATIVE LAND. 

Friends Aid Cloqiiet Young Man to 
Oo Home. 

Cloquet, Minn., Sept. 22. — (Special to 
The Herald) — Antone I. Solem, a young 
single man, left Cloquet for Norway, 
sent back to his native land by his 
countrymen, the local Sons of Norway 
raising a purse to pay his expenses to 
the old country. Solem came to Clo- 
quet a year ago but has been ill with 
rheuiT.atism almost since coming here, 
and had finally gotten so bad that he 
could not walk. Norwegian.^ here took 
up his cause, and at a gathering in 



When prominent men realize the 
Injurious effects of coffee and the 
change in health that Postum can 
liring, they are glad to lend their tes- 
timony for the benefit of others. 

A superintendent of public schools 
in a Southern state says: "My moth- 
er, since her early childhood, was an 
inveterate coffee drinker, had been 
troubled with her heart for a num- 
ber of years and complained of that 
'weak all over' feeling and sick stom- 
ach. 

"Some time ago, I was making an 
official visit to a distant part of the 
country and took dinner with one of 
the merchants of the place. I no- 
ticed a somewhat peculiar flavour to 
the coffee, and asked him concerning 
It. He replied that it was Postum. I 
was so pleased with it that, after the 
meal was over. I bought a package 
to carry home with me, and had wife 
prepare some for the next meal; the 
I whole family liked it so well that we 
discontinued coffee and used Postum 
entirely. 

' "I had really been at times very 
anxious concerning my mother's con- 
dition, but we noticed that after us- 
ing Postum for a short time, she felt 
so much better than she did prior to 
its use, and had little trouble with her 
heart and no sick stomach; that the 
headaches were not so frequent, and 
her general condition much Improved. 
This continued until she was as well 
and hearty as the rest of us. 

"I know Postum has benefited my- 
self and the other members of the 
family, but in a more marked degree 
in the case of my mother, as she was 
a victim of long standing." 

Ever read tJie above letter? A new 
one appears from time to time. They 
lire jsenuiae, true, and full of liunian 
interest. 



tendance of 35,000 no the 450 meetings. 
Fifty meetings wera held in the county 
jail A number of open air meetings 
were also held lasi summer. 

The number of conversions ran into 
the hundreds. Huidreda were turned 
from years of addl ;tlon to liquor 

The hospltal.s. tlie depots, the Jail, 
houses of lU-r^putt: and cheap lodging 
houses were visited regularly in search 
of young girls. 

The Bethel also extended Its visits 
through its workers and chaplain to 
the poor and the sick and the aged 

The work among children went on 
with greater progiess than ever. The 
work among the boys' clubs showed a 
good, healthy growth. The girls in the 
sewing school continued to gain profi- 
ciency with the needle. The two Sun- 
day schools showed an average total 
attendance of 350. . , ^ , . ., ^ 

Nor were the social featuers of the 
Bethel work overlooked. ^ , .. , 

Chaplain Moody conducted the fu- 
neral services for a number of stran- 
gers who died within the gates of the 
city for fallen girls and for some who 
were without chu rch affiliat ions. 

W ORK IN NA\T MAY | 

COST HIM $1,500,000. 

Chicago, Sept. 22.— The love of 22- 
vear-old Horace Lcgan Keeler of^Jll<^*^- 
hiond, Ind., for ;ife In the Lnlted 
States navy may coat him a fortune of 
$1 500,000. The young man, a son of 
Harry C Keeler ol' Richmond, enlisted 
at a naval recruiting station In Chi- 
cago Sept. 7. Tvro months previous 
his grandfather hid died, but young 
Keeler was not told of the provisions 
In his grandfather's will. By Its terms 
Keelor Is left property valued at $1,- 
500.000 provided he earns not less than 
$75 a month salary until he is 2.t 
years old. Keelor enlisted as a medical 
apprentice In the navy for four years 
and will receive 122 a month for hla 
services. 

CLASS OF 19111 CHOOSES 

OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR. 



dishes cooked by the young girls of 
the Margaret Morrison School in Pitts- 
burg, said: 

"I have no fear before these experi- 
mental dishes. He who has eaten in 
France learns to eat boldly. 

"Think of the French cheese alone! 

"Why. one afternoon In a restaurant 
In the Boulevard des Itallens, I heard a 
guest shout angrily: 

■■ 'Walter, lo.jk here; this cheese la 
walking all over the table!' 

" 'Ah, have no fear, monsieur. It 
won't escape.' the waiter replied. 'If 
tt goes too far, just call "Jules, Jules!" 
It always answers to its name.' " 



FUCE Hi m 




Eruption Broke Out when 2 Weeks 

Old -Itched So He Could Not 

Sleep -Hair All Fell Out 

— Cuticura Cured Him. 



Officers for the 
Central high scho 
terday as follows: 
ident; Helen Smith 
rle Whipple, seen 
treasurer; Joseph 
Bondy, sergeants 
Due, class mascot. 
lor of the facult: 
election to the poi 

Palmer Bevis w 
the Zenith. Frn 
made business ma 



class of 1911 of the 
il were chosen yes- 
Stanley Lamb, pros- 
. vice president: Ma- 
•tary; Walter Glass, 
Bi>yle and Mortimer 
-at-arms; Lloyd Le 
Miss Margaret Tay- 
■ was honored with 
it of class advisor, 
as elected editor of 
nk Bergstrom was 
nager. 





Suen for t25,000. 

Marinette, Wis.. Sept. 22.— ^Special 
to The Herald.) — A deposition In a 
damage suit was :aken by Court Com- 
missioner Alvin 3. Davis. The case 
is that of Frank Stoja, who sues the 
firm of Bates & Rogers, contractors 
of High Falls, for $25,000 for pergonal 
Injuries. He alleges he was struck by 
a falling plank at the dam, while 
working for the -on.pany. 

THE DOCILE CHEESE. 
Andrew Carnegie, while eating with 
appetite and courage last month the 






"I wish to have you accept this twtimo- 
nlaJ, as Cuticura did «o much for my baby. 
At the age of t'vo weeks 
his head began to break 
out with great sores and 
by the time he wai> two 
montiis his face and head 
were an awful sight. I 
con.sulted a doctor, who 
said it was nothing but a 
light skin disease which tha 
baby would soon get over. 
But he seemed to get worsa 
BO I call*'d another doctor. 
His opinion seem»^d to be 
the samp. They both pre- 
Bcribed medicine that did 
not do a bit of good. A 
friend advised me to take 
him to the hospital, which 
I did. Two doctors there 
gave me medicine in a liquid 
form. It did him no good. 

"Nearly every day I would read a testlr 
monial In regard to Cuticura and ray wlf« 
thought fihe would try It to see if it would 
help the baby. I got a box of Cuticura Olnt- 
mt-TW, and a cake of Cuticura Soap and after 
uiilrit; the§e he was entirely cured. Before 
Cuticura cured him he could not seem to 
sleep, as h's face and head would Itch so. 
What hair he had all fell out but soon he 
had a nice head of hair and his (ace was per- 
fectly clear. It Is now nearly fire years siace 
he was cured and there ha.s been no sign ot 
the eruption returning. Chas. H. Evans. 81 
Flint St., SomervUle, Mass., AprU 19. 1810." 

A slnple set of Cutlctim Soap and Ointment is 
©(ten iufllrlent to cure, rendarlns It the ln^J« eco* 
Bomlcal treatment for afTcetloDS o( the skin and 
■ealp Sold throughout the world. Potter Drut • 
Cbeto Corp . Sole Prope . Boaton. Uaas. ^TMalM 
tree, lateat Book oa Cue ol Bkla asd Seal*. 




. 4 





^ J 



10 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



September 22, 1910. 




for Infants and Children. 

Castoria is a harmless substitute for Castor Oil, Pare- 
goric, Drops and Soothiuff Syrups, It is Pleasant. It 
contains neither Opium, Morpliino nor other Narcotic 
guV)stance. It destroys Worms and allays Feverishnessu 
It cures Diarrhoea and Wind Colic. It relieves Teeth- 
ing- Troubles and cures Constipation. It regulates tho 
Stomach and I$(>AveIs» g-iving* healthy and natural sleep* 
Tlie Children's Panacea— Tho Mother's Friend. 

1 The Kind You Have Always Bought 

Beais the Signature of 




iothe 



7^ 



'arm 



JOIN THE LOWER COST OF LIVING CLUB 

Be a producer instead of a consumer, a seller instead of a buyer. Go out 
in the Great Northwest, take up a homestead claim, raise wheat, oats, 
barley, potatoes, alfalfa, corn, cattle, poultry, and have the world for 
your market. Buy ten or twenty acres of fruit land in one of the fertile 
moantain valleys and live in the open. 

Qo to Montana, Idaho, Washington or Oregon, where your money, your 
brains and brawn count for the most in your struggle for independence. 

Special 

Opportunity Fares 

Daily September 15 to October 75, 1910 

will purchase a one way Colonist ticket, from St. Paul, 
Minneapolis, Duluth or Superior to numerous points in 
Montana, Idaho, Washington, Oregon and British Columbia. 
You can stop over and Investigate the country on these 

Colonist tickets, and for a small additional amount ride in comfort in 

an immaculately clean berth in a modern tourist 

Two trains daily — The Oriental Limited and 
the Oregon'ian — both electric lighted. For 
Colonist folder describing opportunities, address 

FRED A. HILLS, 

XORTHKHX PASSKNGER .\GEXT, 

432 Wcrit Superior Street. 

Duluth, Minn. 



$25 




WHOLESALE 

JOBBERS AND 
MANUFACTURERS 

OF DULUTH, MINNESOTA. 

Reliable and Up-to-Date Concerns Who Do a Stridly 
Jobbing end Manufacturing Business. 



ASBESTOS. 
H. Kricgcr 



Co. 



BAKERS. 
Crescent Bakery. 



BLAST FURNACE. 
Zenith Furnace Co. 



BREWERS. 
Duluth Brewing & Malting 
Fitger Brewing Co. 



Co. 



BUTTER AND ICE CREAM 

MANUFACTURERS, 

Bridgeman-Russell Co, 



CEMENT AND PLASTER, 
D. G. Cutler Co. 



COMMISSION AND PRODUCE. 
Fitzsimmons-Palmer Co. 



CONFECTIONERY. 

National Candy Co. 

(Duiuth Factory.) 



DRUGS. 
L. W. Leithhead Drug 

DRY GOODS. 
F. A. Patrick & Co. 



Co. 



FURNITURE. 
DeWitt-Seitz Company. 



FOUNDERS and MACHINISTS. 

Clyde Iron Works. 

National Iron Co. 



GLASS, PAINTS AND BUILD- 
ING MATERIALS. 
Paine & Nixon Co. 



GROCERS. 

Gowan-Peyton-Twohy Co. 

Stone-Ordean-Well- Co. 

Wright-Clarkson Mercantile Co. 



HARDWARE. 

Kelley-Hov/-Thomson 
Marshall-Wells Hdw. 



Co. 
Co. 



LUMBER, SASH & DOOR MAN- 
UFACTURERS. 
Woodruff Lumber Co. 



WHOLESALE AND MAN'F'S 
OF MEN'S FURNISHINGS. 

Christenscn-Mendenhall- 
Graliam Co. 



PAPER. 

Duluth Paper & Stationery 
McClellan Paper Co. 
Peyton Paper Co. 



Co. 



PLUMBING SUPPLIES. 
Crane & Ordway Co. 



DHJCHESTER'SPILLS 

for /^\^ 

OB. VX 



•B^_*S->. Tlli: UIAMUNb 




I«<llo«! A«k your i>r« 



• zu::kt for 

....■ T -rT-:.- ---•"osjBroDd 
ru«» !n Ked tnj ii„ii d:«*11!c 
bo.M, ,esle4 with i!;.,e Kii,bo« 
T«k« Ba other. Hoy of t,,, v 

»>.A^OND liKAM* ei LI,(S, fo, 8» 

r ti ri i nowQ ii B«it. Safest. A 1 »«yj R «l|abl« 

SOU BY Di^lGGi3TS l\mmSA 




\: H 



m% mcek's Sttttddy School Cmon 

^rUTTEN FOR THE HERALD BY KJ^V. J. S. KUtTLEY. D. D. 




SINDAY SCHOOL I.ESSOX: SEPT. 25. 
Oalatlaus v, 1.5-:!6: Teniperanoe LeMNun. 



THE CO.\XECTIOX. 

We have left the life of Christ, to 
get our temperance lesson from one of 
I'aul's letters. Tliey were in a state 
of discord and grreat danger up in 
Galatla, and Paul wa.s anxious and dis- 
tre.ssed. He had a right to be, for he 
and Liarnabas, on tlieir first missionary 
journey, had won those people to 
Christ. They were of the same na- 
tionality as the Gauls, the modern 
French, and had some of the char- 
acteristics uf the versatile French. And 
the occasion of the trouble was tlie 
Jewish spirit of those Christians, wlio 
thouglit that all the Gentiles should 
first become Jews before becoming 
Christians. To be sure, the apostles 
at Jerusalem hud decided that no such 
burden should be laid on the converts 
from heatlienlsm, but a little spiteful 
crowd at Jerusalem took the opposite 
view and followed Paul into Iiis work, 
to pervert his converts. They were 
specially active in Galatia. and tiieir 
Inlluence was disastrous to tho har- 
mony of the chu relies. The result was 
that, through the doorway of those 
dissensions, a tidal wave of vices swept 
into the flock. Those people who, at 
first, were ready to pluck out their 
own eyes and give them to Paul, were 
now arrayed against him. They were 
temperamentally fickle. Tlie letter he 
wrote them unfolds the true doctrine 
of salvation, rebukes them for their in- 
constancy, and seeks to Impart to 
them some very practical lessons. 
P'rom that letter we get our lesson to- 
day. 



THE LESSOX. 

I. 
The IrrepreMNible Conflict. I.'.-IS. 

"Uut if yt; bite and devour one an- 
other, take heed that ye be not con- 
suhiod one of another. But I say. Walk 
in the .<^plrit, and ye shall not fulfil the 
lusts of the llesh. For the fiesh lusteth 
against the Spirit, and the Spirit 
against the flesh; for these are con- 
trary the one to the other; that ye may 
not do the things tliat ye would. But 
if ye are led by the Spirit, ye are not 
under the law." 

1. FLESH.— That Is a term that in- 
cludes both the body and the bad 
things of thought and action; and v/e 
will get a list of them a little further 
along. To them all Paul gives the 
title "flesh." They are fleshly or car- 
nal, because they utilize the body in 
depraved ways and are manifested 
very largely in physical ways. But 
the heart pours forth this stream, 
Jesus tells us. Satan spoils our powers 
and despoils us. Vice ruins the reason, 
hardens the lieart. cruslies the con- 
science and slays.,all nobility. 

2. SPIRIT.— When the Holy Spirit 
touches and trains our spirits we do 
differently. Our spirits are capable 
of being Influenced by Gods Spirit. 
Paul contrasts the human spirit with 
its capncity for higher things against 
the flesh or our nature that sins; but 
he also contrasts the Holy Spirit with 
the flesh. 

3. CONFLICT.— The Holy Spirit is at 
warfare with the works of the flesh. 
There is only one hope for any man — 
to live in his spirit rather than in his 
flesh and to secure the aid of the Holy 
Spirit, who will dwell in him. We are 
involved in the conflict. The evidence 
tliai the battle is going against us is 
that we get In conflict with each other. 
We help the devil consume his victims 
and for our reward, he helps them 
slay us. The biter always gets bitten. 

II. 
FruItH o£ the Fle.<«h. 19-21- 
"Now the works of the flei^h are 
manifest, which are these; fornication, 
uncleanness, lasciviousness, idolatry, 
sorcery, enmities, strife, jealousies, 
wraths, factions, dlvlsi-jiis, parties, 
envyings. drunkenness, revellings, and 
such like; of which I forewarn 
you, even as I did forewarn you 
that they who practice such things 
shall not inherit the kingdom of God." 

1. INTEMPERANCE. — Temperance 
moans self-control. When one loses 
control over himself he lets go every- 
thing. Intemperance In speech is sure 
to lead to tlie same in deeds. Eat- 
ing may be Intemperate. Tlie monster 
form of that vice is drink. It unfits 
a man for ■work and our great commer- 
cial and industrial institutions will not 
take or keep a man In their employ 
who drinks, even in moderation. It 
unfits for contests in manly sports. 
You can't get into the Marathon races 
or the baseball or football teams, if you 
drink. You can't get a policy in ac- 
cident insurance or in any of the high 
grade life insurance companies, if you 
drink. You can't have tho confidence 
of the people whose confidence in you 
is worth most, if you drink. You can't 
have the money for clothes and books 
and home that you spend for drink. 
You can't have the fullest respect of 
those who are close to you, if you 
drink. Lower efficiency, lower stand- 
ing, lower prospects, lower power are 
the results. Study the whole black 
list and see if there is any of these 
"works" you would like to have to your 
discredit. 

2. DISASTER. — Intemperance is fatal 
for this life and for me life herafter. 
One who takes himself in hand to work 
evil is lost to God. "And such like," 
Is an ominous phase. It means that 
one who practices even one of these 
vices is apt to go on, in an endless 
series, and there are more than have 
been named. If only the pure in heart 
can see God, these are excluded. If 
only those who yield to God's Spirit 
can live In comfort with God, then 
there is no place for them in God's 
home. They cannot Inherit the king- 
dom of God. 

III. 

Fruit of tlic Spirit. 22-20. 

"But the fruit of tiie Spirit is love, 

joy. peace, long suffering, kindness, 

goodness, faithfulness, meekness, self- 



If Women 
Only Knew 



What a Heap of Happiness It Would 
Bring to Duluth Homes. 




lea au.-d cure for Chronio licsrs. lioue Llcern, 
ScroTuloi: 8 Ulcers, V.nrlcosc Ulcera-Mcrcur^ 
lairicrrn.Fever So res, Gangrene, IJIdod Foi« 
■omnK, White .Swcllinti:, Pdisnned Wounds, 

all sores of king sta'.dtDg.Posltively iu-vT falls. Cures 
Risa CutH, nurns, Bollo, F^'lon!*, carbuncles, 

AbscesH'-B. Forgalf by (iriig^tlsta. Mall 25onn<!o0c. 
j. l\ ALLEN MEDICiyE (.0.. Sr. Facl. :Miwy 



' Hard to do housework with an ach- 
ing back. 

Brings you hours of misery at 
i leisure or at work. 
j If women only knew the cause — 
i that 

j Backache pains come from sick 
' kidneys. 

j 'Twould save much needless woe. 
j Doan's Kidney Pills cure sick kid- 
; neys. 

j Duluth people endorse this: 
1 Mrs. W. F. Humerichous, 109 
! Twenty-seventh avenue, Duluth, 
{ Minn., says: "For several years I 
j was afflicted with kidney trouble and 
I the medicines I tried did not help me. 
I My back often ached severely and if 
I I stopped, dizzy spells seized me. 
I After I had taken the contents of one 
i box of Doan's Kidney Pills, I felt so 
I much better that I procured a further 
j supply. I am now free from back- 
ache and feel better in every way. 
I do not hesitate to recommend 
Doao's Kidney Pills in return for the 
good they did me." 

For sale by all dealers. Price 50c. 
Foster-Milburn Co., Buffalo, N. Y., 
sole agents for the United States. 

Remember the name — Doan's — and 
take no other. 



control; against such there is no law. 
And they that are of the Christ Jesus 
have crucified the flesh with the pas- 
sions and the-4usta thereof. 

"If we live by thef' Spirit, by the Spirit 
let us also walk. -Let us not become 
vainglorious, provoking one another, 
envying one another." 

1. UNITY.— It Is fruit, not fruits. 
Start wtih love and all the rest come 
for they are a part of the kingly vir- 
tue of love — developments from it. If 
one is led and fed by the Spirit of God, 
the characteristics of Christ reappear 
in him, under that Spirit's influence. 
They are the fruit because the product 
of the Spirit. These are a fascinating 
list, but possible only when we re- 
pudiate the works of the flesh by cruci- 
fying the flesh. These virtues enable 
one to embody the law in himself and 
they are what the whole law approves. 
Health is not under tlie censure of san- 
itary regulations nor a public spirited 
citizen under the criminal code. They 
never think of law. Paul assures those 
Galatians that, when the Spirit pro- 
duces such fruit in their lines, they 
M-ill not think of the Jewish rites and 
ceremonials. 

2. DANGER.— The conditions are 
rigid. The Spirit must dwell in their 
hearts. The flesh must be repudiated 
as Christ repudiated sin on tlie cross. 
There is one great brignt hope for the 
sinner — onlv one. That hope is grasped 
when Chris"t lays hold of us. That 
hope is realized on, when one sets him- 
self in array against sin, laying aside 
the sin that most easily besets him. 



\VH.\T THK MASTERS SAY. 

Tlii fact tl:at none of ihii ocmrstants 
(in the 1910 Boston Marathon race) 
used alcohol during tlie race, and that 



OFHCERS 
AREJLECTED 

Rev. A. W. Ryan Heads the 

Duluth Humane 

Society. 

Executive Agent Reports on 

Work AccompHshed 

During Year. 



Offlcer-s of the Humane society were 
elected last night as follows: Rev. A. 
W^. Ryan, president; Rt. Rev. James 
McGolrlck, first vice president; Walter 
Turtle, second vice president; Henry 
Taylor, secretary; J. P. Johnson, treas- 
urer; Rev. Alexander Milne, Rev. N. L. 
Upham, Mrs. William Bates, Henry F. 
Greene, A. E. Prudden, C. B. Miller and 
Mrs. Marvin McLaren, directors. Mrs. 

McLaren takes the place of W. E. 
Magner. 

George V. Fifer, executive agent, 
read an annual report that had some 
"hair-raising" featui-es. He told espe- 
cially of two instances of cruelty to 
children. A' West end bay was beaten 
by his father so severely that both of 
the child's ears were torn and the sea; s 
of mistreatment were visible for sev- 
eral days.' The parent was arrested 
and sent to the city's rock pile for 
thirty days. The boy was placed In the 
Children's Home. 

An Evelcth mother died after giving 
birth to twins, one of which died. The 
father chastised the other, tore its ear 
and inflicted several abrasions on the 
infant's head. He made it drnik a not 
mixture of salt and water. The man 
was fined $90 and costs or ninety days 
In jail. The baby was sent to the state's 
school at Owatonna and will probabiy 
be made a ward of the state. 

In the last fiscal year the society 
took fifteen children from their homes 
b.ecau«e the environment^ was not con- 
ducive to the making of good citizens 
of the little ones. At the request of 
the society the juvenile court sent 
eight children to the state's training 
school one to the Children's Home so- 
ciety in St. Paul, seven to St. James' 
orphanage, «lx to the state's scnool for 
feeble minded, two to the city's hospi- 
tal and five to the state's hospital. 

The work in the animal division was 
large and the report presented many 
statistics showing what was accom- 
plished by the society last year. 
* III. 

Mrs. Jacob Wilmert, Lincoln, 111., 
found her way back to perfect health. 
She writes: "I suffered with kidney 
trouble and backache and my appetite 
was very poor at times. A few week's 
ago I got Foley Kidney Pills and gave 
them a fair trial. They gave me great 
relief, so continued till now 1 am again 
In perfect health." Sold by all drug- 
gists. 



WATER POWER 
SITES HELD UP 

President Withdraws Approxi- 
mately 70,383 Acres in 
the West. 

Washington, Sept. 22. — President Taft 
has withdrawn from entry approxi- 
mately 70,383 acres of land In Cali- 
fornia and Colorado under the provi- 
sions of the act of congress of June 
25, 1910, the California lands, 
mating 1,327 acres and are 
along the East Walker river 
fornla. They are believed to 
able for power purposes. 

Lands In Montana amounting to 
290,036 acres within the primary limits 
of the grant of the Northern Pacific 
Railway company were brought into 
the taxable area yesterday when they 
were clear-listed by the department of 
the interior. The lands are in the He- 
lena, Lewiston and Miles City, Mont., 
land districts. 



approxl- 
situated 
In Cali- 
be valu- 



TWELVE HUNDRED AND 

FIFTY BANKS APPLY. 

Washington, Sept. 22. — Up to date 
1,250 banks in the various states of 
the country have made application to 
the postoffice department to be desig- 
nated &s depositories for postai sav- 
ings funds, and C48 postmasters have 
made requests for the establishment of 
postal savings banks in their offices. 
The greatest number of applications 
tlius far have come from Pennsylvania, 
where 147 banks and forty-eight post- 
masters have applied. One application 
has been received from a postmaster 
in Hawaii. New England states have 
evidenced small interest In the postal 
banks system. 



all but one finished in good condition, 
is another evidence that alcohol di- 
minishes rather than increases bodilv 
endurance and capacity for work, 
since in former years runners who 
have used alcohol liave been the first 
to give out. The establishment of this 
proo:f alone, if its acceptance could be 
mado general, would be sufficient jus- 
tification of the Marathon race as a 
physiological experiment. — Medical 
Journal. 

Physicians sometimes examine the 
blood of their patients and detect dis- 
ease by the revelations of the micro- 
scope. Everyone wlio Is beginning his 
work in the world should search his 
heart, if, perchance, there may be in 
it a poisoned drop which may corrupt 
and ruin his life. — Youth's Companion. 

Have we not reason to suspect tliat 
thest nresent graces of ours are most 
star\pd and meager; that our kindness, 
justice, truth, patience, purity alone, 
are the meanest of growths; that they 
are only as the wild fruits of the wil- 
dern<;ss, as the coarse grass and dwarf 
blossoms of the prairie? Oh. how deli- 
cate and glorious they might be; how 
delicate and glorious we have seen 
them to be In our Master and in His 
conse-crated disciples. — Walkinson. 



PERTINENT QUESTIONS. 

What is the effect of alcohol on 
conscience? 

What has physiology to say about 
evils of Intemperance? 
What is the one subtle law by 
one sin leads to another and one 
to another virtue? 



1. 
the 

the 
3. 
which 
virtue 

4. What is it that 
quest so difficult? 

5. What is the cne 
contiuest? 



makes self-con- 
cnly law of self- 



ARE INCLINED TO 
RAISE STEEL PRICE 

Leading Men in That Indus- 
try Confer in New 
York City. 

Ne^r York, Sept. 22. — A conference of 
the leading steel and ore Interests of 
the country was held yesterday at the 
Railway club. The meeting was called 
by Chairman E. H. Gary of the United 
Steel corporation. 

After the meeting Judge Gary said 
that there was a disposition on the part 
of some of the steel men to advance 
prices! Instead of reducing them. This 
applios especially to the district east 
of Pittsburg and probably will result 
in advances in the steel plates from 
$1.35 to ?1.40 per 100 pounds. Judge 
Gary declared nothing in the nature of 
an agreement as to prices or questions 
of policies was entered into at the con- 
ference. He said such action in his 
opinion would be illegal and altogether 
unwlae. 

Those present at the meeting in ad- 
dition to Chairman Garv and President 
W. E Corey of the United States Steel 
corporation, were representatives of 
the following independent companies: 
Johns & Laughlin of Pittsburg, the 
Lackawanna Steel company, the Re- 
pubiio Iron & Steel company, the Cam- 
bria .Steiel company, the Luk«ns Iron "& 
Steel company and Worth Brothers of 
Coatesville, Pa. 



Danderine 



GROWS HAIR 

and we can 

PROVE IT! 

A lady from Minnesotii writ**: 

" .K& a result of using 3anderine,my hair 
is close to five feet in length." 

Beautiful Hair at Small Cost 

HAIR troubles, like manv' other diseases, have 
been wrongly diagnosed and altogether mis- 
understood. The hair itself is not the thing to 
be treated, for the reason that it is simply a product 
of the scalp and wholly dependent upon its action. 
The scalp is the very soil in which the hair is pro- 
duced, nurtured and grown and it alone should 
receive the attention if resu ts are to be expected. 
It would do no earthly good to treat the stem of a 
plant with a view of making it grow and become 
more beautiful-the soil in which the plant grows 
must be attended to. Therefme, the scalp in which 
the hair grow* must receive the attention if you are 
to expect tt to grow and became more beautiful. 

Loss of hair is caused by the scalp drj-ing up. 
or losing Us supply of moisture or nutriment- when 
baldness occurs the scalp has simply lost all its 
nourishment, leaving nothii g for the hair to feed 
upon (a plant or eveu a tree Mrouid die under similar 
conditions.) 

The natural thing to do in either case, is to feed 
and replenish the soil or scalp as the case may be, 
and your crop will grow and multiply as nature 
intended it should. 

Knowlton's Oanderine hat a most wonder* 
ful effect upon the hair glaiids and tissues of the 
scalp. It is the only remi'dy for the hair ever 
discovered that is similar to the natural hair 
foods or liquids of the scalp. 

It penetrates the pores quickly and the hair 
soon shows the effects of it; wonderfully exhilar- 
ating and life-prodticing qua ities. 

One 25-cent bottle is enough to convince you of 
Its great worth as a hair growing and hair beauti« 
tying remedy— try it and seu for yourself. 

NOW at all druggists in three sizes, 

25c. 50c and $1.00 per bottle. 



FREE 



Cut 

This^ 

Out 



To show hoT? quickly Dsndtrini 
acts, we will ?end a large sam- 
ple free by return m ul to anyone who 
sends this free coupt>n to the 

KNOWLTON OANDERINE CO., CHICAGO, ILL., 

with their name anc address and 10c 
in silver or stamps t') pay postage. 




i < 


\ 


> 


■ 




. 




^ 




^ 




1 








- 




' ■ ■ ^1 


1 




' * 




\t 






1 


i 




■' 




■ 1 








it 


r 




1. 




, 




t. 




"■ 





1 




orncr 




indows 



75,000 MEN TO 
DEMAND RAISE 





We want several 
the best Florida Imd 



men who are "live wires" 
proposition on the market, 



to represent 
who will be 



given territory where big money can be made. The customers 
will be given a chance to select a representative to visit the 
lands for them at our expense. If not as represented by us the 
money paid will be returned. 

We have already more than 500 satisfied customers at the 
Head of the Lakes. Tlie first men will get the best territory 
allotted to them, so better call at once and learn of our 
sition. 



propo- 



^^i FLORIDA LAND GQ., 

309-310 LYCEUM BLDG., DULUTH, MINN. 




Engineers, Trainmen and Con- 
ductors of Western Lines 
Involved. 

Chicago, Sept. 22. — Seventy-flve 
thousand locomotive engineers, train- 
men and conductors on all the railroad 
systems in tlie West are preparing to 
open negotiations with railroad man- 
agers for a wage increase of approxi- 
mately 15 per cent. The engineers gave 
notice of their demands some time ago. 
and their general committee will arrive 
in Chicago Monday to meet the man- 
agers In conference. 

The trainmen and conductors are 
now taking a referendum vote on 
their demands before formally pre- 
senting them to the managers. The 
vote will be completed Oct. 1, when 
the question will at once be submitted 
to the railroad officials. 

Two Act Coujolntly. 
The demands cover every railroad 
system west of and Including the main 
line of the Illinois Central. The Brutli- 
erhooi of Railway Trainmen and the 
Order of Railway Conductors are act- 
ing jointly in the wage movement, 
while the engineer* are acting alone. 

The firemen on the same roads pre- 
sented demands last spring, which 
settled by arbitration under the 
law, giving the men an In- 
about 10 per cent In wage.s. 
managers are said to have 
endeaA'or to adjust the dlf- 
the engineers, trainmen 
by direct negotiation. 




National Bank 



OF DULUTH 

Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits, 31,950,000. I 

Travelers' Cheques I 

Letters of Credit Foreign Exchange I 

Checking Accounts Savings Accounts 

Safe Deposit Boxes. 



nts I 




^ii^PEGIALIST 



CONSULT 

HUNDREDS ARE COMING TO ST. PAUL TO BE CURED 

XH£V 



ALJL SJK^SIBLE PEOP]LE SUOULD QO WU£K£ 
AR£ SL&B OF OETTLNO A CV&B 

The best plao« In the Northwest where yoa can g«t cured tbe qnlckert and 
obeapAst is at th« Great Heidelberg Medical It.stltute. St. Paal. Uoaest, 
faithful pervJce, new, aavanosd treatment. exj>ert skill, rapid cures ana 



obeapest is at th« Great Heidelberg Sedical 

"ful service, new s " 

CCa L oriable charges. Come noir. Railroad rates onlv £ centi- & nilla. 




were 
Erdman 
creaso of 

Railroad 
decided to 
ferences of 
and conductors 



BALLINGER IS 

BELLIGERENT 

Says He Intends to Show 

Up Those Who Criticize 

His Actions. 

Denver, Colo , Sept. 22. — "When I get 
a foot loose from public office I Intend 
to devote a i)art of my time to giving 
to th«} American people some idea of 
the purity of the lives of my traducers," 
said .Secretary of the Interior Richard 
A. Balllnger at a banquet given in his 
honor by the Denver Chamber of Com- 
merce and the real estate exchange. 

"The public Is entitled to know the 
hldde;i springs of the inspiration which 
gushes in torrents of 'uplift' patriotism 
from these self-appointed moralists, 
and 1 shall heartily enjoy using the 
'searchlight' when the proper time 
comet;, he said. 

The secretary a.sserted the efficiency 
of the interior department was never 
great«ir than today and continued: 

"I have no apologies to make to the 
Amer.can people for any act during 
my public career, or in any private ca- 
pacity. 

Defies Hi« Crttlcs. 

"Standing securely upon my con- 
sciouf. rectitude, 1 defy all my critics 
and all my enemie.s, and with deliberate 
purpose of fighting out the battle to 
the end, I propose to administer the in- 
terior department within the Constitu- 
tion E.nd the law as I conceive It to be 
under my oath of office. 

"Perhaps unfortunately for me, but 



WE WLLL CUKE YCU SECRETLY AND CHEAPLY 

A XISIT ^ ILL CON\ INCE YOU -^— — ^^ 

Teftrs of eiperlenoe In treating Nervous. Blood and Chronio Dlseasec giTos ns manj advantafres over fam> 
11 y doctors. We cure weak Kerves, Catarrhal discharges, Pus Soros, dibtaeed Biooj, hupture Varicose 
Veins luid Varicose Uioer, Kidney, Bladder and frustatlc troubles. Piles. Fistula and Rectal affections, 
Rheumatlam, C&tarrh, Eczemi, Sorofula and other stubborn chronic roalsdlee. Ovor 120,000 men havo 
kDQlled to us for irentment. ^oneultatlon, tiaailnatiin a.id Advice Fre« and Cunfldential! If Tou cao- 
—It call, write u* today deeoriblng your case In your own words and we will advUe you FRKS, 

Cor. Fifth and Jackson StC 
ST. PAUL, M1>N. 

•lOV.OOO Cat itai. Incorporated iinder Uie State Iawb oI iilaatiOUi^^mm^^^^^^^^ 



HEIDELBERG MEDICIL INSTITUTE 



unfortunately for the Araerican people, 
I have been the Instrument through 
which the efforts of certain over-zeal- 
ous persons have been, thwarted in an 
attempt to convert the public domain 
into a great national preserve and to 
destroy the opportunities of the West 
for the useful and just development of 
Us resources. \%'hlle I earnestly believe 
In the conservation of our natural re- 
sources, I believe In the exercise of 
sanity in regard to this as well as every 
virtue " 



CHARLTON LOSES 1 IR8T 

SKIRMISH 1\ COURT. 

Jersey City, N. J., Sept. 22. — Porter 
Charlton, lost the opening skirmish 
yesterday In his fight tc escape extra- 
dition for the confessed murder at 
Lake Como, Italy, of t is wife, Mary 



Scott Castle Charlton. Judge Blair, 
before whom he was arraigned, de- 
clined to admit a plea of insanity and 
took the application for his return un- 
der advisement. An attack on tho 
treaty with Italy under which extra- 
dition is asked thereupon became tho 
main prop of the defense. 

Several alienists who have had 
Charlton under observation, were In 
court ready to testify to his mental 
Incapacity, but were denied a hearinjr 
under Judge Blair's ruling. 

Crosby, N. D., <o Have Celebration. 

Crosby. N. D., Sept. 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Crosby business men aro 
laying plans for a jnlque celebration, 
to be held on Oct. 8, being In the na- 
ture of a harvest jubilee. As fea- 
tures of the days program, there will 
be a varied string of sporting events, 
while premiums are to be offered on 
exhbits of farm produce of various 
kinds. 




For the mother in the home to "b* 
strong and -^ell, able to devote hot 
time and strength to the rearing oi 
children, is one of life's greatest 
blessings. Often the bearing oi 
children injures the mother's health, 
if she has not prepared her systexa 
in advance for the important event; 

Women ■who use Mother'} Friend are saved much of the diBcomfort and suffering 

60 common -with expectac t mothers. It is a penetrating oil that thoroughly lubrl- 

fcates every muscle, nervo and tendon Involved at such times, and thus promoted 

physical comfort. It aids nature by expanding the skin and tissues and per- 

(fectly prepares the system for the 

coming of baby. Mother's Friend 

p.ssures a quick and natural recovery 

for every -woman -who uses it. It is 

|for sale at drug stores. Write for 

jfree book for expectant mothers. 
BSASFIELD BEQUIsATOB CO., 

Atlanta* Ga. 




I 

i 



li 



-t 



■ 



— > 



i 



■ a I. ~«i A 




4 



•ifSSB 



6C. 



r ^ 



a^s 



cs: 



- I I mm 



• r-r 



V' 






u 



ill 



Thursday, 



p 



mSSSS^SS^0ti 




sua 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 




September 22, 1.910. 




BHANCH OFFICES t 



A Jrniien. 330 North 57th Ave. AV. 



J. J. Moran, SlOV^ North Central Ave. 




HOUSE MOVERS BUSY CLEARING THE 

CANADIAN NORTHERN RIGHT-OF-WAY 



I 7H£ NEW ENGLAND WING OF THE SENATEI * 




Houaemovera, who have had a busy 
month at West Duluih, have nearly 
ftnlshe'i the work of removing the 
buildings in iho path of the new Can- 
adian Northern Hue. which is building 
Into the city through West Duluth. 

Although the specified time for the 
right-of-way to be clear of obstruc- 



HOUSE MOVING OPERATIONS, 
tlons was given out as Sept. 20, there 
are still a few houses to be removed. 
However, in the vicinity of Sixty- 
fnurth avenue west and Keene's creek, 
where work has been started on the 
bridge construction trestle work by 
Contractor Hauser, there are no ob- 
.siructions. The other houses will soon 
be removed. 
The trestle will be elevated for sev- 



illUHJ Ujr 



L^tiidui. 



NEW DULUTH 
HAS FIRE SCARE 



Brush Fires Threaten Suburb 

But Are Checked Before 

Doing Damage. 

New Duluth had another Are scare 
yesterday a:ti rnoon. Althougii no , 
actual da; resulted, brush fires , 

threatened lur -u. lime to destroy a part 
of tlie rcjiuienoe district. The fires 
darted in the vicinity of the steel 
plant and, fanned by a stiff breeze, 
crept toward New Duluth. 

UftMcr Kruger of New Duluth and 
Postmaster Tower organized a volun- 
teer sijuad of six men, who, after sev- 
eral hours' hard work, succeeded In 
heading off the blaze on a road just a ; 
block north of the residence district. 

Two men were employed to watch . 
and see that there was no fresh out- I 
break during the ntght. iliiln wliich 
came early today pvit out the tires. It 
is said that they were started yester- 
day by laborers clearing away brush at 
tlie steel plant site. 

TO INSTALUWRSE 

IN IKON WORKING. 

Preparations are being made at the 
Duluth Industrial high school for the 
Installation of the new course in iron 
■working, which will be a feature of 
the course in manual training at the 
%'. .-t Duluth cour.^e tliis year. The 
course is for higb school students only. 



The new course will be identical with 
that of the Central high school and | 
Prof Golger of the latter .«»chool will 
have supervision of both schools. One ] 
year will be devoted to forge work and I 
the second year of the course will be 
work in iron moulding. 

About forty are taking the manual 
training at West Duluth this year. 

YOUTHS CHAKcTeI) WITH 

DISORDERLY CONDUCT. 

Bert Clark, 18 years old. John Voi- 
scene. 20. and Kd Cameron, 17, were ar- 
rested late last evening by the West 
Duluth police and charged with disor- 
derly conduct. They will be arraigned 
this afternoon in municipal court. 

The voung men were put olT a street 
car for fighting and creating a disturb- 
ance. They said that they had been at 
a wedding at the Rialto apartments. 
Fifty-second avenue west, earlier in 
the evening and the quarrel started 
there. 

Not being able to furnish $10 ball 
each, all were kept at the station over 
night. All of the boys live In the West 
end. 



eral feet in running through the resi- 
dence district. At every street cross- 
ing steel will be used instead of the 
piling. T. B. Campbell, bridge en- 
gineer for the road, who has the plans 
for the trestle, is here to supervise the 
work. ... e 

Most of the material in the line of 
piling is already on the grounds, and 
active work will commence in a few 
days 



teen deaths In this city today. Among 
those who are ill is Herr Feisoiau, 
a member of the staff of the German 
embassy. • 





KEBP VOlll FEKT IJHV — HI BBEKS AKE THK BEST 
PUEVENTATIVE OF COLDS. 

117-119 \Vi:ST SliFEKlOIt STREET, DILITH, MIXX. 

CHOICE OF ALL OUR 

Ram Coats "f! 

Coats for Women— and Coats for Misses at 
Half Their Original Prices Fridav and Saturday 



CTYLISH general-utility Coats 
*^ that are neet.ed the year around 
— they're dressy in fair weather — 
they're a health necessity in stormy 
weather — any season of the year ! 

And ours are mostly Kenyon 
Coats — the Coats that are 
known as Best of All. 



— From tlie Atlanta Constitution. 



ENTERTAINMENT 

An entertainment will be given at the 
Maccabee hall, 25 Lake avenue north, 
tomorrow evening 

By the Lennaea Branch 

Admission 25 cents. 



among the various railroads and the' 
city. 

Contracts Are Let. 

At a meeting last evening of the 
board of public works, several con- 
tracts were let for the macadamizing 
and grading of streets and the construc- 
tifin of a sewer in the alley between 
Weeks and Lambom avenue from Nine- 
teenth to Twentieth streets. 

Grass Fires Burn. 

Grass fires, which have given the 
Hr.'men at the South end much trouble 
within the past few days, still continue 
to menace property in that vicinity. 
Yesterday afternoon, a grass fire sta,rt- 
ed near the Webster Manufacturing 
company's plant and later in the day at 
Sixty-second street and the Soo right- 
..f-wav. The fir.st blaze for a time 
threatened the chair factory, but the 
firemen soon had It under control. 




SUPERIOR 



HOLD CORN ROAST 

AT FAIRMONT PARK. 

A party of West Duluth young peo- 
ple held the first "corn roast" of the 
season last evening at Fairmont park. 

The affair was chaperoned by the 
Misses Gertrude Brown and Ger- 
trude St. Germaine. Among those 
present were: 



HEARING FOR 

POLICEMAN 



FREE TO 

ASTHMA SUFFERERS 

j^ \eiv Home t'ure That .-\njone Can 

Itte Without DiMOOuifort or Lumm 

of Time. 

We have a New Method that cures 
Asthma, and we want you to try it at 
our expense. No matter whether your 
case is of long-standing or recent de- 
velopment, whether it is present as 
bay-fever or chronic Asthma, our meth- 
od is an absolute cure. No matter in 
■what climate you live, no matter what 
your age or occupation, our method 
■will certainly cure you right in your 
own home. , ,^ ^ 

• We especially want to send it to 
those apparently hopele.'^.s cases, where 
all forms of inhalers, douches, opium 
preparations, fumes, "patent smolces," 
etc., have failed: We want to show 
everyone at our own expense that this 
new method will end all difficult 
breathing, all wheezing, and all those 
terrible paroxysms at once and for all 
time. ^ ^ 

This free offer is too important to 
jiegle^t a eintrk- day. Write u'.w and 
begin to cure at once. Send no money, 
einiply mail couimn below. l>o It Today. 



Messes- 

Lorella St. Ger- 
main. 
Clara Fider, 
Mabel Harker, 
Elizabeth Fitz- 
patrlck, 

Messrs. — 

Carl McMillan, 
Francis Ehr, 
Roy I^arrlve, 
Elwood O'Brien, 
Gordon Method, 



Mae Larrlve, 
ftiace (Jeffort, 
Madaline Labeck, 
Agnes Elir, 
Florence Kern. 



Frank Kerrigan, 

Albert Miller, 
Clayton Corrigan 
Leo Sharidon. 



FREE ASTHMA COUPON 

FUr.NTlKU ASTHMA CO., Koom 161 
Niai,'ara & Hudson Sts., Bulialo.N. Y. 
Send free trial of your metliod to: 



YOUR 
VALUABLES 



ARE m^ 

THEY f 
SAFE ■ 

Think again — for valuable 
pupcrs, etc., are safe only 
when in a modern Safe De- 
posit Vault. Our Manganese 
Steel Fire, Burglar and 
Bomb Pi oof Vault is the 
most modern production of 
human skill. 

You Can Rent a Box For 
$3.00 Per Year. 

American Exchange 
National Bank 



Child Dies. 

May E. McKlnnon, 4 Vi -months-old 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Mc- 
Kinnon, of ul3 North Fifty-second 
avenue west, died this morning. The 
funeral will take place at 2 o'clock to- 
morrow afternoon from St. James' 
Catholic church at f)neota cemetery. 
• » - 

West Duluth Briefs. 

M. E. Keete has returned from a 
ten davs' trip in the East. 

Mr. and Mrs. .1. W. Webster, who 
have been visiting at the home of Mrs. 
B. D. Abbott of 560a Grand avenue 
have returned to their home In Chi- 
cago. 

The Epworth League of Bethany 
Norwegian-Danish M. E. church will 
meet tomorrow evening at the church, 
riixty-flfth avenue west and Polk 
street. A program will be given, after 
which refreshments will be served. 

Mrs. W. H. Lashbrook has returned 
to lier home at Minneapolis after a 
visit at the home of Mrs. E. D. Abbott 
of 5609 Grand avenue. « 

John M. Bouska. a former resident 
of West Duluth, who has been living 
for the past four years at Ml not, N. 
D., returned yesterday and will again 
make his home in the western end of 
the city. 

Mr. and Mrs. Archie Dunlop of 5201 
Wadena street left today for Ashland, 
where they will visit with relatives. 

Mrs. George Vlckers returned yes- 
terday to her home at Scanlon after a 
visit with friends in West Duluth. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Peterson of 712 
North Fifty-sixtli avenue west are tiie 
parents of a son, born Monday. 

Funeral services were held this aft- 
ernoon for John S. Hendrickson, who 
died Monday at St. Luke's liospital of 
tuberculosis. The funeral was held 
from the residence, 719 North Thirty- 
ninth avenue west to Park Hill cemt;- 
tery. Rev. C. G. Olson officiated. 

Watch repairing, Hurst, West Duluth. 
■ « 
The Gratitude of IClderly People 
floe.s out to whatever helps give them 
case, comfort and strength. Foley 
Kidney Pills cure kidney und bladder 
diseases promptly, and give comfort 
and relief to elderly people. Sold by 
all druggists. 



Chief McKinnon Files Formal 

Charges Against Carl 

Halberg. 

Carl Halberg, a patrolman recently 
discharged from the Superior police 
force, will be given a hearing before 
the police commission tomorrow after- 
noon at 2 o'clock. 

Recently Halberg secured a writ of 
certiorari in superior court ordering 
the commission to produce the reason 
why he had been discharged and claim- 
ing tliat no formal charges had been 
preferred. 

Ye.sterday Chief McKinnon filed for- 
mal charge.s before the commission. In 
a general way, they are that Halberg 
was in.subordinate and failed to work 
in harmony with the department. 

It is now probable that the case will 
not be dragged into court. Halberg 
will have his hearing and will either 
be reinstated or discharged. In any 
evenr, it is understood, that Halberg 
will draw pay for time that he was not 
working. 



BIG DAMAG 



AREASKED 

A. G. Smith, Son of Duluth 

Lumberman, Files 

Suit 

Charges Canadian Pacific 
Causing Arrest Without 
Justification. 



MORE MEN TO BE 

EMPLOYED ON SOO DOCK. 



WORCESTER. MASS., 

HAS $100,000 FIRE. 

Worcester, Mass., Sept. 22. — A prop- 
erty loss ranging from $75,000 to $100,- 
000 resulted from a fire which broke 
out early today in the Chase building, 
a ten-story structure on Front street. 
Two firemen v.'ere temporarily over- 
come by smoke and three others were 
injured by falling glass. 

Pateot for Duluth Man. 

Washington, Sept. 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — .A. patent was issued to- 
day to Hans Honiman of Duluth for an 
automatic feeder for a platen printing 

press. 

• ■■ 

See HuMbanda Killed In Duel. 

Pelham, Ga., Sept. 22. — Charles Tate 
;^nd John Marchant, prominent men of 
this county, met in the road yesterday 
and fought a duel in the presence of 
their wives. Both men were killed. 



Diplomat IIiiH Cholera. 

St. Petersburg. Sept. 22. — There were 
thlrty-slx new cases of cliolera and thir- 



Work on the approach and super- 
structure of the new boo ore docks on 
St. Louis bay will be started next week 
and it is probable that several more 
crews will be put to work on the job. 
A force of sixty men is now employed 
and work is advancing rapidly on the 
pile drivins. 

The chutes to be used on the pockets 
of the dock are arriving There are 
100 to be used and sixty are here. 

Arrested in Milwaukee. 

The Milwaukee police yesterday ap- 
prehended Stanley Novak, wanted by 
the local sheriff's office for the deser- 
tion of his two small children, L. Wes- 
alo.ski, a brother-in-law of the accused 
man swore out the warrant. He will 
be held at Milwaukee until a deputy can 
bring him back. 

Harvest Festival. 

The Salvation Army will hold its an- 
nual harvest festival for three days, 
commencing Sunday. The officers are 
anxious to make the meeting this fall 
a big success and have issued an appeal 
to assist them in the work. Harvest 
tiianksglving service will be held Sun- 
day and an authm sale of the goods 
will take place Tuesday evening. 

Buys More Property. 

T Tj^n.svold, Billings I'ark florist, 
who is erecting a $6,000 greenhouse on 
four lots which he purchased on Sus- 
quehanna avenue and Twenty-first 
street has also bought five more lots 
adjoining the property. Most of the 
Improvements will be made this fall. 
Mr Tjensvold has been In the noral 
business in Superior for the past six 

years. 

* 

Annual Reception. 

The Christian Young People's Union 
will give Its annual reception for stu- 
dents and teachers of the Central high 
school, Nelson-Dewey high school, the 
normal school and business college to- 
morrow evening at the Cumming Ave- 
nue M. E church. The evening will 
be spent In a social way. 

Case Is Argued. 

Assistant City Attorney Mcintosh 
left this afternoon for Madison, where 
he will represent the city in arguing 
the Belknap street viaduct extension 
case before the state railroad commis- 
sion. The testimony concerning the 
case was taken at Superior some time 
ago. The case involves the matter of 
damages to be paid as a result of the 
construction of the viaduct and also 
the division of the cost of the work 



Further dispatches received from 
Winnipeg state that A. G. Smith, a Du- 
luth traveling man and the son of a 
l)rominent local lumberman, is the man 
who has started a suit for big dam- 
ages against the Canadian Pacific rail- 
way for alleged false imprisonment. 

It is claimed that he was thrown 
into jail as a suspect in the $100,000 
robbery at the Railroad hotel in Win- 
nipeg and denied the right to see an 
attorney or communicate with the 
outside world. , . . - x, , 

•'Smith is a traveler for his father s 
company, one of the oldest in Duluth," 
says the dispatch. "He is a member of 
the United Travelers' association and 
has been calling on the trade in Win- 
nipeg five years. He was making his 
usual call here and had a room at the 
Royal Alexander next to the one oc- 
cupied by Countess Antrim. When her 
jewels disappeared Smith was at the 
hotel. He discusaed the case as did 
other guests. Pinkertons swarmed 
over the hotel and Canadian Pacific 
railroad trains. Last Thursday night 
one of them. Smith says, came to his 
room and casually asked him if he 
would go to the' police station and 
identify a suspect they had there. 
Smith went and he says he was thrust 
into a cell. He declared that he had 
papers in his pockets showing who he 
was and that he told the police the 
name of his firm, their telephone and 
his bank at Duluth and urged them to 
telephone and verify his statements. 
He also demanded the right to see the 
United States consul, 

"Monday he induced a prisoner who 
was being released to notify the 
United States consul. Consul General 
.lones at once went to the jail. He 
demanded to see the man and, hear- 
ing his story, demanded that he be 
permitted to see a lawyer. This was 
accorded and on threat of habeas cor- 
pus proceedings Smith was released. 
The police deny that he asked to see 
any person." 

ROLLER SKATING ABROAD. 

All Paris has gone wild over roller 
skating and tlie various rinks are gay 
all afternoon and evening with per- 
formers in various degrees of perfec- 
tion. Even the parks and the streets 
have their skaters, and the broad 
asphalt walks of the Tulleries and the 
Luxembourg make line practicing 
grounds for small boys and girls. The I 
keenest of all skaters whether roller 
or otherwise are the English school- 
girls in Paris, and it is astonishing, 
says the Queen, to find how many there 
are of them. 

In London the Olympla Skating club 
an exclusive organization for enjoying 
roller skating on Sunday afternoons, 
lias aroused opposition among church- 
goers, but it has come to stay, at least 
until Easter. 



ASSAULTED 
AND^BBED 

Highwayman Beats Woman 
and Takes Purse Con- 
taining $12. 

Sapalino Padillo Is Arrested 
Charged With Commit- 
ting Crime. 



Sapalino Padillo was arrested at 1 
o'clock this morning charged with hav- 
ing rjbbed Mrs. Frank Columbo after 
he had cruelly beaten her almost to 
Insensibility at Fourteenth avenue west, 
near the Point of Rocks. 

The woman claimed to the police that 
she had been knocked down, choked, 
kioked and pounded shortly before 12 
o'<;iock wiiile she was on ner way home 
alone. Following the assault she as- 
serted that the highwayman took her 
pur.-e, containing $12. 

The street near tlie Point of Rocks 
is in deep shadow and at that time of 
night is practically deserted. Pedes 
tiiaiis are few and the only traffic 
consists of street cars and an occa- 
sional carriage. The police say that it 
is an ideal place for a holdup. 

Mrs. Columbo told her story to Lieut. 
Drennan and Patrol.man Mahlin wiien 
she had recovered sulYiciently to be able 
to walk. She said that she recognized 
lior assailant and caused Padillo's ar- 
rest. He was taken to headquarters, 
where she said site would appear to 
make a formal complaint against him. 
She did not show up this morning, but 
it was thought that she would do so 
tills afternoon, if she was able. Her 
condition is said to be rather serious. 



Prices range as follows: 
$12.50 Rain Coats, . . .$ 6.25 
$15.00 Rain Coats. 
$18.50 Rain Coats. 
$20.00 Rain Coats. 
$22.50 Rain Coats. 
$25.00 Rain Coats. 
$35.00 Rain Coats. 



.$ 7.50 
.$ 9.25 
.$10.00 
.$11.25 
.$12.50 
$17.50 






For School iV Business Wear 



These garments ire a nece.ssity. 
you buy Tomorrci^v ur Saturday. 



Will 



s- 


1 




UmbreUas at $1 That 

Are as Good as Most 

$1.50 Umbrellas 

Good buying on our part — 
coupled with close selling, 
mikes this offer a better value 
than you've seen in many a 
day! Men's and Women's L'm- 
biellas — elKlit-ril) Moulton 
Wireless frame — top of crav- 
eretted fast black serge — 
w Jilt fade — won't leak — good, 
neat, sensild'a handles — special 
at 91.00 riich. 






18c for Women's 35c Handker'fs 

TOMORROW we sliall place on sale a bi^ assortment of Celtic 
lawn and pure Irish linen handkerchiefs ni regular 25c and 35c 
qualities at 18c «:ach. The offer includes embroidered, hemstitched, 

lace edge, broken lines of em- 
broidered initials — it is a great op- 
portunity — be early, it will pay. 

50c for 98c 
Handkerchiefs 

A .MIGHTY fine lot of women's 
**• handkerchiefs — finest linens — 
every thread ptire linen — various 
styles — some with lace edges and 
embroidered corners — 
others with embroider- 
ed edges and embroid- 
ered hems — it is a clean up of last 
season's stock of 65c and 98c hand- 
kerchiefs — some of them are slight- 
ly soiled — special to close, only 50c 
each. 




50c 




lie 



lie for 15c Zephyr Ginghams 

Friday we shall put on sale a mighty 
fine assortment of 15c Zephyr ginghams at 
lie a yard — many of the patterns are copies 
of high priced, imported ginghams — the col- 
ors are good — make it a point to be early 
Friday to share in this splendid offering. 



Two Art Dept. Specials for Friday and Saturday. 
75c for $ 1 .50 Boat Club Pillows 

ENTHUSIASTIC club members will take notice and make it 
lioint to come here totnorrow for these clever Boat club 



r5c 



We Do 

Stenciling 

Right 

Many artistic 
and unique de- 
signs — sold or 
done to order. 



lows — various styles, made of burlaps and felts 
191C designs — choose from regular $1.25 and 
$1.50 ])illows at 75c. 

lea Yard Icr 7c Batten- 
burg, Dutchess and Honi- 
ton Lace Braids 



pii 



75c 



AN unusual opportunity — 
women who use these braids 
in making the pretty laces know 
well enough that the regular 

k prices are 4c, 5c, 6c V 
and 7c a yard for 1/^ 
most of these — to- •^^ 
morrow and Saturday, take your 
choice at our Art Department 
on the Third Floor at lea yard. 



We Do 

Stamping 
to Order 

New designs 
for embroider- 
1 n g , binding 
and holiday 
fancy work. 



» -g i T 



I 



^^ *■ 



CURIOUS STREET NAMES. 

London Chronicle: The list of 
curious street names Is Inexhaustible. 
Bermondsey possesses a Pickle Her- 
ring street. Near Gray's Inn there is 
to be found a Cold Bath Square. Most 
of the Nightingale lanes and Love 
lanes are hidden, ironically enough, 
in the slums of the East end. 

But for really bizarre street names 
one should go to Bru.ssels. The Short 
street of the Long Chariot, the Street 
of the Red Haired Woman and the 
Street of Sorrows are remarkable 
enough to catch the least observant 
eye. The Street of the One Person is, 
as one might guess, considerably nar- 
rower than Whitehall. But the cream 
of Brussels street names surely be- 
longs to the Street of the Uncracked 
Silver Cocoanut, This in the original 
appears as one ponderous thirty -six 
letter word. 



SECOND SON OF THE CROWN 

PRINCESS OF ROUVANIA. 

London, Sept. 17. — The crown prin- 
cess of Roumania has been described 
oy the ex-queen of Saxony as "the 
biggest flirt in Europe." She is the 
aiother of this picturesque little prince, 
who Is photographed in ancient armor. 
The crown princess delights in dress- 
ing herself in the picturesque cos- 
tumes of old Roumania and posing be- 
fore the camera. She delights no less 
in posing her children in peasant 
dress, in uniform and in other rather 
theatrical garments. Little Nichola.s, 
who has just celebrated his 7th birth- 
day, is one of her favorite subjects be- 
fore the camera. He is the fourth 
child of the crown princess but the sec- 
ond son, and In the even of the death 
of his brother, Carol, now almst 17, 
he will become heir to the throne of 
Roumania. 



ORRIS ROOT. 
Most people know that orris root Is 
one of tlie chief Ini^redients of violet 
powder; many others are well acquaint- 
ed with the strange y shaped pieces of 
white root, that seem like dried ginger, 
which give out the delicate and subtle 
scent of the violet and perhaps the 
privileged few kno^v that it Is made 
from the roots of a nind of iris. 

"Never have I seen the cultivation of 
the iris and the p -eparatlon of orris 
root to such perfection as this summer 
in the Tuscan Apennines, where Val- 
lombrosa lifts its pine covered head," 
says a writer in tl e Queen. "On the 
sunny side of the mountains lies the 
whole district of tie Val d'Arno and 
between Saltino and Plan di Sco the en- 
tire neighborhood is given up to the 
cultivation of vines, olives and Iris. 

"Indian corn, wheat and millet find a 
place: but wine, oil and orris root are 
the three commercial Industries. Per- 
golas of vines stretch along as far as 
the eye can see; vines with clusters of 
purple or white grapes, Olives laden 
with green berries, and under them and 
between them littlt' plantations of iris 
dalmatica. 

The Iris, or giagrgolo as It Is called 



These are then prepared. Nearly the 
whole of the tuberous root is cut oft, 
leaving only a tiny bit with fibres in 
order that the jdant may grow when 
replanted, as It Is at once for another 
three years of peace. 

"The tubers are then thrown Into blgf 
basins of water, and the whole family 
of the contadine, or peasant, sitting on 
the doorstep of their house or under 
the pergolas in tlie shade of the vines 
begin the business of peeling them pre- 
vious to their being dried in the sun 
for the market. Everybody la busy 
with the small stickle knives trimmins 
the iris root. In Its fresh condition it 
is sold for about 20 centimes the kilo, 
about 2 cents a pound. But after a few 
days exposure to the brilliant sunshine 
on large wicker work trays it loses 
two-thirds of Its weight and is sold to 
the wholesale merchants at a cents • 
pound."' 



SALOMES, ETC. 

Addison Mizner, the well-known Neir 
York vlveur, discussed in a Broadway 
cafe the subject of the feminine toilet. 

"A beautiful prima donna," said Mr. 
Mizner, "told me the other day that 
the less a woman wears, the longer 
it takes her to put it on. 

"'Aha!" said 1. 'In that case, I won 



In Italy, is planted thinly, and allowed 1 der how some of our — er — cla.«sical 
to grow for three years, when the roots dancers manage to be in time for their 
are dug up and tied Into big bundles. I turns at all.' " 





indows 



■ I* I 



^ 


1 

i 

- 


1 


t 

k 




- 


1 

1 




I 




12 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



September 22, 1910. 



LATE RETURNS ASSURE 

VICTORY FOR GILPIN 



Late this afternoon returns from ten 
of the twelve missing precincts were 
received at the county auditor's office. 

This leaves tut two of the precincts 
mlssilngr. those of 61-13 and Morcom. 
Botlj of these precincts are small, hav- 
ing not to exceed twenty votes apiece, 
and they cannot affect the totals. 

Tho ten precincts increased tlie lead of 
both Mr, Gilpin and Mr. Norton, elnch- 
Ing tlie nomination of the former 

On the ten precincts Mr. Gilpin in- 
creased ills lead by thirty votes, now 
havinK eijfhty-one to the srood. Mr. 
Norton increased his lead by seven 
votes, now having 176 to the good. The 
returns from the ten precincts follow: 

Adams. Norton. 
Missing precinct of Great 

Scott 9 14 

Lake wood 12 7 

Lavell 8 13 

Linden Grove 8 13 



Halden 17 

French 5 

Sturgeon 4 

Normanna 11 

Nichols 14 

64-21 1 

Totals 89 

Gilpin. 
Missing precinct of Great 

Scott 10 

I.akewood 7 

Lavell fl 

Linden Grove 11 

Halden 13 

French 3 

Sturgeon 10 

Normanna 12 

Nichols 10 

64-21 12 

Totals 94 




7 
7 
.11 
7 
17 

96 

Middle- 

coff. 

9 
8 
13 
7 
4 
4 
1 
8 
8 
2 

64 



/^ 



NEWS AND VIEWS OF POLITICS 
AND POLITICIANS 



V^ 



Judge Alfred Jaques opened his 
speaking cau^palgn as a candidate for 
congress from the Eighth Minnesota 
district at Pine City last evening, ad- 
dressing a Deino- 



Judge Ja«iueM 

At 

Drtuucratlc llally. 



cratic rally In the 
city hall. There 
was a good at- 
tendance — almost 
200 people — and Judge Jaques was 
given a flatteringly warm reception. 
He spoke during the day at the Fine 
countv fair and later was informed 
that his friends had arranged a meet- 
ing for nim In the evening. Although 
unprepared to address a political gath- 
ering, Mr. Jaquea gladly acquiesced in 
the arrangements made and made a 
brief but telling talk. Judge \Vilco.\ 
of the Pine county probate court pre- 
sided. 

Congressman Miller's record was 
discussed by his Democratic nominee, 
It being explained tiiat tiie present 
campaign must necessarily be along 
lines that will make Millers record a 
distinct Issue. Judge Jaques told his 
audience that he Is firm believer in 
representative government and that he 
believes the people of this district 
ralize that Mr. Miller has positively 
demonstrated that he Is out of sym- 
pathy with the principles of represen- 
tative government. This he demon- 
strated by his consistent support of 
and alignment with the elements and 
Influences at Washington, which are 
Inimical to true representative gov- 
ernment. 

Judge Jaques went Into the question 
of Mr. Miller's votes on Cannon Just 
enough to show the errant soplii.«try 
of the congressman's defense of those 



THE HARI r MAN OF 

GREAT U#lfll-t MrSTERY 

King of Mediums 






LOW 
FEE 




TODAY AND 
TOMORROW 



\VITH<H I A.-.KI.N(i A Ul ESTIO.V 

He tells you exactly what 
troubles, worries or perplexes you 
now, and what will bring success 
Calls you by name and reveals 
to you the "Secret of SuoceHJi'*— 
How to charm, fascinate and 
control the one you de.«lre, even 
tliough miles away — who and 
when you will marry. If ever 
AVhat Is the best to do In any se- 
rious undertaking, In business, 
love, courtship, marriage, health, 
mines, mining, etc. He tells It 
all to you. Mnken no faliie 
prumlHen, doeM hunent %Vf>rk, no 
one leaveN dlMMiitlHtied -^ No 
charge in advance and no fee 
asked unless you get the truth, 
but you must come to him sin- 
cere and honest or ho cannot 
help you. Low Fee, 50 OntH To- 
day. All business strictly con- 
fidential. 

129 EAST FIRST STREET 

<>ppi>Hite Vrniory. 
Hourni ll> to ^, Dully A .Sundn.v. 




>Ve Retail ^hoeit at 

A\ koIeMnle Prlopn. 
SorenKon S2.50 ShueN. 

For ladie.s and gents are 

bargains. Equal to 

others' $3.50 and $4.00 

kind. Why not save the 

extra dollar? Snappy 

styles to select from. 

S. T. SOUI^XSO.N. 

317 >Ve»t Superior St. 

Other Storen; St. Paul 

(iikI >Ilniienpolia. 



WITH 

CENTRAL LOCATION 

Ground Floor Entrance 



CONSERVATIVE MANAGEMENT 

Inder Supervision U. S. Government 

MODERN FACILITIES 



Savings Department 

3%-INTEREST-39b 

On Certificates of Deposit 
and Savings Accounts 



Most Modern Fire and Bur- 
glar Proof Safety Deposit 
Vaults. 



N 



ORTHERN 



[R ATIONAL D 




NEW ALWORTH BLDG. 

Tallest Modern Fire-Proof 
Building in Minnesota. 

Look Up— You Can't Miss It 



votes. He made a distinctly good Im- 
pression and when the meeting closed 
was earnestly assured by scores of 
voters that he will have their support 
at the polls in November. 

J. Adam Bede introduced Judge 
Ja<iues to the crowd when he delivered 
ills address at the county fair in the 
afternoon. 

• « * 

Certain distingui.«hed gentlemen 
known to fame as legislators hav'i 
been extinguished by their con.stit- 
uencies. The primaries brought some 

Joy to a mlnor- 

Leuding Lights ity of those vl- 

'I'hat tally interested, 

Have Been Doused, but t'ney biought 

grief — deep, 
heavy grief — to a very large majority. 
First and foremost, there Is, or wa:^, 
James A. Tawney, congressman from 
the First Minnesota district, who has 
been displaced on the Republican 
ticket by Sidney A. Ander.son of Lanes- 
boro, who. In turn, may be defeated by 
Judge Buck of Winona, the Jjemocrat 
candidate. 

A. L. Ward began to loom up as 
some light in the Second district, where 
it was supposed he had been nominated 
for congress, but today word comes 
that as a ligiit he has lasted very 
quick and that Franklin P. Ellsworth 
of St. James has won the honor of 
being a contender against Congress- 
man W. S. Hammond. 

Out In the Brainerd district Ole 
Erickson demonstrated that he wants 
a thing when he wants it and that 
even though it Is necessary to dis- 
place a good man in the senate, Ole 
will get the senate seat he wants, lie 
has the nomination, at least, and S. F. 
Alderman is lost in the shuffle. 

And down in the region of Long 
Prairie, where the light of Hudolph 
Lee shed Its county option radiance, 
there has been a sizzle and that iight 
J3 out, Senator Johnston winning a 
renomlnation handily. 

But in St. Paul, where they play 
politics all the year round, the blow 
fell heaviest. Thomas J. Brady failed 
to get a renomlnation. Brady is 
tltularly a Democrat and has repre- 
sented the Thirty-fourth district in the 
lower house. He was beaten for the 
nomination by H. W. McDonald, be- 
cause. It Is said, he fought against 
James F. Maloney, when that boni- 
lace was a candidate last spring for 
re-election to tiie council, and who won. 
Before that there was some trouble 
about a job, which Brady could have 
dispensed to the advantage of Maloney, 
but did not. Therefore Maloney some- 
what slaughtered Brady at the pri- 
maries. 

Mr. McDonald is an unknown, but 
it is hopefully believed tliat he will 
be no less effective as a legislator than 
has been Mr. Brady. 

H. O. Bjorge, who trimmed his con- 
gressional lamp with tonnage tax 
shears, will have no further reason 
for doing so. He's in the discard and 
Steenerson is renominated. 



Congressman J. A. Tawney has given 
out a statement concerning the result 
of Tuesdays primary election in the 
First district, at which Sidney Ander- 
son of Lanesboro was 
nominated for con- 
gress by a majority 
estimated at from 2,- 
500 to 3,000. 

"My defeat for the nomination can- 
not be ciiarged to the bolt of Repub- 
licans. In seven of the ten counties in 
tills district there was no contest for 
any Democratic nomination. One vote 
therefore in these counties, would nom- 
inate the Democratic candidates. 
Throughout the primary campaign 
Democrats talked against me and 
worked for my opponent. Tliey boldly 
declared they would vote for him In 
order to defeat me. Under our primary 
law tills could not be prevented. 

"The Democratic vote In these seven 
counties two years ago was over 7,000. 
At the primal y election yesterday In 
these counties there were less than 150 
Democratic votes cast. In a single pre- 
cinct in one county tliere were 70 more 
Republican ballots voted than were 
cast for President Taft In the same 
precinct two years ago. 

"It was not the false representations 
of me made by my opponents nor the 
u.«e of tiie name and popularity of Mr. 
Roosevelt to give color of truth to 
theie rei)resentations that accom- 
plished yesterday's results. It was 
simply the vote of Democrats in coun- 
ties where there was no Democratic 
contest for the Democratic nomina- 
tions." 

• • * 

James Gray of Minneapolis, Demo- 
cratic candidate for governor, will get 
Into harness without delay and men 
who know liim well say that If the 
Repuljlicans expect 



Tawney 

K^xplninn HiH 

Uetent. 



Gray Is* 

About to Ilegln 

lliM Fight. 



fin- 

on- 

ma- 



to see him make a 
spiritless campaign 
for election they 
are excessively 

mistaken. Mr. Gray is known to be a 
whirlwind campaigner when once he 
has started to campaign, and his na- 
tural equipment for a tight to the 
ish Is relied upon to make his 
slaught on the Eberhart-Smlth 
chine an effective one. 

Mr. Gray's itinerary, arranged at 
Democratic headquarters, was an- 
nounced last night to be: Sept. 22, 
Austin, afternoon; Sept. 23, Northlield, 
afternoon: Sept. 24, Long Prairie, aft- 
ernoon; Sept. 27, Fergus Falls, even- 
ing; Sept. 28, Evan.sville, afternoon; 
Alexandria, evening; Sept. 29, Brooten 
afternoon; Glenwood, evening; Sept! 
30, Wlndom, afternoon, W^orthing«^on 
evening; Oct. 1, Luverne, afternoon, 
Pipestone, evening. 

Fred W. Johnson will speak at Her- 
man Sept. 24, at the Grant county fair. 

The Democratic speakers' bureau 
will have as its staff these orators: 
John Lind, John Jenswold, Jr., W. E. 
McEwen, Andrew Nelson C D 
O'Brien Pierce Butler, D. \V. Lawler' 
C. M. TilTt. Edward Peterson, B. b' 
Gislason, J. M. Freeman, T. R Kane 
Harry Lund, T. J. Meighen, J. F d' 
Meighen, A. L. Sorler, Judge M C 
Brady, Stan Donnelly, L. L. Brown m' 
J. Daly and F. M. Larrabee. 



DULUTH MAN ERECTS ONE OF THE 

FINEST CREAMERIES IN THE COUNTRY 



'^•', A,X*- 




4 



B. E. BAKER'S CREAMERY. 

One of the finest and best equipped creameries In the country has been built by B E. Baker of Duluth on his 
farm near Spooner. Whs^ It i.^ a gravity creamery there being no machinery to transport thf^rlamwhrch is moved 
by Sravity frorn the loading platform to the agitator and then into the churns. The building is entlTelv of cTment 
construction. It Is equipped with the latest machinery for butter making. About 300 cows are In the di«mct near 
Spooner of which Mn. Baker owns fifty. The building is lighted by electFicity and a gasofine engine furnUhesaH 
%^l^^^^'^^;^%^i:Z J°oId'';\tTr^^''"^^^- ^"^ ^■■'^•^^ *'^^ "^^^^^ ^^^^ "^^^^' ^'- electncIt^r^Thi-'b^uVlStn^g^'^ 



COPPERS NERVOUS 
CLOSING LOWER 

Calumet & Corbin the Only 

Feature of the Local 

Market. 

The copper market was nervous to- 
day and closed lower than yesterday. 
Tile opening was strong as the coppers 
derived reflected strength from the 
railroads which opened strong on ac- 
count of the St. Paul decision yester- 
day which Invalidated the rate laws 
of Minnesota. Toward noon the market 
became weak and depressed and was 
■subjected to some profit-taking. Th* 
activity was most professional al- 
ihougii the East wired that the public 
was picking up scattered lots. 

News in the steel world is conflicting 
and professionals are inclined to be 
pessimistic over general business con- 
ditions which they think will be ma- 
terially improved after the fall elec- 
tions, however. They are inclined to be 
cautious until conditions become more 
settled. Professionals generally were 
long and tried to bull the market to- 
Uay but it refused to be bulled. The 
clise was strong chiefly because offer- 
ings were exceedingly light. Calumet & 
Mecla which has been soliciting busK 
ness on a basis of 13c Is said to have 
reduced its price to 12 34 c. The market 
for electrolytic copper Is nominally 
t-%c at which some sales have been 
made compared with 12 %c earlier In 
the week. Quotations probably will be 
readjusted on account of tiie decline of 
th.^coppor quotations of the Calumet & 

Sales of several million pounds of 
copper are reported sold for export on 
a basis of 12i^c. This Is i^c to ^c 
below so-called official quotations. Ex- 
ports of the red metal on Wednesday 
were 375 tons. The total exports since 
Sept. 1 have been 20,472 tons. 

The local market was dull except In 
Calumet & Corbin was extremely ac- 
tive, buying being heavy. Butte Bal- 
laklava sold here at $6.12 1,^, Live Oak 
at $16.18-^4 to $1G.50, Shattuck at 
S24.1214, $24.75 and $24.50, Amazon at 
$2. 50, Butte & Superior at $7.50, Calu- 
met & Montana at 90c. Calumet & Cor- 
bin at 46c to 47c, 45c, 47c and 4Sc at the 
close. Chief sold at $1.50 and St. 
Mary's at 18c. 

Amalgamated sold at $63.37 '/i to 
$C2.75 to $63 to $62.25 to $G2.62i/^. Butte 
Ballaklava sold In the East at $6.12 1^ 
to $6, Calumet & Arizona at $59.50, 
Greene at I6.S7% to $6.75, Glroux at 
$6.62 »^, North Butte at $27.75 to $27, 
Superior & Pittsburg was $11 bid. Shat- 
tuck at $24.1214 to $25, $24.25 
$24.87%. 

Closing 



and 



* * 
quotations 
stock exchange today 



on the 
follow: 



Duluth 



Listed Stocks — 



Bid. 



Asked. 



American Saginaw 

Butte Coalition 

Butte Alex-Scott pt pd. , 

Full pd 

Butte-Ballaklava 

Calumet & Arizona .... 
Cactus Development . . . 

Copper Qtieen 

Cordova, pt pd 

Full pd , 

Denn-Arizona 

Dul'ith & Moctezuma . . 
Giroux Consolidated ... 

Greene-Cananea 

Keweenaw 

Live Oak Development. 
North Butte 

I'nliMted StoekK — 

-Amazon-Montana 

Black Mountain 

Calumet & Montana . 
Calumet & Corbin .... 

Cliff 

Mowltza 

North American 

Rawhide Royal 

San Antonio 

St. Mary 

Sierra 

Summit 

Tuolumne 

Vermilion Steel & Iron. 



1% 
18 



5% 

67 »4 

1% 



2 7-16 



6^4 
6% 
3>4 

leva 



2% 
18c 



46c 



2c 
5 
15c 



73c 
3 1-16 



18% 

4 

6 

6 
58 

1% 
30c 
40c 
60c 

2% 

2 

6% 

6% 

4 
16% 
27 Mt 



first baronet, and the daughter of the 
late Abraham Montefiore. 
m 
Nothln better than Pratt & Lambert's 
No. 61 floor varnish. Quayle-Larsen 
company, 23 Second avenue west. 



CITY BRIEFS 



Dulutli-Mnde Books. 

Thwing-Stewart Co., Phone 114. 



Dies In the West. 

Col. A. E. Chaniler, a former prom- 
inent Alinnesota newspaper man, died 
Sept. 15 at Tacoma, Wash., of tubercu- 
losis and sciatic rheumatism. He was 
connected with the St. Paul Globe, 
which suspended publication some 
years ago, and the News Tribune. He 
left here for the West In 1897. 
■■ « ■ 

Goes to Iteforniatury. 

John Williams was sentenced to the 
state reformatory this morning by 
Judge Cant of the district court. Will- 
lams admitted that he stole two open- 
face watches from the person of Erlck 
Aronson during August of tlie present 
year. 



Many Pay Wheelaee Tax. 

Since the announcement that war- 
rants had been issued for the arrest 
Of several corporations which have 
failed to pay the wheelage tax, many 
people have been appearing at the 
office of the city clerk to comply with 
the ordinance. The money has been 
coming in faster than at any time 
since the ordinance was passed. The 
authorities state that all who do not 
secure their tags will be arrested as 
fast as the evidence against them can 
be secured. 



Returns From St. Paul. 

City Attorney Bert Fesler returned 
this morning from a business trip to 
St. Paul. He called upon State Auditor 
Iverson with a view to making some 
arrangement for the use of the state's 
property on the harbor at Thirty- 
seventh avenue west, but Mr. Iverson 
was out of the city. 



Pleads Not Guilty. 

John Epple was arre.'^ted this morn- 
ing on a warrant charging him with 
allowing his cow to run at large. He 
entered a plea of not guilty and will 
be tried Friday morning. 

♦ 

Game Is Postponed. 

The baseball game between the Du- 
luth and Superior aldermen, scheduled 
for this afternoon, has been postponed 
until next Tuesday afternoon because 
of the rain. 



Vnable to Pay Fine. 

Fred Mallnsten, arrested on the 
charge of selling beer without a license 
at 603 West First street, changed his 
plea to guilty in police court yesterday 
afternoon and was fined $100 or thirty 
da\s In the county jail. He was un- 
able to pay his fine. 

♦ 

Bank Clearings. 

Duluth bank clearings for the week 
ending Thursday, Sept 22 are $4,766,- 
678.13. 



92c 
50c 



85c 
3 

4c 
6 

18c 

2>4 
80c 
3T4- 

3'^ 



Total number shares, 12,390. 
• • 

Heath & Milllgan paints have held 
their high reputation for over forty 
years. Quayle-Larsen company, 23 
Second avenue west. 



BLOODHOUNDS 

HUNT SLAYER 



Safe Medicine for Children. 

Foley's Honey and Tar is a safe and 
effective medicine for children, as It 
dees not contain opiates or harmful 
drugs. Get only the genuine Foley's 
Honey and Tar in the yellow package 
Sold by all druggists. 

Gynocologlcnl Congress Meets. 

St. Petersburg, Sept. 22. — The Inter- 
national gynocological congress wa.'^ 
opened here today. There are forty- 
nine American delegates. 



Kentuckian Killed on Way to 

Testify in Liquor 

Case. 

Lexington. Ky., Sept. 22. — Fifty 
deputy sheriffs, with bloodhounds, are 
today scouring the mountains of Clin- 
ton county in an attempt to find the 
assassins of D. C. Moles, a farmer who 
was slain on a mountain road while on 
his way to court to testify as a prose- 
cuting witness. He left home early 
yesterday morning. The man was to 
have testified for the prosecution in a 
case In which Alvln Lee, a distiller, is 
charged with violation of the ware- 
house laws. Several persons have been 
arrested as suspects. 

LADY DE ROTHSCHILD DEAD. 



London, Sept. 22. — Lady Louisa De 
Rothschild died today. She was the 
widow of Sir Anthony de Rothschild, 



Big Plumbing Contract. 

The United States Steel corporation 
has called for bids on the plumbing 
work at the new steel plant. The 
work is estimated at about $150,000. 

Architect in the City. 

William H. Scop-es of the firm of 
Scopes & Fuestman, architects of Sar- 
anac Lake, N. Y., states that the site 
selected for the new St. Louis county 
tuberculosis sanatorium Is of the best. 
Ivlr. Scopes is in the city making pre- 
liminary sketches that he may work 
with intelligence on the plans for the 
new sanatorium when he returns to 
Saranac Lake. 



Temple Services. 

Regular Sabbath services will be 
held tomorrow evening at 8 o'clock at 
Temple Emanuel. The sermon will he 
"The City, " founded on Clyde Fitch's 
play recently seen In this city. The 
Sabbath school will be held Sunday 
morning at 10:30 o'clock. 

Xortlilaiid Printer-v. 

Good Printing. Call Zenith 494. 



A. D Thomson has gone to Denver. 
Colo 

G. T. Winberg of the Minneapolis 
Journal has been spending a few days 
In the city visiting his mother. 

A. F. Goodson, a prominent real es- 
tate dealer of Milwaukee, is a guest at 
the Spalding hotel. 

Henry Longtin of Crosby is In the 
city on business. 

Judge Alfred Jaques returned to the 
city today from Pine City, where he 
delivered a political address at the 
county fair and spoke at a political 
meeting in the evening. 

City Health Officer Fleming of Eve- 
leth was in the city yesterday. 

NORTHWESTERN 
CO UPLE DROWN 

W. H. Wright of Eau Claire 

and His Wife, a Minne- 

sotan, Dead in Florida. 

Eau Claire, Wis., Sept. 22 — G. A. 
Wright, a farmer livln;? nea- this city, 
receivei a message last nlglit from St. 
Cloud, Fla., stating that William H. 
Wright, his son, and his wife were 
drowned there yesterday. Young Wright 
was married to Miss Estella Hou.ee at 
Stewartvllle. Minn., last month and ha.d 
gone to Florida to spend the winter. 




"^*i 




WILL BE ROW 
IN CASS^LAKE 

So Says Mayor Dumas in 

Talking of Liquor 

Troubles. 



Official Appears Before Fed- 
eral Judge at Minne- 
apolis. 



St. Paul, Minn., Sept. 22. — (Special to 

The Herald.) — Expressing his belief 

that violence would be resorted to In 

Cass Lake should the government 

agents further attempt to enforce the 

old Indian treaty forbidding the sale of 

liquor in the northern part of the state. 

Dr. B S. Dumas, mayor of Cass Lake, 

appeared before Judge C. A. Wlllard in 

the federal court at Minneapolis this 
morning. 

Dr. Dumas went to the Mill City to 
attend the case of the two deputies un- 
der W. E. Johnson, government agent, 
who forcibly took a grip carried bv A. 
A. Oliver at Bena, Minn., from hini on 
Sept. 9 in an effort to determine wheth- 
er it contained liquor. They were ar- 
rested ajnd have been in Jail at Cass 
Lake since. 

Today the case was postponed until 
Oct 21, one week after the treat v be- 
comes effective. Cass Lake residents 
want a decision before Oct. 15 or a de- 
lay ill the time of the treaty's effect. 
"Sure to Be IVouble." 

"We are not trying to get permis- 
sion to sell liquor in Cass Lake." said 
Dr. L-umas today, "but If the agents go 
to Cass Lake Oct. 15 and destrov anv 
property there Is sure to be trouble, as 
the people are incensed over the mat- 
ter We probably will make an appeal 
to hf,ve the time extended. 

"The government deputies arrested 
were Norbert J. Sero and James l>avls, 
special officers employed in the North- 
ern Mlnnnesota Indian cases. They 
found no liquor in the grip carried by 
Mr. Oliver, who is a member of the 
Cass Lake board of appraisers. Assault 
was the charge placed against them. 
W'e simply want to argue certain points 
In relation to what the rights of spe- 
cial officers in these liquor cases are 
and whether or not the procedure re- 
sorted to in the Oliver case is to be re- 
peated." 

OPPOSE PENSION 
OF DOLLAR A DAY 



G. A. R. Members Report 

Adversely— Say It Would 

Cost Too Much. 

'F 'F" 3fhf( J^ 3^0j( )jO|( 3fC )JC )jC)|t')f( j^ J^' 3f( ^r )|C 3f; ^ j|("3ft ')sC ^ 3|^ 

^ ^ 

¥lt Atlantic City, X. J., Sept. 22. — ^ 

* Jc'lin E. GtiiiLan of RoMtun ivrm ^ 

^ this afternoon elected oonintand- ^ 

■jjf- er-ln-c!iief of tl-.e Grand .\riny of jjr 

^ the itepiiklic. Jolin .McEilroy of ^ 

^ \A BfthinKton, D. C. tl»e only otlier -^ 

^- cnndidiite, wilhdre^v before tlie ^ 

^' balloting began. ^ 

Atlantic City, N. J., Sept. 22. — The 
pension committee of the Grand Army 
of the Republic today made a report to 
the opening session of the national en- 
campment, condemning the proposition 
that congress grant each Union vet- 
eran of the Civil war a pension of at 
least $1 a day for life. The committee 

made the adverse report on the ground 
that such pensions would be loo ex- 
pensive to the government. 

Th"} report recommends that the 
widows of veterans be given an In- 
creased pension, and also advocates 
that the pensions of veterans above 
the age of 70 years be increased. The 
report was referred to the resolutions 
committee, of which Past Commander- 
in-Chief Torrance of Minnesota is 
chairman. This committee will make a 
report later. 

> . 

THE EXCUSE. 

Helen Phllbrook Patten of Pittsburg 
said at a recent dinner, apropos of a 
grafting politician: 

"What an excu.se he offered: It was 
so ingenious, so unsatisfactory an ex- 
cuse. It made me think of a little Mld- 
dletown boy. 

"One Sunday morning, on mv return 
from church, I saw this little boy 
playing with tin soldiers on the side- 
walk 

"'Tommy,' I said, 'don't vou know 
It's v'icked to play with soldiers on the 
Sabbath?' 

" 'Hut, you see. Ma'am,' Tommy ex- 
plained, 'these soldiers Is the Salva- 
tion Army.' " 



The woman who reads Herald ads 
knows that there's a best time and 
place to buy a thing — and that the ads 
enable her to decide. 



DRYS CLAIM 
LEGISLATURE 

County Option Mtm Declare 

They Won Sv^eeping 

Victory. 

F. C. Stevens' Plurality Cut 

to 1,239 By 

Hatbert 



St. Paul, Minn., Sept. 
The Herald.) — County 
claiming a sweeping vi 
day's primaries. At l 
headquarters today It 
the "drys" will have 
each branch of the 1< 
year. They claim at le 
and Gl representatives 
mum claim goes as higl 
and 67 representatives, 

"W^e are absolutely si 
Start this morning, "tl 
able to control each bra 
legislature. A careful 
returns has been mad' 
sure of a working maj<i 
Steventi' Piurallt 

Congressman F. C. St 
in Tuesday's primary w 
by H. T. Halbert, his 
the Republican nomin: 
gress, according to th 
turns. 

Washington county g 
majoritv of 111 and < 
f;ave Halbert 623 
Stevens. Considering 
Halbert filed at the last 
Stevens, the run he ma 
twenty-day campaign 
remarkable. 



22. — (Special to 
optionlsts are 
ctory in Tues- 
he anti-saloon 
was said that 
a majority In 

'gislature next 

ast 3 2 senator.s 

Their maxi- 

as 38 senators 

ire," said C. W. 
lat we will be 
nch of the next 
canvass of the 
■■, and we are 
ritv." 
y, 1,239. 
evens' plurality 
as cut to 1,239 
opponent for 
itlon for con- 
3 complete re- 
rave Halbert a 
:;hIsago county 
majority over 
the fact that 
minute against 
de following a 
is considered 



and Iron River, W'ls., and served in tho 
W^IsconsIn legislature from 1&94 until 
386fl. 

Mr. Staples was 60 years old and i» 
survived by his v/ife. The funeral will 
be held Sundav and burial will be at 
Anoka, Mr. Staples' old home. 

THE GLOBE WILL 
OPEN SATURDAY 

Store Is Ready for Business 

With Complete New 

Stock. 

After several weeks of busy prepar- 
ation, the remodeling of a storerooia 
and the receiving and unpacking of 
goods, the Globe will open Its doors 
to the public next Saturday morning. 

The Globe occupies the fifty-foot 
store room of the Ingalls block at 105- 
107 West Superior street. The build- 
ing has been remodeled Into a first- 
class storeroom, and has a central 
location that is exceptionally advan- 
tageous owing to its convenience for 
all visiting the downtown shopping 
district. 

The Globe Is a new store, filled with 
new goods, got^is that embrace all 
the latest ideas in mens' and women's 
ready-to-wear clothes. It also carries 
as complete a stock of furnishings for 
men and youths, waists, hosiery, petti- 
coats, sweaters, underwear and jew- 
elry for women, as will be found In 
any city the size, or even larger, than 
Duluth. 

The Globe will undoubtedlv be an 
Important addition to the retail mer- 
cantile establishments on Superlof 
street. 



WARNER RECEIVES 
A BIG MAJORITY 



List of the Succijssful Can- 
didates in Itasca 
County. 

Grand Rapids, Minn., Sept. 22. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — With fifteen 
small precincts still out. Itasca county 
gives C. S. Miller a majority of 800 
for congressman. For the legislature. 
Fifty-second disctrict, C. H. Warner 
polled 614; Charles W Ladu 498, L,. 

A. Ogaard, 471; T. M. Ferguson, 417 
and George Godfrey, 311. 

The Republican candidates having 
contests for nomination who won out 
are: Glenn Strader, county treasurer; 
Ralph A. Stone, county attorney; W. 

B. Taylor, court commissioner; Mrs. 
Estelle Whipple, county superintendent 
of schools. The count\ commissioners 
nominated are: First district, George 
Ruby, Deer River; Third district, J. P. 
Trebilcock; Fifth dlMrlct, Edward 
Logan. 

AKERS Is'eLECTED. 

Defeats Comity Option Candidate 
in Ci'ookston District. 

Crookston, Minn., Sept. 22. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Complete returns 
give Senator Stephens a majority of 
186 over Saugstad. Mnrin, county op- 
tion candidate, is def'.ated by K. S. 
Akers for representatl'e by 57 votes. 

HERRICK PICKED 
BY DEMOCRATS 

Will Be Permanent Chairman 

of New York State 

Convention. 

New York, Sept. 22. — .\t a conference 
of members of the Democratic state 
committe, held in this <;ity while John 
A. Dix, chairman of the committee, was 

here, it was said todjiy that It had 
been tentatively decide! to select Ed- 
ward M. Shepard and L' Cady Herrick 
as temporary and permanent chairmen, 
respectively, of the state convention. 
Mr. Herrick was the i)arty candidate 
in iy04, and Mr. Sheiard has been 
spoken of as a possibility for gover- 
nor this yeai'. 

PRAIRIE FIRES~ARE 
CHECKED BY RAIN 

Haystacks and Other Prop- 
erty Near Crookston 
Saved. 

Crookston, Minn., Sept. 22. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — A welcome rain 
started in last evenln;? and stopped 
the progress of several disastrous prai- 
rie fires, which were raging In the 
Meadows, which were dotted with hay 
stacks northeast of here between 
Crookston and Red Late Falls. 

Several losses were sustained, but 
the situation would have become far 
more serious, and the losses In Polk, 
Red Lake and Roseau counties would 
have been disastrous had it not L'een 
for the rain, as hundreds of thousands 
of tons of hay are unprotected. 

KING G. STAPLES 
DIES IN PORTUND 

Former Duluth Man Passes 
Away in Pacific Coast 



City. 



King G. Staples, founder of the town 
of Staples, died In Portland, Or., yester- 
day. He was a brother of S. F. Staples 
of Duluth. 

Mr. Staples left Norliiern Minnesota 
about ten yean ago, having lived In 
Duluth from 1S96 until 1900. He was in 
the lumber business ai; South Range 



I 



DR. W. H. MAGIE 
SHOOTS A BEAR 

Bruin Plays Hide and Seek, 

But Finally Meets 

His End. 

Dr. William H. Magle Is the latest 
of Duluth's East end residents to have 
killed a bear. 

Tuesday night the doctor was on 
his way from his chicken farm, which 
is just beyond the Jean Duluth stock 
farm, wiien a cub crossed the road 
directly In front of tlie doctor's auto- 
mobile. 

The doctor, who is, by the way, a 
hunter, gave chase. The cub was 
pretty good at making a get-a-way but 
in spite of the fact that the under- 
brush was dense and the going not 
of the best, llie doctor managed to 
keep close enough to the bear to hear 
him going. He could not get a shot 
as the cub was not in sight. 

Finally Mr. Bear got tired and began 
looking around for a tree. The sounds 
stopped and as it was dusk, tbe doctor 
did not know what had become of the 
bear. A large fire was built and the 
surrounding country for several yards 
lighted up. The inhabitant of the 
North woods was discovered slttting 
near the top of one of the tallest pines. 

One shot was all that was needed to 
bring him down. The body will be 
mounted. 



Mlsrepreseataiiuii 111 a .-^loie's adver- 
tising is as rare as — murder! And no 
more profitalde as a business policy. 



FARGO NEGRO SHOT 
AT A POKER GAME 



George Welton Kills James 

Hutchinson During 

Quarrel 

Fargo, N. D., Sept. 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Ab the outcome of a 
poker game James Hutchinson, a well 
known negro of this city, was mur- 
dered todaj". The affair occurred In 
the negro quarter of the city and has 

caused great excitement. There were 
several negroes playing cards when a 
row occurred between Hutchinson and 
George Welton. The latter drew a gun 
and shot Hutchinson dead. The police 
are rounding up all thcj negroes in 
that section. 



Read The 
HeraMWants 



00 LATE 
TO CLASSIFY 

("He Cent a Wortl Bach InKertiun 
\«» Advertlaemeut Le«s Thau 15 Cents 



T 



.NUSS HORRIGAN'S HAIR SHOP NOW 
on Superior street, over the Oak Hall. 



RENOVATE YOUR BASEMENT, 

warehouse, factory or barn with 
whitewash or fireproof paint by the 
spraying process. Zenith phone 721 



SITUATION WANTED — POSITION A3 
stenographer; graduate of the De- 
troit Business university; now em- 
ployed In wholesale house; can fur- 
nish references Address 66 Alford 
street. Detroit, Mich. 



LOST — A 
turn to 
reward. 



RED CORAL 

705 Sellwood 



CHAIN. RE- 
building for 



FOR SALE — TAVO 10-HORSE POWER 
electric motors. Interstate Carpet 
Cleaning company, iy:i8 West Michi- 
gan street. 

EVERYTHING THE BEST AT MIS3 
Kelly's Halrdressing Parlors. over 
Suffela. 

Protect the family, oy life Insurance. 
PINEO, Penn. Mutual, 409 Columbia. 



MARRIAGES. 

Charles Schuffe and Rose KoshTnEkT 
.John Hoven and Annie Shaw of In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 



BIRTHS. 



MARKSTONE— A daughter was born 
l^^o^U- a»d^Mrs. Peter Markstone of 

cA^liT^^^^ ^^'""^ street, Sept. 21. 

bAARlLA— A son was born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles Saarlla of 3611 Coatea 
street, Sept. 20. 



____BUILpiNG^ PERMITS. 

To C. Running, frame cottage, 
Glendale street, between Fif- 
ty-third and Fifty-fourth 
avenues | 

To A. Hammer, frame dwelling. 
Tenth avenue est, betweaen 
Sixth and Seventh streets... 



300 



2,500 



1 



I 



\: 



l! 



--4 





I 



r-/ 




*•— fci 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



September 22, 1910. 



13 




LATEST SPORTING NEWS OF THE DAY 




' 1 *0» m ^ ■ ^ ^»^i^»^»^i^^^>^»^ ^0^ f ^l^l^m^^0^0<0^^ ^ ^^0*0^t^0*0^0^^*0*0*^*0*0*0*0>0*^>****0t0KM0t^ 




CHANCE 



CON«ACK 

Ytorld's Championship Series 
to Strategic Battle Be- 
tween Two Leaders. 



QUARRELS AND QUERIES 



Silent, Sad and Studious Mack 
Prove the Match of 
Dashing Chance. 



May 



Baseball men 
anxiously aw 
twoen the <' :' 
tl:e phy3i> 
imghty ar. 
of the twu ,, 
dents of bast 
will be wasf' 
leailers, Fr:-. ri 
Slack, wh. 
and conies 



(BY BRUCE.) 

t!ie coviivii y over are 

the struggle be- 

.\thlellc3. Behind 

,^'le that will be 

l,» iwren the players 

rival players, the slu- 

.a.11 scent the battle that 

, n those two great 

ance and Connie 

name is a yard long 

ironi the auld sod. 



Mack looks .ml acts like a member 
of the priesthool. They say that three 
vurds is an extended conversation for 
the very shrewd manager of tlie Ath- 
letics, lie 13 >.ue oi the very slirewdest 
men in basebaU. a» the development of 
his wonderful team In two sliort sea- 
B>ns. will eloquently testify. 

Chance has proved his greatness as 
a leader of !. ise"; all pla.s ers. As a 
jjlayer he rani ne of the greatest 

flist basemen • game. His men 

admire him una wnI fi^ht to the last 
ditch for hln.. l>lke Mack. Chance does 
not talk a great deal, but every word 
lie utters counts to liie extreme. 

Before Mack became manager lie was 
a catcher, lie u.sed to catch for the 
Pittsburg riralr.s, and wiille always 
u heady playei , never set the ba.^eball 
world on fire, like Johnny Kling or 
Archer. From the .smoke of rUtsnurg 
I^lack went to the siuis of Milwaukee. 
He was mana.ieT i>i" the team there. 
a«id made good. Ti.en came Philadel- 
h ia. 

r.asebaU nier. ."^ iv that any player 
Mack passes ;io goi'd. bo great 

the conftdenc. iher managers in 

the shrewd judgment of Mack, that it 
Is seldom that a pUiyer passed up by 
Mack Is wanted by managers or own- 
' ers of other teams. Mack lias a fond- 
ness for college players. Kddie Collins. 
the brilliant second baseman of the 
Athletics, being an example of the col- 
lege player. Collins didn't look good 
at first, but Mack said the boy was a 
ball plaver, and his Judgment has been 
vindicated lf> the wonderful develop- 
ment of Ci '• C 'lun.bia college boy in 
the last two seasons. 

Many close students of the game be- 
lieve the fortunes of battle will hitige 
on the strategv of ihf two leaders- 
In 1906 Fielder .Tones, the great leader 
of the Chlcag" V\liite Sox. got the 
lump on the Cnl.s and beat them with 
an interior teuu^. 

Which will show the greatest gener- 
alship. Chance ni Connie Mack? 

That Is the M'"'^i'on the students of 
the game are nallv mo.st Interested in. 

Both are great and shrewd generals 
of play. There is not much in bascb-all 
that Is not clearly Implanted in the 
brains of the tw.. men. The man who 
<7in .'<ee the fuMh.st ahead, anticipate 
' ih'> move of the ether, and spring the 
right move at precisely the right time. 
will win the serie.s. students of the 
game and judges of the two teams. 

^*"jennings v inferior as a f/n;. 

er vl to Chan. e Cubs continuallj, 

outguessed tl>e Tigers during the two 
s.-ri^s they plaved them for the highest 
honors of baseball. Te question as to 
^•hi.h team will pUiy t^^ '"^^^ bramy 
bfts.^ball. is one that is i"t''}:«''^V"^, *'^ 
reading and thinking baseball public 
of this country. 

.silting on the bench, with 



Los Angeles has a lady policeman. 
It is to be hoped that she is perfectly 
l)roperly cliaperoned. 

♦ * • 

Some enterprising fight promoter it 
Is rumored, is planning to take Teddy 
Uoosevelt and Jim Tawney for a 
twenty v/eeks' tour in "DaniOn and 

I'ythias." 

♦ » ♦ 

Down in Dallas, Te.\., Labor day, the 
fans nearly killed an umpire In order 
that tlie team might win th.e rag. 
Kven at tiiat the state Is reforming — 
and what is a human life when tliere 
is a pennant in sight? 

• * • 

A fighter in California, after forty 
years of strenuous straining for the 
elusve lucre, saved just 17 cents. And 
> et some people, misguided in the ex- 
treme, contend that the cost of living 
is one of our most knotty problems. 
« « • 

In a heatlh magazine, some one. pale 
and nervous no doubt, asks: "Where 
can I go for mv liver?" To the butcher 
shop, old top, "as the rest of us. 

* * ♦ 

Jimmy Barrv has borrowed a pair of 
opera glasses" and will search dili- 
gently for the wiiereabouts of ".Sraps 

Costello. 

• « • 

An Englishman won all of the big 

events at the Boston air meet. Which 

isn't Wright. 

« * • 

A bit of news via the grape vine. 



test of skill between the two mo.?! 
prominent men in baseball. The man 
who wins will be the most talked about 
leader that this country has ever 
known. Cigars and breakfast toods 
will l)e 'named after him. What an .n- 
spliatlon to win! 

Connie Mack is more like Gen. Grati'^; 
silent, persevering; Frank L. Chance is 
dashing and brilliant, and yet a great 
and keen student, something on the 
order of Fhll Sheridan. 

Which will win? 



says there is a fighter stranded In 
Keno. Another case of being unable 
to come back. 

« • * 
Mike Brown asks: "How did I look 
the other night?" We will whisper it 
to you some tinic. 

* « • 

G. A. R.. from Virginia, this state, 
dear, asks wliere King Cole of the 
Cubs came from, and how long he iias 
been in his present swell company. 

The man who has been the mainstay 
of the Chance machine the present sea- 
son, came from Bay City in the Michi- 
gan slate league, and has been with 
the Cubs but one full season. He Is 
considered the find of the season, and 
it is exepcled that he will face the 
Philadelphia hitters In at least one of 
the world's series games. 
« * * 

In answer to the query of the "Fan," 
the nhe. well liehaved one. It may be 
said tliat the Chicago team is believed 
to be tlie greatest baseball aggrega- 
tion ever organized, and that by many 
Artie Hoffman is considered the great- 
est player that Chance has. 

* « 

Under Ned Hanlon the old Baltimore 
Orioles plaved baseball that was far 
ahead of their time, and many of the 
regulation usages of the modf»rn game 
were Invented by those players. How- 
ever, according to unbiased critics, the 
machine-like play of the Cubs Is far 



ahead of the clas=!lest baseball 
shown by the Baltimore crowd. 



ever 



with neither team scoring. Fanwell 
pitched steady ball with men on bases, 
while Coombs was practically unhit- 
tabie. It makes forty-six innings the 
latter has pitched without being 
scored upon. La Joie made his two 
liundredth hit of the season. 
Score: R. H. E. 

Cleveland 00000000 00 — 3 4 

Philadelphia 0<) 00000000 — 9 1 
Batteries — Fanwell and Smith; 
Coombs and Lapp. Umpires — Perrine 
and Dineen. 



AS SEEN FROM 
THE SIDE LINES 



'CENTRAL HIGH SQU^D 

I SHOWING GOOD FORM. 



Hard scrimmage practice is the rule 
every afternoon for the Central high 
football squad, in preparation for J,he 



signed a contract to manage the In- 
dianapolis team. The agreement still 
has three years to run. 

Mike (iibbuus Again. 

On behalf of Mike Gibbins, the fast 
and clever St. Paul fighter, a challengo 



Two Harbors game of Saturday. The ] is sent to Curly Ulrich of Superior, 



NATIONAL LEAGUE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION 



Staudiug of the Clubs. 



Stiiudiug of the Clubs. 



Chicago . . . . 
New York . . 
Pittsburg . . . 
Pliiladelphia 
Cincinnati . . 
St. Louis . . . 
Kr(K>klyii . . . 
Boston 



Won. 
..91 
. .79 
. .80 
. .71 
. .69 
. .55 
. .54 
. .47 



Lost. 
42 
57 
57 
fi7 
7L 
79 
83 
90 



Pet. 
.684 

.5S4 



Minneapolis 
Toledo . . . 
684 ' Columbus . 

.514 I .St. Paul . . 

.493 

.406 

.390 Indianapolis 

.352 Louisville 



I Kansas City 
Milwaukee 



Games Today. 



Won. 
. . .105 
. . . 89 
...86 
. . . 86 
...83 
. .. 74 
.... 69 
. . . 59 



Lost. 


Pet. 


59 


.640 


73 


.549 


75 


.534 


78 


.526 


79 


.513 


90 


.453 


95 


.413 


101 


.370 




has ever known. 

and almost shvly subdued. Ihls 

Connie Mad 

rdayers and :[,^ -^si^si by the 

^""■"^^fif,,! , "pn.s he has ac- 

wiinderful '' 



man that 



Is 
an beloved by his 

n who has made the 
II d aglmst by 

:nents he has 




Pittsburg at Philadelphia. 
Cincinnati at Boston. 
Chicago at New York. 
St. Louis at Brooklyn. 

PHILLIES DEFEA^REDS 

LN POOR BALL GAME. 

Philadelrhia, Sept. 22. — In a poorly 
played game here yesterday Philadel- 
phia defeated Cincinnati 13 to 11, the 
home team using four pitchers and * i*^ 
visitors three. Score: R. H. L. 

Cincinnati 14011030 1— U 15 4 

Philadelphia ..00062041.x — 1312 4 

Batteries — Covaleskie. Beebe, Burns 
and Clark; Chalmers. Shettler. Brennan. 
Moren and Dooin. Umpires — ODay 
and Brennan. 

CUBS LOSE TOTiHE" 

SIPERBAS IN LAST GAME. 

Brooklvn, N. Y., Sept. 22.— The Chi- 
cagos wound up tlieir series w'ith 
Brooklvn yesterday and met with a 4 
to 1 defeat, although Manager Chance 
brought most of his reserve forces into 
the game, sixteen in all taking part. 
A home run over the right field fence 
by Hummel clinched the game and 
drove Mclntyre to the clubhouse. Score: 

R. H. L. 

Chicago 000 00100 — 1 9 1 

Br'xdUy n 12 10 x-4 8 

Batteries — Mclntyre. Weaver, Richie 
and Needham; Rucker and Bergen. 
Umpires — Johnstone and Eason. 

cardinalswiTlast 

game from giants. 

New York, Sept. 22.— St. Louis took 
the last game of the series from New 
Y'ork 5 to 4 yesterday, scoring the w'ln- 
ning run in the ninth Inning on hits 
by Konetchy, Kvans and Hauser. 1 he 
Giants had eleven men lett on ba.ses 
to the visitors' three. New Yorks 
four runs v.ere scored by players who 
received passes. Score: ^ ^ ^ ^ I\- H- L. 

St Louis 12 1000 1—5 8 3 

New York : 3 10-4 9 

Batteries — (Golden. l..ush, Harmon and 
Phelps; Marquard, Ames and Myers, 
Schlei. L'mplres — Kane and Klem. 



Games Today. 

St. Paul at Minneapolis. 
Columbus at Toledo. 
Indianapolis at Louisville. 
Milwaukee at Kansas City. 

SEVEN RINSSTORED 

IN SEVENTH INNING. 



Columbus. Ohio, Sept. 2 2. — .San ford's 
wildness in the seventh inning with 
three long hits, turned a good game 
of ball Into a farce. Columbus win- 
ning 11 to 1. Louisville scored its 
only' run on a double steal. Hlnch- 
man's home run inside the grounds 
was a feature. The score: R. H. E. 

Louisville 10 0—1 7 5 

Columbus 2 1 7 1 X— 11 10 2 

Batteries — Sanford and Rellly; Pack- 
ard and Carisch. Umpires — Hayes and 
Chill. 



GEORGE ENGLAND. 

Another man who thinks he would 
have a chance to whip Jack Johnson, 
the colored champion of ttie world, 
is George England a native of Min- 
neapolis. England is 6 feet. 2 inches 
tall and weighs 254 pounds. He 
possesses almost Incredltable speed 
and is verv light on his feet. He has 
won several matches in private by the 
knock-out route in fast time. He has 
plenty of nerve and is absolutely fear- 
less England has already started to 
learn the fine points of the game and 
will soon have a try-out with some 
heavyweight boxer. 



great strides at the Head of the Lakes. 

It is the ambition of the Duluth 
bowlers to develop a team that will 
carry off one of the first Prizes at the 
state tournament. Down at >t. Paul 
and Minneapolis, where bowling has 
been in progress for some years before 
the alley game became Popular here 
the players have shown in the past a 
little more class than the players from 
the Head of the Lakes. 

This winter it is the ambition of the 
local bowlers to develop playe^-s that 
will make a great showing at the state 
tournament. If the same progres.s is 
made as was achieved last wmter Du- 
luth should send some mighty strong 
teams to the state meet. 



INDIANS LOSE FINAL 

GAME TO TOLEDO. 






L.\.ST BHi FIGHT . ^„,.,^. ^ 

SAVS CH.^^ULES GEUAGHT\ * 

^ 

"There villi. In uiy opinion, nev- * 
er be another big world'* cliam- J 
iilunHhlp ftieht in this t^-iuitry, ' * 
nald Charles tieraKhiy, tUe man » 
here »vUh the Jeffrlcs-JohuHon ^ 
light ploturen. "The Jeffries- * 



greater a 
egisi tho 
leiider oi ... 
The series 
— a series ii: 
of the 1! 
ball wll. 
ead-vlsaged mnt 



Astute and resourceful 

•ubs. Frank L. Chance. 

Should he a great battle 

\\Mch the greatest brains 

. .ssive age of base- 

V silent, thin nnd 

will match his brams 

against the large and husky nian who 

• *llrects the destinies of the. Chicago 

Cubs. "Will the silent bench student 

outguess the dashing leader of tne 

"iTyou knr— "lally and finally, you 
could write n ticket. 

They will • f- ; > at games, and un- 
derneath every play, every move, theie 
■will be the dep laid schemes of the two 
leaders. I' :.s gclng to be a personal 



AMERICAN LEAGUE 



Standing of tlie Clubs. 



Philadelphia 

Detroit 

New York . 
Boston .... 
Cleveland - . 
Washington 
Chicago . . . . 
St. Louis . . . 



Won. 
.. .1*5 
...80 
...78 
...78 
.. .65 
...59 
...58 
. . .43 



Lost. 

42 • 

60 

60 

60 

76 

80 

80 

99 



Indianapolis, Ind.. Sept. 22. — Indian- 
apolis lost the final game of the sea- 
son at home to Toledo yesterday by 
the score of 8 to 1. Hi.\on was hit 
hard by the visitors, and was relieved 
In the seventh by Cheney. The batting 
of Hlnchman and Freeman, each get- 
ting- four hits out of five times at 
bat, was the feature. The score: 

R. H. E 

Indianapolis 00010000 0—1 5 2 

Toledo 2 1110201 0—8 16 1 

Batt'^rles — Hixon, Cheney and Kerns; 
YingUng and Hartley. Umpire — Wed- 
dldge. 

MILLERS WIN FARCE 

GAME FROM BREWERS. 

Minneapolis. Minn., Sept. 22 —Minne- 
apolis won a ludicrous game from Mil- 
waukee vesterday, makin.g twenty- 
two hits In seven Innings and scoring 
eighteen runs. The game followed a 
program of field events in which 
Charlps of Milwaukee circled the bases 
In 13 3-5 seconds, lowering tlve record 
of 13 4-5 previously held by Ty Cobb. 
the score: c , n i i d <! ia""" o 

Minneapolis *' ? ^ ? H . c 1.*^ S 

Milwaukee :j l o 1 o— 5 lo 5 

Batteries — Sa.ge and Dawson; Cutting 
Gilllgan, Madden and Ludwig. Um- 
piies — Bush, and Ferguson. 

BLUES ARE"bLANKED 

BY ST. PAIL TEAM. 



St. Paul, Minn.. Sept. 22.— A base on 
^9'i balls followed by two singles In the 
second inning gave St. Paul a 2 to 
victorv In the last game of the sea- 
son with Kansas City. Chech relieved 



* .lohiisou light wan the lail »»lg ^ 
i^ fight that will be held In this ^ 
*• country, until at len«t there Is a * 
^ radical reform in the way tights ^ 

* are conducted. There will be * 
^ limited round flghtn, and it these * 
^ are well conducted, no one, not ¥f: 
^ even the numt nQueanil«U, can * 
^ have any objection tc them. At ^ 

* the iiresent time, Australia In the * 
^ Mecca for the niont prominent il^ 
^- ttghters. France, Knglund and Mf: 
4t even l.ermany. are eujoyiug some *• 
^ very mediocre Hghtw. If the peo- 3(fr 
^ pie In thcNC countries continue to ^ 
^ «ho\v an interest In the game. It # 
^ would not NurprlMC mc t«» hear of -^ 
^ a wcirld's championship flght be- ^ 
^ lug staged acro.ns the water, ^ 
^ AVhen the gamblers and fakers ^ 
#• get out of the enme, tightiug, if 
^ which i.«( In llwclf a decent game ^ 
^ when conducted decently, will ¥^ 

* come bacli into favor. The people * 
^ want boxing, and under the prop- ))t 
•i^ cr (tupcrvlsion. It Is a very decent * 
i- and manly sport." ^ 

MOTOR BOAT 
EVENTS DECIDED 



(BY BRUCE.) 

Charles L. Geraghty, the man here 
In charge of the Jeffries-Johnson fight 
pictures, has some very interesting 
things to say regarding the fight, the 
man w:io won th-a flght, and the general 
result. 

For Instance, Mr. Geraghty saya that 
it wii; be a few years before there 
will bo a fighter who will appear who 
will be strong and clever enough to 
beat tie present holder of the title. 

Mr. Geraghty was present at the 
R.'uo affair, has seen all the heavy- 
weight; champions since the days of 
John L. Sullivan, and has also seen 
all the contenders for the crown, who 
are taken In the least seriously. 

He says that both Kaufmann and 
Lang look the necessary cla.ss, and that 
In hlsr opinion Con O'Kelly, the big 
Turk in the hands of Tommy Kyan, Is 
the only possibility. 

This Ryan protege is about six feet 
four and built for rough weather. He 
never fought before Ryan took him in 
charge, except unconsciously, which is 
not scientifically. O'Kelly is just as 
Jeffries waS when Ryan took charge 
of the coming Callfornlan; green and 
very awkward, but very promising. 

•Johnson is the greatest fighter we 
have liad for years,' said Mr. Geraghty. 
•I doubt if Jeffries could have ever 
beaten him. I saw Jeff fight Tom 
Sharkey, that flght occurring In Jims 
prime, and I don't think he showed tne 
class Johnson showed in the fight at 
Reno. No one knows how much John- 
son can fight, for he has never been 
e.xtended. 

"We never dreamed, none of us at 
the Reno ringside, that Johnson would 
be as strong as Jeffries. In the very 
first <;llnch Johnson pushed Jeffs lett 
clear up behind his back. If Jeff was 
not us strong as Johnson in close 
work, how in the world could he hope 
to win"? He just couldn't. th?vt's all. 

"Taking everything into comsidera- 
tlon, strength, speed and his marvel- 
ous boxing ability, I don't think we 
have had a champion in the past twen- 
ty-five years or more who compares 
with Johnson." 

''They're Even''— Says "Cap." 

Capt. Miser breezily hit the Duluth 
trail yesterday. Since shaking the 
mineral dust of the high hills from his 
ankles, "Cap." has seen some of the 
nice, big teams of the far reservation 
play. How we all do envy the cap- 
tain. . , ^ , 

When he was In Duluth the captain 
used to ypll his head off for the Sox. 
He had much to do with the winning 
of the pennant. He believes that the 
Mack men have an equal chance with 
the Cubs, saying the only advantage 
he could .see In favor of the Chicago 
team, was behind the bat. 

"Can Kllng catch?" — the good cap- 
tain repeated the query, just to be sure 
that he had heard it straight. "He 
can. He Is the niftiest and nerviest 
proposition since th>d days of Sockless 
Jerri Simpson from Kansas. He has 
'em all glued to the bags. He knows 
the weakness of all the batters, and 
he has all the other fellows guessing. 
Behind the wind pad is where, believe 
me, the Cubs will have the big whip 
hand on th«t Athletics. . „ , , , 

"I don't think the Chicago Infield is 
any better than the fotir first defense 
men of th'e Athletics. The outfields are 
about the same. The result of the 
series. In my humble opinion, is in 
the box and behind the bat, for If the 
Cubs can get on and steal, they will 
have the Jump on the Mack boys. The 
series should be very close." 



boys are showing up in good style, and 
though light, are faist and quick to 
learn the numerous complications of 
tlie new game. , 

After the Two Harbors game Colton 
will have more of a line on the worth 
of his material. Some of the new men 
win probably receive a '.ryout Satur-" 
day. 

Boden and Carpenter, new men. are 
showing up well, and promise to make 
valuable men. Glass lias been tried at 
half and Carpenter at end. 



NEW WORLD'S RK( ORD 

SET FOR THE MILE. 



Gibbins, according to his manager will 
meet Ulrich at any time that is agree- 
able and convenient to the Superior 
fighter, and will also agree to any con* 
ditions lmi>osed h>- Ulrich.. 



-Wf— rn g- 



\\ iiru >ieril Wins. 

When the medicine you take cures 
your disease, tones up your system and 
makes you feel better, stronger and 
more vigorous than before. That Is 
what Foley Kidney Pills do for you, la 
all cases of backache, lieadache. ner- 
vousness, loss of appetite, sleepless- 
ness and general weakness that la 
caused by any disorder of the kidneya 
or bladder. Sold by all druggists. 



Columbus, Ohio, Sept. 22. — Racing 
off the trotting division of the Ken- 
tucky stock farm futurlt> at yesterday 
afternoon's Grand Circuit .-aces, brought 
forth a world's record mile by Colorado 
E.. owend bv George H. I'^astabrook of 
Denver. This colt, holder of the 
world's record for 3-yea)--old trotters, 
voluntarily reduced his mark from 
2:06»^ to 2:05=^4. 

In the pacing division of the same 
futurity, backers of first choices were 
dismayed when Nell Gent y. owned and 
driven by Charles Cameron of La 
Crosse, Wis., won In straight heats and 
ordinary time from Barjness Evelyn. 
In the 2:17 trot Peter Dorsey was 
beaten by Maj. Wellington, the third 
choice. The favorite won the first heat. 

YALE SI ( ( ESSFlLlT" 

DEFENDS GOLF TITLE. 



THE PALM ROOM 

At the SPALDING 



Most delightful and luxurious restau- 
rant in Duluth. 



Ties, Pulpwood, Piling 

And <_illi'-r 'liniijer Products. 

McLEOD-DAVIS TIMBER CO., 

51s Lyceum ItulldlnK. 
Duluth, '>n:in. 



Manchester. Mass.. S«'pt. 22. — \ale 
yesterday successfully defended its I 
title to the intercollegiute golf team 
championship at the Essex Country 1 
club by defe.ating Prlnct ton 5 to 1 in ; 
the single matches In tho morning and | 
2 to 1 in the four-ball matches in the 
afternoon, giving Yale a total of 7 
points to 2 for Princeton. 

The amateur record for the course | 
held by W'. J. Travis and John G. An- 
derson* was equalled in the four-ball 
matches by Albert Secke. of Princeton. 
the pre.sent individual ti le holder, and 
bettered by one stroke .>y Carl Moser 
of Yale, the latter making the eighteen 
holes in 74. 

GOOD WE.\THER FOR~" 

RACES AT f* lOUX CITY. 

Sioux City. Iowa, Sept. 22. — Fine 
Weather and a fast tra.'k marked the 
third day's interstate fair race at Wood- 
land park yesterday. The 2:20 trot 
was a har.l fought race between 
Ethange L and Joe Meuto, the former 
winning the last two heats in a bruis- 
ing finish. Foster had no trouble In 
dropping down the llvesstock exchange 
2:lu pace In straight heats. 

CHARLIE CARR HAnI^s" 

IN HIS RESIGNATION. 

Indianapolis. Ind.. Sept. 22.— Charles 
Carr manager of the local American 
Association Baseball club, resigned last 



BLOOD POISON 

CAN BE CURED 

If TOO h»io iil.ert, m-.icoiu p»tihM In tl.e mouth, tore 
tliroa.!. •ruplions. ooppsr colored ipota on your body, 
fkllinc h»ir. hwoUd gUodi, pkini iu th« hone*, or ••- 
vers coatinaed he»d»rhe«, our ipacial treatment will 
cure jou. Our DR. I'ANTER. former chief phyilcUn of 

I the orifinkl Cojk lUuio.lj Cu.. tr^ted orer 22.000 
patient* of th&t oompanr In the fifteen year* endtnc Wer 
12th 1908. the date lliat ooiiipenr difcontinued takint 
caeaa to treat. DO.V'T BK MISLED with offers of 
Free Treatment, that .Uniulata the «»ttein for a fhort 

I time. RELIABLE CURKS ARE NOT FREE. Our treat- 
ment ha« itood the tert for K rear* and bare never 
bean compelled to offer frte tmilmtrtia to pr.jcure 
patlenta. Booklat on Blood Poieon teitimonials and 
full Information about jour ca», PiEE. Write % 

PANTER REMEDY CO.. 

Salte 4aa 67 CUrk 8tr«et, CUvaro HI. 



■I 



ORDER YOUR FAMILY 

Bottled Beer 

(I'KOPLK'S BKKll.) 

From 



Joe Koziarek 



iW I Y» 




As Harry Sees Them. 

Harry Rood of the La Crosse Leader- 
Press has selected an AU-Star Mlnny 
league team. He has given the Irish 
Orator the honor of managing the? 
paper aggregation, staling that Darby 
is the very best little manager in the 
league. „ 

Here Is the selection of Mons. Rood: 
Johnson of Wausau, catcher; BaiUles 
of Vrinona. Dahlgren of Superior. Wat- 
son of La Cros.se, and Lakoff of Wau- 
sau, pitcher; Dolan of Wausau, first 
basf ; Koepping of Winona, second 
base; Breyette of Eau Claire, short- 
stop; Caldwell of Superior, third base; 
Mahoy of Red Wing, left field; Calla- 
han of Eau Claire, centerfleld, and 
Klein of La Crosse, right field. 

Difference of opinion makes the 
ponies gallop with profit — to the book- 
ies — and also makes people buy cigars 
for otlier people they don't speak too, 
when election Isn't nigh. It is right 
and quite the exciting thing In this 
country of ours. But how Harry 
cou'd put Klein In the field and leave 
George Anderson out — well. It Is scan- 
dalcius. 



Harpy IVlitcliell 



The "Stoige" 



Again. 



.571 
.566 

.O'l'J 

.457 
.425 
.420 
.305 




Royal Luncli 

Our wpeilaltlei. for tomorrow (Frl- 
dav>> dinner: 
HO\ST LKG I.AMB, MINT SAICH 
B AKKU SiriCUIOR AVHITKFISH 

poTTKn RIB i:m>s of BKKF, 
With Vegetables. 

Everytliing Hoiue-Made at 

Royal Luncli 

214 UI:M' si rKUIOR JSTUFKT. 



Games Today. 

New York at Cleveland . 

BOSTON TAKES LAST 

GAME FROM BROWNS. 

St. Louis. Mo., Sept. 22.— Boston took 
the final game of the season with bt. 
Louis yesterday, score 4 to 2. ,^ ""anic 
smith formerly of Chicago, allowed 
four hits. Malloy pitched a creditable 
game but Boston bunched hits and 
steals' In the seventh Inning. 
Score: !>• H. E. 

Boston 0010002 10 — 4 6 2 

St. Louis 2000 00000 — 2 4 3 

Batteries — F. Smith and Carrlgan; 
Malloy and KlUifer. Umpires — 

O'Loughlln and Connolly. 

SOX MAKE CLEAN 

SWEEP OF SERIES. 



Ryan In tlio first inning with the bases 
filled and none out anS held the vlslt- 
nr^ rnnless The score: k. «. n.. 

Kansas City ..000000000—0 5 1 
^t I^aul ... 20 0000X— 2 5 2 

Batteries— Powell and Ritter; Ryaii 
Chech and Spencer, 
halter and Cnsack. 



Umpires — 'Bier- 





©TEL 



STRICTLY FIRST CLASS 

New, modern and absolutely fire- 
proof. 

Rates. 11.00 and Up. 

Three Cafes. 

Popular-Priced Lunch Datl7> 



Chicago, Sept. 22. — Chicago yester- 
day made a clean sweep of the New 
York series bv winning the final game. 
6 to 4 This gives Chicago seven con- 
siecutive victories. Scott and Caldwell 
\vere knocked out of the game In the 
early Innings, but Walsh kept New 
York at bav. Manager Stalllngs of the 
visitors left for New York In re- 
sponse to a summons from President 
Farrell, who Is trying to solve the In- 
ternal strife of the club. Hal Chase 
assumed command at the request of 
Secretary Davis. -c v ^ 

Score ■ "• "• 

<'hicago 3 3 X— 6 9 2 

Xew York 00031000 — 4 6 2 

Batteries — Scott, Walsh and Payne; 
Caldwell. Warhop and Mitchell. Um- 
pires — Egan a nd Sherida n. 

NO SCORES IN 

ELEVEN INNINGS. 



CONSTANTINE 
STOPSJAUNDERS 

Range Lightweight Scores a 

Decisive Victory in 

Three Rounds. 

Gilbert. Minn., Sept. 22.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Nick Constantlne, the 
crack range lightweight, last night 
stopped Charles Saunders in the third 
round of a scheduled 15-round contest. 
After the opening round Constantiae 
had the fight all his own way. 

In the first round Saunders rushed 
and kept sending in uppercuts to the 
Lody and swings to the jaw. He had 
the beat of the round and it looked as 
if Constantlne had met his match. The 
second round was slow, the men being 
clinched most of the time. In the third 
round Constantlne delivered three clean 
blows to his opponent's body an.d jaw, 
sending him to the mat, the fight be- 
ing stopped at this point. 

A large crowd from Hlbbing, Vir- 
ginia, Eveleth and near-by towns wit- 
nessed the flght. 

BOWLERS PREPARING FOR 
BUSY W INTER SEASON. 



II Wins Race From 
New York lo Pough- 
keepsie. 

New York, Sept. 22. — Three events 
were decided yesterday in the national 
motor boat carnival held on the Hud- 
son river under the auspices of the 
Motor Boat club of America. Of ten 
boats sent away in the speed race of 
115 miles to Poughkeepsie and return, 
only five finished, the first being J. G. 
Simpson's Peter Pan III, which covered 
the distance in 5:22:43 elapsed time. 
This boat, however, only won second 
prize, as the Edith II, owned by A. E. 
Smith, won first honors on time al- 
lowed. Her corrected time was 3:14:57. 
Vanish was placed third. 

In the event for cruising boats of 
over 40 feet a run to Peeksklll and 
back, sixty miles, the Avis and Edmee 
finished first and second respectively, 
five seconds apart. The Eronel, owned 
by Samuel Cochrane won the event, 
however, neither of the leaders getting 
a place when the corrected time was 
announced. Eronel made the journey 
in 3:ri0::i9. Caroline was second and 
Spendthrift third. 

F. D. Giles' Elmo II was the winner 
of the under 40-foot class, the Klthmar 
being fifth. Elmo IPs corrected time 
for the sixty miles was 4:26:19. 
Gracelda was awarded second place and 
Dell thlrd^ 

COLLEGIANS PLAY 

FOR GOLF TITLE. 



Cleveland, Ohio, Sept. 22. — Cleveland 
and PhUadelpbia played eleveu InniuKs 



Manchester, Mass., Sept. 22.=^The In- 
tercollegiate golfers started today on 
the individual championship won last 
year by Albert Seckel of Princeton, 
whose home green Is the jRiverslde 
Golf club of Chicago, and who defend- 
ed hUs title this year. 

The play was conducted on the usual 
lines, with an elghteen-hQfle rt^alifying 
round In the forenoon and match play 
for the best sixteen In the first round 
in the afternoon. Two routi^i will be 
played tomorrow, with '"a thirty-six 
hole final contest for the championship 

on Saturday. 

■ ■ 

Carlisle Win*. 

Carli-sle. Pa., Sept. 22.— In the first 
game of the season under the new- 
rules, the Carlisle Indian school foot- 



Duluth bowlers are already prepar- 
ing for a busy season. The construe- , — - ^ ^^ t v. tr .i»,r 

Uon of the new alleys In the Oak Hall ball team defeated the Lebano^i Valley 
building will give additional facilities 1 college team yesterday by tne score 
to the game tliat last wlttt«r mad« of 63 tft 0» 



Ijast .season .Joe Tinker and Mike 
Donlln were the star thesplans in the 
baseball brigade. The present season 
we are to have added starters. Christy 
Mathewson and Big Chief Myers, also 
of the New York Giants, are to tempt 
fate by going Into vaudeville. The 
story of the two. says Mathewson, will 
show his curves on the stage. They 
are not the kind the chorus girls show, 
for Christy merely means that he will 
throw his fadeaway and some other 
stuff that Is earning him about $5,000 
per sunny annum. 

The chief will probably do a war 
dar.ce, and do an Indian chant. If the 
rest of us tried to get by with this 
stuff, the stage manager would get 
real 'ugly. But when you are famous, 
Bill — well. It's different. 

» »- ^^ 

Football, for Sure. 

Next Saturday will usher in the 
football season. Interest in the race 
in the two leagues Is v?anlng some- 
what. The Cubs have sewed ujj the 
pennant in the older organization, and 
there has been no doubt for some 
time In the sweet past as to the win- 
ner in the American. 

The world's series will continue to 
excite and interest. The problem of 
picking the winner will keep several 
clerks busy tabulating different priced 
gU'esses. 

Hut Just the same football has 
signed the lease and will take posses- 
sion of the sporting promises, begin- 
ning with Saturday. We will soon see 
tho new rules In working order. At 
the present time most of us have a 
comprehension of them that Is as clear 
as North Dakota alluveal. Some of 
thu sharps may be able to put us right. 

'there is but one big college game In 
th.j vicinity of this part of the coun- 
try the present season. That is the 
game between Minnesota and the 
Wisconsin Badgers. The other big 
games of the state university are with 
Chicago at Chicago and Ann Arbor 
at Ann Arbor. 

The present year will be more or 
ipfis of an experiment, and for that 
reason. If for no other, will be 
watched wit h Interest. 

« ^ETi'^ RECORJD OVER * 

I " HALF MILE TRACK. #: 

I ^ 

* AllentowB. Pa.. Sept. 22. — Ufc- ^ 
^ Ian, the champion trotter today * 
^ clipped % of a tiecond oflf the ^ 
^ world*** record when he went a * 

* mile In 2i05V4 over a half-mile * 
^ traclc. ThU record wax made de- ^ 

* Hplte the fact that Uhlan made a ^ 
4|t bad track at the <lr«t turn. The ^f: 
^ time by auartem: 33; 1:03% ; 1;37> ^(t 

* 2»05y«. * 

|-»^j»jM^- » » » » » y y», iM^*^. » » » »»i t % » 




Let Me Be Your Tailor 

My 'LtgdX Guarantee insurics you satisfaction 
in fit, fashion, fabric on any garment I make. 

This is the most remarkable opportunity ever 
offered to tl'e men of Duluth to havfC their Fall and 
Winter Suits or Overcoats built to their own indi- 
vidual measurements by a real good tailor — built 
into clothing that you yourself will select from the 
cream of the season's woolen innovations — and yet 
built at a price that even the most moderate wage 
earner can c heerfully afford. 



1 Wi n Take Yo ur Or- 
der lor Your Fall and 
Winter Suit or Over- 
coat lor $15 to 





Yours truly, 



HARRY MITCHELL 

123 West Superior Street. 



m^ 



■ 










, 


i 




f 










1 




* 






1 




'■ 




1 




i 


1 


1 


















- 'r- 



«•*« 



q ^-tmww^ 



■w— I 



•^>^MBi«l^— >4^ 



u 



.-^ 



14 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 22, 1910. 



ITV NOTICES. 



^IT 



CONTRACT WORK — 

Office of Koard of Public Workp, 

City of liuluth, Minn., Sept. -'1, 1910 

Pfaled bids will be received by the 
Board of I'ublic Worksr in and for tiie 
corpuialicn of the City of L>uluth. Min- 
nesota, at tli^Ii office in said city, at 
ten o'clock A. M., on the Thirtieth day 
of September, A. D. 1910, for the con- 
strue tioii of fi sanitary sev/er in Juni- 
ata street, In said city from Fifty- 
fourtii avenue east to the sewer at 
Sixtieth avenue east, according *o 
plans and specifications on file in the 
office of said Board. 

A certified chick for ten per cent 
of the amount of the bid. payable to 
the order of the Treasurer of the Clt^' 
of I'uiuth, must accompany each pio- 
pos<iI. 

The Board reserves the right to re- 
ject any and all bids. 

OLUF O. OLSON. 
Official: President. 

R. MUKCHISON. 

Clerk, Board of I'ublic WtJks. 
(Seal.) 
1). H. Sept. 21 and 22, 1910. D 167. 

CONTRACT WOKK — 

Office of Board of I'ublic AVorks, 

City of Imluth, Minn.. Sept. :i. 1910. 

SeaJeil bids will l>c received by the 
Board of I'ublic Woiks in wnd fur the 
corporation «>f the City ot Imhith, Min- 
nesota, at their office in saui city, at 
ten n clock A. Al.. on the thirtieth day 
of September, A. i». 1910. for the con- 
struction t>f a sanitary sewer in Re- 
Biormel Jilley in sai<l city iruin a point 
2-6 feet west of Atlantic avenue to 
Pacific avenue, with outlet to the sewer 
in Vernt-'n street, according to plans and 
specifications on Hie in liie office of 
said Hoard. 

A certified check for ten per cent of 
the amount ot the bid, layalde to the 
order of the Treasurer of the City of 
t>uluth, mui-t accompany 
posal. 

The Board reserves the 
jtcl any and all bids. 

OLOF a 
Official: 

R. MURCHISON, 

Clerk. Board I'ublic Works. 
(Seal.) 
1). H., Sept. 21 and 22. 1910. I> 159. 



each pro- 
right to re- 

, OLSON, 
I'lesident. 



corporation of the City of Duluth. Min- 
nesota, at their office In said city, at 
10 o'clock a. m., on the Thirtieth day 
of September A, D. 1910, for the con- 
struction of a sanitary sewer In 
Princeton avenue In said city from 
Oxford street to St. Andrews street, 
with outlet to the sewer in Woodland 
avenue according to plans and specifi- 
cations on file in the office of said 
Board. 

A certified check for 10 per cent of 
the amount of tlie bid, payable to the 
order of the Treasurer of the City of 
Dulutb., must accompany each proposal. 

The Board reserves the right to re- 
ject any and all bids. 

ULUF G. OLSON. 
Official: President. 

R. MURCHISON, 

Clerk, Board Public "Works. 
(Seal.) 
L>. H., Sept. 21 and 22, 1910. D 161. 



L>uluth n-usi 

The Board 

ject any and 

Official: 



Cti-N'TRACT WUHK— 

Offici; of Board of Public Works. 

City of iHiluth. Minn.. Sept. -1. 1910. 
Sealed bids will be received by the 
Board of Public Works in and tor ll'e 
corporation of the City of Duluth. 
Minnesota, at their office In said city. 
at ten o'clock A. M., on the ThlrtieUi 
Oay of September, A. L>. 1910, tor tiic 
tonstructioii of a sewer in the alKv 
between Glenwood and Oneida str-.^ets 
In said city from Fitty-sevent a avenue 
east to ti.e sewer at Si.xtleth aven.ic 
tast. according to i>lan}» and speci.'ica- 
tions on file in the I'fficr of said B'sard. 
A certified check for ten per cent r.f 
the amount ol the bid. i>ayable to tlic 
order of the Treasurer of the City of 
accompany each propo.-?al. 
reserves the ligiit to le- 
aii bids. 

OLUF G. OLSON. 

Piesident. 
R MLRCHISON, 

Clerk, Board of Public Works. 
(Seal.) 
1>. H., Sept. 21 and 22. 1910. D 168. 

CONTRACT WORK— 

Office of Board of Public Works, 
City of i>uluth. Minn.. Sept. 21, 1910. 

Sealed bids will be received by the 
Board ot Public Works in and for the 
corjoration of the City of I>uiutn. 
Minnesota at their office in said city. 
at ten o'clock A. M., on the Thirtieth 
day of September, A. 1>. 1910, for the 
construction of a sanitary sewer in 
Eightli alley, in said city, from Ninth 
avenue east to Eleventh avenue east. 
aci"iirdl:ig to plans and specifications 
on hie in tlie office of said Board. 

A certified check for ten per cent of 
the amc>uni of the bid. payable to the 
order of the Treasurer ol the City of 
Duluth, must accompany each proposal. 

The Board reserves the right to re- 
ject any and all bids. 

OLOF G. OLSON. 

i'resiuent. 
Official: 

R. MURCHISON, 

Clerk. Board Public Works, 

(Seal> 
D. H. Sept. 21 and 22. 1910. D 169. 

CONTRACT WORK— 

Office of Board of Public Works, 

City of i'Uluth. Minn.. Sept. 21. 19H'. 

Sealed bids will be received by the 
Board of Public Woiks in and for the 
corporation of the City of L'ulutli, Min- 
nef^ota. at their office in said city, ;it 
ten o'clock A. M.. on the thirtieth day 
of September. A. D. 1910, for the con- 
etruction of a sanitary sewer in Re- 
gent Street in said city from a point 
25 feet east ot Fortieth avenue east to 
the sewer at Forty-second avenue east, 
according to plans and specifications On 
file in the office of said Board. 

A certified check for ten per cent ot 
the amount of the bid, payable to the 
order of the Treasurer of the City of 
Duluth, must accompany each pro- 
posal. 

The Board reserves the right to re- 
ject any and ail bids. 

OLOF G. CiLSON, 
Official: President. 

R. MURCHISON. 

Clerk, Board Public Works. 
(Seal.) 
L>. H . Sept. 21 and 22, 1910. D 160. 

CONTRACT WORK— 

Office of Board of Public Works, 

City of Duluth, Minn., Sept. 21, 1910. 

Sealed bids will be received by the 
Board of I'ublic Works in and for the 
corporation ol the City of Duluth. Min- 
nesota, at their office in said city, at 
ten o'clock A. M., on the thirtieth day 
of September. A. 1». 1910, for the con- 
struction of a sanitary sewer in Re- 
Btormel street in said city from the 
west line of Bryant addition to L>uluth 
to the outlet sewer at Second street, 
according to plans and specifications 
on file in the office of said Board. 

A certified check for ten per cent of 
the amount of the bid. payable to the 
order of the Treasurer of the City of 
Duluth, must accompany each proposal. 

The Board reserves the right to re- 
ject any and all bids. 

OLOF G. OLSON, 
Official: President. 

R. MURCHISON, 

Clerk, Board Public Works. 
(Seal. > 
p. H.. Se pt. 21 and 22, 1910. D 165. 

CONTRACT WORK— 

Office of Board of Public Works, 

City of I>uluth, Minn., Sept. 21, 1910. 

Sealed bids will be received by the 
Board of Public Works in and for the 
corporation of the City of Duluth. Min- 
nesota, at their office in said city, at 
ten o'clock A. M., on the thirtieth day 
of September, A. L>. 1910, for the con- 
struction of a sanitary sewer in Wy- 
oming stieet in said city from Fifty- 
fourth avenue east to Sixtieth avenue 
east, according to plans and specifica- 
tions On file in the office of said Board. 

A certified check for ten per cent of 
the amount of the bid. payable to the 
order of the Treasurer of the City of 
Duluth. must accomi>any eacli proposal. 

The Board reserves the right to re- 
ject any and all bids. 

OLOF G. OLSON. 
Official: President. 

R. MURCHISON, 

Clerk, Board I'ublic Works. 
(Seal.) 
P. H., Sept. 21 and 22, 1910. D 166. 

CONTRACT WORK— 

Office of Board of Public Works. 

City of Duluth, Minn., Sept. 21. 1910. 

Sealed bids wi;i be received by the 
Board of Public Works in and for the 
corporation of the City of Duluth, Min- 
nesota, at their office in said city, at 
ten o'ciock a. m., on the Thirtieth day 
of September A. D. 1910. for the con- 
Btructlon of a sanitary sewer in Wick- 
low alley in said city from Michigan 
avenue to the sewer in Winnipeg a\e- 
nue according to plans and specifica- 
tions on file in the office of said Board. 

A certified check for 10 per cent of 
the amount of the bid, payable to the 
order of the Treasurer of the City of 
Duluth. must accompany each pro- 
posal. 

The Board reserves the right to re- 
ject any and all bids. 

OLOF G. OLSON. 
Official: President. 

R. MURCHISON. 

. Clerk, Board Public Works. 
(Seal.) 
D. H-. Sept. 21 and 22, 1910. D 162. 

CONTRACT WORK — " 

Office of Board of Public "^''orke. 

City of Duluth. Minn., Sept. 21 1910. 

Sealed bids will be received by the 
Board of Public Works in and for the 



CONTRACT WORK — 

Office of Board of Public Works, 

City of Duluth. Minn., Sept. 21, 1910. 

Sealed bids will be received by the 
Board of I'ublic ^Vorks in and for the 
corporation of the City of Duluth, Min- 
nesota, at tl-.eir office in said city, at 
ten o'clock A. M., on the Thirtieth day 
of September, A. l'. 1910, for the con- 
.•-■truction of a sanitary sewer In Sixty- 
fiist Alley West in said city from Polk 
Street to the sewer In Sherburne 
Street, according to plans and specifi- 
cations on file in the office of said 
Board. 

A certified check for ten per cent of 
the amount of the bid, payable to the 
order of the Treasurer of the City of 
Duiutli, must accompany each proposal. 

Tlie Board reserves the right to re- 
ject any and all bids. 

OLOF G. OLSON, 
Official: President. 

R. MURCHISON, 

Clerk, Board of Public Works, 
tSeal) 
D. H, Sept. 21 and 22, 1910. D 163. 

CONTRACT WORK — 

Office of Board of Public Works. 

City of iiuluth, Minn., Sept. 21, 1910, 

Sealed bid-s will be received by the 
Board of i'ublic Works In and for the 
corporation of the City of Duluth, Min- 
nesota, at their office in said city, at 
ten o'clock A. M., on the Thirtieth day 
of September, A. L>., 1910. for the con- 
struction of a sewer in Glenwood Street 
in said city from Fifty-fourth Avenue 
East to Fifty-eighth .\venue East, ac- 
cording to plans and specifications on 
file in the office of said Board. 

A certified check for ten ler cent 
of the amount of the bid. payable to 
the order of the Trea.surer of the City 
of Duluth, must accompany each pro- 
posal. 

The Board reserves the right to re- 
ject any and all bids. 

OLOF G. OLSON, 
Official: President. 

R. MURCHISON, 
Clerk, Board of Public Works, 
(Seal) 
D. H., Sept. 21 and 22, 1910. D 164. 



OFFICI. \L PUOCEEDINGS. 

Council Chamber. 
Duluth, Minn., Sept. 19, 1910. 

Regular meeting. 

Roll call. 

Present — Alderman Barnes, Berg- 
strom, Bernard, Curren, Getchell, Hec- 
tor, Hoar. Hogan, MacDonell, Makow- 
ski. Merritt, Stoiey, Wharton, Presi- 
dent Jordan — 14. 

Absent — Aldermen Moore, Shartel — 2. 



On motion ot Alderman Barnes ine 
minutes of the meeting of Sept. 12th 
were ap-proved as published in pam- 
phlet form by a unanimous yea vote of 
ail present, on roll call. 

Mayor Cullum, being present, was 
accorded the privilege of the fioor and 
read a communication urging that an 
appropriation be made for the securing 
of dock sites. The communication was 
referred to the Committee on Finance. 



PRESENTATION OF PETITIONS AND 
OTH ER COMMUNICATIONS. 

Joseph H. Haines et al, for the con- 
struction of a viaduct on Twelfth or 
Thirteenth avenues west from Michi- 
gan street to Railroad street — Bridges, 
Viaducts and Ferries. 

J. R Burdash et al, and T. N. Steven- 
son et al, asking that Superior street 
from Twenty-third to Twenty-fifth 
avenues west be placed in the patrol 
limits — Police and License. 

Referee in bankruptcy notice in the 
matter of Albert M. Sieuerwald, bank- 
rui.it — City attorney. 

Tliomas Szosiak et al, that a sani- 
tary sewer be constructed in Welling- 
ton street from Michigan avenue to 
Grand Forks avenue, with outlet — 
Board of Public Works. 

Ajiplications for license to operate 
motor vehicles. 

Application and bond of F. Kohnen 
to operate pool tables at No. 2b05 West 
Superior street. 

Application and bond of Joseph 
Kenny for license to sell intoxicating 
liquors at No. 101 Lake avenue south — 
i'olice and License. 

Estimates to sewer contractors — 
Drains, Sewers and Sanitation. 

Estimates to street contractors — 
Streets, Allevs and Sidewalks. 

Ilequisitions Nos. 202i56 to 20315 in- 
clusive — Purchasing and Supplies. 



REPORTS OF CITY OFFICERS. 

City engineer transmitting plat of 
Home Acres — Streets, Alleys and Side- 
walks. 

City attorney as to the legality of 
the estimate to George I{. King on his 
contract for the construction of sani- 
tary sewer outlet in Sherburne and 
Polk streets — Drains, Sewers and Sani- 
tation. 

Report of conference with officials of 
Soo ICailway company relative to pav- 
ing of Michigan street from Eighth to 
Twelfth avenues west, and kindred 
subjects — Streets, Alleys and Side- 
walks. 

City clerk reporting receipt and 
transmittal to city attorney of com- 
muiiication frc)m Duluth Jobbers 
Credit Bureau relative to tiling claim 
against A. M. Steuerwald, bankrupt — 
Received. 

Transmitting copy • of resolution 
adopted by the Conference committee 
determining the amount of money 
which in his opinion will be necessary 
for the various departments for the 
year 1911 — Finance. 

Manager water and light department 
reiiuesting immediate action on certain 
bills — Claims. 

Transcript of minutes of meeting of 
Sept. 6 — Received. 

Board of Public Works reporting 
award of contract for construction of 
a sanitary sewer in the alley between 
Greysolon place and Superior street 
from a point 300 feet west of Twenty- 
seventh avenue east to Thirty-first 
avenue east, etc. 

Report on petition of James A. 
Weaver et al, for the construction of a 
sanitary sewer in West Fourth street 
from 200 feet east of Tenth avenue 
west to a point 100 feet west of Elev- 
enth avenue west — Drains, Sewers and 
Sanitation. 

Reporting pole permit granted to Du- 
luth Telephone company — Streets, Al- 
leys and Sidewalks. 



MOTIONS AND RESOLUTIONS 

The following combined resolution 
was submitted by Aldermen Barnes 
and Getchell: 

Resolved, That the city treasurer Is 
hereby directed to receive from the 
owners of the following described 
property the amount of the original 
assessment levied against said proper- 
ty as full payment of said assessments, 
as follows: 

The assessment against the north 
100 feet Of lots 3 and 4. East First 
street. Duluth Proper, First division, 
levied to defray in part the cost of 
paving First alley from Lake avenue 
to Third avenue east. 

The assessment against lot 22, block 
6, Central division. West Duluth, levied 
for the construction of a sanitary 
sewer in Sixtieth alley west. 

The a.ssessment against lots 3 and 4, 
Block 131, West Duluth, Fifth division, 
levied to defray in part the cost of 
constructing a sanitary sewer in Fifty- 
ninth alley west. 

P'rovided in each case that payment 
is made within fifteen days from the 
date of the passage of this resolution, 
and further provided that each of said 
owners shall at the same time pay the 
sum of $1.50, one-third the estimated 
cost of the publication of this resolu- 
tion. 

Alderman Getchell moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution, and it was de- 



clared adopted by a unanimous yea 
vote of all present, on roll calL 

I'assed Sept, 19, 1910. 

Approved Sept. 21, 1910. 

By Alderman Storey: 

Resolved, That the attention of the 
Board of Public Works is hereby called 
to the deflection of the water from 
Brewery Creek by the sewer con- 
structed underneath said creek in 
Sixth avenue east between Sixth and 
Seventh street, and following the line 
of said sewer to a point below .Sixth 
street and said board is hereby directed 
to take such steps as may be necessary 
to keep said water in the original 
channel of said creek, as otherwise 
serious damage will probably occur to 
Sixth street and adjacent property 
from such water. 

Alderman Storey moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution, and it was de- 
clared adopted by a unanimous yea 
vote of all present, on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 19, 1910. 

Approved Sept. 21, 1910. 



luth wat 
Consolidated 
Andrew C>ahl 
son Electri 
Van & Sto 
luth Fire In 
luth Street 
Dunlop-Moor 
Ice company, 
R. R. Porwa, 
E, Gurley,» |9 
Son, $20. PO; }< 
$40.00; G. A 



By Alderman Makowski: 

Itesolved, That John McDonald 1b 
hereby granted permission to connect 
his premises, lot 7, block, >:0, Lake- 
view division, witli the storm sewer 
In Ninth avenue east for sanitary pur- 
poses, provided said McDonald shall 
first get the approval of the city en- 
gineer to sucii connection, and further 
provided that said McDonald shall file 
the customary agreement with the 
Board of Public Works. 

Alderman Makowski moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution, and it was de- 
clared adopted by a unanimous yea 
vote of all present, on roll call. 

Passed Sept, 19, 1910. 

Approved Sept, 21, 1910, 

By Aderman Hector: 

Resolved, That the Board of Public 
Works is hereby directed to discon- 
tinue proceedings heretofore instituted 
for tlie construction of sidewalk on 
the west side of Lake avenue from 
Sixth street to Seventh alley. 

Alderman Hector moved llie adop- 
tion of the resolution, and it was de- 
clared adopted by a unanimous yea 
vote of all present, on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 19, 1910. 

Approved Sept. 21, 1910. 

By Alderman Curren: « x, v,,. 

Resolved, That the Board of Public 
Works is hereby advised that this 
council consents to the issuance ol" a 
permit to Charles Schober, the owner 
of the building at No. 27 East Superior 
street to construct underneath First 
alley an area-way three feet wide by 
seven feet long immediately adjacent 
to said building, for the purpose of re- 
moving ashes from the basement of 
said building, provided said area-way 
shall have a corrugated iron or steel 
cover whicii shall be kept in place ex- 
cept when used for the above stated 
purpose, and further provided that such 
permit shall be subject to revocation 
by this council at any time. 

•Vldcrman Curren moved the ademp- 
tion of tiie resolution, and It was de- 
clared adopted by a unanimoi.s yea 
vote of all present, on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 19, 1910.^_ 

Approved Sept. 21, 1910. 

Bv Alderman Bernard: .. t^ ti-« 

Resolved, That the Board of Public 
Works is hereby directed to fill m the 
roadwav on the line of Fiftieth avenue 
•ve.-t adiatent to the Northern Pa^'itic 
Railway company right-of-way, where 
the bridge formerly used as a roadway 
was located, said bridge having burned 
down in the fire of the 18th inst, such 
roadway to be filled with slabs at an 
estimated cost of $200.00. such cost to 
be paid out of tlie permanent improve- 
ment fund. „ , ,^ -r, 1 

Resolved Further, That said Board 
Is hereby directed to call the attention 
of the officials of the Northern Pacific 
Railwav company to the destructiun of 
said bridge across its right-of-way, 
and to reciuest said company to fill In 
across said right-of-way. 

Alderman Bernard moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution, and it was de- 
clared adopted by a unanimous yea 
vote of all present, on roll call. 

I'assed Sept. 19, 1910. 

Approved Sept. 21, 1910. 

Bv •■Mderman Barnes: 

"Resolved. That the city engineer is 
hereby directed to make an examina- 
tion of the roads and bridges from 
Seventy-first avenue west to Fond ou 
Lac, and report to this council his rec- 
ommendation of the route to be fol- 
lowed by a street car line if construct- 
ed between said points, said street car 
line to pass through Ironton, Smitli- 
ville, the Steel plant and New Duluth, 
and to also report at the same tinj.-s 
what is necessary to place said roads 
and bridges in a condition to receive 
the street car line, with an estimate 
of the cost thereof. 

Alderman Barries moved the adoptloi 
of the resolution, and it was declared 
adopted by a unanimous yea vote of 
all present, on roll call. 

I'assed Sept. 19, 1910. 

Approved Sept. 21, 1910. 

By Alderman Getchell: 

Resolved, That the City engineer is. 
hereby reciuested to establish the grade 
on Fortv-seventh avenue west from 
Sixth to "Eighth street. 

Alderman Getchell moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution, and it was de- 
clared adopted by a unanimous yea 
vote of all present, on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 19. 1910. 

Approved Sept. 21, 1910. 

By Alderman Moore: 

Resolved, That the Duluth-Edison 
Electric company is hereby directed to 
move the light located in the middle 
of the block between Crescent and 
Allendale avenues to the corner of 
Crescent avenue and Anoka street. 

Alderman Hogan moved the adoption 
of the resolution, and it was declared 
adopted by a unanimous yea vote of 
all present, on roll call. 

Passed .Sept. 19, 1910. 

Approved Sept. 21, 1910. 

By Alderman Moore: 

Resolved. That an extension of tlmo 
is hereby granted to P. McDonnell to 
Aug. :i5, 1910, for the completion of 
his contract for the paving of Twenty- 
fctcond avenue east from First alley to 
Second alley, provided the surety on 
his bond shall first file its written con- 
sent thereto in form approved by the 
city attorney. 

Alderman Hogan moved the adoption 
of the resolution, and it was declared 
adopted by a unanimous yea vote of 
all present, on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 19, 1910. 

Approved Sept. 21. 1910. 



By Alderman Moore: 

Resolved. That H, O. Williamson is 
hereby granted permission to connect 
his premises, lot 1, re-arrangement of 
block 15. Highland Park addition, with 
the sanitary sewer in East Sixth street, 
provided the said Williamson shall first 
file with the Board of Public Works 
the customary agreement, and further 
provided that this permission sli.all be 
revocable by this council at any time. 

Alderman Hogan moved the adoption 
o:' the resolution, and it was declared 
adopted by a unanimous yea vote of 
all present, on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 19, 1910. 

Approved Sept. 21, 1910. 



By Alderman Storey: 

Resolved, That the Board of Public 
Works is liereby directed to circulate a 
petition for the paving of Tenth ave- 
nue east from Fourth street to Sixth 
street. 

Alderman Storey moved the adoption 
of the resolution, and it was declared 
adopted by a unanimous yea vote of 
all present, on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 19, 1910. 

Approved Sept. 21, 1910, 

REPORTS OF STANDING COMMIT- 
TEES. 
To the Common Council: 

Your Committee on Claims, to which 
was referred miscellaneous bills for 
the month of August, 1910, having 
considered the same, recommend the 
adoption of the following resolution: 
LUCIEN MERRITT, 
W. B. GETCUELL. 
LUCIEN A. BARNfcs, 

Committee. 
Resolved, That miscellaneous bills 
against the city for the month of 
August, 1910, be and hereby are al- 
lowed, and it Is hereby directed that 
orders be drawn on the city treasurer 
to pay the same as follows: 
GENERAL FUND. 
H. Bartlett, ffi.OO; Barber Asphalt 




Paving emnrmny, $82.14; E. F. Burg. 
$7.00; R. J. i^rnes, $8.00; City of I.'ii- 
light department, $6.53; 
bstract company, $4.70; 
an. $5.00; Dulyth Edi- 
ompany, $53.(50; Duluth 
e company, $11.00; Du- 
ance agency, $20.00; Du- 
ilway company, $10.00: 
com;ianv, $l.r..j; East End 
$1.35; W. K. Fowler, $G.00; 
jil & Co,, $20,00; W^ & L, 
1.33; P. George Hanson & 
fertman-O'Donnell agency, 
Herstrom, $10.61; The 



Herald *pmpany, $3.30; Alfred Le 
Richeux,Tif'S.OO; Linen exchange, $4.00; 
R. C. McKinlav, $10.00; W. F, Markus, 
$2.04; W.^. Moer, $:n.25: Mutual Elec- 
tric company, $12.10; Northern Elec- 
trical company, $27.28; Ohio Coal com- 
pany, $1**.7»; Herman Pfitzenmeier, 
$9.00; Poirier Tent & Awning company, 
$10.00; Rankin Printing company, 
$12.05; Union Abstract com.pany, $20.60; 
N. J. Upham, $10.00; F. J. Voss. treas- 
urer, $26.}ss; E. G. Walton. $402,19; West 
r>islnfecting companv. $15.00; Zenith 
Teleplione company. $20.00. 
GEWERAL FUND (INFECTIOUS DIS- 
EASES). 

Armour & Co., $11.(^0;' City of Duluth 
water and light department, $57.60; 
Duluth Heating company, $32.64; Du- 
luth Marine Supply comjany, $257.63; 
R. R. Forward & Co., $13.00: H. Gould, 
$26.44; II. J. Jeronimus, $3.52; F. S. 
Kelly Furniture company. $14.10; 
Mork Bros., $39.54; Neil McDougall, 
$4.80- Northern Hardware company, 
$6.77; Noyes Bros. & Cutler, $9.00; the 
Ohio Coal company, $*2.00; Pantcn & 
White company, $15.98; Smith & Smith, 
$4.05, Woodruff Lumber company, 
$7.76; Zenith Telephone company, 
$20.50. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

E. 1>. Curry, $4.00; Duluth Street 
Railway company^ $35.00; Duluth Van 
& Storage company, $2.05; Kelley Haul- 
ware company, $3.2.'i; Mesaba Boilei- & 
Manufacturing company, $6.11: Na- 
tional Stamp & Printing company. 
$55.95; Jens NiJson, $83.52; Rankin 
Printing companv, $5.50; T. A. Scarlett, 
$53.62; Standard Salt & Cement com- 
pany, $74.71; Tliomsen Foundry co.m- 
pany, $22.92; L. P. Totman. $5.liO; Zen- 
ith Telephone company, $12.00, 
LIGHT FUND. 

Duluth-Edison Electric company, 
$2,772.07; Herman Bros., Becklinger & 
Reindl, $220.00; Welsbach Street Liglit- 
ing company Oi America, $145.19; City 
of Duluth water and light department, 
25 cents. 

MUNICIPAL COURT FUND. 

Brown-Yale company, $2.50; Christie 
Lithograph & Printing company, $18.00; 
Duluth Paper and Stationery company, 
$19.00; r>un!th-Edison Electric com- 
pany. $13.16; French & Bassett, $34.00; 
1). P. McDonald, John A. Stephenson, 
agent. $175.00; Zenith Telephone com- 
pany, $2.50. 

PERM.\NENT IMPROVEMENT FUND. 

Board of Public Works (public woi^ks 
fund), $364.96; C. O. Backlund, $63.42; 
John Claffy, $88.32; The Herald com- 
pany, $64.15; A. J. Harker company, 
$8.22; E. F, Hilliard, $13,58; Emil John- 
son, $24.96: W. E. Kern, $62.15; Nelson 
& Noren, $35.66; L. W. Palmer. $60.09; 
I'eter G. Pastoret, $40.00; Radcliffe & 
Price, $163.90; Thomson & Stewart, 
$2.94; Charles Wallin. $35.00. 
PERMANENT IMI'ROVE.MENT RE- 
VOLVING FUND. 

Joseph Ario, $52.24; Sarah H. Banks, 
$103.36; J. W. Bell, $51.68; Gustav A. 
Bergstrom, $55.56; Tliomas Cameron, 
$51. 6S; P. F. Castle, John F. Dow, 
agent, $111.12; Hannah H. Christian, 
$6(;.(i9; Consolidated Abstract company, 
$49.20; Frank A. Day, $133.37; estate of 
J. L. Dodge, J. C. & R. M. Hunter, 
agents, $444.56; John F. Dow, $6t;.68; 
George i:>rennan, $55.56; Frances D. 
Feniiev, W. M. Prindle & Co., agents, 
$266.74; Robert H. Grimshaw, $40.57; 
Ole Giinden, $51.68; Mrs. J. F. Hector, 
$111.12; The Herald company, $322.75; F. 
K. Hicks, $88.07; Robert Hooey. $111.12; 
John Jenswold, $186.16; M. V. Jones, 
$66.69; Lillian KJellin, $111.12; Dr. 
Peter Kraft. $47.79; J. H. Lanyon, 
$55.56; Hogan Lindahl, $85.02; George 
H. Lounsberry, $111.12; E, H. Lovald, 
$61.13; J. P. McCue, $55.56; Richard 
McCue, $55.56; John F, McDonald, 
$55.56; P. McDonnell, $215.61; Annie 
McLean. $55.56; John H. Murray, $51.68; 
R. Narotta, $45.29; N. J. Orr, $36.68; 
William B, Patton, $111.14; P, E. Peter- 
son, $122.04; W. J, Prince, $122.24; 
Gustav Schlender, Richardson, Day & 
Harrison, agents, $133.37; Joseph Sell- 
wood, guardian. $66.69; J. W. Sheri- 
dan, 5111.12; Carl V. Sjoberg, $2,91; J. 
W. Stewart, $55.57; Susan M. Stryker, 
$122.24: Margaret E, Toben, $133,36; 
Edith P. Townsend, $56.12; Edward 
Wakefield, $7,20; W. J. O. Walling, 
$47,79: Maud Wardwell, $83.35; Mrs. 
Louise Willard. $138.92; A. L. Wright, 
$66.68. 

PRINTING AND SUPPLY FUND. 

H. W. Cheadle, $8.60; Cb.ristie Lith- 
ograph & Printing comi>any, $194.00; 
The Herald comi>any, $434.04; J. J. 
Le Tourneau I'rinting company, $47.00; 
J. H. McCall, $5.00; W. S. McCormick, 
$3.00; National Stamp & Printing com- 
pany, $3.61K Peyton Paper company, 
$9.95; Thwing-Stewart company, $4.25; 
Wendlandt Bros. & Co., $56.75. 
WATER FUND. 

City of Duluth water and light de- 
partment: $97.57. 

Alderman Merritt moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution, and it was de- 
clared adopted by a unanimous yea 
vote of all present, on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 19, 1910. 

Approved Sept. 21. 1910. 

To the Common Council: 

Your Committee on Claims, to which 
was referred bills against the fire de- 
partment and tlie water and light de- 
partment for the month of August, 
1910, having considered the same, rec- 
ommend the adoption of the following 
resolution: 

LUCIEN MERRITT, 
W. B. GETCHELL. 
LUCIEN A. BARNES, 

Committee, 

Resolved, That bills against the fire 
department and the water and liyiit 
department for the month of August, 
1910, be and hereby are approved, and 
said departments are hereby author- 
ized to draw orders on tlie fire de- 
Itartment fund and llie water and light 
plant fund, respectively, to pay the 
same, as follows; 

FIRE DEPARTMENT F'UND. 

Acme laundry, $26.48; W. A, Abbett, 
$4,93; American La France Fire Ex- 
tinguisher company, $132,88; C. G. 
Braxmar, company, $3.50; Babcock Ex- 
tinguisher company, $12.00; Burns 
Lumber company, $14.14; E. J. Bunker, 
$5.24; Burgess Electric company, $12.97 ; 
J. II. Constantine company, $22.85; 
Consolidated Stamp & Printing com- 
pany, $7.50; Clyde Iron Works, $1.00; 
Duluth Universal Milling company, 
$35.13; Duluth Brass Works company, 
$11.24; Elkhart Brass Manufacturing 
company, $25.00; M. Goldberg. $325.00; 
(Jogebic Steam Boiler Works, $58.00; 
J. G. Harris, $25,00; E. G. Hilliard, feO 
cents; George C. Hale, $1.46; Interstate 
Traction company, $30.00; Kelley Hard- 
ware company, $17.94; Kelley-How- 
Thomson company, $21.15; The Minne- 
sota Soap company, $22,50; Marshall- 
Wells Hardware company, $13.09; 
James McMartin, $22.45; Martell Broth- 
ers, $5.00; E. Ott, $12.75; Peerless 
Laundry company, $15.33; Peter Pirsch 
& Co., $63.75; Quayle - I.,arsen com- 
pany, 40 cents; John Runquist, $350.00; 
Standard Oil company, $3.50; Scott- 
(iraff Lumber company, $7.50; Standard 
Salt & Cement company, $2.91; St. Ger- 
main Brothers, $5.30; T. A. Scarlett, 
$1.50; Waterous Engine Works com- 
pany, $1.00; R. M. White, $397.75; The 
Williams Drop Forging company, 
$44.00: The Herald company, $6.60. 
WATER AND LIGHT PLANT FUND. 

Thomas Brown, $25,00; Burgess Elec- 
tric company, $49,11; Bergren Machine 
Works, $5.10; Board of Public Works, 
$7.09; E. J. Bunker, $19.00; L. B. Man- 
ley, L. N. Case (Contingent Fund), 
$3,164.49; George M. Clark & companv, 
$21.43; D. H. Clough & Co., $146.51; 
James B. CU>w & Sons, $173.80; Crane 
& Ordway company, $167.21; Charles 
H. Dickey & Co., $1.00; Duluth Hard- 
ware company, $7.98; Duluth Telephone 
company, $52.00; Duluth Fire Depart- 
ment, $2.50; Endion Lumber company, 
$6.14; Fostoria Novelty company, 
$21.60; Gowan - Peyton - Twohy com- 
ipany, $2.75; Great Northern Pov.-er 
^company, $12.14; James Henderson, 
$3.15; The Herald company, $2.20; 
Hartman-O'Donnell agencv, $30.60- A. 
J. Harker, $47.45; Charles litis, $29.40; 
P. Johnson, $5.00; C. E. Judd companv, 
$2.50; H. C. Kendall, $44.00; Kelle'y 
Hardware company, $12.28; Daniel 
Keefe, $19.00; Lyceum Livery company, 
$61.00; J. J. Le Tourneau Printing coni- 
pany. f2S.2&{ The Ludlow Valve Manu- 



ficturing company, $246.60; the Linen 
Exchange, $.i.70; G. R. Lee Auto Livery 
company, $5.00; E. A. Lund, $4.50, Mar- 
snail- Wells Hardware company, $24.24; 
H. Mueller Manufacturing company, 
$1,135.52; Macbeth-Evans Glass com- 
pany, $44.10- Neptune Meter company, 
$68,50; Northwestern Steam Boiler & 
Manutacturing company, $8.39; North- 
western Fuel companv, $116.79; North- 
ern Electrical companv, $17.98; North- 
western Iron & Metal company, $1.00; 
the Ohio Coal companv, $4 5.88; Ouel- 
I'Jtte & company, $a.85. Power Equip- 
ment company, $21.25; (Juavle-Larsen 
companx, $42.40; Rankin Printing com- 
pany, $1.75; the H. G. Razall Manu- 
facturing company, $19,50; Russell 
Motor company, $6,48; Standard Oil 
company, $6.43; the Standard Meter 
company. Inc.. $99.00, the A. P. Smith 
^Manufacturing company, $75.60; Stand- 
ard Salt & Cement company, $45.45; 
Star Roofing & Cornice V.'orks, $1.80; 
Schulze Brothers company, $1 50; 
Thomson Mtter company, $800.00; Capi! 
H. H. Thompson, $10.00; Thomsen 
Foundry company, $230.15; N. U. 
Upham company, $250.00; F. J. Voss, 
treasurer, $12.35; Viscosity Oil com- 
pany, $6.98; West Duluth & Duluth 
Transfer company, $3.50; tlie Western 
Union Telegraph company, $9,84; 
Northern Hardware company, $8.75; R. 
1). Wood & company, $675.75; Zenitii 
Furnace company, $8,921.07. 

Alder:nan Merritt moved the adop- 
tion ol tlie resolution, and it was de- 
clared adopted by a unanimous j ea 
\ott of all present, on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 19. 1910. 

Approved Sept. 21, 1910. 

To the Common Council: 

Your Committee on Drains, Sewers 
and Sanitation, to wliich was referred 
estimates to contractors, having con- 
sidered the same, recommend the adop- 
tion of llie following resolution: 
H. P. curi;en, 

WILLIAM L. BERNARD. 
TH<JS. J, STOREY. 

Committee. 

Resolved, Tliat estimates to contrac- 
tors are hereby allowed, and it is 
hereby directed that orders be drawn 
on the permanent imiirovement levolv- 
ing fund to pay the same, as follows: 

To Charles Eklund, on his contract 
for 1 he construction of a sanitary- 
sewer in Seventh street and Seventh al- 
loy from Twenty-fourth to Twenty-sev- 
enth avenues east, in the sum of 
$143.00. 

To Mattl Pykari, on his contract for 
the construction of a sanitary sewer in 
Third alley from Twenty-eightii ave- 
nue west to Tv.enty -ninth avenue west, 
in the sum of $254.95. 

Alderman Curren moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution, and it was de- 
clared adopted by a' unanimous yea 
vote ol all present, on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 19, 1910. 

Approved Sept- 21, 1910. 

To the Common Council: 

Your Committee on Drains, Sewers 
and Sanitation, to which was relerred 
award of contract, having considered 
the same, recommend the adoption of 
tne following resolution: 
H. P. CURREN. 
WILLIAM L BERNARD. 
THOS. J. STOREY. 

Committee, 

Resolved, That the contract awarded 
by the Board of Public Works to 
Charle--! Ekiund for the construction 
of a sanitary sewer in the alley be- 
tween Greysolon place and Superior 
street, froni a point 300 feet west of 
TAventy-seventh avenue east to Thirty- 
first avenue east, in Thirty-first avenue 
east to Greysolon place, thence east- 
erly in Greysolon place to Congdon 
I'afk with outlet in Thirty-first ave- 
nue east to the sewer in Greysolon 
road, is here"i..y confirmed. 

Alderman Curren moved the adoption 
of the resolution, and it was declared 
adopted by a unanimous yea vote of all 
present .on roll call. 

Passed Sept, 19, :9]0. 

Approved Sept. 21. 1910. 



To the Common Council: 

Your Coi-nmittee on Drains, Sewera 
and Sanitation to which -was referred 
estimate to Geo. R. King, and report 
of the city attorney thereon, having 
consi lered the same, recommend the 
adoption of the following resolution: 

H, V CURREN. 

WILLIAM L. BERNARD. 

THOS. J, STOREY. 

Committee. 

Resolved, That the estimate to Geo. 
P.. .King, in the sum of $8,798.52, on his 
contract for the construction of sani- 
tary sewer outlets in Sherburne street 
and Polk street, etc.. is hereby al- 
lowed, and It is hereby directed that 
an order be drawn on the permanent 
Improvement revolving fnud to pay the 
same. 

Alderman Curren moved the adoption 
of tie resolution, and it was declared 
adopted by a unanimous yta vote of all 
present, on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 19. 1910, 

Approved Sept. 21, 1910. 

To the President and Common Council: 
Your Committee on Drains, Sewers 
and Sanitation, to which w.ns veferrt-d 
the report of the Board of Public 
Works, dated Sept. IC. 1910, relative 
to the petition of James A. A\ eaver 
and others for the construction of 
sewer in West Fourth street, having 
considered the same, recommend the 
adoption of tlie following resolution; 
H. P. CURREN, 
WILLIAM L. BERNARD, 
THOS. J. STOREY, 

Comm-lttee. 
Be It resolved by the Common Coun- 
cil of the Citv of Duluth, that the 
P.oard of Public Works of the City of 
Duluth !s hereby ordered to cause the 
following improvement to be made, to- 

That a sanitary sewer be construct- 
ed in West Fourth street, in said 
cHv, from a point 200 feet east of 
Tenth avenue west to a point 100 feet 
v;est of Eleventh avenue west, with 
outlet In Eleventh avenue west to the 
sewer at Third street. 

Resolved further. That Board of 
Public Works Is hereby instructed to 
cause said improvement to be made 
iv contract; the cost therefor to be 
paid out of the permanent improve- 
ment revolving fund; and it is fur- 
ther ordered: 

That said Board of Public Works 
proceed in accordance with the provis- 
ions of the City Charter to levy as- 
sessments upon the property benefited 
by said Improvement, according to 
benefits received, to defray the cost of 
such improvement, with such other ex- 
penses as under the provisions of satcl 
charter may be assessed. 

Alderman Curren moves the adoption 
of the resolution which was declared 
adopted by a unanimous yea vote of 
all present, on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 19, 1910, 

Approved Sept. 21. 1910, 

To the Common Council: 

Your Committee on Ordinances .infl 
Iiesolutions, to which was referred 
the following entitled ordinances, viz: 
By Alderman Bernard: 

An ordinance to amend an ordinance 
entitled "An ordinance providing for 
tne construction of other than wooden 
sidewalks within certain limits within 
the cltv of Duluth. and forbidding the 
construction or repairing of wooden 
sidewalks within said limits," passed 
Sept. 7, 1S91. as amended. 
By Alderman Bernard: 

An ordinance to amend an ordinance 
entitled "--Vn ordinance to establish the 
width of certain sidewalks in the city 
of Duluth," passed May 28, 1906, as 
amended. 
E:y Alderman Barnes: 

An ordinance to amend an ordinance 
entitled "An ordinance to prescribe 
fire limits in the City of Duluth, regu- 
late the construction of buildings and 
prevent the maintenance of lumber 
and wood yards, gas works and gas 
reservoirs therein," having considered 
tie same, recommend the adoption 
taereof. 

C. R. HOAR, 
CHAS. J. HECTOR, 

Committee. 

The report was received. 



To the Common Council: 

Your Committee on Police and Li- 
cense, to which was referred applica- 
tions and bonds for license to sell In- 
toxicating liquors, having considered 
tne same, recommend the adoption of 
t3e following resolution: 
C. R. HOAR. 
JAMES A. WHARTON, 
Committee. 
Resolved, That applications for "il- 
c^nse to sell iatozicating liquors ara 



liereby granted and bonds accompany- 
ing same are herebj approved as fol- 
lows: 

Gust Johnson, at PTo. 413 West Mich- 
igan street; L. R. Birch, at No. 1510 
West Superior stree ; Frank Peterson, 
at No. 1627 West Superior street, be- 
ing a transfer from No. 1613 Piedmont 
avenue west); S. !•. Ives, at No. 28 
South Twentieth av.^nue west. 

Alderman Hoar moved the adoption 
of the resolution, and it was declared 
adopted upon the fallowing vote: 

Yeas — Aldermen /iBergstrom, Ber- 
nard, Curren, Getchell. Hector, Ho\i 
Hogan, MacDonnell. Makowski, Mer- 
ritt, Storey, Wharton, President Jor- 
dan — 13. 

Nays — Alderman Barnes — 1. 

Passed Sept. 19, 1910. 

Approved Sept. 21, 1910, 



To the Common Council: 

Your Committee on Police and Li- 
cense, to which was referred applica- 
tions and bonds for license, having 
crmsiueied the same, recommend the 
adoption of the following resolution: 
C. R. HO A P., 
J.AMES A. WHARTON, 

Ti , , _ Committee 

Resolved, That applications for li- 
cense are hereby granted, and bonds 
accompanying same are hereby ap- 
pioved. as follows; 

.^^r'^'^K Kohnen to operate three pool 
tabl€-s at No. 2805 West Superior street. 

-Alderman Hoar moved the 
of the resolution, and it 
adopted by a unanimous 
ail present, on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 19. 1910. 

Approved Sept. 21 1910, 



and Twelfth avenue west sewers will 
meet with the Council's approval, if 
satisfactory arrangements can ba 
made as to the repaving matter; that 
the report of the disposiuon of the 
comi'ariy to advance the cost of the 
entire work of repaving this year Is 
appreciated as an evideiice ol a desirt* 
on tlie part of tiie company to do its 
business with ft;e city on friendiv 
terms, and as such is reciprocated;; 
and that the city attorney and city -en- 
gineer are requested to continue liieir 
negotiations with the company to tlio 
enti that a fair and leasonanle basi*J 
be arrived at for the ultimate division 
I oi the ^ost of repaving. 

Aider.man Hogan moved the adop- 
tion of the lesoiution and it was ae- 
clared adopted by a unanimous yea 
vote of an present on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 1S4, isio. 

Approved Sept. 21, 1910. 






was 
yea 



adoption 

declared 

vote of 



and Li- 
applica- 



To the Common Council; 

Your Committee on Police 
cense, to which was referred 
tions for license to operate motor ve- 
hicles, having consic.ered the same, rec- 
ommend the adoption of the following 
retolution : 

C. R. HOAR, 

JAMES A WH.\RTON. 

Committee. 

Resolved, That applications for li- 
cense to operate motor vehicles tipon 
the streets of the lity of Duluth are 
hereby granted, as follov/s: 

Philip S. Wood, George H. Louns- 
berry. 

Alderman Hoar moved 
of the resolution, and it 
adopted by a unanimous 
all present, on roll call 

Passed Sept. 19, 1 )10. 

Approved Sept. -21. 1910, 



the adoption 

was declared 

yea vote of 



and 

was referred 
considered the 
adoption of the 



To the Common Council: 

Your committee on Purchasln 
Supidies, to which 
retiuisitions, having 
same, recommend t le 
following resolutioi : 

J. A. Mad ONELL, 
LUCIEN A. B.VltNES, 
C. R HOAR, 

Committee. 
Resolved, That requisitions of city 
officers Nos. 20296 to 20315 inclusive, be 
and hereby are approved. 

Alderman MacDonell moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution, and it was de- 
clared adopted by a unanimous 
vote of all present on roll call. 
Passed Sept. 19, IrflO. 
Approved Sept. 2], 1910. 



yea 



To the Common Council: 

Your Committee on Streets, Alleys 
and Sidewalks, to 'vhich was referred 
estimates to contractors, having con- 
sidered the same, recommend the adop- 
tion of the follow ng resolution: 
W, S. MO'jRE, 
JNO. HOG.VN. 
J. A MacDONELL. 

Committee. 

Resolved, That estimates to contrac- 
tors are hereby allowed, and It is here- 
by directed that oders be drawn on 
the permanent improvement revolving 
fund to pay the same, as follows: 

To I', McDonnell on his contract for 
the paving of Twenty-second avenue 
east from First alley to Second alley, 
in the sum of $1.06;:. 41. 

To Pastoret-Lawrence company on its 
contract for the grading of Sixth street 
from East Cascade street to Fourteenth 
avenue east, in the sum of $10,188.53. 

Alderman Hogan moved the adoption 
of the resolution, and it was declared 
adopted by a unanimous yea vote of 
all I) resent, on roll call 

Passed Sept. 19, : 910 

Approved Sept. 2:., 1910. 

To the Common Cotncil: 

Your Committee on Streets. Alleys 
and Sidewalks, to H'hich was referred 
report of the Boarii of Public Works, 
having considered the 
mend the adoption of 
resolution; 

W. S- MOORE. 

JNO. HOGAN. 

J. A. MacDONELL. 

Committee. 

Resolved, That the Board of Public 
Works is hereby advised that this 
council consents to the i^^suance of a 
permit to the Duluth Telephone com- 
pany to set poles f s recommended by 
said l>oa.-d in communication dated 
Sept. 19, 1910. provided such permit 
shall be temporary and subject to rev- 
ocation by this cou!;cIl at any time. 

Alderman Hogan moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution, and it was de- 
clared adopted by a uanimous yea vote 
of all present, on roll call. 

Passed Sept. 19, 1910. 

Approved Sept. 21, 1910. 



same, recoiu- 
the following 



To the Common Council: 

Your (.'ommittee on Streets, Alleys 
and Sidewalks, to vhlch was referred 
petitions for estahl'ishment of biillding 
line easements, having considered the 
same, recommend t!ie adoption of the 
following resolution: 

\V. S, MO<iRB. 
JNO. HOtiAN. 
J. A. MacDONELL. 

Committee, 

Resolved, That fre city engineer is 
hereby directed to make a survey of 
the buildings on i he upper side of 
Richardson avenue from Twenty-second 
to Twenty-third avenues west; on both 
sides of Cascade street from Twenty- 
second to Twenty-fourth avenues west: 
on the east side of Central avenue from 
Central pdace to Eighth street, and on 
the east side of Fifty -seventh avenue 
west from Cody street to Elinor street 
with the view of the establishment of 
a Ijuildlng line casement thereon, and 
report said survev tc- this 

Alderman Hfigan noved 
of the resolution, arid It 
adopted by a unan mous 
all i>resent, on roll -all. 

Passed Sept. 19, i:MO, 

Approved Sept, 21 1910. 



council, 
the adoption 
was declared 
yea vote of 



plat 

the 

tha 



To the Common Council: 

Your Committee on Streets. Alleys 
and Sidewalks, to T.hich was referred 
of Home .Acres, having considered 
same, recommend the adoption of 
following resolution: 
\A , fe', MOORE. 
JNO. HOGAN. 
J, A. MacDONELL. 

Committee. 
Resolved, That the plat of First Di- 
vision of Home Acref is hereby accepted 
and .approved. 

Alderman Hogan moved the adoption 
of the resolution, aid it -was declared 
adopted by a unanimous yea vote of all 
present, on roll cal!. 
Passed Sept. 19, m.O. 
Approved Sept. 21, 1910. 



To the President an! Common Council : 
Your committee on Streets, Alleys 
and Sidewalks, to v.'hich was referred 
tne report of the city attorney of the 
meeting held Sept. : 3, with officials of 
the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. 
Marie Railway company, with refer- 
ence to the West Michigan street pav- 
ing between Eighth and Twelfth ave- 
nues, the Seventh avenue west sewer 
between Superior s" reet and Michigan 
street, and the Twelfth avenue west 
sewer outlet across Railroad street, 
having considered the same, recom- 
mend the adoption of the following 
resolution: 

W. S. MOORE, 

JNO. HOCAN, 

J. A. MaciJONELL. 

Committee. 
Resolved, That this Council is of th<i 
opinion that its resolution of Aug. 2.r;, 
requested of the rai.way company only 
a fair and reasonable division of the 
expense of repavin,? Michigan street, 
and that our oplnicn of what such a 
fair and reasonable division was, at 
that time, has in oui opinion been veri- 
fied by subsequent events; that the 
tentative arrangement made by the 
representatives of the city with the 
cosapany as to th« Sev«ntli avenue -west 



INTRODUCTION AND CONSIDER- 

atkjn of ordinance.-. 

The oruinance suomuteu uv Alder- 
man Bernard, entitled "An oVdmance 
to amend an ordinance entitled 'An 
ordinance providing for t!:e c-jnstruc- 
tion of otner than wooden sldewalka 
within certain limits witnin the city 
oi liuiuth. and lorbidding the con- 
struction or repairing of wooden side- 
walks within said limits,' pas.sed tjept. 
7, 1891. as aniended. ' took its second 
reading. 

Alclerman Bernard moved that the 
ordinance be now placed upon its final 
passage and the motion was declared, 
adoi'tea by a unanimous : ea vote of 
all present, on roll call. 

Alderman LernarU moved the adop- 
tion of the ordinance and it was de- 
clared adopted by a unaniincus yea 
vote of all present, on roll call. 



--•< 



r 



The ordinance subinitted bv Alder- 
man Bernard entitled "An ordinance to 
amend an oTdinai.ce entitled 'An ordi- 
naiice to establisii tlie width of cer- 
tai sidewalks in the city of Duluth,' 
passed May :;b, 190«, as amended. ' tooK 
Its second reading. 

Alderman Bernard 
ordinance be now placed upon its final 
passage, and the motion wa 
adopted by a unanimous 
all present, on roll call. 

Alderman Bernard moved the adop. 
tion of the ordinance and it was de- 
clared adopted by a unanimous 
vote of all present, on roll call. 






moved that the 
its final 
declared 
yea vote ot 



yesL 



•r— 



gas works 
took its 



The ordinance submitted by Alder- 
man Raines entitled "An ordinance to 
amend an orainance entitled 'An ordi- 
ance to prescrilte fire limits in the city 
of Duluth, regulate the construction of 
bui dings and prevent the maintenance 
of lumber and wood yards, 
and gas reservoirs therein, 
second reading. 

Alderman Barnes moved that the or- 
dinance be now placed upon its final 
passage, and the motion was declared 
adoi)ted by a unanimous yea vote of 
all present, on roll call. 

Alderman Barnes moved the adop- 
tion of the ordinance and it was de- 
clared adopted by a unanimous yea 
vote of all present, on roll call. 



The following entitled ordinance 
took its first reading and was re- 
ferred to the Committee on Ordinances 
and Resolutions: 
By Alderman Hoar: 

An ordinance to amend an ordinance 
entitled ".An ordinance granting to the 
Duluth, Winnipeg & Pacific Railroad 
company, its successors and assigns, a 
right-of-way, over, under, across and 
along certain streets, avenues, alleys 
and public grounds in the city of Du- 
luth. with the rignt, privilege and au- 
thority to construct, lay down, maintain 
and operate railway tracks and fa- 
cilities over, under, across and along 
the same, and imposing certain obli- 
gations on said co.mpanv." passed Feb 
7 1910, and approved by the 
Feb. 11, 1910. 



mayor 



' -,*■ 



Chairman Wharton cf the Sports 
committee, brouglit up the question 
ot the baseball game with the Superior 
council, to be held Thursdav 
at 2:30 p. m. 



Sept. 22, 



On motion of Alderman 
the Council adjourned. 
H. \\ 



MacDonell 



CHEADLE, 
City Clerk. 



By Alderman Bernard: 
AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND AN OR- 
DIN.ANCE ENTITLED "AN ORDI- 
NANCE PROVlL>ING Ff>R THE CON- 
STRUCTION OF OTHER THA.N 
WOODEN SIDEWALKS WITHI.V 
CERTAIN LLAIITS AVITHIN THF. 
FV£-^' ^^ DULUTH, AND FORBID-^ 
DING THE CO.VSTRUCTION OR RE- 
PAIRING OF Wooden sidewalks 
WITHIN SAID LIMITS." PASSED 
SEPTEMBER 7, 1891, AS AMENDED. 
The Common Council of the City of Du- 
luth Do Ordain as P^ollows; 
Section 1 That Section 2 of an or- 
dinance entitled "An ordinance provid- 
ing for the construction of other than 
wooden sidewalks within certain limits 
within the city of Duluth, and forbid- 
ding the construction or repairing ot 
wooden sidewalks within 
passed September 7, 1891, 
by adding thereto at the 
the following: 

"Uiion both sides of Twentv-first ave- 
nue west from Third to Sixth streets." 
Section 2. This ordinance siiall lake 
effect and be In force from and after 
its passage and publication. 
Passed Sept. 19, 1910. 
Approved Sept. 21, 1910. 
Attest: 

H W. CHEADLE, 

City Cierk. 



said limiti 
as amended 
end thereof 



I 



By Alderman Bernard: 

AN ORLU NANCE To AME.VD AN OR- 
DINANCE ENTITLED 'AN ORDl- 
NANCE TO ESTABLISH THE WIDTH 
OF CERTAIN SII'EWALKS IN THE 
CITY OF DULUTH." PASSED MAY 
28, 1906, -AS AMENI'ED. 
The Common Council of the City of Du- 
luth Do Ordain as Follows; 
Section 1. That Section 1 of an or- 
dinance entitled "An ordinance to es- 
tablish the width of certain sidewalks 
in the city of Duluth," passed Mav 8, 
1906, as amended, be further amended 
by adding tliereto at the end thereof 
the following: 

"Uiion both sides of Twenty-first ave- 
nue west from Third street to Sixth 
street, six feet," 

Section 2. This ordinance 
effect and be in force from 
its passage and publication. 
Passed ocpt. 19, 1910. 
Aiiproved Sept. 21, 1910. 
Attest: 

H. W. CHEADLE, 

City Clerk. 



1 



shall take 
and after 



By Alderman Barnes: 

-AN ORDINA.NCE TO AMEND AN OR- 
DINANCE ENTITLED "AN ORDI- 
NANCE TO PRESCRIBE FIRE LIM- 
ITS IN THE CITY OF DULUTH. TO 
REGULATE THE CONSTPtUCTION 
OF BUILDINGS .AND TO PREVENT 
THE MAINTEN.ANCE OF LU.MBER 
AND WOOD YARDS. GAS WORKS, 
AND GAS RESERVOIFtS THEREIN." 
The Common Council of the City of Du- 
luth Do (3rdaih as Follows: 
Section 1 That Section 3 of an or- 
dinance entitled "An ordinance to pre- 
scribe fire limits in the city of Duluth, 
to regulate the construction of build- 
ings and to prevent the maintenance 
of lumber and wood yards, gas works 
and gas reservoirs therein." be and 
hereby is amended by inserting after 
the words, "northeasterly In a direct 
line to the intersection of the easterly 
line of Fifty-eighth avenue -west' and 
before the words "southerly line ot 
the first alley north of Grand avenue 
west, " the words "a line drawn parallel 
to and 35 feet distant southerly from 
the southerly line of the first alley 
northerly from Grand avenue extended- 
thence northeasterly on said line paral- 
lel to and 35 feet distant sc<itherly 
from the southerly line of the first al- 
ley northerly of Grand avenue to the 
northeasterly line of Lot 25 in Block 
141. West Duluth, Fifth Division; thence 
northwesterly along the easterly line ot 



-•-." 



Shall take 
and after 



said Lot 25 to 

Section 2. This ordinance 
effect and be in force from 
its passage and publication. 

Passed Sept. 19, 1910. 

Approved Sept. 21, 1910. 
Attest: 

H. W\ CHEADLE. 
City Clerk. 

M. B, CULLUM. 

D. H, Sept. 22, 1910. D 170. ****"**'• 



L 
1 
1 













f 



tc: 




» ti » ■ >- tr^i 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 22, 1910. 



IB 



We have a comer on First street suitable for hotel 

or commercial purposes. Improvements no w 

on property net 5 per cent. 

$12,500 

R. P. DOWSE ®, CO. 



106 Providence Building. 



General Insurance. 




$30,000 
to Loan at 

On Business Property. 

J. D. HOWARD & 

21 West Superior Street. 



PROPERTY OWNERS COMPLAIN 
OF DIRT ON SCHOOL GROXrNDS 



CLARKE 
WERTIN CO. 

200 Alwoi-th IJuililins. 

FIRE INSURANCE 



SI\JAF»S IISJ LOTS 

$200 — [iiiys desirable corner lot in Duluth 
Heights. 

$100 — For a corner lot on East Tenth street. 

$400 — Wt'St Seventh street lot, between Sec- 
ond and Third avenues. 

SireoO — 50x1 40-foot lot on East Fourth St., 
nt-ar Eighteenth avenue. 

S2.000 — 50x1 75-foot lot on upper side of 
Jefferson street. 
We Can unange teriim. 



SftPHtNSffN INSURANCE AGENeV 

, LIABIUTYiFIRE.THEFTANB COLUSON 



iNmjRmm 



PHONE*MELROSE 2406 ZENITH 406 

WOLVIN BUILDINX5. 



LAKE FRONTAGE ON LONG LAKE. 

On account of urgent demands for little pieces of land on a lake, I 
have recently platted the east side of Long Lake into ten acre tracts. 
Long Lake is located between Caribou and Grand Lakes and is reached 
at present via the Cloquet River Road, about sixteen miles from Du- 
luth. The Canadian Northern runs through corner of land and sta- 
tion has been granted at crossing of the Swan Lake Road, one mile 
south. Price $25.<^J per acre, easy terms. 

Four ten-acre tracts were sold last Sunday and for those who can- 
not look land over during the week I have arranged to take out next 
Sunday morning, leaving Board of Trade Livery Barn at 7 a. m., back at 
noon, weather pcrmittuig 

AX.. KUEHMOW, 
Bell 'Phone. 1001. 715 TORREY BUILDING. 




Don't buy garden acres un- 
til you have seen 

Farmington 
Place 

We will convince you that this 1.4 
god advice. Plat.4 vrill poon be out. 

GETTY-SMITH CO.^ 

:t4X; rnl!rt«lli> Itnildine. 




A SNAP 

Two tine lots on McCuUough 

street in Lakeside. Must be sold 

at once. Make an offer. 

Houses and lo s in all parts ot 

the city. 

Fire Insurance in the Best Com- 
panies. 

G. A. BUSH 

600 LONSDALE BLDG. 



BARGAINS 

DOIBI.E HOUSE — Containing eight 
rooms and bathroom on each side; 
etone foundation. cement floor, 
ftirnace lieat. gas and electric 
llglit. Rents. $60 per month — full 
L)-toot lot. on upper side of Lon- 
don Road, near Fifteenth avenue 
east. Price. f5,500; on favorable 
terms. 

.IT LESTER P.VRK — Nice lot on up- 
pwr side of Colorado street, with 
seven-room liouse. part concrete 
foundation, furnace, bath, gas and 
electric light, hardwood floors on 
first floor. Immediate po3.-ie3sion 
given. Price 912,800; on easy terms. 





Let us lend you the 
monev with which to 
build your home. 

Standard Home Go. 

418 l»rovidente Building. 

l>ulutli. 

Zenith Phone, 2435. 

Offi'-es open Monday, Wednesday 
and Saturday evenings 
o'clock 



until 



STRYKER,MANLEY&BUGK 

1 a.Hh un Hniid fur (<<>»d Loanft. 
Store;*, Houses and FJat.«» For Kent. 



— DESIRABLE HOMES — 

We have a large list of very de- 
^iirable homes at prices that will 
interest you. Come in and let u.s 
show you. 

A good home close to the new 
proposed car line, has six rooms and 
50x140 lot; only $1,400; must be 
sold at once. 

Soven-room house, strictly mod- 
'^.•rn; fine location at Lakeside; own- 
er leaving olfy. Very ea.sy term.-i. 

EBERT, WALKER & McKNIGHT 

3i::-.'tl5 Torrey nuildlngr. 
'■SpeoInli.st.<t In Rapid Dealft." 



w 



HEELER & PARSON 

608 AUorth BIdg. 

"Sell Dirt and 
Duy Aah^m" 



s 



LAND 



EASY 
PAYMENT ! 



2) acres on Pike Lake road, snap 
$5O0. 

20 acres. 2 miles from car line, 
#1,000, 

■io acres. French River, good land, 

8o" acres. 11-50-15, good buy, r-.OOO. 
80 acres. French River. »1,200. - 
160 acres, suitable for platting, 
and many other tracts. 

W. H. LOOKER^ 

4l>(-tlT l.iinMtlalf Ilullillufc. 




HOrVIE 

New and warmly built, six rooms 
and bath, etc. No. 717 Tenth ave- 
nue east. Very easy terms. 

LOT 

Fifty f'^et on London Road, near 
Twenty-third avenue. The cheapest 
good lot in the East End. 

FORTY ACRES 

Near Fjnd du Lac and S'.eei Plant. 
A snaj). 

SIS i'alindio Building. 



SOME SNAPS! 

X Went End Home ot" six room.s, wa- 
ter, sewer, elei-tric light, and lot 
2Sx95, on Second street, close to 
street car barn. Price if you have 
the cash, «2,100. 

Another .Snap^iOast "end, six large 
rums, water, sewer, eloctric light, 
hardwood throughout; lot 25x140, 
on Jeffers^Dn street, 9:i,000; one- 
third cash, balance easy terms. 

Another One — Close in on Second 
street, eight rooms, modern; a 
beautiful 50-foot lot; street paved; 
it is a bargain and a good liome — 
$4,500; half cash Get It. 

SMITH REALTY CO. 

~t'i-l MaubattHii niilldlng. 



NOTICE 'Vg 

Our Tac-illll'sa and connections for 
buying and selling your lands are 
unexcelled. We are also In the mar- 
ket for timber in Northern Minne- 
sota 

GREAT NORTHERN LANS CO. 

>eil n. >iorrU<iii, H. <;. ( kninpliu. 

Suite 413, I'alluilio RuIIiIIuk, 

Ujilutli, >llun. 



JAMES THORBURN 

«M»4 I'AI.LADin Itl ILDING. 
Xenllh 'Phone 017. 

Plrc InMuranee — Rental*. 
Real Estate ^ SIortgaKe I.<oan«. 



MONEY TO LOAN 

5, S<4 and 6 per cent. 

FIRE INSURANCE 

Old Reliable Companies. 

REAL ESTATE 

Monthly Payment Plan. 

COOLEY & UNDERHILL, 

200-10-11 Exchange Building. 



$1,000 cash will handle modern 
six-rooni house, hot water heat, 
electric light, gas and bath; hard- 
wood finish. Balance $3,100 to 
suit. 

LANIGAN-GAROMER COMPANY 

905-906 Alvvorth Buihliug. 
Zenith Phone 2117. 



< 
( 

■ ■ 



RICHARDSON, DAY 
& HARRISON 

Wholesalers and Re- 
tailers of 

REAL ESTATE 



Of f ices— Exchange Building. 




Small Monthly 
Payments 

Will buy vou :i Tot in 

LAKESIDE 



Why dor.'t you 
wards a home. 



make a start to- 



LAKESIDE LAND GO 

S01-2-3-4-r, .SelUvitod Building. 
Phones 40S. 



FOR SALE 

9500 Cash — Seven-room house, 1125 
East Fourth street; balance of 
$3,500 in monthly payments. A 
bargain. Will not need any re- 
pairs. 

93,Sl>0 — New six-room house, 1301 
K;i.si Si.\th street; hot water heat- 
ing plant; $1,000 casli; balance 

easy term.s. 

$»,::oo — Two flats, five room.s each. 
■2*i:'.z West Fifth street; $500 cash; 
balance $30 per month. 

9^{,:!00 — New six-room house, 4115 
West Third street; water, gas. 
electric light, bath, hardwuod 
floors; $1,000 cash; balance, easy 
pas'inent.s. 

PULFORO, HOW <& COMPANY 

;(0U EsohnuKe lluiidluK. 



LOOK THESE IP ! 

$0,04)0 — New six-room house on Ding- 
wall street: 50xl40-foot lot; 
strictly modern, on easy terms. 

$6,500 — Six-room house on .Jefferson 
.street: lot 50x140 feet; elegantly 
decorated; hot air furnace; a .snap 

lj(7,.'>00 — Seven-room house on Jeffer- 
t-on street, lot 58xl00-foot corner: 
new and strictly modern; hot wa- 
ter heat. 

C. H. 6raves & Co., 

500 ALWORTH BtlLDIIVG. 



DOUBLE HOUSE 

STSOO 

Fur a brick double house, centrally 
located; each side contains six rooms 
and bathroom. Property in splendid 
condition and commands good rent- 
als. Live In one side and rent the 
other. Can be had at reasonable 
terms. 

CORPORATE INVESTMENT COMPANY 

Loan.s, Real E.state, Rentals, 
Torroy Building, First Floor. 



n WILL PAY YOU 

TO 

INVESTIGATE THIS ^VESTMENT 



An elBht-room h4»u.'«e, 
desirable location; water, 
electric llgrhtn. . Price 



cloMe in; 
gak and 



$2100 



»T00 handler It; rent.« $2.% per month) 
1^ per cent on the Invoitnient. 

0. E. ROE 

412 PROVIDENCE BLDG. 



LAKESIDE 

HOMES 

$900 to $6,000 

9004) — Five-room house; lot 50x140 
feet. Jay street. 

91,300 — Five-room hou.se on Forty- 
sixth avenue east; water and gas; 
easy terms. 

9l,3.';() — New flve-room house on Jay 
street; lot 50x140 feet; easy terms. 

$2,100 — Six-room house on stone 
foundation; corner lot; 50x140 
feet; $200 cash. 

i(!2,.S00— Seven-room house; hot air 
heat; graded street, cement walk; 
cash $300. 

$2,000 — Seven-room house on car 
line; water, bath, toilet; $100 cash. 




hou.se on car 
and gas; one- 



DIRT PILE 



Many residents have complained bit- 
terly of the dirt which has been 
stacked on the grounds of the Nettle- 
ton school. First avenue east between 
Fifth and Sixth streets. They claim 
that it is unsightly and injures the ap- 



pearance of the school buUdirg as well 
as damaging the property on the lower 
side of the street. It Is alleged that 
heavv rains wash copious quantities of 
dirt "acri'ss the street omo their lots. 
It is Slated that it has been washed 
on property a block beloiv the school. 




92,80©-— Seven-room 
line; water, sewer 
half cash. 

$3,400 — Seven-room house; modern^ 
hot water plant; one block from 
car line; easy tertns. 

9.t,SOO — New flve-room house, strict- 
ly modern; two blocks from car 
line. 

$3,.'lO0 — Seven-roojn house, Lester 
i'ark; modern, except heat; terms 
to suit. 

$3,800 — Eight-room lv:>uie, one block 
from car line; water, sewer, gas 
and bath; large lot. 

93,M)0 — Seven-room cott^ige at Les- 
ter Park; modern in every way; 
a great big snap. 

94,4)00 — New Six-rootp house, near 
London Road, strictly modern. 
Very good terms. 

$4,200 — Beautiful new bungalow; 
modern in every respbct; fine cor- 
ner lot; street and avenue fully 
improved. 

$4,:{<)0 — Just completed, six-room, 
iiiodern house, two blocks from 
car line; terms to suit any pur- 
chaser. 

$4,504) — New .seven-room house; 
strictly modern; very reasonable 
terms. 

$4,500 — Complete, modern, seven- 
room home at Lester Park; $1,000 
cash. 

95,()00— New eight-room house, mod- 
ern in every respect; one block 
from car line. Very easy terms. 

$S,0OO — Nine-ro6m house, upper 
side London Road; strictly modern. 

$5,000 — Nine-room house, strictly 
modern on corner lyt at Lester 
Park; cash $1,000. 

$5,500 — Large nine-room house, 
lower side London Road; lake 
shore lot; easy terms 

$.\H00 — New, modern, six-room 
house; very laxge room*; fine lo 
cation; easy terms. 

96,oOO — Large eight-room house on 
McCulloch street; living room 16 
by 34 feet; modern In every re 
spect; grounds 100x140 feet. 

LOTS — In every block at Lakeside 
on monthly payments. 

GREENFIELD 

310-311 Columbia Dullding. 



and in said matter are hereby cited and 
required at said time and place to show 
cause, if any there be,, why said peti- 
tion should not be granted. 

ORDERED FURTHER, That this or- 
der be served by publication in The 
Duluth Herald, according to law. 

Dated at Duluth, Minn., September 
7th, 1910. 

By the Court. 

J. B. MtDDLECOFF, 

Judge of Probate. 
(.Seal Probate Court, St. Louis County, 

Minn.) 
D. H.. Sept. 8, 15 and 22, 1910. 



MEMBER OF 

CREW MISSING 



Dinkey, 3; Helena, 3:30 
Northern King. Haven, 
Rogers, 7:3o; W. T. Smith 
Newona, 9; Manola, 9:30; 
Down Thursday. (Jates, 
Houghton, 3; Sinaloa, 
Wells, 4:30; Midland, 
5; North Sea, 5:30; 



Buffalo, 4; 

Wall, H. H. 

S;:J0; Butler, 

Maiietoa, 11. 

1:30 a. m. ; 

3:30; Hoyt. 

Queen Edenborn, 

B F. Jones, 6. 



Parn^ Milton Disappears From 

Deck of Sierra of Tom- 

linson Line. 

A w;re from the Soo tells of the -osa 

of Parry Milton, a member of the crew 

of the steamer Sierra of the Tomlln- 

son line. There is an air of profound 

mystery connected with the loss of 

the boy. Milton was but IS years of 
age. 

It 1h stated In the dispatch that he 
must have been standing on the deck 
alone. No one noticed the absence of 
the boy until he was wanted for some 
work, when a search of the vessel 
failed to reveal his whereabouts. 

The menibers of the crew believe 
that Milton was lost 8<jme where be- 
tween tlie Superior entry and Devils' 
island 

Milton was from Peoria, 111. He was 
.seen on the deck shortly before he was 
nii.ssed. There was no one on tito 
deck .It the time lie must have £alle;i 
overboard. There was no sea rolling 
at the time It is believed tlie accident 
occurred. 

STEAMER SALiTmARMET. 

ISLNK OFF UALLIPOLIS. 



22. — The tow- 
lu deep water 



Galllpolis, Ohio, Sept. 
boat Hally Marmet sank 
at th<) liead ot (Jallipolis island last 
night, the crew jiarrowly escaping 
drowning. The boat was owned by the 
Marnijt company of Cincinnati and was 
valued at $20,000. 



Shenango, 7:30; Harvard, a. Joliet, 9; 
Huronic, Canadian City oi; Bangor. 10; 
Shaughnessy, 11. 

Detroit Pas»a^;es. 

Detroit, Mich., Sept. 22.— ^Special to 
The Herald.)— Up Wednefiday: Cornell, 
Nasmyth, 11:30 a. m.; Matoa, 12:30, L. 
0. Smith, 12:45; Shaw, 1; Maruba, 
George Peavey, 1:05; Murlposa, Bell, 
1:15; W. G. Mather. 1:30; Widlar, 1:40; 
New York. 1:55; Maine, targe Uranus, 
Unadilla, 2:20; J. W. Mt>ore, 3:25; Wa- 
saga, 3:45; Joseph Wood, «.>lcott. 4:15; 
Clint, 4:20; Admiral. Moreland, 5:20; 
Samuel Morse, 6:10: Utley, C:20; Tus- 
carora, 6:25; Townsend, L.inn, 8; W. E. 
Reis, 8:15; Luzon, 11:2*'; Frontenac, 
Chattanooga, midnight. Down Wednes- 
day: Crerar, 11:50 a. m.; Langdon, 
11:5;'.; Ponllac, I. J. Boyoe, Iron Cliff, 
W. Young. 12:20 p. m.; rteed. Verona. 
Pickands. 12:55; WUkesbarre, Frank 
Peavey, 1:45; Gienellah. 1 50; Hill, 1:55; 
J. J. Barium, 2:10; Corona. Martha, 
2:45; Davock, Maraitana, Holley, 3; 
Presque Isle, 3:40; Sachem, C. B. 
Jones, 4:40; Leland, Melbourne, Sweet- 
heart. 5:15; Woodruff, 5.:45; Gilbert, 
6:30; Maricopa. 6:45; Amazon, 6:50; 
Hand, 7:35; Nepawah. •::5'); Arabian, 
8:15; Huron, 9:2«; Dulut i, 9:40; E. L. 
Wallace, 11:30. 

Up Thursday: Yosem te, Nicholas, 
Minneapolis, 12:30 a. m. ; L;range, 12:40, 
I'lowtr, 1:30; Vetiezuela. Paisley, 1:20; 
•^Olborne, 2; Brltannie, 2:30; .=rhell 
Parks, 2-45; M. A. Bradh y, 3:45; How. 
Hanna, 5; Klrby Hartwtdl. 5;li»: Don- 
aldson, 6:10; Adams, 6:30; Hartwell, 7; 
Fletcher, 7:30, George L. Craig, 7:40; 
(big) Samuel Mather, 8; Wasage, 9: 
Minneapolis, (old), 9:15; Dunham. 9:20; 
Wyandotte, 9:30; Milwaukee, noon. 
Down Thursdr.y: Itutland, 1 a. m. ; 
Fitch, Afailland, 3:30; Corsica, Maroa. 
4; ArgT», 4:15; Edwards. Con, 5:30: West 
•Star, 5:35; Peter Reiss, 7:45; Path- 
finder, Sagmore. 7:50; Grammon, Seneca, 
1:30: Schuylkin, 9:30; Ne tleton, 10:10: 
Russell, 10:40; Hope, 11; lilg Living- 
ston, 11:1 5- French, 11:45; Crescent 
City, 11:55; Heffellinger, 12:15 p. m. 



WANTS OPINIONS ON 

KNIFE RIVER HARBOR. 



Col. Graham D. Fitch desiro.s to b'et 
the opinions of citizens who aie either 
in favor or oi)posed to the consti*uctlon 
of a l.arbor at Knife River. Minn. The 
last river and harbor bill authorizes a 
preliminary examination looking t<> the 
construction of the proposed liarbor, 
and in making his report to the gov- 
ernment ofClcial.s, Col. Fitch desires to 
give any rcisons for or against tlie 
proposed construction. Tlie opinions of 
those interested in the construction 
would be of value in this regard. 

Col. Fitch asks that those iiitereste 1 
in the matter will submit to hhn in 
writing, not later than Oct. 20. such 
facts and opinions as they may have 
on the matter. 



Uetui'ns From South Shore. 

Capt. Fred Winter oi the tug May- 
flower and a crew of four returned 
from down the south shore this morn- 
ing. The captain and his crew had 
been gone i.or about three weeks, do- 
ing some log towing. 



Sauit Passages. 




LEGAli NOTICES. 

ORDER TO EXAMINE FINAL AC- 
COUNT. ^ ^. -r 

State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis. 

— — ss 

In Probate Court. 
In the Matter of the Estate of James 

Babcke, Decedent. 

THE PETITION OF H. H. Salmon of 
Blwabik, Minnesota, as representative 
Of the above named decedent, together 
with his final account ot" the adminis- 
tration of sai 1 estate, having been fl'ed 
in this Court, representing, among 
other things, that he has fully admin- 
istered said estate, and praying that 
said final account of said administra- 
tion be examined, adjusted and allowed 
bv the Court, and that the Court make 
and enter its final decree of distribu- 
tion of the residue of the estate of said 
decedent to the persons entitled there- 
to, and for the discharge of the repre- 
sentative and the sureties on his bond. 

IT IS ORDERED, That said petition 
be heard, and said final account exam- 
ined, adjusted and allowed by the Court, 
at the Probate Court Rooms in the 
Court House, in the City of Duluth, in 
said County, on Monday, the 3rd day of 
October, 1910, at ten o'clock A. M., and 
ali persons interested la said hearing 



♦ 



STATE OF MINNESOTA, COUNTY OF 
ST. LOUIS.— 38. 

District Court, Eleventh Judicial Dis- 
trict. 

Eugene J. Bunker, Plaintiff, 

vs. 

Great Lakes Radio Telephone 
Company, a corporation, 
Quayle - Larsen Company, a 
corporation, Henry Gould and 
Mary Gould, his wife. 

Defendants. 

SUMM< .VS. 
The State of Minnesota to the Above 
Named Defendants and Each of Them: 

You aie liereby summoned and re- 
quired to file your answer to the com- 
plaint of the plaintiff in the above en- 
titled action, with the Clerk of said 
Court at ills office, in said County, 
where the complaint of the plaintiff 
is now on file, within twenty (20) days 
after the service of this summons upon 
you, exclusive of tlie day of such serv- 
ice; and if you fail to answer the said 
complaint within the time aforesaid, 
plaintiff in this action will apply to the 
Court for the relief demanded In said 
complaint. 

And you are hereby notified that this 
action is brought to foreclose a Me- 
chanic's Lien, upon the premises here- 
inafter described for the sum of Two 
Hundred and Sixty and 95-100 «,$260.96) 
Dollars and interest from June 20th, 
1910; that the premises affected by this 
action are described as Lots One Hun- 
dred Forty-five (145) and One Hundred 
Forty-seven (147) Block One Hundred 
Forty-four (144), Duluth Proper. Third 
Division, St. Louis County, Minnesota, 
according to the recorded plat thereof; 
that the improvement out of which 
plaintiff's lien arose is as follows, to- 
wit: 

Plaintiff, between May 10th, 1910 and 
June 20th, 1910, incltialV'e, furnished 
and delivered lumber an4 materials for 
the erection and improvement of a 
building on said premises and said lum- 
ber was in fact used in the erection, 
construction, alteration, repair end Im- 
orovement of the building thereon. 
J. J. ROBINSON, 
Attorney for Plaintiff. 
Offices 504-6 Torrey Building, Duluth, 

Minnesota. • 

D. H., Sept. 8, 15. 22, 29., Oct. 6, and 13, 

1910. 



Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., Sept. 22. — 
(.Special to The Herald.) — Up Wednes- 
day: Ireland, Nye, Keewalin, 11:30 a. 
m.; Morrell, 12:30; Uranus, 1:30; Tom- 
linson, 2; Bunsen, Roebling, 3; Penob- 
scot, 4; Frick, 4:30; Jenkins, 5; Mid- 
land Prince, Joshua Rhoades, North 
Star, 7:30; Fairbalrn, Thomas, 8; Capt 
T. Wilson, 8:30; Castalla, Weeks, 9::50; 
Tlonesta, 10; Ream, 10:30; Rockefeller, 
Mala, 11:30. Down Wednesday: Besse- 
mer, 11 a. m.; Saxona, Assinlboia, 
Slem, noon; Socapa, La Salle, 1; Jay 
Morse, 1:30; Vance, 2:30; Steel King, 
Empress of Midland, 3:20; John Mitch- 
ell, AVexford, 4:30; Ishpemlng, McKee, 
5:30; Griffin, 7:30; Cole, 8; Siemens, 
Marsalla, 8:30; Taylor, 9; Price, 9:30; 
Saturn, 10; Mcintosh, 11; Baker, mld- 
nigiit. Up Thursday: Rosedale, Mea- 
ford, 12:30 a. m. ; P. P. Miller, West- 
mount, Ungava, 1; Prince Rupert, 2; 



Port of Diiliith. 

Arrivals: Walter .Scrai tor,, Ericsson, 
Fritz, C. A. Black, Buffington, Wilp*»n, 
W. E. Corey, light for ore; Superior 
City, John A. McGean, Planklnton, 
Laughline, George W. Peavey, coal; 
Sultana, light; Codorus. package 
freiglit. 

Departures: Garretsor, Yuma, C. A. 
Black, Buffington, Carrlngton, Rens- 
selaer, Hoover and Ms son. Pollock. 
Plankinton. Laughlin. W. E. Corey, An- 
drews, H. H. Brown, F. ('. Ball, Amasa 
.Stone, ore; Walter VaM, Norris, Peter 
son, Miko, Bourke, Wyoming, D. W. 
Mills, lumber; Sultana, Gratwlck, light; 
Superior, Oclorara, p.i' kasre freight. 

CARLTON COIJNTY 
VOTE COMPLETE 



railroads ] 

SCHEDULE IS 
BEING^MADE 

Running Time of Soo Four- 
teen Hours Between Du- 
luth and Chicago. 

Officials of Road Look Over 

Work in Duluth and 

Superior. 



President E. Pennington of the Soo 
line, G. R. Huntington, general man- 
ager, and Harry Lewis, asslritant gen- 
eral passenger agent, are in the city 
today, together with W. F. Filch, presi- 
dent and general manager of the Du- 
luth, South Shore & Atlantic, and "W. 
R. Calloway, general passenger agent 
of the Soo, who came up yesterday 
afternoon. 

President Pennington and President 
Fitch were in conferen-e part of th« 
morning. Both officials visited the 
depot, and later Mr. Pennington stated 
that the depot will be completed to the 
very last detail Saturday night. The 
finishing touches are being put on the 
station today, and President Penning- 
ton expres.sed himself as thoroughly 
satisfied wltli what has been accomp- 
lished here. 

This afternoon the president of the 
.Soo will go to Superior, where he will 
look over some of the work that has 
been done there. 

The mo.st Important announcement 
made today l)y the officials of the Soo, 
wa.s made by General Manager Hunt- 
ington, who stated that the runnlnif 
time of the Soo between here and Chi- 
cago win be fourteen hours, and that 
the leaving time will be the same both 
in Duluih and Chicago. 

The schedule has not been completed 
as yet. but information as to the final 
schedule decided upon by the passen- 
ger department of the Soo, will be 
made public the first part of next week. 
Another Important announcement, 
was the statement by President Fit<"h 
of the South Shore, confirmliig the 
story published in The Herald to the 
effect that the trains of the South 
Shore will run Into the new Soo sta- 
tion 

•'We will come Into the new depot, 
but how soon 1 cannot say," said Presi- 
dent Fitch. "When everything gets 
Into running order in the new depot. 
It will be time to decide upon the South 
Shore traiurt coming in there. The de- 
cision to have the South Shore trains 
operate Into the new depot, has been 
made. " . 

"Everything is looking fine," said 
Pre.sldent Pennington. There is noth- 
ing much to do before the opening of 
through passenger traffic between here 
and Chicago. With the depot about 
completed and the tracks awaiting the 
operating of the first through train, 
about the only thing remaining is to 
bring the train here and put you in 
direct touch with Cldcago, via our new 
line. That will be done the third of 
next month." 

Mr Calloway and Mr. Lewis, with Q. 
A. Sherwood of the loi-al office of the 
.Soo, were busy directing the final de- 
tails of the passenger offices of the 
Soo. The sign painting of the regular 
Soo trade mark will start this we»-k. 

The Soo offi< lals will leave ttie Head 
of the Lakf-s this evening. 

C. M. & ST. P. (IlILTY OF 

FEED LAW VIOLATION. 



U. S. Engineer Offltfe. Duluth, Minn., 
Aug. 23, 1910. Sealed proposals for 
furnishing and placing granite riprap 
at the upper entrance to Portage Lake 
Canals (Keweenaw Waterway), Mich., 
will be received here until noon, Sept. 
23, 1910. and then publldy opened. In- 
formation on application. GRAHAM D. 
FITCH, Lt. Col.. Engrs. ' 
D. H., Aug. 23, 24, 23, ^4, 8ept 21 and 22. 



LKGAL NOTICES. 

ORDER OF HEARING ON PETITION 
FOR LICP^NSE TO SELL, M(jRT- 
GAGE OR LEASE LAND — 
State of Minnesota, County of St. 
Loils. — ss. 

In Probate Court. 
In the Matter of the Estate of Amanda 
A. Karlenberg, Jn.sane. 
THE PETITION OF Martin Karlen- 
berg, as representative of the above 
namtid Insane person, having been filed 
in this Court, representing, among other 
thinsrs, that for reasons stated in .said 
petition, it is necessary and for the 
best Interests of the estate of said in- 
sane person and of all persons Inter- 
ested therein, to sell her inchoate In- 
terest in certain lands of the petitioner, 
in sEkld petition described and praying 
that license be to said petitioner, Mar- 
tin Karlenberg as such guardian grant- 
e<i to join In the sale and conveyance 
of the said land. 

IT IS ORDERED. That said petition 
be hsard before this court, at the Pro- 
bate Court Rooms In the Court House, 
in Duluth, in said County, on Monday, 
the 8rd day of October, 1910, at ten 
o'clock A. M.. and all persons interested 
in sa'd hearing and in said matter are 
heresy cited and required at said time 
and place to show cause, if any there 
be. Why said petition should not be 
granted. 

OltDERED FURTHER. That this or- 
der be servea by publication In The 
Duluth Herald, according to law. 

D8.ted at Duluth, Minn., September 
8th, I'ilO. 

By the Court. 

J. B. MIDDLECOFF. 
Judge of Probate. 
ANDREW NELSON, 

.'ktlorney for Guardian. Duluth, Minn. 
(Seal Probate Court, St. Louis County. 

Minn.) 
D. it, Sept. 8, li and 22. 1910. 



Harry McKinnon Wins for 

Sheriff After Very Close 

Contest. 

Cloquet, Minn.. Sept. 22.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The con^plete election 
returns of Carlton councy follow: For 
congress. Miller, 950; McKntght, 565. 
For representative, Ferguson, 982; 
Warner, 697; Ladu, 353; Ogaard. 221. 
For county auditor, Andrew Norman, 
Cloquet, 952; Scott. Barrum, 463; Will- 
Ham Cain, Carlton, 342. For sheriff, 
Harry McKinnon, Carlton, 552; A. H. 
Lee, Carlton, 520; Andrew Nelson, Clo- 
quet, 536; Peters, 283. For clerk of 
court, George Mathews, Mahtowa, 468; 
John Swanson, Carlt>. n, 613; J. B. 
Thomson, Carlton, 656. For county at- 
torney, H. S. Lord. Carlton, 943; J. A. 
i-esenbeck, Cloquet, 693. For Judge 
of probate, F. A. Watkins, Carlion. 
917; J. D. Connor, 834. For surveyor, 

"Reservation, 824; 



Council Bluffs, Iowa. Sept 22. — 
Representatives of the Chicago. Mil- 
waukee & St. Paul Railroad company 
appeared in the federal court here yea- 
terdav and pleaded guilty to a viola- 
tion o"f the twenty-elght-hour feed law. 
The court ;i..ss<'8srd a fine of $100. 

WILL HAVE RIDE 
IN WHEELBARROW 

Gene Foucoult Is Loser of 

Unique Bet on Sheriff 

Contest 

As the result of a unique election 
bet. Gene Foucoult of 19 Twenty-eighth 
avenue west will be required to ride 
Theodore Daljelm. 2914 West Third 
street, from the Lenox hotel to the 
city hall and return in a wheelbarrow. 

The time of the ride has not yet been 
definitely settled but It will take place 
about 7 o'clock some evening during 
the present week. Foucoult bet on Will- 
lam J. Bates for sheriff and Daljelm 
bet on John Meinlng. 

The two men got into an argument 
as to who would win. Both were work- 
ing hard for their respective candidates. 
Both became so hot that a mere money 
bet would have afforded but little sat- 
isfaction. 

The suggestion by a bystander 
the wheelbarrow be brought into 
was no sooner mentioned than 
had agreed 

TEDDY'S BUSY DAY. 



Charles Jackson 
William Oliver, 672. 

The closest contest locally w^aa for 
the office of sheriff. Hiirry McKinnon 
of Carlton winning out over his three 
opponents by 16 votes more than An- 
drew Nelson of Cloque".. Nelson was 
on tlie police force a number of years. 
A. H. Lee of Carlton lis been sheriff 
foi a number ^)t years. 

J. E. Diesen was the only candidate 
for county attorney on the Democratic 
ticket, as was Dr. J. S. Nyqulst the 
only candidate on t^ie Republican 
ticket for coroner. 

The contest for election to the office 
of county superintendent of schools 
lies between E. J. Colo\ in, the prese-it 
incumbent, who receivtd the nomln-A- 
tlon on the Democratic ticket with no 
opposition and N. G. Nllson of Moose 
Lake, nominated on tie Republican 
ticket. 



that 
play 
both 



Saratoga Speech aud Political Call- 
ers Occupy His Time. 

Oyst.-r Bay, L. I, Sept. 22. — Theo- 
dore Roosevelt was busy this morning 
with his secretary In preparing in part 
the speech which he Is to deliver at 
Saratoga next week. He refused to 
talk politics. Col. Roosevelt said he 
expected several visitors this after- 
noon, when one of the last political 
conferences at Sagamore Hill will be 
held before the Saratoga convention 
will be held. 



How's Tltii? 

We offer One Hundred Dollars Re- 
ward for any case of Cs.tarrh that can- 
not be cured by Hall'e Catarrh Cure. 
F. J. CHENEY St. CO., Toledo, O 

We, the undersigned, have known 
F. J. Cheney for the la:it 15 years, and 
believe hlni perfectly lonorable in all 
business transactions, and financially 
able to carry out any oi ligations made 

by his firm. 

WALDING, KINNAN & MARVIN, 
Wholesale Druggists, Toledo, O. 

Hall's Catarrh Cure Is taken inter- 
nally, acting directly upon the blood 
and mucous surfaces of the system. 
Testimonials sent free. Price. 75c per 
bottle. Sold by all Druggists 

Take Halls Family .PlUa for eonstl- 
pation. 






TWO HURT ON THE 

MKHIGAN CENTRAL. 



St Charles, Mich.. Sept. 22. — Conduc- 
tor William Clements and his helper, 
O. G. Doty, of a Michigan Central 
switch engine were perhaps fatally In- 
jured today when their engine, which 
was standing at a switch, was struck 
by a southbound through freight train. 
The accident occurred in a dense fog. 

Clements, who lost both legs In the 
wreck, and Doty both died several 
hours later. 



ONE KILLED AND ONE 

INJURED IN FIRE. 



Greenwich. Conn., Sept. 22. — Joseph 
Christopher, a poi ter, was burned to 
death and Sarah Stewart another em- 
ploye, was Injured in a fire here early 
today which destroyed an annex of the 
Elms hotel. The Stewart woman 
jumped from a second-story window. 
The guests in the hotel proper left th» 
building. 



m-^ 



w > 



■^w— *^ 



*#■■ *» 



i' 



i>- 



Bit I I a I < 



16 



OFFERINGS 
ARUIGHT 

Wheat Advances When Small 

Export Business Frightens 

Shorts. 



Country Sells Sparingly— 

Manitobas Sold Abroad— 

Flax Up. 



Duluth Board of Trade, Sept. 22. — 
Wheat advanced today in a strong 
market in wliich tradintj was exceed- 
ingly liKlit. Values wliich weakened at 
noon firmed after noon and closed at 
the days hitch prices. September gained 
%c, l>ecember and May 'ac each. Cas!» 
wheat was on a parity with September. 
Oats, rye and barley were unchanged. 
September durum advanced \c. 

Flax was stronger, offerings bein;^ 
light. September gained 'l\ic, October 
■4I2C, November S^/zC and December 
8*Ac. Minneapolis crusliers bought 
Jlghtly. chietly in the C'ctober option. 
Eastern crushers did not talce much 
Interest in the market. 

Minneapolis reported that the flour 
trade iuiproved slightly yesterday. 
One of tiie big mills reported large 
Bales but most mills made only m >d- 
erate sales at tliin prke:*. This marUei 
Uiis weel\ has sold low 
export to EiiglaiiU and 
larger t^ales 



Thursday, 



AMERICAN WHEAT MARKETS, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



September 22, 1910. 



22. 



Sept. — Open. 

Duluth $1.14b 

Chicago 97- Vs 

Minneapolis ... l.OSt^s 
Winnipeg 'J'Jla 

December — 

Duluth Lia^ib 

Chicago 1.00%-01 

Minneapolis ... 1.11?* 

New York 1.0. % 

Winnipeg 98 

Kansas City ... .98% 
St. Louis 1.01% 

May- 

Duluth 1. 

Chicago 



Minneapolis 
New York . . 
Winnip-eg . . 
Kansas City 
St. Louis . . . 
Suuthwesttm 



,16%b 
1.06H- 
l.lBVi- 
1.12 »^ 
1.03-4 
1.02% 
1.06% 



High. 

11.14% 

.97i,i 

1.09% 

l.OlVs 

l.llU 
1.01 'b 
l.ll"a-12 
1.08% 
.98% 
.9ST8 
1.02 

1.17%b 

1.06 34 

1.15% 

1.12% 

1.03% 

1.03 

1.07 



Low. 
11. 14b 

.97 
1.09 



Close. 
fl.l4%b 
.971^ 
1.09%b 
1 . 00 % 



21. 



SEPT. 

Sept. 
$1.13% 

.96%b 
1.08% 

.99%b 



ajid Winnipeg auotations fumlslied by 



1 . 1 ."i 34 
1 . 00 Vz - % 
1.11%-% 
1.08% 
.97% 
.98%-% 
1.01% 



1.16a4b 

1.06% 

1.15%-% 

1.12% 

1.02 « 

1.02% 

1.0634 

B. K linker 



1.14 > 6 b 
1.00%a 
1 . 1 1 3-4 b 
1.08% 
.98%-%b 
.98%- " 
1.01%- 



-02 



1.17V4b 

1.06%b 

1.15%-%b 

1.12% 

1.03 

1.02%-03 

1.06% 

Co. 



DULUTH DURUM MARKET. 



September 
Novt mber 
December 



Open. 



.93%b 
.93a 



High. 
$ .92% 
.93% 
.93% 



Low. 
$ .92b 

.93%! 
.93 



Close. 

$ .y2%b 
.93%b 
.93%b 



1.13% 

1.00%-% 

l.ll%b 

1 . 08 % - % 
.97%b 
.98%-% 

1.01% 

1.16% 

1.06%-%a 

1.15%a 

1.12% 

1.02%-%b 

1.02%-% 

1.06% 



Sept. 21. 
I .92a 

.93% 
.92% 



DULUTH FLAX MARKET. 



open. 
.$2. 73b 
. 2.65 
. 2.64% 



High. 

$2.76 

2.69 

2.68 

2.60 



Low. 

12. 73b 

2.65 

2.64 

2.56b 



Close. 

$2. 76a 
2.69b 
2.68% 
2.59Va 



Sept. 2L 
$2.73%a 
2.64%b 
2.65 
2.56b 



September 
October . . 
November 
December . 

Duluth close: Wheat— On track: No. 1 hard, $1.15%; No. 1 northern, 
$1.14%; No. 2 northern, $1.11 %-1.12%. To arrive; 
No. 2 northern. $1.11% -1.12% To arrive in September 
$114%- No. 2 northern. $1.11 %-1.12% ; September, $1.14% 
$1:1414 asked; May, $1.17% bid. Durum— On track. 

No 1 92Vi,c; No. 2, 90%c; September, 92',i8C bid, _ ^., -c. .„ , ,. 

ct^mber 93%c bid; May, 96% c bid. Flax— On track and in store. $2..8;.to ar- 
r ve $2.71: to arrive by Sept. 24 $2 78; September, 
November, $2.68%; December, $2.59^2; May, $2.64. 
Barley, old, 65-70c; new, 68-73c. „, c- v . 

Receipts— Wheat, 302,051 bu; corn. 21,51. bu; 
7 751 bu; rye, 952 bu: liax, 17,068 bu. „^_-- . 

Shipments— Wheat, 21,000 bu; oats, 28,. 50 bu; 



No. 1 northern, $1.14%; 

No. 1 northern, 

bid; December, 

in store and to arrive: 

November, 92 %c bid; De- 



$2.76; October, $2.69 bid; 
Oats, 34c. Rye, 68-70c. 

barley, 60,327 bu; oats, 

barley, 87,044 bu. 



«n(fthe market eased off 
•U'iie close, however, was 



selling ^et In 
temporarily, 
firm with De 

The oats 
sympathized 
December sta 
of a shade to 
34T5<&35c. 

Not much support was given to hog 
products. The first sales Avere at a de- 
cline of 15c tc* 2%c advance, with Oc- 
tober at $19.3144 & 19.35 ^oi" P<Ji*k, $12.45 
for lard and $SI.27% for ribs 



iilj^r %c up at 51 %c. 

irwt, though inactive, 
lih 9.he firmness of corn. 

;(i at 34%'S34%c. a gain 
*&€, V4C, and sold later at 



Ship- 
ments. 
54,300 
194,600 
1,025,000 



grade Hour lor 
.Scotland. Mucii 
_ on domestic aceouni could 

be made if sellers were willing to meet 
reauced bids irom prospective bu\ ers. 
Tne Eastern milling demand for wheat 
Is dull I'eing conflned to sales of scat- 
tered lots. 

Wheat values were strong until to- 
ward noon when some selling devel- 
oped. Heavy country offerings forced 
down prices. After noon, however, the 
market rallied and was stronger. 

At the opening values were frac- 
tionally higher than yesterday. News 
And statistics were mixed, but the 
bulls w ere favored by a preponderance 
of unfavorable gossip and by reports 
of e.xport business. Cahles were 
higher although I'aris markets were 
lower on profit- taking. The Italian of- 
ficial report was bullisli, the wheal 
crop tills year being estimated at 15>>,- 
000. uOO bu. The revised estimate of 
last year's crop is l*5.ooo.0i'0 bu. The 
official report on last year's yield was 
placed at 14 4.000,000 bu, but the revised 
figures are said to nearer to the actual 
production. 

Argentine shipments of wheat this 
■week are estimated at ^00.000 bu. com- 
pared with S64.000 bu last week and 
160,000 bu in the corresponding week 
last year. The outKmk in .Argentina 
Is favorable, copious rains liaving 
proven of much benetit to the growing 
plant. Indian shipments of wheat this 
week are estimated at l,6SS.0OO bu, 
compared witii 376.000 bu last week 
and 3:;, 000 bu a year ago. Shipments 
next week are estimated at 3>4.(i(iu bu. 
The Argentine report was considered 
bearish and the Indian statistics con- 
cerning next week were regarded as 
moderately bullish. 

The trade did not pay much attention 
to statistics, however. On the higher 
cables shorts covered and continued to 
buy in their wheat on reports of export 
business. The rumors of export trad- 
ing were vague, but the shorts v.ere 
frlglitened and covered freely. This 
market did a very small export busi- 
ness In Manitoba wheat. The durum 
market wa.>; from %c to %c out of line. 
The proximity of the durum market 
to an export basis was considered fa- 
voralle by people friendly to the mar- 
ket. Receipts of durum wheat in this 
market i:ave been exceptionally heavy, 
and tiie run promises to continue mod- 
erately large. Much of this wheat has 
come from Minneapolis. Duluth prices 
have been more favorable than the 
Belling basis of the Minneapolis durum 
market resulting In heavy shipments 
from that market to Duluth. Exporters 
hope to ship most of this stuff abroad. 
The peculiar movement lias resulted 
In some duplication of figures giving 
receipts at the two Northwestern prim- 
ary points, which liave not been as 
heavy as statistics indicate. 

Seaboard markets reported that Rot- 
terdam liad taken forty loads of wheat 
for export. No particulars were given, 
but it is thought that most of the 
Btuff was red winter wheat. Portland, 
Or., wired that 500.000 bu of Pacific 
coast wlieat had been sold for exp«.(rt 
to France. French buyers it was re- 
ported, were taking wheat (luietly on 
qutitatlons asked but were not sub- 
mitting bids. Winnipeg, which was 
weak yesterday, was strong today, re- 
flecting the small export business that 
was being transacted in Manitoba and 
covering by shorts. Cash markets were 
strong. 

In the face of what appears to be a 
bearish condition abroad ti;e foreign 
markets displayed unusual strength. 
This firmness imbued the bulls with 
hope of export business from this 
country. The possibility of an export 
trade is an obstacle in "the way of the 
bears who are somewhat timid about 
Belling the market at current prices. 
The leading compeiilors of America 
continue to ship wheat freely. The fea- 
ture of the export business to foreign 
countries is the heavy outgo of wheat 
from the Danubian states, which are 
■hipping around 5.500.000 bu weekly, 
con. pared with .slightly more than half 
a million bu last year. India is ship- 
ping heavilv compared with last year, 
when at this time the outgo of v.heat 
was almost negligible. Australian 
shipments are about double tlie exports 
at this time last year. Argentine 
shipments are also greatly in excess 
Of shipments a year ago. Russian 

? rices are firmer although that coun- 
ry is sending out wheat lia\ ily. 
The country today sold wheat more 
freely, but offerings were well ab- 
sorbed. Toward noon the market 
seemed to lose some of its strength 
on account of the heavy country offer- 
ings. This wheat appears to be com- 
ing in ^rom farmers who need money 
to pay tlirashing bills and meet de- 
mands from country bankers. After 
forced sales are over the bulls think 
the Northwestern farmer will hold 
supplies for higlier prices and the trade 
Is generally of the opinion tliat the 
Northesiern farmer will obtain the 
Increased values which he Is seeking 
Tlie cash demand is only moderate. 
It lacks the proi)ortif>ns which would 
make it a bullish factor. The bulls 
have depended lately on tlie possibility 
of export business for an argument i 
and have not placed much reliance in I 
the cash situation, although lighter re- j 
ceipts in the Northwest are expected ' 
to result In firmer cash markets event- | 
ually. On every decline to an export | 
basis the shorts have run to cover and I 
the pit element has helped them buy I 
wheat, putting up rices and removing I 
the possibility of an export trade. Ex- | 
porters Fay that a week of good for- | 
eign business would put the market 
In an extremely healthy condition. 

Primary receipts were much heavier | 
today compared with last year, but the i 
market was not in a rr.ood to pay much 
attention to .'Statistics. Bears were I 
g ■- ' 



piaving for an addiional advance to 
put" out wheat and in the face of a 
slight export demand the increased re- 
ceipts at primary points did not have 
anv market inlliience. 

Wheat seeding is well under way in 
the Central and -Middle Atlantic states. 
Spring wheat thrashing Is in full blast 
and marketings are supposed to repre- 
sent the regular fall movement, al- 
though they are much under the run 
,.f whi^at last vear. Excellent weather 
has helped thrashing. Elevators in the 
Southwest, especially at Chicago, are 
overflowing and Chicago Is sending 
wheat to Buffalo for storage to make 
room for corn. 

Flax offerings were scarce today 
and bidders were forced to raise prices. 
The trade was extremely light and did 
not repr>?sent prevailing conditions, be- 
ing too insignificant in volume to be 
taken as a criterion of market crop 
or supply conditions. Flax in the 
countrv Is being bought at stations gen- 
erally on an Ocl.iber basis. Thrashing 
Is backward and the supplies available 
appear to consist of broken lots which 
cannot be hedged. Sellers appear to 
be holding off until they can ship in 
car lots. ,, , , 

.\ wire to The Herald from Mondak, 
Mont., said that stations will produce 
100,000 bu of flax this year, mostly on 



Articles. Receipts 

Flour, bbl ;:3.800 

Wheat, bu . . ««w 72,000 

Corn, bu . . . .1 433,700 

Oats, bu I 225.000 355,100 

Rye. bu X 4.000 ^3.000 

Barley, bu ....... .": 85.500 32,500 

Car lot receH>ti**-Wheat, 74 cars, with 
13 of contract grade; corn, 454 car.s 
with 92 of contract grade; oats, 109 
cars. Total receipts of wheat at Chi- 
cago. Minneapolis and Duluth today 
were 658 cars compared witli 507 cars 
last week and 1,176 cars the corres- 
ponding day a year ago. , „„ _ 

Clash close: Wheat — No. 2 red, 99 @ 
99%c; No 3 red. 96g98c; No. 2 hard, 99 
(Tjl.Ol; No. 3 hard, 961i98c; No. 1 north- 
ern, $1.12® 1.15%; No. 2 northern, 
$1.10(gl.l4; No. 3 northern, $1.00&1.12; 
No. 2 spring. $1.00^1.10; No. 3 spring, 
96 (5; 1.10; velvet chaff. 90 @ 1.03; durum, 
85 (g 95c. Corn— No. 2. 53% #53%; No. 
2 white, 53%@54c; No. 2 yellow. 5^\-4.<y/ 
53%; No. 3, 52%(&53; No. 3 white. o3(W 
53%c; No. 3 yellow. 53#53%c; No. 4, 
51%(Q52c; No. 4 white. 52<&52%c; No. 
4 yellow, 51%(g52%c. Oats — No. 2, 
32c; No. 2 white, 34%Cf35%c; No. 3, 
32c; No. 3 white, 33%@34c; No. 4 
white, 33 f?! 34c; standard, 34%©ooc. 
Rye — Cash, 74c: December, 74c. Bar- 
lev— Ca.sh, 561i73c. Timothy — Cash, 
$7.50 & 8.75; March, $9. 10 y 9.40. Clover 
—Cash, $12.00 ©18.00: October, $16. < 5. 

Wheat— tlpen. High. Low. 

Sept ....$ .'.n-% i .v7't I -v' 

Dec 1.0i'%-01 I.OIH l.OOH-' 

1.0€H-% 1.06%i l.OtJ'A 



new ground. 



$>aleN ThuTHilay. 



iHi 

bu 



arrive 

urrive. .N. .. 



to arrive September. . 

Ciirs 

to arrive SeptenitfT. 



liu to 
mixed 



CaHh 

No. 1 h.iril. 1 lar .... 
No. 1 ii.iril. 1 car .... 
.No. 1 noriliem. 21.200 
N>. 1 ninhem. 5.0(11 
Ni'. 1 iiiinhorn, 1 oar 
-No. 1 northern. 1 I'iir 
.\o. 1 nortliein, 22 3-3 
No. 1 ni rthern. 1 f.ir 
.No. 1 uortlum. l.UO 
.No. 1 iicrthern. 1 car 
No. 1 iiiTlhern, 1 car 
N,). 1 northern, 1 car 
.No. 1 nov.hcni. 1.000 
No. 1 norilitm. 2 cars 
No. 2 northern. 2 cars 
.No. 2 I'.orUitrh. 2 curs 
No. 1 ilunnu. 4 can . 
No. I durum. 1.400 bu 

X.'. 2 durum. 1 car 

No. grade durum. 1 car 

Harley. 1 car 

Bi'.rley. 1 car 

Barley. 1 car 

Parley. 2 cars 

Flax, 1 car 

Flax, 1.730 bu to arrive September. 

Flpx, 400 bu to arrive October 

Fliix. l..')00 bu to arri\e 

Flax. 165 bu to arrive October... 
Flux, 1 car 



arrive »>.'pttmber 



bu to arrive September 



to arrive.. 



.Jl.l.l 

. 1.14% 

. 1.14 

. l.H^i 

. 1.14^i 

. 1.14 

. l.UKi 

. l.ll'/i 

. 1.14 '4 

. 1.07',4 

. l.ll'b 

. 1.14»» 

1.14*B 

1 . 1 4 ■'S 
LIU. 
1.12VI 
.!'2»4 
.02 'A 
.90Vi 
.90»4 
.60 
.70 
.60 
.68 
2.70 
2.74 
2.6.-i 
2.67'! 
2.65^ 
2.76^4 



in the drouth districts of Argentine 
where the outlook is now favorable. 
With the exception of March, ih.e gen- 
eral market developed pronounced 
firmness and prices showed an advance 
of %d to %d during the morning with 
shorts nervous and some buying by 
yesterday's sellers. Support was due to 
an improved demand for cargoes which 
weer sparingly offered and a good de- 
mand for white sort.s and the fact tl;at 
off coast cargoes of Australian wiieat 
v.ere sold to Antwerp. Argentine ship- 
ments continue light and there is talk 
here of smaller Black Sea shipments 
this week. The Italian official report is 
bullish. At midday the market was firm 
%d to %d higiier than yesterday. Corn 
easj-. %d lower in sympathy witli the 
decline in America and the forecast of 
continued liberal shipments from Ar- 
gentine. Following tiie opening the 
market was dull and unclianged." 
« « « 

R. H. Graham, who lives at Mondak, 
Mont., was a visitor on the floor yes- 
terday. He said that liis district will 
ship llax lieavlly, but that seed will 
not be forv.arded until the Missouri 
river freezes over, as the seed must be 
transptorted across tlie ice to a rail- 
road. The acreage, he said, is large 
near Mondak and most of it is new. 
The Herald wired Mondak, Mont., for 
confirmation of Mr. Grahams estimate 
of 100,000 bu for acreage near Mondak. 
and received a reply tliat the estimate 
was substantially "correct. Mr. Gra- 
iiam was the guest of J. A. McAuley. 

* « * 

Car receipts of flax: Last 

Today. Year. 

Duluth 31 36 

Minneapolis 36 

Winnipeg 9 2 

Total 76 3S 

* * * 

Foreign wheat markets closed: Liv- 
erpool — %(g%d up. Berlin — May %c 
lower. Budapest — October %c higher. 
Paris — %c higher to %c lower; flour, 
%c to %c lower. Antwerp — unchanged. 

* * • 

Car receipts of wheat: La.st 

Todav. Year. 
221 5S0 



May 

Com — 

Sept 

Dec 

.M.iy .... 

Oatfi— 

.Sept 

Dec 

May .... 

Mess Pork 



Close. 

1.90'i 
1.06'^ 



.51Vb 
.54 ^fc 



.53% 
.51S, 

.547i- 



55 



.33H 

.34»4-% 
.3-%-%. 
per bbl — 



.34T4-33 
.37-i 



.52% -53 

.50% 

.54Vi-'-4 

.33 •4 



.37»A 

10 
93 
97^ 



% 



Sept ....\9.27^ 19.27'.^ 19 

Oct 19.32^-33 19.3.> 18. 

Jan 18.27\i 18.30 17 

Lartl, per 100 lb— 

,7an 10.67'3 10.C7^ 10.60-62% 

Sept ....12.57'/a V^.:.-!% 12.42^8 

Oct 12.45 12.45 J2.3.i 

.Not 11.60 ll.t!2^ 11.60 

Short Ribs, per 100 lb- 
Sept .. .11.62:^ ll.tVJi^ 11.50 

Oct n.27Vi 11.30 11.22',i 

Jan •J.C7'/4 U,67^4 9.57'^ 



.53% 
.51H 
.64% 

.33',^ 

.34%-% 

.37^ 

19.10 
18.93 
18.03 

10. 60 -62 H 
12.42% 
12.35 
11.60 

11.50 
11.25 

9.57% 




THE MINNEAPOLIS M.4RKET. 

Wheat Is Firmer But Prices Hold 
to Narrow Range. 

Minneapolis, Minn., 
wheat market today 
continued in narrow 
light and 
September 



remained 
character 
%c lii"iher 



Duluth 

Minneapolis 



363 



oats, 6. last 
4; barley, 4 9, 
on track tc- 



!• lax stores amount to 6:;, 000 bu, an 
increase of 22,^00 bu in four days. 
Wlieat stores amount to 2,S67.000 bu, 
an increase of 214.000 bu in four days. 
Shipments not reported: Spring wheat. 
ITS, 000 bu; bonded wheat. 50.000 bu; 
loading, 38,000 bu of spring wheat. 
• * • 

Wall Street Journal: At present in- 
dications the cereal crops will contrib- 
ute not far from 5,000,000,000 bu to the 
countrvs gross agricultural income. 
The United States have never had an 
equally good oats crop, and but once 
before so large a corn crop as is now 
promised wiiii no heavy frost up to the 
middle of the montn. Our wheat yield 
this vear is barely a ten-year average, 
and a showing of 67.000.000 bu below 
that of 190S looks rather meagre tor 
a population of over 90.000.000 people. 
But the average of tlie two crops of 
1909 and 1910 exceeds ToO.OOO.OoO bu. 
A consumption of an average of 6 bu a 
head would retjuire 540,000,000 bu, thus 
leaving an average of 160.000.000 bu 
for reserve, seed and export. Although 
that does not afford a large margin, it 
does relieve the country of anxiety as 
to its year's bread supply. 

• 4t * 

riuluth car inspection: Wheat — No. 
1 liard. 14; No. 1 northern, 94: No. 2 
northern. 26: No. 3 northern. 5; durum. 
No. 1, 53: No. 2. 9; no grade. 2; total 
durum. 64; winter. 1 western red. 2; 
no grade. 3; mixed. 12; total wheat, 221; 
last year. 580. Flax, 31, last year ."'6 
corn, 1, last year, none: 
vear, 32; rve, 2, last vear, 
last year, 94; total, 310; 
day. 300. 

• * « 

The Northwestern Miller said: The 
Minneapolis flour output week Increased 
43,360 bbl. This made the output, for 
the week ending Sept. 17, 339,830 bbl, 
against 356,685 in 1909 and 339,270 In 
1908. About the same capacity Is In 
operation again this week and the pro- 
duction ought to be about 340.000 bbl. 
In the corresponding week last vear 
the output was 381,000 bbl. Minneap- 
olis mills are doing a good steady bus- 
iness. Sales are not anywhere near 
as large as a year ago, but most every 
mill manages to dispose of more than 
its output. At times fair prices are 
obtained but, on account of the active 
competition for business, sales are 
usually made a very close margin cl 
profit. Foreign inquiry was light last 
week. 

« 4> * 

Kansas City wired: Very heavy re- 
ceipts today, over 600 cars that we 
know of now and more roads to here 

from. 

• • * 

Primaries: Wheat receipts, 1.262.000 
bu; last year, 362,000 bu. Shipments, 
593,000 bu. last year, 191,000 bu. Corn 
receipts, 608,000 tu; last year, 449.000 
bu. Shipments, 1,179,000 bu; last year, 
369,000 bu. 

• • * 

( Total clearances — Wheat, 24,000 bu: 

; flour, 16,000 bbls. Corn 18,000 bu. Oats, 
500 bu. Wheat and flour, 90,000 bu. 

• * * 

Broomhall cabled: "Wheat — The 

steadiness in America yesterday caused 

lighter offerings here and the general 

undertor e was steady and unciianged 

'to %d higher. Following the opening 

I March was under pressure and eased 

id due to the continued rains reported 



Northwest 684 580 

Chicago 74 46 

Winnipeg 649 688 

St. Louis, bu 62,000 71,000 

Kansas City, bu 302,000 73,000 

• * * 

Price Current, Cincinnati, said: Sit- 
uation of corn crop one of fair pro- 
gress in betterment of general condi- 
tion. Certainty already reached of 
production exceeding highest record of 
past years. Liability of some injury 
to tjuallty of Immature grain from 
hard frost. Considerable plowing in 
progress, some seeding being done 
with ground generally in splendid con- 
dition. Continuance of evidence total 
area winter wheat will be increased. 

♦ ♦ • 
Winnipeg — October flax closed ?2.45 

bid and November closed $2.45 bid. 

Liverpool Grain. 

Liverpool, Sept. 22.— Closing: Wheat— Spot dull: No. 
2 rod western winter, no stock; futures steady; Oc- 
tober. 7s 4Hd; Docember, 7s 5%d; March. 7s .".^id. 
Cini — Spot steady; American mixed. 7s 5d; futures 
steady; October, 4s U'-id; Deremlcr, 43 7-%d. 



Se:?t. 22. — The 
was firmer but 
range. Trading 
of professional 
closed at $1.09%. 
than yesterday; December at 
Jl.11%, %c higher and May at |1.15%C« 
115%. %@%c higher. Local elevator 
stocks increased 915,000 bu for five 
days. Minneapolis today received 363 
cars of v.heat against a holiday a year 
ago- Duluth. 221 cars against a hoilady 
and Winnipeg 049 cars against 368. 

September opened $1.09 -^s. high, 
$1.09-g; low, $1,119; closed. $1.09%: De- 
cember opened $1.11%; higli, $1.11% (g 
1.12; lov.'. $1.11%; closed, $1.11%: May 
opened, ?1.15% ^t 1.15% : high. $1.15%; 
low, $1.15% (& 1.15%; closed, $1.15*8^ 
1.15%. 

Cash wheat demand stronger. Mills 
bought a majority of offerings. Ele- 
vator interests bouglit quite freely. No. 
1 northern sold for %@%c above De- 
cember. Closing cash prices; No. 1 
northern, $1.12^1.12%. to arrive $1.12; 
No. 2 northern. $1.07% fj 1.10%, to ar 
rive. $1.07 %(& 1.09%. No. 3 wheat, 
$1.05% (g 1.09%. No. 3 yellow corn, 
ClV2!g'52c; No. 3 white oats, 32%@%c; 
No. 2 rye, 69®70%c. 

Millstuffs — Shipments, 1,857 tons. 
Demand strong and market active. 
Prices unchanged. Bran in 100-pound 
sacks f. o. b. Minneapolis, $18.50® 10. 

Flour — Mills doing fair business for 
immediate shipments, but deferred or- 
ders very light. Prices unchanged. 
Shipments. 55,649 bis. First patents. 
In wood, f. . o. b. Minneapolis, $5.40® 
5.60; second patents, $5.20(85.40: first 
clears, $3.80Cii; second clears, $2.6o@ 
2.80. 

Flax — Receipts, 36 cars; year p^go, 
holiday; shipments, 11. Demand was 
good for spot at 3c under the Duluth 
September and to arrive at 3c under 
Duluth September and to arrive at even 
October. Closing price, $2.7 3; to ar- 
rive. $2.69. 

Barley — Receipts, 81 cars; year ago, 
holiday: shipments, 77. An easier tone 
ruled In barley today. Demand was 
only fair for all grades at prices Ic 
lower. Closing range, 60C« 70c. 



DECUNES 
INJTOCKS 

Opening Price Movement Nar- 
row and Weakness Soon 
Appeared. 

Realizing on Large Scale and 

Wednesday's Gains 

Wiped Out. 



New Y'ork, Sept. 22. — The opening 
dealings In stocks today were quite 
active, but tlie price movement was 
rather narrow. Gains were in the ma- 
jority, but the Northwestern railroad 
stocks showed the effects of the realiz- 
ing sales. The metal group was some- 
what irregular. United States Steel 
hardening a fraction, with other mem- 
bers of the group receding a fraction. 
American Malting preferred dropped 
2%. 

Realizing was on a large scale, and a 
considerable part of yesterdays rise 
was wiped out by tlie end of the first 
hour. All the active stocks were sold 
fr'jely and there was no apparent effort 
m.ide to stop the decline. St. Paul, 
Great Northern preferred and Nortliern 
Piiciflc fell 1% and Union I'aciflc, Read- 
ing, United States Steel and Amalga- 
mated Copper 1. Pacific Mail rose 1% 
ard Minneapolis, St, I'aul & Sault Sle. 
Marie 1%. 

The dropping tendency of prices fol- 
lowed revised estimates of the Minne- 
sota railroad law decision. The fail- 
ure of yesterdays advance to attract 
n«!w outside interests in the mafket 
prompted selling of stoclts. The de- 
cline in Union Pacific reached 1% and 
S(»uthern Pacific, Chesapeake & Ohio, 
B.iltimore & Ohio, Toledo, St. Louis 
& Western preferred and Amalgamated 
Copper, 1. Bonds were Irregular. 

The market took on an appearance 
of strength and activity shortly before 
2 o'clock. The movement started in 
Heading, which bounded up to 143 y2 
and then spread to the rest of the im- 
portant stocks. Practically all of the 
morning losses were recovered. 

The market closed lieavy and dull. 
The tone of the market became hesitat- 
ing on the rally and the prices wavered 
within a fractional range and on light 
dealings. Amalgamated Copper weak- 
ened to 1% below last night. 



"U'inona 

Wolverine ! 115 



Wyandot 

Yukon Gold 

Bohemia 

Cactus 

Chemung 

Cliff 

Chief Cons. 

Cobalt Central 

Chino 

Corbln Copper 

Cortez 

Ely Cons 

Ely Central 

Ely Witch 

Fremont 

Goldfield Consolidated 

Inspiration 

La Rose : . . . 

Live Oak 

New Baltic 

Ohio Copper 

Oneco 

Kay Central 

Hawhide Coalition ... 

Shattuck 

South Lake 

Tono Nevada 

Yuma 



1% 
S% 
5 
1% 

?!t 

I 1-16 

6 
17 

6% 
2 

28c 
49c 

10c 



8 



8% 
1-16 
3% 
16% 

5% 

1% 

2% 

2% 

10c 

24% 

8% 

8% 

48 



117 

1% 

4 

5% 

1% 

6 

1% 

1% 

8 

17% 
6 
2% 

31c 

50c 

12c 
3% 
8% 
8% 
3% 

16% 
6 
1 11-16 
2% 
2% 

lie 

25 
9 

9% 
55 



South St. I'aul Ltveotoek. 

South St. I^lul, Minn.. .Sejit. 22.— <.'attle— Kecelpte, 
l,7t'0; market gciifraUy stead: and unchange»i. Hces 
— Ket-elpts, I.IUO; market l;*: lower; nuige, $S'.35(tt 
I*. 10; bulk of sales. t8.60(E:?.90. Sheep— Receipts. 
C.600; market mostly steady, but mutton grade;' were 
q;:oted 15(a25c Uwer; sbap, (1.50(94.75; lambii, 

$o.;!j(3 6.00. 



THE PRODUCE MARKETS. 



CALIFORNIA ORA.NGES- 

Califcrnia. late V a k ucles. extra fancy 

Callfoniia late Valenclas, B6'i. per bi 

California late VaituclHS, extra tamy. 250s. 
Late ValtiK-la». txtra fancy, ;21ii. txix..., 

BEKRIES— 
BlueLierries, case 

CA.NTALOL'Pi.8— 

Standaril, crate 

U!>ago melons, crate 

Indiana gtms, half h\i 

WATERMELONS— 
Missouri watermelons, each 

fRLlT— 

Yellow plums, extra (ancy, crata 

Mlclilgau plums, crate 

Idaiio pe^rs, box 

Miclilgan Bartlett pears, per bbl 

CalUiTula .•.liiic Malaga grapes, crate.... 

Michigan grapes, per basket 

Callfoniia Tuiiay grapes, era e 

Waslilnglou and Colorado leaches, 

APPLEii— 

varieties, bbl. . 



tioi 



box. 



fancy 



3C'8, 

42'6, 



crate. 

irate, 
(rate. 



Piper, 



York stock quotations furnished The Herald by 
Joluism it Case. 



•STOCKS- 



Open.l High. I Low. | Close 



AiaalgamatC'd 

.^.Merloaii Car Foundry. 
Aintrlian Locomotive . 

Cotton OU. . 

Smelters . . . 



Aiatrlcan 

.^loprli'an 

Atfhlsoii 

llitltimore 

Rrooklyn 



& Ol!lo 

IlHpid Transit. 

C. iitral Leather 

Cliesiipeake & OlUo .... 

C, M. & !St. Paul 

Cdomdi Fuel & Iron... 

Canadian I'aciflc 

l><!nver & Rl) Grande... 

D , S. S. it A 

Erie 

do 1st ipfd 

Great .Northern 

G:vat Nortliern Ore 

ir ter SletropoUt.in 

do pfd 

Missouri Pacific 

Nitioiial Lead 

*.S"cw Y'ork Central 

Noifolk & Western 

Northern Pacific 

Pennsylvania 

I'joples Gaa 

Pre^sed St«<;l Car 

RcpubU3 Steel & Iron. . . 

Rock Island 

do pfd 

Reading 

S)j Line 

Sjuthern Railway 

do pfd 

.S jutherr. Pacific 

Tennessee Copiier 

Texas Pacific 

Cidon Pacific 

I tail Copper 

I. 8. Steel 

do pfd 

Wabash 

do pfd 



New York Grain. 

New Y'cirk, .'^ept. 22. — ('lll^t■: Wheat— September. 
$105%; December. $1.0g'-4; May. $1.12^. Corn— 
May. 62!2c; September, ei'ic; December, 59H<". 



For 



Corn and Wheat Bulletin. 

24 hours ending at 8 a. m., Thursday 



^v;■pt. 



STATIONS— 



l^tate of 
I neat her 



Temperaturft j 


^ 


^ 


3 






E 










*5 


1^ 


• 


+- 



Alexandria 


Cloudy 


Campbell 


Cloudy 


Crcoltston 


Cloudy 


Detroit City 


Raliung 


Halstud 


Cloudy 


New llm 


Cloudy 


Rochester 


Cloudy 


Wlnnebag ) City . . 


Pt. Cloudy 


Worthlugton 


Cloudy 


Amenia 


Cloudy 


ISotilneau 


Cloudy 


Lisbon 


....Pt. Clmdy 


Mlnot 


Cloudy 


Peiut>ina 


Cloudy 1 


ALierdeen 


Cloudy] 


Millbank 


Cloudyl 


>Utcliell 


Ralnlng| 


Redfleld 


Cloudy i 


BUmarck 


Cloudyl 


Devils Lake 


Ralnlng| 


*Duluth 


RaiidngI 



Huron Kainlngi 

Lii Crosse Pt. Cloudy] 

Mlnneai«lls Cloudy | 

Moorhead Cloudy] 

St. Paul Cloudyl 

Winnipeg Raiuhigl 



84 
84 

70 
84 
82 
81 
76 
84 
78 
82 
74 
86 
78 
72 
8e 
84 
86 
84 
76 
74 
52 
S6 
78 
80 
84 
82 
70 



44 
46 
54 
36 
46 
52 
42 
50 
S6 
44 
46 
46 
42 
50 
48 
48 
50 
48 
56 
58 
46 
60 
SO 
60 
58 
58 
52 



Rain- 
fall. 



;i 



.06 

.80 

. 22 

'.36 

.10 







.14 

.22 

.38 

.52 



.06 

.40 

.;i4 

.!i2 

.52 

.54 

.20 



.72 





.30 

a 
.20 



Trensury Statement. 

V>'Hshlngton. Stpt. 22.— Ti.e condition of the treas- 
ury at the iiepiiniing of busliics« today was as follows: 

Trust funds — Gold coin. $8'.*3,377,G6'j; silver doiiars, 
$485,473,000, sllvtr dollars of 1800. $3,556,030; silver 
cerUflcates outstanding. $48j. 473.000. 

General fund — Standard ".liver dollars In general 
fund. $5,732.P94: current linblUties. f '.14. 232. 163; w .rk- 
Ing l»alance In treasury offices. $32,280,415; in banks 
to credit cf treasurer of tlie United States, $3j,l'0ri.- 
876; subsidiary slher coin. $l'J.342,.'it;8; minor coin, 
$t)3y,311. Total balauoe in general fund, $liO,B-H;.2y2. 
^ 

Chicago Livestock. 

Chicago, Sept. •.;2.— Cattle— Ku-eipts estimated at 
5,.TriO; market rteady; bee\ts. Jl.&OfeS.S?; Texas 
steers. $3.75(sC.OO; western sti-ers, $4.40w7.10; stock- 
crs and feeders. $4.30(n6.00; cows and heifers, $2.25@ 
6.50; calves. $7.00in lO.JO. Hogs— Receipts esUmated 
at 12,000; marliet steady to a shade hiwer; light. $P.OJ 
@0.4o: mixed, 8.25fel<.3:>; hea\y. 8.ir,(a Si.iO ; rough, 
$8.15(«8.35; go d to choice heovy, $8. 35 (ft 9.20; pigs. 
$8.40©l'.3l>; bulk of sales. $*.5,iC<! 8.'.i5. Sheeip — Re- 
ceipts esUmated at 33,000; market weak; native, $2.65 
(34.45; we^te:^l. $3.25<o'4.40; yearlings. $4.75(30-75; 
liimbb, native, $j.25(d7.O0; western. $5.50{§7.00. 



63%; 

467^ 
37%| 
61^1 
66 vs] 

yp% 

105»i 
75'4 
33\ 
75T* 

123 
29% 

190 Vs 
80 V4 
10 
26 
43 

127% 
55% 
20% 
54 V4 
5354 
52 

113% 
87 

117% 

i2yv 

107% 
33% 
3n% 
31% 
63 

142% 

132% 
23% 
53% 

115% 
33% 
26% 

167% 
46 
68% 

116% 
16% 
86% 



63% 


62% 


'66% 


"65% 


&'J% 


98% 


105% 


104% 


75% 


73 


34% 


33% 


76 


75% 


123 


121% 


33 


29% 


190T4 


190% 


"26 ' 


"25% 


128 


126% 


20% 


20% 


53% 


53% 


113% 


112% 


117% 


116% 


129% 


128% 1 



New apples. 

Idaho, box 

Maidtu Blush, bbl . 
crab apples, bu — 

P1.NE.\PPLES— 
Florida, extra fancy. 
Florida, extra laucy, 
Florida, extra laiay, 

CALilOU.MA LEMONS— 
Callfoniia lemoiis. txua laniy. 300 to 360. box 
Imported Umes. per box 

TUilAiOt:>— 

Uouie grown, bu 

Home growu. crate 

BAN.^^NAS— 
Bauanar, per lb 

CRAMiKRlUEi— 
Genuine Ligiiun. bUl •• 

BUITEU— 

Fancy ci-eamtry, per lb 

Dairy, per lb 

Packing, per lb 

CHEEfcE— 
Fai'cy full cream, twins, 
block Swiss, per lb. No. 
Prlmost cuccac, per it}. . 
Wheel Swiss, per lb 



S.S) 

... 4.00 
Ux 5. 50 
... 4.0« 

... 2.7S 



.... 2.50 

1.40 

75 

25® .30 



1.90 
2.25 
2.65 
6.50 
1.65 

.35 
1.90 

.'JO 

4.00 
1.85 
4.25 
2.i\) 

4.23 
i.li 
3.0« 



3.75® 



2S 



p<r Id.. 



1.50 

.90 

.04 

T.O* 

.31 
.25 
.22 

.17 
.21 
.10 
.21 



3i% 


■'31'- 


63% 


63 


143% 


141% 


134 


182% 


23% 


23% 


'ii5% 


114% 


33% 


32% 


167% 


165% 


46 


45% 


68% 


67% 


116% 


116% 


i 36% 


j"35% 



62% 

46% 

37% 

61% 

66 

99 

105 
75% 
33% 
75% 

122 
30 

190% 
30% 
10 

25% 
43 

126% 
55% 
20% 
54% 
53% 
D2 

112% 
97 

116% 

129% 

107% 
33% 
30 ',2 
31 
63 V4 

142% 

134 

2 3% 

53% 

114% 

32% 

26% 

166% 

45 ^c 

67% 

116% 

16% 

35% 



»Ex-dlvldend of 1% per cent 



Duluth Securities. 



SECURITIIOS- 



Bld.lAsked 



*Not liiiludej In district averages. 

RUMARKS— Showers f^'U < vtr the Dakolas, Ne- 
bra.ska, Northeni and Western Mlnntscta and Mani- 
toba. H. W. RlCH.MtDSON. 

Local Forecaster. 



T Indicates Inappreciable rainfall. *For yesterday. 
tFor 24 h. urs ending 8 a. m., 7ith merlilian lime. 

NOTE — The average maximum and minimum tem- 
peratures and the average rainfall are made up at 
each Center from tne actual number of repons re- 
ceived, and the average rainfall fiom tlio nainber of 
Blallons reporting In .10 Inch or more. 'Ihe "state of 
weather" .s that pre\aillng :(t liino of observali.^u. 



SELL TO ARRIVE ON BULGES. 

C. C. WYMAN & CO. 

Velvet Chaff or Dearded Wheat Now Sell* 3 Cents L'uder No. 1 Northern Price. 

DULUTH. Grain Commission. MINNEAPOLIS. 



THE CHICAGO MARKET. 

Wheat Turns Upward on News of 
Foreign Orders. 

Chicago, Sept. 22. — With reports that 

Rotterdam had taken forty boatloads 

of wheat at the American seaboard 

and that a good deal was being put on 

ships for Havre, France, the market 

turned upward today. In addition, 
cash demand and Hour sales were said 
to be Improving. Black sea shipments 
were also estimated to be lighter, a 
sharp contrast compared with yester- 
day. In consequence, the opening liere 
wa.'j generally higher, the range being 
%c up to V8<S'^4c off. December started 
at |1.00%@1.01. a shade to %@%c ad- 
vance. A rise to ?I.01®1.0IJ^ fol- 
lowed. 

Portland, Or., al«o reported sales to 
France, but commission selling caused 
prices to become easier. The close 
was at $1.00% for December, a net gain 
of 1/4 @%c. 

Indications of colder and unsettled 
weather strengthened corn. Shorts 
were buyers, December opened Vfe&Msc 
higher at Bl'.iQ'bl^c, and steadied 
around 51%c. 

Because no frost waa predicted, short 



Cotton Market. 

New York, Sept. 22. — Cotton opened 
steady with a decline of 1 point on 
September, but generally 1 to 5 points 
higher on buying, inspired by bullish 
private crop accounts, talk of a hold- 
ing mvenicnt amng planters in the 
Southwest and the steadier ruling of 
Southern spot markets. Business was 
rather more general than recently, 
commission houses being better sup- 
plied witli buying cijders, and while 
the market met with considerable 
realizing, tlie undertone was very 
steady with the active months ruling 
about" 8 to 9 points net higher during 
the middle of the morning. 

Spot closed dull: muddling uplands. 
1.?.90; middling gulf, 14. IT.; no sales. 
Futures closed firm: closing l>ids: Sep- 
tember. 13.83; October, 13.33; Novem- 
htr 13 26: December. 15.28: January. 
13 24- February, 13.28; March. 13.33; 
May, 13.37; June, 13.35; July, 13.33. 
» 
New York Money. 

New York. Sept. 22. — Mimey on call, 
casv, 154(5/2 per cent; ruling rate, 1 Ts 
per" cent- closing bid, I'i per cent; of- 
fered at 2 per cent. Time loans, dull 
and easier; sixty days, 3^4 per cent, 
and ninetv days, 4 per cent; six months, 
4 I/O p'er cent. Close: Prime mercan- 
tile paper, ^\^^i^ per cent. Sterling 
exchange, steady, with actual busi- 
ness in bankers" bills at $4.83.r)(?i 4.83.6 
for sixty-day bills, and at $4.96.1.5 for 
demand. Commercial bills. $4.83® 
483^4. Bar silver, hSVzc: Mexican dol- 
lars, 44c. Government bonds, steady; 
railroad bonds, irregular. 



I'list National Banlt 

/» me rican Excliange bank 

tltj- .National Hank 

gt. Loulfi County tftate Bank 

Western State Hank 

Northern Natimai Bank 

Iiuluth- Superior Traction Co 

do pfd • • • 

Duluth Street Uailway, Ist g. 5s 30 M. 

& N. A •■•••• 

Duluth Edison Electric, 1st g. 8. r. 88 

March, I'XSl, op. M. it S. A 

(ireat Northern Power Co. bonds 

Aniirlcan Carbollte. par $1 

/*inth I'uniace Co 



400 
300 
130 
IOC 
110 
12(1 
60 
63 

96 

98 

80 

2.85 

85 



70 
72 

100 

100 

100 



THE COPPER STOCKS. 

The following are the closing quota- 
Lions of copper stocks at Boston today, 
reported by Paine, Webber &. Co., 316 
West .Superior street: 



box 



STOCKS- 



Bid. 



Asked. 



A GOOD FIRM TO SHIP 
YOUR GRAIN TO 

Atwood-Larson 
Company, Inc. 

Special attention given to cash 
grains. We give all shipments our 
personal attention. 

DVLL'TH. MINXEAPOLIS. 



Amalgamated Copper ..| 


^2\ 1 


62^ 


Anaconda 1 


08% sale 


.idventure 


6 


7 


.^hmeek 


185 


190 


.Vllouez 


41% 


42 


.American Teleplione. . . 


1361% 


136^8 


.Atlantic 


6 


7 


.Vrcadlan 


5 


514 


Arizona Commercial . . 


16% 


17 


tSuUe-Ballaklava 


^% 


6 


Boston Consolidated . . 


13Vi 


14 


Black .Mountain 


13c 


15c 


Butte-Coaliticn 


18 


18% 


Calumet & Arizona . . |. 


58 


59% 


Calumet & Hecla 


543 


550 


(''^i^t^^nn 13.1 


16 


17% 


Consolidated Mercur . .. 


6c 


10c 


Copper Ilange 


65 


66 


Daly- West 


4% 


5% 


Davis-Daly 


2 


2% 


East Butte 


6% 


7% 


Franklin 


11 


11 V4 


First national 


3 13-16 


3-6 


Glroux 


6% 


6% 


Granby 


32 


33 


Greene-Cananea 


6% 


6% 


Hancock Consolidated . 


20 


20% 


Helvetia 


2M 


2^A 


Indiana 


14 


14% 


Isle Royale 


21 


21% 


Keweenaw 


3>i 


4 


Lake Copper 


33»/4 


84 


La Salle 


9\ 


10 


Massachusetts Cons 


7 


7% 


Mexico Mining 


40 


45 


Miami Copper 


19 


19V4 


Michigan 


4 


4% 


Mohawk 


47 


47 li 


Nevada Cons 


19% 


20 1/4 


Nevada -Utah 


72 


76 


North Lake 


8M! 


9 


Kipisslng 


^^ 


11 


North Butte 


27 


Ojibway 


A'^ 


6 


Old Dominion 


36 




Osceola 


125 


127 


Parrot 


13 




Pneu. Ser 


4% 


5 


Quinc>' 

Ray Cons 


72 


74 


18H 


18% 


Santa Fe 


1% 

9^ 


1% 


Shannon 


9% 


Shoe Mich 


57^ 


'57% 


Superior Boston 


7% 


8 


Superior Copper 


49 


49% 


Superior & Pittsburg. . 


11 


11% 


Tamarack 


60 


62 


Trinltv 


5V4, 


6 


United Fruit 


19414 

361^ 


195 


United States Mining ,, 


39 


Pfd 


48% 


49 


United States Oil 


86 


86% 


Utah Anex 


3% 
22% 


3% 
22% 


Utah Consolidated 


Utah Copper 


46 


sale 


Victoria . , ._._.jL._. . .. .J., v 


*ik 


1 i% 



Lcwla H. Merrttt. 



Laelea Merrttt. 



LEWIS H.MERRITT 

& COMPANY 



BROKERS 



PRIVATE WIRES TO ALL MARKETS 



104 ProTidcmce 
Zenith. 707. 



BalldtnB. 

Duluth. 12S9. 



r- 



1 



Paine, Webber & Co, 

316 West Superior St., 
CULUTH. 

BANKERS & BROKERS 



BRANCH OFFICE} 

Detroit, 
Milwaukee, Marquette, 

Butte. Houghton, 

Great Falls, Caluiuet. 



T* 



r 



• r — 



* I 
t 



j 



LEE W. FARMER, 

IRON nnd COFPEfl STOCKS. 

Best facilities for handling out-of- 
town Order«. 
Corrrspoadence Solicited. 
PboBC*. 432. 410 I.ua■d^l<^ Dlds. 



r.cBlth. 1464. Dulutb, Blelrose. UUli. 

MRm ROSEIVDAHL 

& tOMPANV, In; 



iZ. 



COPPER STOCK BROKERS. 

404 AVfiel Flrnt Street, 
C<iiuinerolnl lluildlni;. 



UUubarger '.IV 

EGGS— 

i>tri<.tly fresli candled eggs 25 

treSli igt!s> in cariblib ::4 

tJliifuge iKS^ .23 

KlUS A.NU DATtls— 
SugnroU nuluut ualca, 10-lb box l.U 

PtA^ UTS— 

Kaucy. law, per lb., by the taca OT 

li'duc}' r 'a!^ted, eackii. per U o'H 

fancy ruasted. k-sa tUaii sacks 08 

Balled peauau, iu-lb boxai 1.3S 

Called pcuuuls, 3u-lb pullo 3.7S 

Kaucy Jumbos, ruasied, pet lb IS 

CIDEU- 

Apple cider, clarified, per keg S.OJ 

Apple elder, caiki-. l>er ga 23 

Krult elder, lb-gal keg 4.50 

lUackberry cider, keg 4.50 

KuEpbero' elder 4.50 

L'licrry cider 4.50 

MAPLE SYRUP— 
Venuuut. per gal 

MAPLE SUGAK— 
luwa. us:>urtcd paga.. 30-U« bos. per lb. . 

Pup coh.n— 

8nuwball pop euro, 4U-pkg box 

Pup curn. sbelicd 

Pop curn, en tUe cub 

HONEY- 
Columdo while clover, per «a*e, 24'*. . . . 
POTATOES— 

>ew Pu'.alues. per bu 1.00® 

Jrrcey bvvcetd, per bU 

ONIONS- 

Oiiluu, yellow, per TO-lb iiack 1.25 

Spaiilbli onions, per craie l.U 

CABBAGE— 

Uume gruwu, ciute 

NUTS— 

Waluula, New Callfumla. llO-lb sack, pa lb.. 

Filberts, Sicily, per lb 

Brazils, extra laige, per lb 

Pecans, extra taucy polbilud, per lb 

Almonds, Taragoula, per ID 

Mixed nuts. lUJ-lb and &J-lb boxes, lb, new 

Cocouiiuli. per Uuz 

New hickory uuts, large or sm:Ul, per lb 

Pecans, halves, bUelled. exira lan»:y, 5-lb car- 
tons, per lb 

Waluuts. shelUd, extra faijoy, 511b cartuos. lb 

Almonds, shelled, extra fai.cy, 5-lb carious, lb 
UaTKS ANU F1G3— 

Hallowl dates. 70- ib bcxes new 

Hallowl dates, 30 pacKage;:, per box 

Kard dates. 12-lb boxes, lew 

Sugar wolnut dates, i*-lb boxes 

New Calif oriJa figs. 12-pkt box, per box 

New Smyrna tlis. 5-cr-iHn, 12-lb bos. per 

New Smyrna figs, 7 -crown, 35-lb box, per 
FUKSU \ FXiETABLKS- 

Eau Claire green ctrn. per sack, 5 doz.... 

Lettuce, leaf, per bu bx 

Lettuce, head. Boston, exlia fancy, bu 

Beans, string, per bu .'...1.25 

Beans, wax. home grown, per bu 

Beans, green, siring, bu 

Onions, green. Iiuiiie grown, per doz 

Parsley, home grown, per dox 

Garlic, rew. Italian, per jD 

Cauliflower, fancy, per bu 

Uadishes, round, per doz 

Spiiu!c-h, bu 

Cucumbc rs. bu 

Cucumbers, hothouse, fane], per uoz 

Egg plant, per bu 

Pi.i'l)ers, per ba 

Peppers, per bu 

Beets, new, with tops, bunches, per doz 

Carrots, new, with lops, per bu box 

Pic plant, home grtwn. ptr b.x 

Green peas, per bu • 

Celei-y. Mlchlg:.n, per buncii 

Hubbard sQUash, doz 

Punipiuns. do: 

Yellow plum tomatoes, bu 

ItOOTS— 

Table beets, per bu sack 

Table bagas, per bu sack. . 

Table carrots, pec sacii 

MEATS— 






Blcmbers Dulutb Stock li^xchanse. 



222 Manhntlan Dlds. 
Duloth, 3S4S. Zenith, 2354. 

Vermilion Iron Stooka a Specialty- 



-— T«- 



1.79 
.10 

1.25 

.04 
.03 

4.00 

l.XO 
4.3J 



2.25 

.17 
.14 
.13 
.15 
.11 
.12 
.7u 
.t»8 

.M 

.35 
.42' 

6.00 
2.40 
1.35 
1.25 
.90 
1.25 
box 4.25 

.CO 

.80 

1.59 

1.75 

1.75 

1.75 

.18 

.89 

.11 

2.50 

.25 

.91) 

1.25 

.40 

2.00 

1.75 

2.25 

.35 

1.23 

1.50 

2.00 

.39 

l.'JO 
1.50 
1.75 

1.50 
1.25 

2.00 



5 

6V2 
6 



% MONEY 



Money to Loan on 

Real Estate Security. 

Building Loans. 



W. M. PRINDLE & GO. 

LONSDALIi: BVILDIIVO. 



Q. S. cews, 25 lb up, branded flat.. 
U. H. bulls. Blags and oxen. 40 lb 

and up 

G. S. loi;g haired kips. 8 l« 25 lb... 



.0* 



10 
. .11% 
.. .14 
.. .80 
.. S.50 
iban tailed. 



.08 
.10% 
.12^ 
.TO 
1.80 



O. B. veal kips, 5 to 23 lb 

G. B. Deacon skins, under i lb., 
G. B. horse hides 

Green hides .-.nd call, IVic leas 

IIUY SALTED— 

Dry Ur. hides, ever 12 lb 20 .18 

Dry Mlnnesou, Dakota, WUconaln 

and Iowa bides, over 12 lb 16 .14 

Murrain* 15^ 

Dry kip. under 12 lb 18Vi .16^ ,£. 

Dry salted hides and kip, 5 lb and " v 

orer, all sections 15 .18 

Dry salted c&lf. under 5 ib. all sec- 
tions 18 ... 

TALLOW AND GREASE— 

Talluw. in cake* 06 .04% 

Tallow, in bbi ti'o'A .04Vfc 

Greace, white .04% 

Grease, yellow and brown 04^ .03^ 

Ship in tighi two-iieaded barrels to avoid leakage. 

SHEEP PELTS— 
G. S. pells, estimated washed wool. 

per lb 



O. S. shearlings, each 

Dry murrains, ib 

KUKS— Largei 

Skunk, black 84.50 

Skui:k, short stripe 3.00 

Skunk, long nareow stripe.. 2.50 
Skunk, broad stripe and w idle 1.00 

Muskrat. spring 7o(g80 

Muskrat, wii:;er 6jiis.6i 

Muskrat, faU 41(i40 

Muskrat, klU 

Kaccoon 3.10 

Mliik, dark and brown 7.50 

Mink, pale «.00 

Beaver 7.50 

Cat, wUU 5.00 

llsher, dark 20.00 



Beef, per lb 

Mutton, per lb 

I'ork loins, per lb 

Veal, per lb 

Lamb, per lb 

Lard, per lb 

DUESSli) POULTKY— 
Hens, fancy, fat, per lb. . . 

Spr.ngs, per lb 

Turkeys, per lb 

LIVE POULTlty— 
Hens, fancy, lat, per lb.. . 

Hens, small, per lb 

Springs, per lb 

Turkeys, per lb 

Uuclis, per lb 

Geeie, per lb 

HAY AND STUAW— 
Choice timothy, per ton . , 



6® 

...8H@ 

..i6Mia) 

8(g» 

n& 



..13(9 

..ll(iE( 

..15® 
..17® 



.11 

.OOV: 

.174 

.11^2 

.18i« 

.14 
.16 
.22 

.14 
.12 
.16 
.18 
.16 
.12 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
Itye 
Oal 



timothy, per ton. . , 
timothy, per ton... 
mixed timothy, p»r 
mixed tim thy, per 
uplands, per ton... 
uplands, per ton... 
midland, per ton . 
midland, per ton . 

straw, per ton 

sltaWj per ton 



ton. , 
ton. , 



..20. 30 (£21. 00 
..10.00^29.00 
. .17.00(^19.00 
..17.00(310.00 
..11.00@12.30 
. .13.00 isie. 00 
. .12.00@14.0a 
..12.00(^13.00 
. . 9.00(S'10.00 
.. 6. so® 7.09 
.. 5.50® 6.00 



Fl^lier, pale 

Fox, red 

Fcx. gray 

Lynx 

Marten, dark 

Marten, dark brown 

Marten, light br. and p^Ie. 

Weasel, white 

Weasel, stained, damaged . 
Wolf, timber 

brush, cased 

rpen 

coyote, cased 

blk.. br., grizzle 

yearlings 

cubs .... 



.17 
.12 



.12.00 
.10.00 
. Z.OO 
.30.00 
.20.00 
.lU.OO 
. 6.00 
. 1.00 
. .25 
. 6.50 
. 1.00 
. 3.25 
. 3.50 
50@25 
S0(gl5 
.00^10 



.28 

.15 

.liiVi 

Medium. 

(3.50 

2.50 

2.00 

.75 



.10^08 
2.10 

e.50 

4.00 

5.00 

3.75 

15.00 

9.00 

7.00 

1.30 

25.00 

15.00 

7.00 

4.^5 

.50 

.15 

4.5) 

S.OO 

2.40 

2.50 

14(3 20 

6^13 

4.50^ 7 

55 (s 350 

10(^15 

cross and 



.90 

.20 
.16 

SmaU 

82.50 

2.0* 

1.58 

.50 

.41@4S>^ 

.25«l24 

.25^24 

1.60 

4.08 

8.08 

8.89 

2.50 

10.00 

1. 00 

6.00 

1.00 

12.00 

10.00 

4.50 

8.00 

.M 

.18 

S.OO 

2.00 

1.60 

1.89 

10(315 

7«1» 

3.50(tf 8 

35(fil5a 

7@10 

kit fox. 



1 



Wolf, 
Wolf, 
WMf, 
Bear, 
Bear, 
Bear. 
Fox. blk. and silver gray.80(!j4;o 

Otter, dark and pale 15(ai20 

Badger, civet and house cat. 
mounlHln lion, opossum and wolverine couimaud mar- 
ket irices. The above prices are for prime No. \ 
ikins. ♦Nos. 2. 3 and 4 In proportion. Wisconsin and 
Mississippi river heavy muskrat, 3(3 5c higher; klta. Sm 
higher. . a/r 

YOUKG AMERICA, 
Delineator: Johnny, reading aloud in 
school, "I change my hues like th» 
shammy Hon (chameleon.) 



New York. 

New Y'ork, Sipt. 22.- Butter— Market firmer and 
umrhanged: receipts, 4,ii4( ; cri'ameo' speelaU, 30»ac; 
extras, 29c; third to frst^. 24(«2Sc; state dalr>-. 
cunmion to finest. 23(a2Jc; process, second to st>e- 
clal, 23@27c; factory, Jine make, 22^sisf24Hc; do. 
current month. 22fe23c; milallon creomery, 24(i25c. 
Cheese — Market firm ; recc pts, 3. 531) ; stale wiiole milk 
special. 1 5 Mi (g 17c; do, fancy. ISVi; d\ choice, 
1474(3i5c; do, good to jrinie, 14fel4iic; do, com- 
mon 10 fair. 11(3 13%c; <kinis, full to special. 2'4(a' 
12%c. Eggi^ Market sterdy and unchanged; receipts, 
1'>.948; state, P?iinsylvanii and nearby hennery white. 
36(a40c; do, gathered «hlte, SJtS'Sec; do. htnneiy 
brown, 30(ft32c; do, gatliered brown, 2S@2&c; fresh 
gathered extra flrsU, 25(a27c, firsls, 24(i3_5c; second, 
22(3 23c. 



Bert and his mother were feedingf 

the chickens. She had just diessed 

him In new leggings, mittens, cap and 

cloak. He was very conscious and 
very proud of his new loKS. He 
looked up and said: "Mamina, th© 
chickens know I'm dressed up, don't 

they?" 

■Willie had been a good boy lately, 
so papa promised to take him down tc* 
the wharves to see boats for the first 
time. The first thing the little fellow- 
saw was a whistling, puffing little tuy 
pulling a large cruiser. Finally, after 
a few minutes Willie exclaimed: "Ool 
look. Pop, the big boat's got the littl* 
one by the tall and he's squealingl" 



*•- 



Chlraso. 

Chicaffi, Sept. 22.— liutur Market ste.idy; cream- 
ertes. 24(g28c; dairies, 23 3 2:c. Eggs— Market steatiy; 
receipts, 5.188 cases; at mark, cases Included, 17'j 
(a20'2c; firsts, 22c; prlire firsts. 24c. Cheese — Mar- 
ket steady; daisies, 15^c: twins, 14%(sl,")c; young 
Americas. 15i/»SlGc; lorg horn.s, 15>4«»16c. Pota- 
toes— Markcl steady; chdce to fancy. rO(&T8c; fair 
to good, 6(J(g70c. PoulUv— Market «ulel; turkeys, 18c; 
fowls. 13V4c; springs. Kc. Veal— -Market quiet; 50 
to 60-lb weieMs, S^jSVi'': 60 t> 85-lb weights, i(^ 
O'/ic; 85 to UO-lb weljiib', 10(3 lOHc 

M » X . 

HIDES, TALLOW AND FURS. 

GREKN SALTED HID1C8— No. 1. No. t. 

O. 8. iteers. oter 60 lb 8 .13 | .12 

G. S. steers. 25 lb and uj) and R«cn 

uadw 90 ib u .jf 



A father, crossing the Mississippi 
river wUh his children, called their at- 
tention to the magnificent stream, say- » 
ing: "Children, remember the Mlssi*- V* 
slppi is called the Father of "Waters on 
account of Its size." 

"How strange!" chirped his littl« 
daughter. "If he's the father, they 
ought to call him Mr. Slppi." 



Little Annie and her mother wcr» 
spending a few weeks at the house of 
a friend In the country. The child was. 
delighted over the abundance of pretty 
flowers in the garden of the hoste-s 
but was instructed by her mother not 
to pick any of them, but to content 
herself with picking up those that had 
dropped to the ground. Presently the 
child was noticed standing near a 
beautiful rose bush, holding her little 
basket under one of its prettiest blos- 
soms, saying with a coaxing voice' 
"Please, iiltle flower, drop off" 
m . 

If, through some special gift of bu-sl- 
ness clairvoyancy, you could estimate 
the number of people who during last 
week should have patronized your 
store, but who were influenced bv the- 
other store's advertising to 
Instead, you'd have insoomla. 



so ther» 







1 



•1— 



■ 



W *' 



i i»i i i< l y TV 



t 



i 
: cs: 




=^=«5( f^ 



I 



Thurs3ay, 



THE DULUTH iHERALD. 




September 22, 1910 



,^ "^4<^'^' 



ytA- 



m% 



LOST 



aKD 




PRINTED 






IN tHE HERAliD IS UKE A SEARCHIICHT ON A 

DARK HigHT QUICKEST & 8EST RESULTS 






FOR RENT— FLATS. 

(Continued.) 

FOR RENT — FOUR- ROOM UPPER 
rtat on East Jefferson street; liard- 
woud lloora. bath, electric light, gas 
ran^e In kitchen; nice basement with 
gas and stationary tubs; use of attic. 
Call Lakeside 114-K. 

FOR ItKNT — SEVKN-ROOM FLAT; 
hot water heat; all modern conven- 
iences; No. 19 West Fourth street. 
Apply J. E. Mannheim, 4U3 West 
Third street. 



LOST AND FOLXD. 

1X)ST^^ETWEKN THE Y. W. C. A. 

and First street on Second avenue 
west today, a lady's purse containing 
about J 16 or |17; also a certificate of 
deposit for %iKi. Return to the i^e- 
nlth grrooery for reward, 21 Second 
avenue west. 



LOt,i— RILL BOOK OONT.VINIXG 
cash and valuable papers. Finder 
please return to Herald. 



LOST — HANDBAG CONTAINING 
Stock certlflcate. ladies" watch and 
owners cards, lieturn to M. C. Mc- 
Laren, 1924 East Superior street; 
no ijuestlons asked. 

LOST— PURSE BETWEEN THIRD 

avenue we^jt and Fifth avenue west 
or MloMsan street. Finder call 1720-A 
new phone. 

LOST ^^^^ WHITE POINTER DOG. 
niark>?d brown tars; brown spot over 
rlpiit t'5'e. two brown spots on l)aok. 
Collar fastened with wire. Answers 
to name of "Sport." Return to -223 
Manhattan building, Duluth. Tele- 
phone. Melrose, 1535. for reward. 



FOR SALE MISCELLANEOUS. 

(Continued.) 

FOR S.'V.LE— IRON BED. SANITARY 
couch, two rugs. 9 by 12, three dress- 
ers and ga.s lamp, at 416 East First 
street, flat A. 

FOR .SALE — VERY REASONABLE; 
Buck Radiant heater; almost new; 
call BOG First avenue east. Zenith 
■phone, 1682-D. 

FOR SALE— SAFES, OFFICE FTJRNI- 
ture. architects' and engineers' sup- 
plies, typewriters and supplies. J. S. 
.^ay Co.. 4002 W. Sup. St. Both 'phonea. 

FOR SALE — HOUDANS; OLD AND 
young fowls; also No. 1 comb honey. 
William Taber. 114 Minneapolis ave- 
nue; Melrose 2871 

F<.>R S.\LE CHEAP— GOOD DISH CUP- 
board; glass doors. Over 614 Tenth 
avenue east. 



FOR SALE — GOOD HEATER. PRAC- 
tically new; easy on fuel. Apply 
evenings, 481 Mesaba avenue. 



e 



-; 



OCEAN STEAMSHIPS. 

WHITE STAR-DOMINION 

Caiintliau Ser\ii'c Mail !!iteaini-r9 
MO.\TKia.ll. — (iLKBEC — LIVERPOOL 

W ■<'kli rSalUiUi. 'Hie S('-_-iJc It lUtt- i- i:i;ru>«. 
KEW S. N, LAI RE.XTICaiid .ME(;A\TI0 

oa the .Si. ijwreiKo. 

118 "Soin DdOM .St.. West. 121 S.v Ttilnl St. 

Sl.)ii*.re<»l. Or Locul Ajsentd. Mlniieapoll*. 



RAILROAD TIME TABLES. 

miTH^lnssABFTN^^ 

ERN RAILWAY. 

Ofttce: 4:iii V. e»t »iuperlor St. 
'Phone, iMiU. 



i.cdve. 



Arrive. 



; HIbbliK. ChlshoUn. Vtrglola. 1 [ 
•7.40 aiu, 1 i.^eleiii, Colerilna.. tiliumain f ; *3.2I pm 

^ ituii. t^nyana aud rBtwaltUc J i 
*3.50 pa,' Ull<biutf. (.hlihulni. Vlrfiuui. |*I0.3I am 

I bveletu. Culeralna. 

, I Virgiiiia. Oj»k. Uaiiler, Fort i 
•7.10 pm i tTi.i.-es. Pr. Aithur. 15»a- ^ *8.3I pm 

: ^ UetU!. Warr .jj. Wiuuiiitg. J 

•I>3:;y jluCy exi-ept .Suii.lay. 
Cate. Observation Car. Mesaba Range 

f'oints. Solid Vestibuled Train. Modern 
leepei-3 tarough to Winnipeg. 



THE DILITH Al IRON UANGE 
RAILROAD COMPANY. 

••VKKHILHOX KOLTL:." 

Ltravo. 1 1 Arrive. 

I I Kiilfr lUver. Two Uar- 1 | 
•7.30 am , boM. Xow«. Ki*. Auior«. | ;ti2 00 m 
t3.l5 pm] i UiwiLU. MKinley. Kveleth. I-. '6.30 pm 

I ; Glliwrl and ! ; 

I L Vlr*lnU. J . 



1$ 
%% 

w 

%i 
%% 

?l 



MONEY TO LOAN. 
$ $ $ $ $ %n%i^%%%n%%%%%%%%%%%% i% %%% i $ $ 

CHEAP LO.-VNS 

On Furniture, Pianos or Salary. 

You Borrow 

$10 and pay $12.60 in 6 payments. 

$-5 and pay $:.'8.50 in 6 payments. 

$50 and pay $55.80 In 6 paymenld. 

No Other Charge. 

DULUTH LOAN CO., 

Cor. Tlilrd Ave. W. and Sup. St., 

?.07 Columbia Bldg. 

Old 'phiMie, Melrose :i.sr)5. 



•DdiU- 



'I>AiIy cxcdpc SoiiJa;. 



Dulutb (iL Northern Minnesota Ry. 

Ullifvn, r>lU Luu-iUnie HIdg., Duluth. 

Traina leave Knife River, 20 miles 
out on the D. & 1. R. R. every day ex- 
cept Sunday on arrival of the train 
leaving Union station. Duluth. at 7:30 
a. m. Returning coniieotions are made 
at Knife River with trains due in Du- 
luth Union station at 6:^0 p. m. Con- 
nections are mada at iiaplism River 
with stage line lor Grand Marais and 
all Noriii Shore points wlien operating. 



KORTEERN PACIFIC RAILROAD. 




Adtilaitil duj Kiiit 

AdtlUllJ UllJ Kuit 

Minn, aud l>diiota Expreji. 
. ..Nurth i.Mi*t iiuiUeJ 



I Arrive. 
.;*! 1 . 15 am 
. •6.40 pm 
.| 'd-IS am 
. i •6.25 pm 



t«ave. 
to 00 an, 
•I 55»m, 
*ll 1(1 [iin; 



'UulutU Sliort Liiiti. ' 

ST. PAUL. 
MINNEAPOLIS. 



I Arrive. 
I •fi.30 am 
I t2.05 pm 
I '7.00 pm 



*Dj.iii TUjii> except Suuday. PUone 21i. Ualou 



No RTH-W£ST£RN |1N£ 



L» l>'ii *'< i yra t5 r.»ai|L» D-il. . M 35:itn *i ?5pm 

Lt 8ui> . 3 jJiim J 3.>pmiL,T Sup... U OJam 4 JSpm 

▲r K Cla i 301131 iJ 2iii»uilA( ti.l'aul 4 30Dm U iivta 

▲r Mdd.. 3 l^Ain ;< 4t)ain|Ar Mpls. . 5 ujpui 10 2oi)iii 

Ar Mil 7 4'J<m, PalUiuia iile«|>ei3 aiid cuair 

At Jau'lo 4 2.iam 4 5<JaiU|cac3 to Ctilcago. I'arl'jr aud 

Ax Chi ; jUaiu 7 aiJaiu.^;d[(j ca.r^ to TwUi CiUea. Of- 
*0%iXl. TJicipt Sunday, [ttce. 302 W. Sup. St.. UuL 



Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic. 



^o. 



-M. 



..No. <J.| 

r.M. I 



No. 7. 
A.M. 



INo. 5. 
P.M. 



t7.-»5; 
t8 05i 
F.M. I 
|7.55, 

ttt.55, 

J7.09, 
t7.4Sl 



•5 00 I.V I>ulaUi •• Ar|*l0.30t t4.55 

•5 li; Superior flO.I5| t4.35 



A.M. , 

•S.40|Ar. 

•ti.30,.... 

•3.50,.... 
•4.38).... 

•lO.li)..- 
'8.001 



P.M. 



n^iuglituD Lvl'U.OSi 

Laluuiet {'lO.lai 

1 P M. 1 A.M. 



. . , l9ht>etulng . . . 

... Mi: lui.'t'.s ... 
.Sauit .SIS. Marie.. 
M'jiitreal .... 



•a. 13 Buat n 



•I2.20; ttt.ZO 
•11.30; T5.15 

•a.30| 

•9.5«l 
•lO.OOl 



P.M. 



t« 50 •7.I0L* Maulreal Art •7.30itl0 

P M A 11. ; PM i A., 

ta 00 '7 .\i Ar New Yorfc | *7.00| te 



A.M. i P.M. 
7.30 tlO.IJ 
M. 
43 



'Daily rUalijF Dxctiiit duuJay. Twin Cldy ilMffen 
Traliu No. 7 aud 3. 



THE (iREAT NORTHERN. 



Lt iv..- 



SlATlU.NS. 



I Arrlra. 



re iW ain ; 8T. PAUL )|tlO.I5pm 

*3.25pmii and ^| '1.33 pm 

•II.IOp»|,, MINNEAPOLIS. J 'S 30 am 

'8.43 am , Crooiat.jii, GriiiU |iuriu. | ) '6.35 pm 
•8 55 pm, ^ Muntaaa and Coast. ; | ♦7.13 am 

t2 2J pm, Shmu Ulvur, lilLiLuitf. Virginia Itl2.30pm 
t«.iJ0 »m .St Cloud. WUmir. Sioux City |tlO.I5pm 

•Dolly TDally eicept Sunduy. Twla CUy aie<)peri 
raady at 9 i> in ufftce, Spalding tiutel. 



HOTELS. 

N«w Buiidinf. New Equipment — Rates, }2 ami $2.50. 

tl@t?! !^cUy 

Corne- First St. and FiUti Ave. West. OULUTH. 



i 



Dtel 



New liUiUUi^s with moiini couTenlern-oa. European 
plan. JOc lu }'.: i>j i>t>r day. .Spei-ial rates bjr the veek. 

321 WEST FIRST 8TK£ET. 



NOTICE TO BOKROWKR3. 
We are now making special rates on 
loans from $10 to $10U on furniture, 
pianos, horses, wagons, eti-., and to sal- 
aried people. Vou can pay your loan on 
our easy weekly or monthly plan. Dis- 
count allowed on all loans paid before 
due. Loans also made on city and farm 
property. Union Loan company, o02 
l^alladio Bldg. Both piiones, No. 227. 



MONEY TO LOAN — ANY AMOUNT. 
Mortgages and notes purchased. Both 
'4)hones. Western Loan couipany, 62i 
Manhattan building. 



MONEY ON HAND TO LOAN ON REAL 
estate. Apply N. J. Upham Co., IS 
Thli-d avenue west. 



MONEY TO LOAN — ANY AMOUNT. 
Minnesota Loan company, 205 Pai- 
ladio building. 



CITY PROPERTY LOANS. 

BUY' OR BUiLD A HOME 

ON MONTHLY PAYMENTS. 

C. A. KNIPPENBEKG. 

300 AND 301 ALWORTH. 



MONEY SUPPLIED TO SALARIED 
people, women keeping house and 
others, upon their own names with- 
out security; easy payments. Tolman, 
Bo9 Palladlo building. 



MONEY TO LOAN ON DIAMONDS, 
watches, furs, rilles, etc. aud all 
good-j of value, Jl to }l,a00. Key- 
stone Loan & Mercantile Co., 22 West 
Superior street. 

MONEY TO LOAN — LOANS MADE ON 
farms and timber lands. Guaranty 
Farm Land company, 416 Lyceum. 

Money to loan — Any amount; low rates. 
Cooley & Underhill, 209 Exchange. 

MONEY TO LOAN— LOANS MADE ON 
timber and farm lands. John Q. A. 
Crosby, :i05 I'alladlo building. 



lahlGAlj NOTICES. 

(Torrens No. 1374.) 
SUMMONS IN APPLICVTION FOR 

REGISTRATION OF LAND— 
State of Minnesota, County of St. 

Louis. — ss. 
Dltirict Court, Eleventh Judicial Dis- 
trict. , 
In the matter of the applica- 
tion of Adolph Wieberg, to 
register the title to the fol- 
lowing described real e.state 
situated In St. Louis County, 
Minnesota, namely: Lot Three 
Hundred and Fifty-three 
(353), in Block Seventy-five 
(75). Duluth Proper, Second 
Divisiun, according to the re- 
corded plat, on file and of 
record in the office of the 
Register of Deeds of St. 
Louis County, Minnesota, 
Applicant, 
vs. 
Albert Westlund. Duluth Fire- 
men'.^ Relief Association, City 
of Duluth, Mary Hubbard, 
Hazel Soldall, Margaret 
Strong, and all other persons 
unknown, claiming any right, 
title, estate. Hen or interest 
in the real estate described 
In the application herein. 
Defendants. 
The State of Minnesota to the abore 
named defendants. 

Y'ou are hereby summoned and re- 
quired to answer the application of 
the applicant In the above entitled pro- 
ceeding and to file your answer to the 
said application In the office of the 
Clerk of said court. In said county, 
within twenty (20) days after tlie ser- 
vice of this suinmons upon you, ex- 
clusive of the day of such service, and. 
If you fall to answer the said applica- 
tion within the time aforesaid, the ap- 
plicant In this pruceedtntf will apply 
to the court for the relief demanded 
therein. 

Witness. J. P. Johnson, clerk of said 
court, and the seal thereof, at Du- 
luth, in said county, this 2l3t day of 
September, A. D. 1910. 

J. P. JOHNSON. 

Clerk. 
BY R. E. JOHNSON, 

Deputy. 
CRASSWELLER & 



CR.-V.SSWELLER, 

BLU, 
Attorneys for 
Duluth Herald Sept. 

6, 1910. 



Applicant. 
22 and 



29. Oct. 



i 




FOR SALE— HOUSES^ 

FOR SALE — WE HAVE DECIDED 
not to advise building in the winter, 
except such houses as will be 
equipped with heating plants. It 
Is now well onto fall and our season 
is short. We are equipped to build 
you a house In sixty days — built on 
honor by day laW)r with our guar- 
antee behind it, all on time. Just 
monthly payments. Every part of 
these cities bloom with our cottages 
— they fairly smile at you in their 
beauty and defy competition In ma- 
terial, price, workmanship and value. 
We airspace, we beamflll, we paper 
between roof boards and shingles, 
between floors and between siding 
and sheatlng. Send for plans and 

f)lcture8 or call at our offices. Even- 
ngs by appointment only we will 
call at your residence If you desire. 
Edmund G. Walton Agency, 114 
South Fourth street, Minneapolis; 447 
Endicott building, St. Paul; 312 Ex- 
change building, Duluth. 



II 

II 
1$ 

II 

II 

II 

Security Mortgage Loan Company, 
401 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BLDG. 

We lend money to salaried people 
and others on furniture, pianos, horses, 
wagons, etc. for a long or sliort time, 
and allow liberal discounts if paid up 
before due. 

YOU CAN GET IT TOD.A.Y. 

Security Mortgage Loan Company, 

Melrose 4693. Zenith 612. 

401 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BLDQ. 

FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM FLAT. 710 Vs 
East Fifth street; hot water; $30 per 
month; water and gas range. 905 
East First street. Zenith 2253-A. 

MONEY TO LOAN ON FURNITURE, 

liorses, wagons or any personal se- 
curity, at til© lowest rates of any 
place In the city. Our largt clientage 
and twenty-five years' exper.ence 
should be sufficient jjruof tliat we do 
business right. Call and see us be- 
fore closing deal elsewhere. Duluth 
Mortgage Loan company, 430 Man> 
hattan building. William Horkan. 
manager. Zenith, 1598-0; old. Mel- 
rose, 3733. 

^¥¥^¥*¥*¥^^^¥^«*^¥«¥¥¥***¥¥ 

■jt CHEAP LOANS -^ 

•^ On Furniture, Pianos or Salary. •^ 

i^ $10 return 25o a week, i^ 

^ $30 return 75c a week. ^ 

•^ |50 return $1.25 a week. H; 

j^ No other cliarges. i^ 

a Y'our credit is good here. *t 

y(. DULUTH FINANCE Co., * I 

* 3ol Palladlo Bldg. •j^ | 

•?^ Open Wed. and Sat. to S o'clock. * 



FOR SALE — SEVEN-ROOM, NEW 
house; ail conveniences; furnace 
heat; hardwood floors and finish; 
laundry tubs In basement; owner 
leaving city. 518 Tenth aven ue east. 

F(JR SALE — WOODL.VND AVENUE 
below Vista, beautiful home, oak 
finish, cream ceilings, hot water; re 
stricted Normal district; beautiful 
location; ready Oct. 1. Melrose 4197. 

FOR SALE— $550 WILL BUY A NEW 
five-room house. Inquire 518 North 
Fifty-eighth avenue west. Zenith 
3189-D. 



FOR SALE— $3,600; SIX- ROOM HOL'SE 
on upper side of London road; be- 
tween Fifty-ninth and Sixtieth ave- 
nue east; furnace, bath, gas. electric 
light, open fireplace and hardwood 
floors; nice large rooms; beautiful 
lake view; lot 50 by Uo feet. $1,800 
caah. Ludwig B. Donner, 809 Torrey 
building. 



FOR SALE— HOUSE, NO. 722 PIED- 
mont avenue; twelve rooms; hard- 
Wood finish througliout; 50-foot lot; 
price, |3,O00, |500 cash. G. A. Ryd- 
berg, 417 Torrey building. 



DANCING ACADEMY. 



Coffin's, 18 Lake Ave. N. Beginners' 
class every Mon. evenings 8 p. m. 
Private lessons by appointment. Open 
afternoon or evening. 



SCHOOL OF ENGLISH. 



TANIS, TEACHER FOR MEN AND 
women of other countries. Day and 
night school. Wrnthroj) block, corner 
of Fourth avenue west and First 
street, directly east of postoftice. 



ASHES AND GARBAGE. 



REMOVED PROMPTLY. ZENITH 2378- 
X. 807 Sixth avenue east. 



REMOVED ON SHOUT NOTICE— DICK 
Barrett, 1122 E. 4th St. Zen. 1943-Y. 



UPHOLSTERING. 

FURNITU^ReT AUTOMOBILES, CAR- 
rlages; reasonable prices. E. Ott, 112 
First avenue west. Both phones. 



HOARD WANTED. 

BOARD WANTED— FAMILY TO CARE 
and board baby boy 1 year old. In- 
quire 416 North Fifty-eighth avenue 

west. 



^CLAIRVOYA>TS. 

Mme. Anna — Card reading, 11 to 7; 
business advice, love affairs, 18 
Third ave. VV.. Dodge blk; Z 'J'Jl-D. 



SWEDISH MASSAGE. 



A. E. HANSEN, M.VSSEUR, 400 NEW 
Jersey building Old 'phone 4273 Mel- 
rose. 



TIMBER LANDS. 

TiMBER AND CUT-OVER LANDS 
bought; mortgage loans made. John 
Q. A. Crosby, 305 Palladlo building. 



TIMBER AND CUT-OVER LANDS 
bought and sold. McLeod-Davls Tim- 
ber Co., 515 Lyceum building, Duluth. 

I buy standing timber; also cut-over 
lands. (3eo. Rupley, 615 Lyceum bldg. 



PATENTS, 

PATENTS — ^^"aLiT'aBOUT PATENTS. 
Sec Stevens. 610 Sellwood building. 



l.eg.1lL notices. 

ORDER TO EXAMINE FINAL AC- 
COUNT— 
State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis 
— ss. 

In Probate Court 
In the Matter of tlie Estate of Eliza- 
beth T. Nutting, Decedent. 
THE P1':TITI(3N of Erwin W. Nutting 
as representative of the above named 
decedent, together with his final ac- 
count of .the administration of said 
estate, having been filed in this court, 
representing, among other things, that 
he has fully administered said estate, 
and praying that said final account of 
said administration be examined, ad- 
justed and allowed by the Court, and 
that the Court make and enter its final 
decree of distribution of the residue 
of the estate of said decedent to the 
person.s entitled thereto, and for the 
discharge of tlie representative and the 
sureties on his bond. 

IT IS ORDERED, That said petition 

be heard, and said final account ex- 
amined, adjusted and allowed by the 
Court, at the Probate Court Rooms in 
the Court House, in the City of Du- 
luth in said County, on Monday, the 
3rd day of October. 1910. at ten o'clock 
A. M., and all persons interested In 
said hearing an(i in said matter are 
hereby cited and required, at said time 
and place, to show cause. If any there 
be. why said petition should not be 
granted. 

ORDERED FURTHER. That this or- 
der be served by publication in the 
Duluth Herald, according to law. 

Dated at Duluth, Minn., September 
8th. 1910. 

By the Court, 

J. B. MIDDLECOFF, 
Judge of Probate. 
(Seal, Probata Court, St. Louis Co., 

Minn.) 
D. H.. Sept. 8. 15 and 22. 1910. 

U. 3. ENGINEER'S OFFICE, Duluth, 
Minn., Sept. 19, 1910. — Sealed proposals 
for furnishing and placing rock in the 
foundation embankment for the break- 
water extension at Marquette, Mich., 
win be received here until noon, Oct. 
19, 1910, and then publicly opened. In- 
formation on application. GRAHAM D. 
FITCIi, Lt. Col., Engrs. 
D. H., Sej.t. 19, 20, 21, 22; Oct. 17. 18. 



Sutaibe foi Thi Wil 



i 



WANTS CONTINUED 
FBOH PAGE 18. 

BISINESS CHANCES, 



BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR SALE — 
35-room rooming house; Superior 
street location, long lease; chance 
for party with, money. Price $2,000. 
Duluth Locators, 424 Manhattan 
buUdiTg. 



BUSINE.SS CHANCES — CONFECTION- 
ery store for sale; good location; 
good business. Owner leaving city, j 
Easy terms; sacrificed for quick sale. 
Deppe Realty company, 501 Mantiat- 
tan building. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — SALOON Lo- 
cated in good live town, doing good 
business; oest of reasons for selling. 
Duluth Locators, 424 Manhatian 
buildi;ig. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — FoR SALE — 
Small corner store, well establisaed 
and splendid locaiion on car line, 
owner must leave city on otlier busi- 
ness. George A. Wieland, room 1004 
and 1005 Alworth building. New 
'phone. 



BUSINESS CH.\NCES — FOR SALE— 
Two-chair barb«r shop, money mak- 
ing stand; party retiring from occu- 
pation. Price, |200. Address VVm. 
Monahan, Hlbbing, Minn. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR RENT, 
cafe of Palace «hotel, Hibblng; best 
location north of Duluth; good terms 
to responsible man. Address Frank 
Lavell, Hlbbing;. Minn. 

BUSINESS CHANOaa— THREE-CHAIR 
barber shop for sale, price $173; 
terms, |10u down, balance $10 per 
month. Deppe Realty company, oOi 
Maniiattan building. 

BUSINESS CHANCES — RESTAUitANT 
for sale, doing big business, very 
centrally localet,!, bargain price, |S7o. 
This is a snap. Deppe Realty com- 
pany. 601 Manhattan building. 

BU SIN ESS^ CHANC ES^AN IRON MIN- 
Ing company operating on Mesaba 
range wants an agent to sell Its 
stock. Good couuuission and salary 
to right party. Applicant must lur- 
nlsh references L 69, care Herald. 

BUSINESS CHANCES — GROCERY 
stock for sale, good location; doing 
good business; price, ♦l.oOO, terms. 
Deppe Realty gmpany, 501 Manhattan 
building. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — CENTRALLY 
located rooming: house for sale, very 
easy terms; $loO down, balance $15 
per month. Deppe Realty company, 
bOl Maniiattan building. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — CONFECTKJN- 
ery store, located in one of the best 
towns on tiie range, terms, if de- 
sired. Dulutii Locators, 424 Man- 
hattan building. 



MEDICAL. 



LADIES — 11,000 REWARD! I Posi- 
tively guarantee my great successful 
"Monthly " remedy. Safely relieves 
some of the longest, most obstinate, 
abnormal cases in three to five days. 
No harm, pain or interference with 
work. Mall, $1.50. Double strength, 
|2. Dr. D M. Soutuington &, Co., 
Kansas City, Mo. 



RENT— STORES, OFFICES, ETC. 

FOR RENT— WE HAVE TWO OR 
three very desirable stores for rent 
In central location. Apply N. J. Up- 
ham company, 18 Third avenue west. 



FOR RENT— STORE, NO. 907 WEST 
Michigan street, from Oct. 1; $25 per 
month. D. W. Scott & Son, 4U2 Tor- 
rey building. Zenith 'phone, 291. 



FOl^ RENT — OFFICES OVER THE 
Big Duluth. Inquire at the Big Du- 
luth. 



FOR RENT— LOFT; VERY' DESIR.V- 
ble, on Michigan street; suitable for 
light manufacturing; steam heat; el- 
evator service; cheap rent to right 
party. Charles P. Craig & Co., 601- 
2-3-4-5 Sellwood building. 



FOR RENT— STORE; SUITABLE FOR 
grocery or other such business; good 
location; cheap rent to right party. 
Charles P. Craig & Co., 501-2-3-4-5 
Sellwood building. 



FOR RENT — CHRISTIE BUILDING, 
one room 25 by 75 for light manu- 
facturing. Apply Christie Litho & 
Printing company. 



FOR RENT— HOUSES. 

FOR RENT— 1119 EAST FOURTH 
Street. Six rooms and alcove. New 
house. Hot water heat. $40. N. J. 
Upham Co., 18 Third avenue wesL 

FOR RENT — EIGHT-ROOM DE- 

tached house; East end; modern In 
every respect. J D. Howard & Co., 
216 West Superior street. 

FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM HOUSE. 411 
Twenty-first avenue east; all con- 
veniences with gas range, full laun- 
dry, hot water heat; hardwod finish. 
Zenith phone 1196. 

FOR RENT — FOUR-ROOM FUR- 
iilshed cottage till May 1; electric 
lights. Call rear 2818 Minnesota 
avenue. 

FOR RENT — MODERN SIX- ROOM 
house, 1214 East Third street; rent 
$35 per month. Stryker, Manley & 
Buck, Torrey building. 



FOR SALE— REAL ESTATE. 



FOR SALE — THREE FIRST MORT- 
gages for sale; giit edge security. If 
you want to loan your money see 
tie Smith Realty company; 524 Man- 
hattan building. 

l<"Of. SALE— MODERN FLAT BTJILD- 
ing, hot water heat; fireplaces, etc.. 
aimual rent, I960. For a limited time 
price |7,3Q0. E. D. Field company. 

FOR SALE — WANTED TO TRADE 
a choice West end property for one 
or two working teams; must be 
sound. Address Western Realty 
ctmipany. 

FOR SALE — AT A B.\RGA1N A LOT 
25 by 140 feet, on upper side of Su- 
ptrlor street, between Twenty-third 
and Twenty-fourth avenues west. 
Whitney Wall, Torrey building. 

FOR SALE— A FINE BUSINESS COR- 
n«}r near large school building; will 
s^ll reasonable or may build for good 
tenant. George A. Wieland, rooms 
H»04-lo05, Alworth building; Zenith 
'phone. 



FOR RENT — NINE-ltOOM HOUSE, 
213 West Fifth street; furnace heat, 
gas, electric light and gas mantle; 
rent $35 per month. Stryker, Man- 
ley & Buck, Torrey building. 



FOR RENT — AN EIGHT - ROOM 
house, 4013 Rene street: newly pa- 
pered and painted; rent cheap for 
the winter. Inquire 517 First avenue 
east. 

FOR RENT— MODERN EIGHT-ROOM 
house, 223 East Third street; $45. 
A. H. Burg, 300 Alworth building. 

FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM HOUSE, CEN- 
tral ; lake view; all conveniences; 
cheap for the winter. Call at Mrs. 
Morse. 126 West JFaurth street. 

FOR RENT — BRAND NEW MODERN 
house; six rooms, "hardwood floors 
throughout, city water, bath, sewer, 
electric an(i gas lights, beautiful lo- 
cation, within walking distance of 
Aerial bridge, Park Point; owner 
leaving city; will rent to right 
party; $20 per j month; telephone, 
M9lro.se 731. ■'\. ks 

Uii! 



AGENTS WANTED. 

AGENTs'^^STAlvf-^^UR"oWN Busi- 
ness, capital not r^uireti; advertis- 
ing novelties; fourteen samples mail- 
ed for 25 cents. Pencil Advertising 
company. East Orange, N. J. 



WANTED — RELIABl.E AGENTS TO 
sell a meritorious mining stock on 
commission basis. Address P. O. 
drawer 441, DuUiUik 



F(3R SALE — BUILDING LOT NEAR 
car line, from $15o to $2o0; $5 down. 
If. per month. Inquire 518 North 
Fifty-eighth avenue west. 



FOR SALE— A BARGAIN IF TAKEN 
at once — Forty- third avenue ea.st 
and Gladstone street, corner lot 50 
b;/ 140; neatly arranged cottage, 
water, gas, electric light; party leav- 
ing city. Call at house. 



FOR SALE — A VALUABLE BUSINESS 
corner 100 by 150 feet, strictly in- 
side and well suited for jobbing, 
manufacturing or a variety of other 
lines. (Jeorge A. Wieland, roon.s 
1004-1006, Alworth building; new 
■phone. 



B'OR SALE— TR.VDE FOR L(3T, BE.\U- 
tlful li- w mahogany player piano; 
Ci».st $700. G. H.. Herald. 



CLOJ^HES^EANED j^RESSED. 

W. LIPSHIN, CLOTHES CLEANED 
and repaired. Alteration done for 
ladles or gentlemen. 12 East Fourth 
street. Telephone. 1657-X new. 



Suits pressed, 50c; pants, 15c. Ladles 
skirts cleaned and pressed, oOc. Zen. 
1852-X. J. Oreckovsky, 10 4th av. W. 



JOHN MUELLER. 208 WEST FIRST 
Street. 



ALTOS, LAUNCHES AND BOATS. 

FOR SALE. 

One 4-cyUnder Franklin touring car, 
cost $3,000; just overhauled, new tlrea, 
complete equipment. $1,300. 

One 2-cyllnder Rambler touring car; 
new tires, recently overhauled, $300. 

One 2-cyllnder Buick touring car; a 
snap If taken at once. 

One 6-cylinder 7-passenger Franklin 
touring car; complete equipment, good 
condition; a bargain. 

RUSSELL MOTOR CO. 



FOR SALE— ONE 16 AND ONE 22-FT. 
launch; will sell cheap, If taken at 
oace. H. S. Paterson, foot Sixth 
avenue west. 



_^ORSES, VEHICLES, ETC. 

*• LOGGING AND DR.^ FT HORSES. ■* 
^ LUMBERMEN, TAICE NOTICE. ^ 
% Omt manager, John Walt, has ar- # 
#• rived at our stables opposite the •^ 

# Duluth postofflce \,ith a large % 
% consignment of big. young, extra # 
•^ quality, 1.600 to l,8(»0-pound log- *• 
•Sf glng horses; they .ire all good, # 

# rugged horses, ready to go into ■j^ 
■^ the harness and do the job. We id 

# can sell you a team or a carload. % 
^- Part time given If de.sited. ^ 
% BARRETT & ZllWMERMAN. % 
A< Duluth, Minn. ^ 

FOR S.\LE — CHEAP. TWO BUGGIE.S, 
one stylish rubber tire and one Con- 
cord; good condition. Zenith 6040. 

FOR SALE — LIGHT DELIVERY AND 
draft horses. Inquire Brldgeman- 
Russell company. 16 West First 

. street. 



PERSONAL. 



PERSON.\Lr— 25c BIRTHDAY' B(X>KS, 
only lOo, at the Pennv Arcade. Mall 
orders promptly filled. Send birth 
date. Address Agnes Bacon. Penny 
Arcade. Duluth. Minn. 

PERSONAL — WE ARE PLACING ON 
sale a large slock of unredeemed 
diamonds at great reductions. Key- 
stone Loan Co., 22 W. Superior st. 

PERSONALr— COMBINGS MADE INTO 
switches, vl.50; Marinello parlors, 20 
West Superior street. 

Wringer repairing. Interstate Mer- 
cantile Co., 1627 W. Sup. St. Zen. 787. 

PERSONAL^DONT FORGET. JIMMIB 
Morgan, best electric rug cleaner in 
city. Call Zenith 650. Old 595. 



I guarantee to grow a head of hair on 
bald heads, or no pay. Bryant, room 
4Vi, lb Tlilrd ave. W., Dodge Block. 



FOR SALE — TWO FINE SADDLE 
horses. 714 Torrey building. 



FOR SALE — NICE BLACK ROAD 
team; very good for traveling; 
weight about 2100 pounds; also 
buggy and harness. Inquire 310 
Twenty-fifth avenue west. 

FOR SALE— OR WIU. TRADE FOR 
cow, a bay working horse, weighing 
about 1,400 pounds. Address U 372, 
Herald. 



FOR SALE — SPLENDID TEAM AT A 

bargain, weight 2,800 pounds; must 
be sold at once; give us an offer. 
Fine set of harness Call 20 East 
Railroad street. 

FOR SALE HORSIES; 826 EAST 

Third street. H. Inch^ 

FOR S.\LE — ONE GRAY HORSE; 
weighs 1,450 pounds; 7 years old. 
Call 111% East Second street. 

FOR SALP:- G<,>OD HORSE, CHEAP 
Inquire at 428 West Fourth street. 

FOR SALE — GOOD tlORSE AT 925 

Fourth avenue east. 

FOR SALE — HORSE AT L. HAMMEL 

company. 



DRESSMAKING. 



DRESSMAKING— sew; NG, TAILoit- 
ed and hand embroidered shirt wai.s'.s 
a specialty. Mesdam?s McCowan and 
Fox, 720 >-2 Filth av'inue east. , 



THE NEW METHOD DKESSMAKINfJ 
school teacnes dressmaking in six 
weeks; makes dresses for yourself or 
otiiers while learning. 310 West Sec- 
ond street, next Y. AL C A. building. 
Also evening class. 



FOR SALE — ELECTRIC AUTO; 15-H. 
p ; new tires and newly painted; 
clieap. E 264, Herald. 



BOARD OFFERED. 



WELL FURNISHED STEAM HEjVTED 
ro"ms, good board 3)1 E. Third st. 

BOAIID OFFERED — FIRST CLASS 

boiird and large furnished rooma at 
101 Park Terrace. 



PERSONAL — ARTHUR ARMSTRONG, 
tlie only expert window cleaner in 
the city. Special rates given office 
buildings. Zenith 2082-Y. 



LADIES — ASK YOUR Dl^UQGIST FOR 
Chlchest' rs Pills, the Diamond Brand. 
For 25 years known as best, safest, 
always rellible. Take no other. 
Chichesters Diamond Biand Pills are 
sold by druggl.><ts everywhere. 



PERSONAL — IF YOU WANT A CAR- 

penter to do good repairing, who 
will charge you a reasonable price 
and guarantee work. Call Zenith 
'phone 2291-X or address George 
Walker, 213 Mesaba avenue. 



PERSONAL — WANTED: VIOLIN, CLA- 
rinet, cornet players for small or- 
chestra. Apply at 318 Eighth avenue 
east. 



PERSONAL — MME. MAY FRENCH, 
female regulator, best of all. Mailed 
in plain wiapper, $2 a bjx. Oipbeum 
phaimacy, 201 East Superior street. 

PERSONAL — COMBINGS AND CUT 
hair made into beautiful switches. 
Knauf Sisters. 

PERSON-iVL — Private home for ladles 
before and during confinement, ex- 
pert care; everyiliing confidential ; 
Infants cared for. lu.i Pearson. M. D., 
284 Harrlsun avenue. .St. I'uui. Minn. 



WANTED TO BUY. 



WE BI'Y SECOND-HAND FUi:.NlTURE 
and .stoves. 1629 \\ est Superior street. 
- nith 189d-D. 



BO.\RD OFFERED — BOARD AND 

room $25 per montli. 221 E. Third St. 



WANTED TO BUY— HIGHEST PRICE 
paid for casl-oft men's clothing. 
Stone, 213 West First street. Zenith 
1134-D; Melrose 1834. 

WANTED TO BIY— SECOND-HAND 
logging outfit. Address R 335, Her- 
aliL 

WANTED — Old clothes, auto and car- 
riage tires. 328 E. Sup. St. Zen. 2013-D. 

WANTED TO BUY — A LAk3E OR 
small tract of land for invesln;?nt. 
1 6J, Herald. 



WATCHES REPAIRED. 

Guaranteed Main Springs, |1 oi»; watch 
cleaned. $1. Garon Bros.. 213 W. 1st. 



if PROGRESSIVE FIRMS THAT BOOST DULUTH jj 



ART GLASS AND MIRRORS. 



All Kinds glass; lowest prl-esi. St. Ger- 
n all! Bros., 121 First avenue west. 



ATTORNEYS. 



S. L. SMITH, Attorney, has moved his 
office from 118 to 624 Manhattan. 



CARRIAGES, WAGONS, DRAYS. 



Farm wagons, open and top buggies, 
Concords; all styles delivery wagons. 
Ford automobiles. International auto 
buggies, auto delivery wagons. M. 
\J. TUR NER. 21>i-220 E. First St. 

If you want a high-grade delivery wag- 
on or buggy that was built especially 
for this part of the country, for least 
money, call or write for catalogue. L 
Hlammel Co., 300-308 East First St. 



FURNITLRE RECOVERED. 

Leri^oTserr'do''7ouri!d*HOLSTE R I NG. 
334 E. Superior St. Z.Milth phone 949. 



GRADING AND SODDING. 

CAlZ'^MERC ErTI^IEL. ^dTTT'eXPERT 
sodding, grading. Tries, vines, liedges 
trimmed. Everything In gardening. 

LAWN AND garden" WORK BY' DAY 
or contract. Mel. 4241;, Zen. 1197-D. 

H. B. keedy, landscape GARDEN- 
er; both phones. Blaok dirt and loam 
for sale. 



GUN AND LOCKSMITH. 




A. ERICKi=50N, 
Expert Qun Repairer , 

I ES. Superior St. Zenith phone 510. ; 



MASSAGE. 



DR. WICSTLIND, MASSAGE, RHEU- 
matlsm, backache, liver and stomach. 
Lady assistant. 30 East Superior 
street. Rooms 2 and 3. Ze nith 2246-X. 

MASSAGE — WEIR MITCHELL SYS^ 
tem. Ladles treated at their homes. 
Miss Small, Melrose 3214. 



CORSETS MADE TO ORDER. 

SPIRELLA MEANS CORSET PERFEC- 
tion. 50 styles. See them. 531 E. Sup. st. 



CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER. 



Olof Pearson, contractor and 
builder; general repairing. 2o7 
West First St. Shop, Zenith 
12T4-X; residence. Zenith 6097. 




CARPET CLEANING. 



Interstate Carpet Cleaning company — 
Slnotte & Van Norman, compressed 
air cleaners and rug weavers, 1928 
West Michigan street. Both 'phones. 



CHEMIST AND ASSAYER, 

Du;.uth Testing Laboratory — C. A. 
Graves, Mgr. Assays, cnemical analy- 
sis, cement testing, 514 W. First St-, 
Edison building. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING. 



Du.uth Engineering Co.. W. B. Patton, 
Mgr., 613 Palladlo Bldg. Specifications 
prepared and construction superin- 
l.jnded for waterworks, sewerage, etc. 



DENTIST. 



Dr. W. H. Olson. 222 New Jersey Bldg. 
All work guaranteed. Both phones. 



FLORIST. 



J. .r. Le Borlus florist, 921 E. 3rd St.; 
floral, funeral designs, cut flowers. 



FURNITURE AND PIANOS. 

Polished and repaired. Theo. Thomp- 
son, 336 E. Sup. St. Old 'phone 2S28-L. 



GRAPHOPHONES. 

(TorLTulirBTA^ RA PHO 
phones. Ask for cata- 
logue of our new double- 
faced r'jcords for 65c; 
_ also our Indestructible 

cylinder records. 35c. ildmont, 330 West 

Superior street. 




HORSE SHOEING. 



IF YOU HAVE A CRIPPLED HORSE 
consult us; all the ;atest specialties 
in horse shoeing. I'Mward Schau & 
Son, 14 Third avenun east. 



IMPROVED SHOE REPAIRING. 



MONEY SAVING, TIME SAVING, SHOE 
saving. While you wait. Gopher 
Shoo Works. 



MUSIC. 



MUSIC AND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 

___ i\ of every descrlp- 

^^^^JIL^^^I tion. Edison pho- 

^y ^^^^BB^W i^^'i nographs, b an d 

l/flSBi^r^^^w and orchestra In- 

^■■■|BkHa^n| struments, pianos 

^^^ ^wt^ ^^^^^ and organs. Ing- 

••• vald Westgaard, 7 

and 9 First avenue west. 



PIA.VOS. PHONOGRAPHS, 
sheet music; everything in 

musical Instruments. Mail 

orders promptly filled. Zen- 

itli Music company, 6 East 
.Superior street. 




au^ 



MOVING PICTURE OUTFITS. 



Moving picture machines, films & slides 
bought and sold. Nat. Co., 6 S. 6th -v. w. 



KEY, LOCK AND SAFE WORKS. 

Duluth Gun Shop. Saul San- 
ders, 203 \\\ 1st St. Phones, 
Old, Mel. 3969; New 2288-A. 

NORTHERN Hardware: company repair 
shop. Key and look work. Lawn 
mowers sharpened right. 222 West 
Superior .street. Eltier 'phone, 67. 



KODAKS AND CAMERAS. 



Eclipse View Co., Inc. 30 4th Ave. W, 
Develop and finish for amateurs. 



LIFE INSURANCE. 



DO IT FOR DULUTH' BY PURCHAS- 
Ing life Insurance In Northwestern 
National, which invests In Duluth 
gilt-edge city mortgages. George M. 
Marnle. general ager t. 18 3rd Ave. W. 



PHOTOGRAPHER. 

GUST LA^<Ln^r?RnnTNGri3EVELOP- 
Ing; amat^^ur supplies, 24 21.qt Av. W. 




LAUNDEY. 



Model Laundry, 126 E. 1st St. "We do 
the work. ' Old, 2T4!i-L. New, 13o2. 



TURKISH BATH PARLORS. 



KASMIR'3 TURKISH BATHS OPEN 
c^ay and night. Ladles' days, Tues- 
uays and Thursdays. Baths under 
McKay hotel. Filth avenue west. 



MACHINE WORK REPAIRING. 



MACHINE WORK REPAIRING OF 
all kinds. Zenith Ms.chlne Works. 207 



West First 
2288-X. 



street. 



Old, 



new. 



MANTLES, TILING, MARBLE. 

UUio^OP^lioOR^'^COlfPAI^^ 

Superior street. Both 'phones, 656. 
D«iii£ns aud eatimaics furnished. 




■^ri ■ 



■^ 




OPTICIANS. 

C. C. STAAclcErTo?'wEST SUPERIOR 
street. Ojjen Wednesday and .Satur- 
day evenings. 

OPTOMETRIST AND OPTICIAN. 

ArTri^?oRBHior'?oL^2or"'w^ 

perlor street, over Oak Hall. 



ROOFING, CORNICE, SKYLIGHTS. 

BURRELlTX^ILxliMON^ 

Both 'phones. First-class work. 



RIFLES AND GUNS. 



Grinding and Repairing % 
Specialty. City Gun Store. 

R. C. KRUSCHKE. 
402 West Superior Street. 



SHOE REPAIRING. 

HAVE^^^YOUR SHC^^ "^rFpAIRED 
right at the Champion Shoe Works, 
14 Fifth Ave. W , in Lyceum Bldg. 

SALES AND BOARDING STABLE^ 



ZENITH SALES & BOARDING S*a- 
bles; the Racine Sattley company's 
high grade wagons, trucks and car- 
riages; horses bought, sold and ex- 
chang-d. Moses Goldberg, proprie- 
tor, 326 West First street. Both 
'phones 553 



TOWING LINE. 

\ JEFFERY BROS. 

n Office foot 

; I ¥^\ Garfield 

Ave. Old 
■phone, 
_ ^- - 1-^ Melrose 
488; Zenith 'phone 15Il 





r^ 




Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 22, 1910. 




Herald. 



Phone 
Your Want 
Ada to The 

Herald. 




One Cent a Woril Each Insertion. 
No Atlvcrtt»-fmrnt Ijc^s Tliaii 15 Cents. 

One Cent a Word Kaeh Insertion. 
No AdvcrtistMuent Less Than 15 Cents. 

TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 

-OF— 

BUSINESS 
HOUSES 

Below yen will find a 
condensed list of reliable 
business Hrnis. This is de- 
signed for tiie convenience 
of busy people. A tele- 
tlione order to any ore of 
tliem will receive the same 
cireful atteniit'n as would 
be given an order placed In 
person. You can safeJy de- 
ptrd upon tlie reliability 
of these firms. 




of any one 



Old 

'Phono. 



MFAT MARKETS — 

Mork Pros 

GROCKHS — 

Thatciier & Thatcher 
L.WNOllIES — 

Peerless Laundry . . 

Yale l.aundry 

Lutes Laundry .... 

Troy Laundry 

Home Laundry Co.. 

DRlGtilSTS — 

Eddie Jerorlmus ... 

Boyce 

Smith & Smith 

AR( HITECTS — 

P'rank L. Young & Co. 44. 6 

ailLLI.XERV — 

M. A. Cox 

TE.XTS A.\D AWNINGS 

Poirler & Co 

DYE WORKS — 

Zenitli Cily Dye works 
Nurtiiwesiern Dyeing 

& Cleaning Co 1337 

Naticral Dyeing & 

Clean'ng Co 2376 



.1590 



428 
479 
447 

i:r.7 

i»41 

1243 
lt;3 

2S0 



.457« 



.1SS8 



New 
'Phone. 

1S9 

1907 

428 
479 
447 

257 
1128 

lf>27 

163 

7 



735 
188S 
1516 
237(5 



REAL ESTATE, FIRE 

ixslraxce, and 
rental agencies. 



JoJ;n A. Sieptenson, Wolvsn building. 
E. D. Field Co, -03 Excliange building, 
L. -\. Larsea Co., I'rovldeiice builujug. 
H. J. Muliln, 4li3 Lonsdale building. 



FOU S.JLLE— MISlELL.iNEOLy. 

FUK SALE — NEW AND SKCOND- 

hund engines, boilers, pcriaule saw- 
niiils, planers, niaiclieib, resawa, pul- 
leys, bhatiing, h^iui^ers and uo.xea. 
'i-rione 91. 

DULUTH MACHINERY CO. 



re 

it 

i6 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
Xo .^dvertii^jment Less Than 15 Cents. 

^nHELlTwAxHD^^MALK. 



WANTED — NEAT GIRL FOR GEN- 
cral housework; family of two; can 
go home nights. Mrs. S. H. Bing- 
ham. 1607 East Fourth s treet. 

WA.NTED — GIRLS AT MRS. SOM- 
mers' employment ofttce, 16 Second 
avenue east. 



WANTED — GIRLS AT NEW WE.ST 
End Employment office. 2824 West 
TJiird street. Zenith L'U80-A. 

LADIES — WE ARE PLACING ON 
sale factory sample line of Jewelry 
consisting of neck chains, lockets, 
braclets, etc., full line of holiday 
goods, cut glass and ladies' hand 
bags — 26 hand bags, while they last, 
at $1. Keystone Loan company, ZZ 
West Superior street. 



t'5v''«C<V'rt''< 

a- 
* 



WANTED. 



I 



* 



One Cent a Word Elach Insertion. 
No Advertisement Ix»ss Than 15 Cents. 

helFwanted^mSeT^^ 

WANTED^^^^^^XBLEpBObn^ 

the U. S. Marine Corps, between the 
ngee of 19 and 36; must be native 
born or have first papers; monthly 
pay (IG to (69; additional compensa- 
tion possible; food, clothing, Quar- 
ters and medical attendance free; 
thirty years' service can retire with 
75 per cent of pay and allowances; 
service on board ship and ashore In 
all parts of the world. Apply at U. 
S. Marine CorpS'Recrulting Office, 405 
Superior street, Dnluth, Minn. 



WANTED— 500 MEN TO KNOW THAT 
we are i)lacing on sale factory sample 
line of clothing and shoes; 500 pairs 
men's winter pants, tl.5o; 300 pairs 
work shoes, ^2; 400 mens Harvard 
dress sliiris, while they last 50c. 
stone Loan Co., 22 W. Sup. St. 



SI d 
Key; 



lff*>'e^f5**^-*?^^^->Y-^^J*fWf'^^f*<^**-^f* 



CASH AND BUNDLE GIRLS; 
GOUD WAGES. INQUIRE AT 

THE GLOBE COMPANY, 
105-107 West Superior Street. 



W .\ .\ T E D — AN EXPERIENCED 
operator on body ironer. Apply Linen 
exchange, South Tliird avenue east. 

WANTED— GOUD. COMl'ETENT GIKL 
for general housework; good wages. 
7zl West First street. 

W.\NTED — FIRST-CL.\SS TRIMMER 
and maker for millinery store. Ad- 
dress J 321. Herald. 






i:- 

ii 
;> 

a- 

if- 



WANTED. 



SALES- 



TWO E»XPERIENCED 

WOMEN. 

Ai^ply immediately to 

MANUFACTUREICS' OUTLET 

S.\LES COMPANY. 

15 East Superior Street. 






r'.<^T¥'^--^7V^^^^*«'^'*^-;^TWf««**#^«i^o->^ 



WANTED— YOUNG NURSE GIRL. TO 
go home nights. Apply room 350, 
McKay hotel. 

WANTED — CO.MPETENT GIRL FOR 
gei^eral housework. 2529 West Sec- 
ond strtet. 

WANTED— YUUNG GIKL TO ASSIST 
In light housekeeping. 41:2 West 
Third street. 



FOR SALE. 
LOGGING EQUIPMENT. 



it 

* 
i6 



W ANTED— DINING ROO.M AND 

kitclien girl at Blanchet hotel. 522 
Lake avenue soutii. 

WANTED— COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework. 1424 East Second 
street. 

WA NT ED — SCANDINAVIAN GIKL 
for general housework; three In fam- 
ily; no objection for newcomer. Cull 
506 East Superior street. 



WANTED — GIRLS TO STRIP 
bacco. Apply Interstate Cigar 
lory, 112 >i West First street. 

W A N tT: D — Y O U N G 

in small grocery 
store, .-\pply 53i' 



TO- 
fac- 



WANTED. 

BEST OPPORTUNITY' IN TEARS. 
Steady cmplojment for young 
man if he has $1,000 or more to 
pi.it in a good business propofcl- 
lion. For further information 
address H 655, Herald office. 



* 

a- 



«-^?t-5^fi?*;\i^S?T^^'^-^X'^*J¥^;c'*«*'J^*^*^ 



WANTED— 500 MEN TO SEE OUR UN- 

redeemed pledges, 25 shot guns, 50 
rliles, 50 revolvers, 200 overcoats, 2.5 
fur coals, 200 men's and ladies' 
watches, 200 solid gold rings, 25 vio- 
lins, 15 mandolins, all at great reduc- 
tions. Keystone Loan Co., 22 Wes'. 
Superior street. 



•^c'^:<''k'iir.i-;^i^^iiiil^;iii>^^ii^}i.^ 



i^ 






WANTED. 

TEN EXPERIENCED SALESMEN. 
Apply immediately to 

MANUFACTURERS' OUTLET 

SALES COMPANY, 

15 East Superior Street. 



;;<^'^-i'f#>>^^^f*>¥*^l^'iJ'iS*?!MW^^ 



WANTED — Men to learn barber trade; 
free Cat.; come now; good opportunity 
Moier Bar. Col., 27 Nic, Minneapolis. 



WANTED AT ONCE — TWO FRIST- 
class coal niakers; guaranteed steady 
work; pay hlgiier wages than union 
bill. M. A. Schweig, Fort Willi am. 

WANTED — A HOTEL CLbIRK AT 
Western hotel. Apply to J. B. 
Dun i'hy, 2803 West Superior street. 

W A N TED — A GOOD TINNER AND 
plumber, able to clerk if necessary; 
no boozor; good salary; state every- 
tliing in first letter. Clark 6i John- 
son. Westhope, N. D. 



LADY TO WORK 

and Confectionery 

East Fourth street. 



Ca.Tip kit sufficient for 175 men, 
twenty sets of logging sleigns, 
two tank sitighs, tix pair heavy 
horses, all ai a bargain price. 

For detailed Information address 

THE DAVIS & STARR LUMBER 
COMPAN Y, , 

Eau Claire, '^'is. 



* 
* it- 



FOR SALE— ONE DOUBLE CO-MBINA- 
tiun bookcdse. almost new; a bargain 
at $4'.', will sell for |:jy. Upstairs 71 J 
East Sixth street. 

For sale— CHAMBERS' ENCYCLO- 
poedla, nine volunies, good condition, 
bound in slieep, |2. Look lias up, a 
bargain. B 710, Herald. 

Fur sale — range. also cuok 

ttoves, oil heater and a number oi 
tiher small articles. Will sell cheap. 
709 ;n rear ot 705 West Third street. 

r».»R SALE— AT A BARGAIN, IRON 
ted, ^letl conch and Iron ioldlng bi;d. 
Call at once at aJS Lake avenue 
north. 

FOR SALE— SOLID OAK DREs...,..R 
and cnest ot drawers, Jewell gas 
heater and laundry supplies. Cheap, 
if taken at once. IZH East Third 
street. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. Apply G. A. Klein, 320 
Ninth avenue east. 



WA.NTED— 500 LADIES TO HAVE 
shampoo and manicuring done at 
Mrs. Vogfs iiair dressing parlors, 
only 25c. 17 East Superior street, 
upstairs. Phone appointements. 

Zenith, 1152-X. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework; no cooking. 511 Wood- 
land avenue. 

WANTED — FIRST-CLASS WAIST 
and skirt makers; also apprentices. 
Apply at once, -20 West .Superior 
street. Eugenic Lambert. 



WA.NTED AT ONCE — YOUNG GIRLS; 
must be neat sewers. Madam Burns, 
fifth fioor, Christie building. 



WA.NTED— .\ MIDDLE-AGED HOUSE- 
keeper, 2S04 \Vei-:t Helm street 



WA.NTED— YOUNG GIRL, POLISH OR 
German, for liglit housework and 
care of baby. 323 East First street. 



WANTED — ENERGP:TIC SOLICITORS 
to write the best selling accident a.'ul 
health jjolicy ever offered; annual 
premium, fo; if you want a propo- 
sition that is bound to make you 
money, write for particulars. Tlie 
Indemnity Life & Accident company, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 



WANTEi.'- BOY ; MUST BE 16 YEARS. 
The Great Eastern. 

WA.NTED — AT ONCE, FIR.ST-CLASS 
electrician for inside work; one tliat 
can work from blue prints, familiar 
With bells, phones and clock wiring; 
must be able to furnisii reference; 
none other need apply; good job for 
the right man. Adoress, h\ C. Miller, 
Iron River Electric company. Iron 
River, Mich. 



W.YNTED — TWO 
to run shot drill. 



DRILL RUNNERS 
Y 7, Herald. 



WANTED — YOUNG MA.N, BRIGHT, 
for government railway mail clerk; 
beginning salary about $9u0; en- 
trance examination announced; cx- 
ceuti'jnal o.otioi tunity. for paiticu- 
lafs see Mr. Williams, Hotel Lenox. 



WANTED — YOUNG MAN AS OFFICE 
assistant for large real estate office; 
must be good writer and wide awake. 
Apply B 424, Herald. 



FOR SALE — COAL 
don road. 



STOVE. 1731 Lon- 



FOR SALE— UNREDEEMED MILL- 

wnglits" and machinists' outfit of 
toois; sell cheap. Duiutli Loan ^if- 
rtce. 5o7 West Michigan street. 



FOR SALE 
ing stove, 
stairs. 



CHE-\P - 

2yl West 



- GOOD HEAT- 
Flfth street, up- 



FUK SALE — LE.VDING HOTEL; 4'J 
room?;, in best town on iron i-ange, 
doing Al business with bar in toi.- 
ncclion; good terms to rlglit party. 
Adaress, .Marren & !• inn. Two liar- 
bcrs, Minn. 

FOR SALE CHEAP — KITCHEN FUR- 

niture, dining room table, beds and 
mattiess, bowls and pitchers; party 
leaving city. 3b3'j Minnesota avenue. 

Fur sale — thorough bred 

Scotcn collie pups. Inquire ot J. B. 
Pfau at lo:il East Sixtii street. 

FOR SALE — FULDING BED AND 
Iron bed. cheap. Call al 221 \N est 
Fifth street, upstairs. 

FOR SALE — CHP2AP, SEVERAL 
good heating stoves in first-clats 
condition. ■ Thomasson, the Furni- 
ture Man." 



WANTED — CUMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework. Mrs. W. A. 
Coventry, 1911 Piedmont avenue. 

WANTED— ENGLISH-SPEAKING GIRL 
for general housework; two in fam- 
ily. Mrs. William H. Sailer. 30 Kent 
road. Plione Zenith 469;' Duluth, 
Melrose 2429. 



WANTED — COUNTER MAN. ROYAL 
lunch. 214 West Superior street. 

WA.NTED— APPRE.NTICE. APPLY AT 
Le Richeux's drug store. 405 East 
Fourth street. 



WANTED — A COMPETENT SECOND 
girl; .Scandinavian preferred. Apply 
32G West .'^econd street. 



WA.NTED— A GOOD GIRL FOR -EN- 
eral housewoi k- family of three. 
1021 East Second street. 



WANTED— GIRL FOR SHORT OR- 
ders, nights; good wages. 2531 "V\'est 
Superior street. 



FOR SALE — AN OLD ESTABLISHED 
weekly neWEj.aper In a tliriving North 
Dakota county seat town; a small 
cash payment will handle this and 
balance can be paid from earnings 
of tile business. Walton-Reynolds 
company, Oakes, N. D. 



FOR S.VLE — ONE DROP-HEAD. SEV- 
en drawer Singer, |18; one latest 
Standard Rolasg, |20; one While, 
eligiitiy used, j^25. ^^■hite Sewing 
Machine company, next to lu-Cent 
store. 



FOR SALE BOOKS — The Pulpit Com- 
mentary, Library of Universal Lit- 
erature, Nations of the World, Wav- 
erly Novels, 'the People's .Natural 
History, Irving s Works, Makers of 
History, Bulwers' Works, I'art of 
Carlyle's Works. 325 Forty-second 
avenue east. Lakeside. 



FOR SALE — MACHLNERV:. PULLEYS, 
largest slock, wood split and steel 
split, sliafling, hangers, belting, wood 
and iron working macninery. North- 
ern .Maciiinery company, .Minneapolis. 

FOR SALE— GOOD SOUND 6-INC H 
■hiplap, $16 per 1,000; also dimen- 
sion and cedar sliingles; and all kinds 
of otrier lumber delivered to any pan 
of the city at reasonable prices. Mill- 
brook Lumbt r company, R. F. D. No. 
8, Duluth, Minn., Melrose 1798, 4 rings. 

' - REMINGTON TYPi> 

as new; a bargain. Room 
block. 



FOR SALE - 
writer; good 
15, Phoenix 



(Continued on page 17.) 



WANTED — YOUNG GIRL TO DO 
light housework and go to school, 
'ph one Zenith 3050-D. 

WANTED — A TEACHER AT THE 
Finnish college at Smithville, Minn., 
to teach ti'.e English language. Ap- 
plications coming in later than Oct. 
1 will not be considered; state sal- 
ary expected. Address Hj. Malison, 
Box 1. Smithville, Minn. 



WANTED — 
clerk with 
tion; slate 
Herald. 



GENERAL OFFICE 
experience; steady posi- 
salary. Address Y 241, 



WANTED— A TINNER FOR INSIDE 
and outside work; steady job. A. O. 
Giese, 106 West First street. 



WANTED — GOOD SCANDINAVIAN 

clerk for employment office, wiiii 
experience; good writer; steady po- 
sition; must have good references. 
Address Y 2, Herald. 

WANTED — BARBER, AT ONCE- 
steady Job. Write or wire J, J. 
Plant, Hibblng, Minn. 



WANTED — TWO BRIGHT GIRLS TO 
learn dressmaking. Apply 218 West 
Superior street. 



WANTED— COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework. 1422 East Sec- 
ond street. 



WANTED — COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework. 2328 East Third 
street. 

WANTED — CO.MPETENT HOUSE 
maid at once. 2029 East Superior 
street. 



WANTED— GIRL FOR GENER.\L 
housework; small family; good 
wages; easy place. 107 South Nine- 
teentli avenue east. Zenith 'phone 
S73. 

W A N T E D — CO .M PET E N T GIRL FOR 
general housework. 1713 East Su- 
perior street. 

WANTED — GIRL TO BAND CIGARS; 
must be experienced. Apply Ron 
Fernandez Cigar company, 312 West 
Second street. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
So Advertlfiement Less Than 15 Cents. 

ADDITIONAL 
WANTS 
^MNJPAGE^ 

SITUATION WANTED— FEM.VLE. 



SITUATION WANTED — POSITION AS 
stenographer and office assistant; 
best ot references. E 268, Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED BY A. YOUNG 
lady experienced in bookkeeping; can 
lake charge of office, liaving had 
several years' experience in general 
office work. Address K 6 5, Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED — BY YOUNG 
lady stenographer; has had one year 
experience. B 433, Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED — EXPERIENC- 
ed dressmaker will go out by the 
day. Call new phone 1445-D. 



SrriATION WANTED— MALE. 



tilTUATlON WANTED — PUBLIC JAN- 
itor and window washer, Prudence 
Robert, the best new window clean- 
er in the city. Zenith 'phone 2i;91-X. 



SlTU-VnoN WANTED — BY YOUNG 

man, experienced ia bookkeeping and 
stenography. Address Edward Sun- 
din, 25 South Fltly-eigfiiu avenue 
west. 



SITUATION WANTED — BRIGHT 
young man, with some experience in 
bookKeepmg ami a good collector, 
would like position with reliable 
firm. A 6, Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED — .MIDDLE- 
aged man would like position as 
watchman or some place of trust; 
Sober and reliable; can furnish ref- 
erences. Address B 392, Herald. 

SITATION WANTED — AN EXPE- 
rlenced janitor would like a posi- 
tion . Herald, B 393 

SITUATION WANTED — AS PASTRY 
and short oraer cook. Address R 308, 
Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED — YOUNG MAN 
tliorouglily experienced in office 
work, desires permanent position 
wiiere there i-s a chance for advance- 
ment. Am experienced stenographer 
and good penman, yuick and accurate 
al figures, and can furnish best of 
refeiences and bond, if necessary. 
Address R 353, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED — BY AN Ex- 
perienced siatiouery fireman. Wil- 
liam F. Grlmmeke, general delivery. 

SITUATION WANTED — M.YN. 40 
years of age; reliable, industrious; 
work traveling, adveriiKing, distrib- 
uting samples, circulars, posting 
bills, etc.; reasonable salary and ex- 
penses; faithful w-ork guaranteed, 
no canvassing; references given. 
Box 42, Park Rapids, Minn. 



One Cent a Word Elaeb. Insertion. 
No Advertisement Less Than 15 Cents. 

^^JixJOENiKFLATsT' 

FOR RENT — LARGE FIVE-ROOM 
Hat with bath. 206 East 1; ourth 
street. Hartman O'Donnell, 2U5 
Loi sdale building. 

FOR RENT — THREE-ROOM FLAT, 
central; fine view; cheap lor the win- 
ter, also flve-room fiat, central. Mrs. 
Moi-se, 126 West Fourth street. 



FOR RENT — SEVEN-ROOM MODERN 
fiat; hardwood floors and linisn; liot 
wa;.er heat, possession Oct. 1; $35 
per monih. c. H. Graves & Co 



FOR RENT— NICE FIVE-ROOM FLAT. 
Modern conveniences. 1218 Is East 
l-otrth street. Hartman O'Donneu, 
2'J5 Lonsdale building. 

* FOR RENT. * 
a- If you are looking lor a nice, up- if- 
H' to-daie, seven-room heated flat, ■# 
rj centrally located, at a moderate ■* 
^ rert, we can suit you. 4u8 botn ■* 
■^ phones. * 

* CHAS. P. CR-^IG & CO., *t 
H' Loi-2-3-4-5 Sellwood Building. •jt 



^ One Cent a Word Ea<'h Insertion. 
Ko Advertisement Less Thau i5 Cents. 

___F0OENr^00MS; 

FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
^•^^l^t room, all conveniences; suit- 
^.Pie for one or two ladies. Call al 
»2o Kast Second street. 



^^H^^ HEN-r— HEATED ROOMS IN 
Dodge building; very .entral. Apply 
XM. J. Lpham company. 18 Third ave- 
nue west. 



FOR RE.NT- 
nlce place. 
Hartman 
building. 



-FIVE LARGE ROOMS; 

1218 East Fourth street. 

O'Donnell, 205 Lonsdale 



FOR RENT — SIX-ROOM FLAT IN 
Ko.iagan flats; heat, hot and cold 
water, janitor service; tnoroughiy 
modern; rent $47.50. Corporate In- 
vestment company, Torery building. 



FOR RENT— NICE NEW 
flat. Central location; 
able. Ready Sept. 26. 
West l-irst street. 



FOUR- ROOM 

rent reasjn- 

S. Rhode, 1209 



FOR RENT— FIVE-ROOM FLAT WITH 
gas range and coal heater. Inquire 
at 418 West Fourth street; new phone 
909-Y or 1595* 



FOR RENT— THREE-ROOM FLAT IN 
Sealon terrace. No. 907 West Michi- 
gan street; ^12 per month. D. W. 
Scott & Son, 402 Torrey building. 



FOR RENT— BASEMENT FLAT, $20 
per montli; steam heal, gas. 122 East 
i'irst street. 



FOR RENT— TWO NEW 
Hats; *12 and |14. C. A. 
oOO Alworlh building. 



FIVE-ROOM 

Knippenberg, 



FOR RENT — FIVE-ROO.\l FLAT, 
iil8 West Fourth street; sewer and 
gas; rent $18 per monm. Stryker, 
Aianley & Buck, Torrey building. 



FUR Rl- 
rooms, 
slr>;et. 
east. 



;NT— NEW. MODERN FIVE- 

brick flat at 6o7ito East Sixth 
Call 7u2 Seventeenth avenue 



FOR RENT — THREE LIGHT FRONT 
rooms at 101 Vi West Fourth street, 
suitable for residence and dressmak- 
Ing parlors, etc. Inqv-lre afternoons. 

FOR RENT — BOARD AJJD ROOM FOR 
man and wife; private family; no 
oilier boarders. West end, quiet place 
near car line. R 307, Herald. 

FOR RENT — YOUNG MAN WITH 

good habits has a n:ce large room 
in steam-heated bricii flat; wishes 
roommate; must be sjber. 32 West 
Second street. 

FOR RENT— FRONT ROOM AND AL- 
cove; modern in every respect. 414 
Secon d avenue west. 

FOx. RENT— NICELY FURnIsHED 
room, healed. Zenith 'phone 2323-.'i. 
2o03 West S uperior sireet, flat D. 

FOR RE.NT— ONE FUR.N'ISHED ROOM* 
$0 per month. 711 We^t Third street. 



SECRET SOCIETIES. 



PALESTINE LODGE NO. 79; 
A. F. & A. M. — Regular meet- 
ings first and third Monday- 
evenings of each month, at 
8 o'clock. Next meetingf^ 
Sept. 19, 1910. Work — Sec- 
ond degree. Gorham A. Taylor, W. M.^ 
H. Nesbit, secretary. 




IONIC LODGE, NO. 1S6, A. P. 
& A. M. — Regular meeting* 
second and fourth Monday 
evenings of each month at 
8 o clock. Next meeting^. 

Sept. 26, 1910. Work— First 

degree. Herbert W. Richardson, W. M.] 

Hugh Burgo, secretary. 




KE Y.STONE CHAPTER. N<5; 
20, R. A. M. — Stated convo- 
cations second and fourth 
Wednesday evenings of each 
month at 8 o'clock. Next 
meelinK Sept. 14, 1910. Work 
— Regular business. Andall» 
Torrance, H. P.; Alfred Le RicheuXi 
secretary. 




W 



A 



FOR RENT 

laeni nat; 
street. 



— THREE-ROOM BASE- 
modern. 428 i:.ast Sixth 



FOR 
six. 

the 
Oct 



RE.NT FLATS — HIGH GR.\DE 

heven and eigiii-room flats iii 

Adams and St. uirno, to rent from 

, 1. All large, outside rooms, 



W ANTED TO RENT. 

WANTED TO RENT^^^^^FIVE^R SIX 
rooms, furnished, heated flat, with 
all conveniences. Call Melrose 3511 
after 5 p. m. 

WANTED TO RENT — THREE UN- 
furnisiied oorms with bath, for light 
housekeeping; West end preferred. 
Address Herald, M 4 7 6. 

WANTED TO RENT— FOUR OR FIVE 
rooms for couule with no children; 
state price ana conveniences. E. 250 
Herald. 

WANTED TO RE.NT — BY YOUNG 
ladies, modern furnislied flat; best of 
care guaranteed; A-1 references. 
Postoffice box 97. 



evtrylhing modern and up-to-date. 
Satisfactory reterences required, .rip- 
ply rental d'^i»artment, John A.. 
tolephenson, Wolvm building. 

__ FIVE-ROOM 

end. Melrose 



FOR ItENT— MODERN 
luinished llat. East 
41t4. 



FOR RENT — SIX-ROOM 
modern conveniences. 
Fourth street. 



FLAT ; 

202 



ALL 
East 



WANTED— ABOUT TEN BOYS; MUST 
be good workers, no loafers; must 
be 16 years old or over. Apply Pat- 
ruske Box & Lumber company. 



WANTED TO RENT — MODERN FUR- 
nished house of about six rooms In 
East end. Hunters' Park or Wood- 
land. E. D. Field Co., 203 Exchange 
building. 



F.IRM LANDS. 



PRIVATE HOSPITAL. 

MRS. HANSON, GRADUATE MID- 
wife; female complaints. 413 Seventh 
avenue east. 2^nith 1225. 

MRS. ANNA RONGE — GRADUATE 
midwife, 2018 West Superior street- 
Zenith phone 1894-D. 



Mrs. H. Olson, graduate midwife. Pri- 
vate hospital, 329 N 68 Av. W. Zen. 
3173. 

Mrs. A. Ferguson, graduate, midwife; 
private hospital, 2201 W. Fourth St. 
Zen. 2014-X. 

PRIV.\TE MATERNITY HOME FOR 
ladies before and during confinement 
Mrs Marv Barrell, nurse, 931 London 
road. Zenith 1597. 



FOR SALE— 30,000 ACRES CHOICE 
cutover lands, on line of the Alger- 
Bmlth railroad, at low price and on 
easy terms- to settlers. Alexander 
McBean, sales manager, D. & N. M. 
Land company, 406 Columbia build- 
ing, Duluth. 

FOR SALE— FORTY ACRES, ENTIRE^ 
ly level land; twenty acres cleared; 
free of stumps, log house, 18 by 40 
by 10, chicken house, borders on nice 
lake; $550, $100 cash, balance long 
time. Tom O. Mason, Cumberland, 
Wis. 

FOR SALE — 160 ACRES IN RAINY' 
River district, Koochiching county, 
Minn.; good timber and good land; 
stream running through land; «lu 
per acre. Address U 356, Herald. 

FOR SALE— 10,000 ACRES LN 40 AND 
80-acre tracts, close to Hibbing and 
Chisholm; good markets; forty an- 
nual payments of $16 each on 40 
acres, or $32 each on 80 acres, pays 
both principal and interest. For 
further infoilmation apply Guaranty 
Farm Land company, 416 Lyceum 
building, Duluth, Minn. 

FOR SALE — LANDS IN SMALL 
tracts to actual sellers only; good 
location for dairying and truck gar- 
dening. For further information call 
on or address Land co'nmissioner, 
Duluth & Iron Range Kailroad com- 



FOR RENT — EIGHT-ROOM FL.\T; 
city water paid; electric light; rent 
$2'.' per month. 537 Garfield avenue. 
Imiuire Wing & Co., Paliadio Bldg. 



FOR RENT — EIGHT-ROOM FLaT; 
sec;ond floor; $15 jjer nioiith. oJJ 
Garfield avenue. inquire Wing <& 
Co, Paliadio building. 

FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM FLAt" 
electric light, gas and sewer; three 
rooms wall hardwood floors, $14. 
81V East Fifth street. 

FOR RE?^ — FIVE-ROO.M FLAT; ALL 
conveniences. 731 West First street. 

FOR RENT — P^UUK-RUOM M(. )DERN 
flat; very central. S. S. Williamson 
51.1 T' rrt y, bo;h pnones. 

FOR RE.NT— TWO FLATS. 109 EAST 
Fli:tii street. Inquire Zenith piione 
829-. \. 



FOR RENT CHE.\.P— P^OUR OR FIVE 
beautiful, lurnisiied room.-: on car 
line; lake view;; modern, conveni- 
ences; will rent for $30 a monlii. 325 
Foity-seconti avenue east, Lakesidt. 



pany, 
Minn. 



512 Wolvin building, Duluth, 



MILLINERY. 



tXJR RENT— NICE FIVE-ROOM FLAT, 
all conveniences. Call 417 Twenly- 
sevenl.h avenue west. 

FOU RENT — THREE-ROOM FLAT; 
el'ictric light, gas, water and sewer, 
203 Nortli Central avenue; water paid 
by owner; $9 per month. W. C. Sner- 
wood ii Co., 118 Manhattan building. 



FOR. RE.NT — FIVE-ROOM FLAT, 

water paid . $6 per month, 2316 Wil- 
kum avenue and Oxford street, Hunt- 
er s Park. 



FOP: RENT — FRONT FLAT. 2018 
NS'est Superior street; five rooms, 
ba.lli, gas and electric lights; rent 
$18 per month. Stryker, Manley Ai 
Buck, Torrey building. 

FOP^ RENT — 704 WEST ThTrD 
street; six rooms; bath, cily water in- 
cluded; $25 per month. J. D. Howard 
&Co.. 216 West Superior street. 

FOR RENT- SEVEN-ROOM, STEAM 
heated flat; all modern; janitor 
service; central location; convenient 
to courlaouse; government buildings 
and railroad depots; charming view 
of bay and lake; moderate rent to 
riirht party; no children. Chas. P. 
Craig & Co., 601-2-3-4-5 Sellwood 
building- 



MRS. SHARPE, MILLINERY PARLORS 
318 West Third street. 



FOR RENT — FIVE - ROOM FLAT; 
hsirdwood floors, electric light and 
gas; water paid; rent $23. 219 Sev- 
enth avenue east. Apply Corporate 
Investment company, Torrey build- 
ing. 



(Continued on page 17.) 



«^3^^!f^€^:x:i*^^=^5:3i^5^i^i 



WANTED— A 
Sixth avenue 



"WAITRESS 

hotel. 



AT THL 



WANTED— A W^AITRESS CITY RES- 
taurar.t. 508 West Superior street. 

WANTISD — COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework. Mrs. H. F. New- 
ell. 2431 East Fifth street. Melrose 
4220. 



WANTED — 
housework. 



GIRL FOR GENi:[l.\L 
2102 East Third street. 



WANTED AT ONCE — OlRLS TO 
learn to make switches, and all 
kinds of hair work; also to learn 
hair dressing. Call at Moisan's 
hair dressing parlors, 212 West 
First street. 



WANTED— A COMPETENT GIRL TO 
take care of children and to assist 
with second work; good wages. 17*21 
East First street. 



WANTED — GOOD GIRL FOR GEN- 
eral housework; good wages; no chil- 
dren. j\pply to Mrs. O. H. Claike, 
14 20 East Superior street. 




ra 



FOR RENT — 
room for two 
avenue west. 



FURN1;^HED FRONT 
gentlemen. 215 Third 



FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
room, gentlemen preftirred. 4oi East 
Third street. 

FOR RE.NT — NEATLY FURNISHED 
rooio; steam heat, gas and bath. Flat 
4, 14 First avenue west. Inquire Bon 
Ton bakery. 

FOR RE.Nf — FURNISHED liOO.MS; 
modern conveniences very cheap; 
fine view. 213 Mesaba avenue. 



FOR RENT — FOUR 
rooms. Call at 12 V^ 
street after 7 o'clock in 



BASEMENT 
East Fourth 
the evening 



FOR RENT — LARGE FURNISHED 
parlor and bedioom; t nly $15 per 
month. Apply evenings, after 6, at 
rear fiat 12U West i'ourth street. 

FOR RENT — FOUR ROOMS FOR 
small family; very wc.rni; gas, water 
and electric liglils; |>12 per month. 
322 West Fifth street. 



FOR RENT — NEWLi' FURNISHED 
rooms. 313 West Sui. erior street. 



FOR RENT— FURNIS'HED ROOM; HOT 
v.ater heal; batii. light, and use of 
telephone. 1224 East ..''ourth street. 

For RE.NT— nice STE-\M HEATED 
room, $2 per week; roommate to 
share large room, two closets, witli 
good sober man. 219 Filth avenue 
west. 



DULUTH COUNCIL. NO. 6, 
R. & S. M. — Next meeting: 
Wednesday, Sept. 28. 1910. at 
7:30 p. m. Work — Royal and 
select masters. Carl L. Lone- 
gren. T. I. M.; Alfred L« 
Rlcheux, recorder. 

DULl'TH COM.MANDERY NO.' 
18, K. T. — Stated conclav* 
first Tuesday of each month 
at S o'clock p. m. Next con- 
clave, Tuesday. Sept. 27, 1910». 
al 4 p. m. Work — To confer 
the orders of Red Cross Temple and 
Malta. Dinner at 6:30. Newton H. 
Wilson, E. C; Alfred Le Richeux, re- 
corder. 

' SCOTTISH RITE — REGU- 

lar meetings every Tiiursday 
evening at 8 o clock. Next 
meeting Sept, 29 1910. Work 
— Installation of officer*. 
Henry Nesbitl, secretary. 







FOR RE.NT — FURNISHICD ROOMS FOR 
light housekeeping at 618 West Thn-d 
street. 



FOR RENT- 
Wesl Fifth 
water; $17 



-NICE FOJR ROOMS; 12 
Street; electric light, gas. 
per montli. 



FOR RENT— THREE L.\RGE ROOMrf, 
hot and cold water, electric light, 
gas and bath. Call 109 West Fitlh. 



ZENITH CHAPTER NO. 25, 

Order of Eastern Star — Regu- 
lar meeting . second and 
fourth Friday evenings ot 
each month at S o'clock. 
Next meeting Sept. 9, 1910. 
Work — Regular business. Minnla 
Keeler, W. M.; Ella F. Gearhart, sec- 
retary. 

EUCLID LODGE, NO. 198, A.. 
F. & A. .M.— Regular meet- 
ings second and fourth 
"VX'ednesday evenings of each 
month at 7:30 o'clock. Next" 
meeting Sept. 28, 1910. Work 

— Second degree. L. R. Clark, W. M.{ 

A. Dunleavy. secretary. 

DULUTH CHAPTER. NO. 59, 
R. A. M.— Meets at West 
Duluth first and Thlyd 
Wednesdays of each month at 
7:30 p. m. Next meeting 
Sept. 12, 1910. Work— Regular 

business. W. B. Geicheil, H. P.; A- Dun-. 

kavy, secretary. 

DULUTU LODGE. NO. 28. L 0. O. F.— MEETS 
e\fry Friday eventig at 8 o'clotk nl 0J4 
KcUowg* liall. 16 Luke Bxer.r.e nciitii.-- 
Next mfetiiigs night, Sept. i3. lliirj il»- 
E. A. Hcrgstroffi, .N. G.; G. H. Glus, Be&- 
A. H. Paul, Flu. Sec. 




gree; 

Sec.; 




HVLUTH E.N'CA.MrMi;.VT NO. 36, J. (*. 
O. K. — MecU en ttie 8oco!i<l and foartk 
Tliurstlay* ut Odil Fell'ws' Ifiil, IS Lakr 
uviuue uo:tli. Nml meetiiig ii'if'it, Se[*t. 
'12; £moktr — o\er>b<'dy come. }. U Cada^ 
C. P. ; L G. M;.rkw, Ktc. Scribe. 



FOR RENT— COZY ROOM,. L.\RGE 
closet; liot water heal and balii; 
breaklast and 6 o'clock dinner; pri- 
vate home. East end. Melrose 446. 

ROOM; 
329 East 



FOR RE.NT — FURNLSHED 

light housekeeping allowed. 
Superior street, llat t. 

FOR RENT — ONE, TAG OR THREE 
steam-healed rooms, hot and cold 
water, bath, gas. etc; light house- 
keeping allowed. 12 \\ est First 
street, flat D. 

FOR ^RENT — FOUR 
Conveniences except 
avenue. Call 32 East 




haU. 
'phone 



K. 0. T. M. 
DCLVTH TENT, NO. 1— MKETS EVERT 
WtdM's-lay, 6;13 [.. m., at Mrccab** 
:..-\ll, 21 Lake avenue r.ortti. VUub)t. 
niinibers always welcome. O. P. Uetal- 
scn. ccmmniider, &C'0 Wti-t Tliira Ktrect; 
J. B. OeiintBU. record lie*.rer. uflke ia 
Hours, 10 a. m to 1 p. m., daUj. Ztnit* 



-X. 



FOR RENT — ONE 
nished steam heated 
Superior street. 



ROOMS; ALL 
leat; 19 Me.saba 
Superior street. 

LARGE FUR- 
•oom. 218 West 



FOR RENT — FUR.NjSHED ROOM; 
steam heat. 226 Eas: Third street. 

FOR RENT— NICELY FURnTsHED 
room, steam heat anc. hot water, $12 
per month. B-5, St. tlegis flats. Sec- 
ond avenue east and ."jecond street. 



FOR RENT — TWO 

and one furnished room for 
housekeeping, in a :irlck flat; 
view; gas, electric Lgnt, bath, 
nace lieai. ai9 .Mesaba avenue; 
rose 1874. 



UNFURNISHED 

light 

lake 

fur- 

Mel- 



FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOM; 
steam heal, electric light, bath and 
lelepiione. 42 West First street, 
flat E. 



FOR RENT — THR1:E ROOMS 
220 Seventh avenue ^vest. 



AT 



FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOM, 
also rooms furnis led for light 
liousekeepmg; will rent very cheap- 
ly for winter. 709 West Tliird 
street, in rear of "05 West Third 
street. 

FOR RENT — TWO UNFURNISHED 
rooms for light housekeeping. 5o7 
East Superior street. 




A. 0. U. W. 
FIDELITY LODGE NO. 105 — MEET*. 

at Maccabee lialJ. 21 Lake avenue nt-nll, 
eveo" ThurEday al S p. m. VLln;,f mem- 
bers welctii.e A. E. Jackbon. -M. W.J 
A. E PkrinB- rec<>rdtr: O. J. MurvoJit- 
fiuauclir, 217 Eail Fifth aireel. 




S ; 
S.. 



Wat- 
Flnt- 




liaU. 

I'lIBt 

room 
seore 

Milneg, lreai.iier. 

■phono I'tCS-X. 



MODEH.N SAMARITANS. 

a: p.ma council no. i.— take so- 

.Ue thai S.-ima.'ltan degree mnis flrit. 
..lid third Thursdiiyt; ticiimcci,l, »ec nd. 
and fou.-lli Thursdnys. Lucy A. Paidj, 
Lady G. S. ; N. U. ilotribwi, G. 
Wellbaiiks, write; T. A. Gall, 
Bank buUuhig. ^ 

VNITED OUDEU OK FOKESTERS— 

Ciurt Eastern Star. No. 86, meets tTtif 

first aiid tliird Tuisdiiy at V. O. T. 

comer FourlU avenue vTcst sn4' 

street. L:Uabtt:>. Mllncs, C. B., 

23. Wlnthrop block; A. E. Piertng, 

an-. 2io Lust Fifth 6ir«et; !iarr>- 

rvom 23, WiulUrop block. Zeultk 




M. W. A. 

IMPERIAL CAMP NO. 2206 — MEET»- 
at L'. O. F. h;ill. Foorth i.Teiiue weak 
and First Ktnct, Btconu and fouitJl- 
Tue&ilayi d each monlli. William T.aiaU, 
coiwul; C. P. Etrl, clerk. Ikx ill; F. & 
Dcreiaus. deputy, addresa N. P. frelsfa^ 



cfflce. 




K. of P. 

sr Lodge N<.. 



FOR RENT — O.NE LARGE, FURNlSH- 
ed room for couple. ; 16 West Fouiin 
street; all conveniences. 



FOR RENT — T W (J FURNISHED 
rooms, lb East Sect, nd street; new 

'phone 1828-A. 



FOR RENT— PLEASAr.'T FUuNISHED 
room, suitable for one or two gentle- 
men. 29 West Fourth street. 

FOR RENT— ELEGANT FURNISHED 
large front room; suitable for one 
or two; all conveni* nces. 224 Third 
avenue east. 

FR RENT— SIX LARG i: ROO.MS WITH 
all conveniences. 5:14 Lake avenue 
north. 

FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOM; ALL 
conveniences, for gentlemen only, 
breakfast if desired 15 South Sev- 
enth avenue east. 





-r K. 



G. W. 

it 8. 



Boutin. C. C; C. U.. PuiUlp^. 





-It 
i 



I 

* 

I 



i 
« 



^' 



North Star Lodge No. 35, K. of P., meeU- 
t\ery Tuesd.iy evening at Caslie hail. 111- 
Weet Superior street. All knights cot- 
.iially ln\lted. H. N. Colviu. C. C^ 
(has. F. Uopklns, Iv. of U. 6t S. 



^ 



li. of P. 
PL^MOND LODGE NO. 45. K. of F.-— 
Meew every m ndsy evening In Sloao'c 
iiali, comer Twentieth avenue nest and, 
Sut>t:lor street. All knights corlully In- 
vited; work in secciid rank. M. J. Murtar.- 
C C. ; Otto E. NeJaoD. K. of IL & i. 



KITCHI GAMMI LODGE NO. 1U3, K. of' 
p —Meets every ThurstUy tveniug at Com- 
menlal Club haU. Central aveuae. Wc* . 
Duluth. Next nitet.r.g Thursday even- 
All ktiigh'.* cordially invitad.- 



-# 



DYE W OHKS. 



ZENITH CITY DYE SN'ORKS— LARG- 
est and most reliable. All v.'ork 
done In Duluth. Work called for and 
delivered. 'Phones: Old 1154-R; new 
1888. 232 East Superior street. 



CLAN STEWART. NO. 5''. O. S. C. — " 
Meets first and third Wednesoays eack- 
mouth, £ p. m., al U. O. F. h-.ll, ccmar 
Fourth avenue W€bt and First street. Next- 
regular mteth.g Sept. 21. .Mejtander G. Mo- 
ik night, chief; Don McLennan, secretarjj 
Jolui Buinett. :Ujancl.-.I secrttiry. 212 
Ttrrey building. 

ROYAL LEAGLE. 
Zl^NITH COUNCIL. NO. 161. ROTAI^ 
Lci^gue— Meets in K. P. hall first and 
tul-.d .Monday evenings at 8 o'clock. O. 
L llargra.cs. fcrlbe. care cf Norlbet*^ 
Bnoe company; R- S. Spn aJ. aicbou. SeU- 
wovd building. 





WOODMEN OF THE WORLD. 
ZICNMU CITY CAilP NO. 5.— MEBTH 
every scccnd auu fourth Wednesdays t\. 

the eld Masonic lempie, flftU floor. U«c- 

AuUy C. C. ii.'2 West Michigan street; 

Wliil:i.'rd Curlls, backer. No. 1. Tlie Glen; 

Temple Sloan, cleik, 6 Soutii Ttilrtecatb- 

v»est. Zenltli 'I'lione 71. 




Duluth Dye Works — French dry clean- 
ing; fancy ryeing. Old 'phone, Mel- 
rose 4191; new 1191-A. 320 E. Sup. St. 



NATIONAL DYEING & CLEANING 
company, 15 Lake avenue north. 
French dry cleaning and fancy dyers. 
Both phones 2376. 




hall. VS est 
Twtullelh 



itOYAL ARC.\NC.M, Duluth CouncU No. 
Hfto — Meeti second and fourth Tuesday 
evening., Macxabee hall. £1 Linkii avcnu* 
;; .-ai. Cllijtc!! Brooks, secretary. 4oi 
v-oluuibla building. 

Mesaba Council, No. ir43— .Meets firs* 
and ihlrd Wednesday evenings. Columblft. 

end. A. M. Johnson, ^icreiary. 117 Nort^ 

avenue west. 



Northwestern Dyeing & Cleaning Co. — 
Oldest reliable dyersi and French dry 
cleaners In Northweit. 23 Lake Ave. 
north. Phones: Ne^v 1516; old 1337. 




FOR SALE— COWS. 



FOR SALE— TW^O FAIdlLY COWS; AT 
707 South Twenty-fourth avenue 
east. 



FOR SALE — GRA]JE GUERNSEY 
cow, three years old, and heifer 
calf, at Marshall's, 832 South Sev- 
enty-second avenue west. 



NEST NO. 1200 — MEET1NQ& 
arc held on the first and Uilid 
Fiiday. of eacii luoulU. Next 
j;eeUag night. Friday. Sa'- 16. 
at Ovs-ljs' hall. liC West Su- 
perii r slrect. Joseph li. Feakfc 
stcietao'. 22 Eas: Sujwnor lUeM. 



STOVE REPAIRS 



WE CARRY IN STOCK REPAIRS FOR 
10,000 different stoves and ranges. 
C. F. Wlggerts & Son, 410 East Su- 
perior street. Both telephones. 



PICTURE FRAMING, 

DECKER'S, 16 ST^CONET AVE. W. Al^ 
complete line of artists' mate rials. 

GU8TAVB HEKNSCKE. 211 E, SUP. SB. 



'"J 



-t 



- rr- 



r 



-r 



+^^ 



mi wmm 





ULUTH HERALD 




¥i\m' 




■tr* 



■ t . ■ ; P— 



VOLUME XXVIII— NO. 144. 



FRIDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 23, 1910. 



TWO CENTS. 



Champ Clark Makes Address 
at Illinois State Con- 




MORE ALASKA 
LANDFRAUDS 

Ballinger Is Said to Be Work- 
ing on New Set of 
Claims. 



Points to "internecine War" 

of Opponents as Cause 

for Hope. 

Scores New Tariff Law as 

Dishonest to the 

People. 



Fast St. Louis. 111., Sept. 23.— "The 
li.terneolne war of the H»>publicaiis has 
tnveloped tlie whol<' ^.and, and to even 
the dullest ml: eyideiues of Re- 

publican dlsso! .:. ;- .. ust be apparent," 
Paid Congressman (Mianip Clark to the 
delegates to the Ulimtis Democratic 
state convention here today. 

Three candidates for trustees of the 

University of Illinois wiU be nomin- 
ated and a platform will be adopte I by 
the convention. Tlie delegates number 
1.140. The draft of the platform was 
offered to the resolutions committee 
for apjiroval. but the different j>lanks 
were kept secret. Ooiiffressman Hen'-y 
T. Kainey wa» chairman of the con- 
vention and Congressman Champ Clai'k 
the principal .speaker. 

>luMt Ilnve I'rograiii. 
"We cannot depend upon Hepuhllian 
factionalism alone to win." continueil 
the minority leader. "That may give 
us the house this fall without any . f- 
furt on our part, but the chances aie 
that Republican, factionalism alone 
would not grive us victories beyond this 

(Continued on pape 12. fifth column.) 

NEW ARREST FOR 
SLUICE BOX THEFT 

Marcus Johansen Accused of 

Part in Alaska 

Robbery. 

Seattle. Wasii., i^ept. 23. — Marcus 
Johansen, 22 year.s old, was arrested 
here yesterday on a cliarge of com- 
plicity in the stealing of |14,345 from 
the sluice boxes of the Pioneer Mining 
company at Nome, Alaska, several 
weeks ago. Johansen worked for the 
company with Johan Tyberg, who is 

lield here in connection with the same 
case. Johansen and Tyberg came out 
on the same steamship, the Senator, 
Iroru Nome last Friday. 

WAIVE EXAMINATION. 

Smeaton and IJoyd Bound Over to 
the Circuit Cuurt. 

Ashland. Wis.. Sept. 23.— i Special to 
The Herald. > — Smeaton and Lloyd 
waived examination on considracy 
charge today and w.re bound over to 
the April term of circuit court in ?2,000 

bonds. 

—, » ■■ 

Carrlem at I,ouK I'rnlrie. 

W'ashirgton, Sept. 2r>. — (Si'ccial to 
The Herald.) — Merton M. Hamlin was 
today appointed rural carrier and 
Charles O. Hamlin substitute on route 
4 at Long Prairie. Minn. 
— — m .. 

.^nicrlciin TypeirrUer Flrnt. 

Bru.^sels, Sept. 23. — The Smitli pre- 
mier typewriter, manufactured at Syr- 
acuse. " N. Y., has been awarded the 
prand prix over all competitor.'; at the 
Brussels international exposition. 

PAYNE LAU 



Situation Like That in Cun- 
ningham Affair Reported 
to Exist. 



MAY DISCUSS 
LEE'SJTATUE 

Grand Army Leaders Hope 

to Prevent Radical 

Action. 



DULUTH, SOUTH SHORE & ATLANTIC 
RAILROAD WILL BE MERGED WITH 
SOO LINE WHEN DEPOT IS READY 




McCumber Pension B9 Ex- 
pected to Find 
Favor. 



EDWARD C. STOKES. 




THE AL 




Chavez, the Peruvian, Takes 

Monoplane Across Sim- 

plon Pass. 

Accident at Domodossola Pre- 
vents Finish of Trip- 
American Fails Again. 



Spokane, Wash., Sept. 23.— The Chron- 
icle says:, 

"An investigation of suspected land 
frauds in Alaska, which may exceed 
in scope and siartllng developments 
the famous Cunningham cases, is be- 
lieved to be in progress, guided by 
feleral officers in the Northwest. 

"This investigation, said to involve 
an entirely new group of claims in 
charges similar to those brought 
against the Cunningham entries, is 
believed to have been instituted and 
activelv pushed by Secretary of the 
Interior Ballinger. . 

"The list of entrymen involved is 
said to Include many men of promin- 
ence in Spokane and the inland em- 
, pire. as well as others of national im- 
portance. .. ■ li. «^ 
"Secretary Ballinger s recent visit to 
Spokane, according to the rumors 
alloat here, was made in furtherance 
of the investigation now in progrei:s 
by officials of tlie land office and the 
department of justice." 

Siieelal .\Keiit» on <irosin«l. 
Lending color to ;eports of an in- 
vestigation of susiteoled land frauds in 
y^laFka Is the presence in Spokane of 
Clvde Walker, former special agent at 
Spokane and now register of the land 
office at Juneau. 

Two special agents operating out ol 
the Seattle office are said to have 
been on the ground In Alaska, and to 
have conducted an exhaustive inquiry 
with thorough secrecy. Special Agent 
Christensen the successor of Louis R. 
Glavis and Special Agent Carnahan are 
said to have been engaged on the cases 
for several months. 

The developments expected in Spo- 
kane in the next few days are believed 
In some quarters to explain in some 
measure the long silence of Secretary 
Ballinger under stlnK of the Glavis 
charges as well as the attitude of 
President Taft toward his much criti- 
cised secretary of the interior. 

STOKES LEADS IN 
NEW JERSEY RACE 



HURT WHILE "TUNING UP" NEW RACER 



Atlantic City, N. J- Sept, 23.— The 
national encampment of the Grand 
Army of the Republic will finish its 
business today and bring the reunion 
to a close. There have been no se- 
rious accidents and the health of the 
encampment has been excellent. 

The principal business of today is 
the report by the committee on reso- 
lutions. .Many subjects were r?ierred 
to that comniitte, among " them the 
question of tlie increasing of the pen- 
sions and tlie controversy over the 
I{obert E. Lee statue. It Is not ex- 
pected that radical action will be taken 
on any subject. The leaders expect 
that some of the old soldiers who still 
have a lot of fighting spirit left in 
then, will try to put through a resolu- 
tion denouncing the placing of the Lee 
statue in the national capltol, but hope 
to prevent the encampment from tak- 
ing anv action whatever. 

MfCumber Bill Favored. 
The encampment probably will con- 
fine itself to indorsing tj»e McCumber 
bill now in congress. Which grants 
pensions to widows of veterans, pro- 
viding they were married to the old 
soldiers .it least three years before 
they died. The McCuihber bill, if 
pas!-ed, will let down the bars to about 
20 000 widows and will increase the 
pension roll about $3,000,000 annually. 
The Sons of Veterans selected Roch- 
ester for their next years' meeting. 
John F. Gilinan of Boston for comman- 
der-in-chief, and Rochester, N. Y., for 
the next lace of meeting, was the win- 
ning combination In the G. A. R- The 
other officers elected were: Senior 

(Continued on pagelS, fourth colu?nn.) 

TAFT PLANS FOR 
RATHER FULL DAY 




Duluth Road Will Be Oper- 

ated By the Soo 

System. 

South Shore Trains Will Rffli 

Into New Depot Just 

Completed. 

Move Long Expected in Rail- 
road Circles About to 
Be Made. 



GEORGE ROBERTSON. 

Aflneola Sent '>?, George Robertson, tiie automobile driver, was injured 

and^siephe^n l^ynoldsTa ?el1ow rider, was slightly hurt today ^. hen the^^ 
Benz (ar which Robertson was tuning up tor the Vanderbilt cur rate i* rne 
turtle as it struck the Massapcqua curve at high speed. Robertson was picked 
ip'umonscious and taken to^he Nassau hospital, where it was ound t^at le 
had suffered contusions on the head and arm, and bruises on the body. Hks in- 
liirl.»R are not serious The car was going about seventy miles an hour 
J"'^*ft?rbenevedl"obertson attempted to take the dangerous curve at too high 
speed It is not known whether anything went wrong with the mechanism. 



N 



Ten Counties Yet to. Make 

Returns in Senatorial 

Primary. 





Domodossola, Italy, Sept. 23. — To 
George Chavez, the Peruvian aviator, 
belongs the honor of being t,lie first to 
fly across the Alps. 

Tlie daring feat was accomplished 
today in an attempt to win the prize 
t)f f20,000 offered by the Italian Avia- 
tion societv of ililan for a flight from 
Brig, Switzerland, to Milan. Chavez, 
however, was unable to complete the 
trip, having sustained painful injuries 
when iie alighted here. His machine, a 
mononlane, was overturned and he was 
burled in the wreckage. It is not be- 
lieved, however, that his injuries are 
serious. 

Ciiavez crossed the Simplon Kulm at 
l-m and thus accomplished wh.at has 
been regarded as one of the most dar- 
ing feats i>ropcsed for the airmen. He 
liad wailed patiently for favorable 
I weather along the route, where strong! 
I winds are th.e rule. This morning both i 
! sides of the Alps reported clt-ar j 
weather, but the top of th.e Simplon 
pass was In haze. 

Hoftv Nearly 7.0OO Feet. 
Chavez rose to a heiglit estimated at 
nearly 7,000 feet. It was known that 
it would be necessary for him to attain 
to nearly this altitude to clear the 
Simplon pass, the summit of whica 
rises 6,.j92 feet. He maintair.ed ap- 
parently this altitude for at least a half 
hour, and followed over the road built 
by Napoleon in ISOO over the Simplon 
pass. He accomplished the eight miles 
that brought him over the top of Simp- 
lon and then sailed gracefully over the 
eighteen miles down to Domodossola. 

Arriving at Domodr^<=ola he had left 
the hardest part of hi\ journey behind 
him, ha ving escaped the high pe aks 

(Continued on page 15, sixth column.) 

CLAIMS CANADA 
IS BEING CHEATED 



Trenton, N. J., Sept. 23. — Official re- 
turns of the Republican United States 
senate primary contest for indorse 
inent were received at the secretary of 
state's office today from four of the 
remaining counties. There are t-^n 
more counties yet to send in their 
figures. A compilation of official re- 
turns already in and the semi-official 
figures of the other counties gives Hd- 
ward C. Stokes a total of 39,1)1:7 votes; 
Charles N. Fowler, 3S,b:53, and Frank- 
lin Murphy, 36,163. 

Mr. Fowler, who is a conspicuous 
leader of the anti-Cannon forces in the 
present ccmgress, was at the same 
time a candidate for renomination to 
congress, but was defeated by Judge 
Runyon. 



Refuge Home and High School 

Will Get Some of 

His Time. 

Cincinnati, Ohio, S^»i. 23.— President 
Taft will be fairly busy +*>day. He is 
to receive visitors at'the home of his 
brother, visit Cincinnati's refuge home, 
motor to the new Woodward high 
school, and dine with his sister-in-law. 
Mrs. Charles Anderson, at her home. 

At the refuge home the president 
will be received by Mayor Schwab and 1 
Safety Director Scott Small. The home 
was founded sixty years ago today by 
Judge Alphonso Taft, the father of the 
chief executive. It is expected the 
president will deliver a brief speech. 
From there the president will go to the 
new Woodward high school, the cor- 
nerstone of which he laid the day aft- 
er he was elected. He >*^as graduated 
from the old school, an4 is president 
of the Woodward Alumni association. 
The girl pupils of the school will pre- 
pare lunch for him. 



MORE THAN 88,000 
DEAD OF CHOLERA 

Figuires Are Shown at Sani- 

taiy Bureau in Russian 

Capital 



St. Petersburg, Sept. 23.— The figures 
availa-ble at the sanitary bureau show 
that during the present cholera epi- 
demic there have been 191,076 cases 
with 88,716 deaths throughout the 
country. In the last six days there 
have been 301 new cases and 83 deaths 
in this city^ 

TWO COMPANIES OF 

FIREMEN OVERCOME. 

Chicago, Sept. 23.— Fire today in the 
twine plant of the Deering Harvester 
works cau.^ed $200,000 loss. Two com- 
panies of firemen, struggling to over- 
come the flames, were toppled over, 
unconscious from smoke, in upper sto- 
ries of the plant, but were rescued. 
» 
Lightning Causes Fire. 
Belle Fourche, S. D., Sept. 23.— Fire 
originating from a stroke of lightning 
vesterdav destroyed tlie Bernard & 
Staley flouring mills and the electric 
light plant here, causing a loss of ?65,- 
000. 



WILL HOLD 
INQUIRY NOW 

Senate Committee Decides 

Not to Delay lorimer 

Case. 



Newspaper's Attorney to Take 
Part in Chicago Pro- 
ceedings. 



23. — The senatorial 
privileges and elec- 




I WRECKED! 



;t****^<H^-^BM^*- 






^*4Mt-*****^HMf 



g. ^ ^, A" A W W 'jf lif 
y^ ^ ^ "^ ^^ "^ ''^^'t^ ^ 



Admits Woolen Schedule Is 

Too High— Says He 

Is Sorry. 

Denies Coramiitee Was "In- 
fluenced"— Talks of Cost 
of Living. 



Lyons, N. Y., Sept. 23. — Representa- 
tive Sereno F. Payne, chairman of the 
ways and means committee of the 
house of representatives and author 
of the law bearing his name, made a 
warm defense of that measure before 
the congressional convention which re- 
nominated him today. He said in part: 
"I have always been ready to give 
an account of my stewardship to my 
constituents There has been so much 
unjust criticism, so many mistaken 
statements made during the past year 
and a half, that it seems more fitting 
than ever to si>eak in detail of what 
has been accomplished. 

"The platform promised a revision of 
the tariff that should provide a duty 
equal to the difference in cost of labor 
here and abroad, with a reasonable 
profit to the manufacture. It promised 
this a.s to each article whether it re- 
sulted in raisin g or lowering the tar- 

( Continued on page 16, second column.) 



Dominion Officer Says Chinese 

Are Dodging $500 

Head Tax. 

Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 23.— Edward 
Foster, special officer of the dominion 
government, now here, believes He has 
discovered a scheme whereby the gov- 
ernment is defrauded through illegal 
entrv of Chinese into Canada by the 
avoidance of the ?."00 head tax. He has 
detained thirty out of about 400 Chi- 
nese arriving by the steamer Empress 
of China. It is believed that the scheme 
is being carried on by an organization 
working on both sides of the Pacific. 

LABOR BOARD IN 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Conciliation Body Is Organ- 
ized to Deal With 
Differences. 

San Francisco, Sept. 23. — Labor dif- 
ferences in tills city hereafter will be 
submitted to the San Francisco indus- 
trial conciliating l)oard, a permanent 
organization which was formed yester- 
day. The boarcT* consists of twelve 
employers end twelve labor delegates. 
William Mafson was chosen president. 




Chicago, Sept. 
sub-committee on 
tions which convened here to investi- 
gate the alleged fraud and corruption 
In the election of Senator "William Lori- 
mer, decided today to proceed at this 
time with the taking of testimony, and 
not to postpone the meeMng until after 
the November elections, as urged by 
the senator's attorney, Elbridge Han- 
ecv, at the first open session of ihe 
committee yesterday. 

At the opening of • oday s session 
Chairman Burrows also announced that 
the committee would permit Attorney 
Alfred H. Austrian, representing the 
Chicago Tribune, and Former Judge 
Elbridge Hanecy, repref^enting Senator 
Lorimer. to appear in t le hearing. 

This finding was arri\ ed at in an in- 
formal conference of the senators last 
night and today the committee mem- 
bers were unwilling to discuss any 
phase of the hearing. 

Hanecy A«iked I>elay. 

Attorney Hanecy pre^^ented his for- 

fifth column.) 



That the Duluth, South Shore & At- 
lantic railroad will peacefully and 
quietly pass out of existence as a 
separate road, beginning with the 
operation of its trains into the new Soo 
depot in the very near future. Is a 
story that today received confirmation 
from an official in a position to give 
the facts in connection with the oft- 
repeated statement. 

For the past few years the South 
Shore has been considered a failure 
as a monev-making railroad. Though 
the groFs receipts of the road have 
been increasing, the deficit has also 
been increasing. 

Tlie bonded indebtedness of the road 
is large, and the interest upon this 
eats up the earnings of the road. 

It is generallv known that the Soo 
is the railroad child of the Canadian 
Prclfic, It is also generally known 
that a very clcee affiliation exists be- 
tween the South Shore and the great 

(Continued on page^B, fourth column.) 

BIG BREAKWATER 
AT SAN PEDRO DONE 



Immense Structure Soon ot 
Be Turned Over to - 
Government 

Los Angeles. Sept. 2o. — The great 
breakwater protecting the harbor of 
San Pedro, which represents an ex- 
penditure of many millions and ten y 
years of continuous labor, is complete. 
The structure will be turned over to 
the government Oct. 1. The break- 
'water is 9.250 feet long. It has a 
width of 200 feet at the bottom and 
20 at the top. At the outer end the 
water is 4h feet deep. 



No MlMHlOBM In Sudan. 

Boston, Sept. >'3. — A recommenfl- 
ation that no missions be established 
In the Sudan, but that the missionaries 
on the Congo be reinforced and the 
work extended, is made in the report 
of the American Baptist Foreign Mis- 
sion societv of the special commission 
sent by the society to investigate con- 
ditions In those regions. 



(Continued on 



page 

• 



15 



SMASH TARGETS 
AniX MILES 

Navy Marksmen Do Great 

Work on the Drill 

Grounds. 

On Board U. S. Battleship Kansas, at 
Sea, on Southern JJrIU Grounds, 
Wednesday, (by wireless via Ports- 
mouth, Va.), Sept. 23— The Atlantic 
fleet, the pride of the American navy, 
has demonstrated that no mark is too 
small for it to hit if it shows any- 
where above the horizon. 

Eight of the sixteen big battleships, 
forming the first squadron and headed 
bv Rear-Admlral Schroeder's flagship, 
the Connecticut, peppered four targets, 
each one-fifth the size of an ordinary 
warship, at a range greater than 10,- 
000 varde, or more than six miles. The 
Delaware, one of the two new Ameri- 
can super-Dreadnoughts, cut away her 
target at the first salvo. The other 
ships of the fleet, incljdlng the Dela- 
ware the North Dakota, the Connecti- 
cut, 'the Louisiana, the Kansas, the 
Michigan, the New Hampshire and the 
South Carolina, also found the range 
accurately. ^ 

Targets Were ToweO. 
The target floats were towed in 
Single file by a battleship which was 
not shooting. Some of the shells 
dropped 500 feet astern and gave a 
realistic imitation of actual battle to 
those aboard. After the signal to 
commence firing had been given, the 
ships had four and a half minutes to 
fire. Nearly 500 shots, including 100 
twelve-Inch shells, were fired. 

During the practice one of the big 
twelve-inch, fifty-ton Kuns of the bat- 
tleship Georgia burst on the first 
range shot. The muzzle as far back as 
the forward end of the jacket was 
blown off. The crew miraculously es- 
caped injury. v, v., v. 

The big rifle was ruined, probably be- 
yond repair. The Georgia was one of 
th-' battleships of the second squadron 
of the dav target practice. She Is com- 
manded by Capt. William L. Rogers 
and is the flagship of Rear-Admiral 
Samuel P. Comly, conmander of the 
third division of the Atlantic fleet. 



lALTIMORE 
DRO^ BACK 

Loses Sixlh Place in Rank of 

Cities to Cleveland, 

Ohio. 



Decreases in Population Shown 

By Chelsea and 

Galveston. 



Washington, Sept. 23.— Baltimore, 
which was the sixth city in the United 
States in point of population in ISOO, 
has lost her position in the country's 
great cities, according to today's cen- 
sus statistics, and now becomes seventh 
city, having In the last ten years been 
outstripped by Cleveland, which takes 
sixth place. rr^ ^o- 

Baltimores population is now 55S,4K» 
as compared with Cleveland's 560,663. 
The Maivland city grew 9.7 per cent, or 
in numbers 49,528, during tne last ten 
vears, having had b08,9t.7 in 1900. 
Cleveland, which had a population of 
381,768 in 1900, grew 46.9 per cent in 
the decade just ended. Sixth position 
liad been Baltimore's for the last thirty 
years. 

Other Cttle* Reporte*. 
The population of Savannah. Ga., Is 
65,064, an increase of 10,820, or 19.9 
per cent, as compared with 64,244 in 
1900. 

Population statistics of the thir- 
teenth census were made public today 
1 by Director Durand of the census bu- 
I reau for the following Massachusetts 
'cities: . , 

Fall River, 119.295, an Increase of 
14,432, or 13.8 per cent, over 104,863 In 
1900. . , 

Cambridge, 104.839, an Increase of 
12,953, or 14.1 per cent, over 91.886 in 
1900. 

Lynn, 89,336, 'an increase of 20.823, or 
30.4 per cent, over 68,513 in 1900. 

Chelsea. 32,452, a decrease of l.$20, 
or 4.8 per cent, over 34.072 In 1900. 
Three Texas cities also are reported 
on, as follows: 

Fort Worth. 73,312, an Increase cf 
4C,644, or 174.4 per cent, over 26,668 in 

Galveston, 36,981. a decrease of 808, 
or 2.1 per cent, over 37.389 in 1900. 

San Antonio, S6.614. an Increase of 
43,292, or 61.2 per cent, over 63,321 m 
1900. 



— "^ »— 



^i> 



I 








r— • — i 







11 P I iioa 



Friday, 



THE DUfLUTH HERALD. 



a^^^^ ##4^ 



WKATHKR — Generally cloudy tonijilit and .Saturday; contitiued 
cool temperature; moderate to brisk northeasterly winds. 



The Store Evervbody Is Talking About. 




Superior Street at Second Axertue West. 
Ttie One Dulutli Store for Ov^ereoats. 





wuak 

Bensh-Made Glofhss for Fall 

'TIIFA-'RE all here— the new, fall Oak Hall Bench- 
tnado Clothes — and every man in Duliith should see 
thcni. They're desii^ned and put together and finished 
just like the best class of made-to-measure garments. 
They'll wear and fit and look better than any clothes 
3 ou o\er owned. Stylish men, economical men, partic- 
I'.lar men should wear them. Come for yours tomorrow 
—score of styles, grades 
.ind I <)!' irings to choose 
fr jni — priced . 



• ••«••• 



v^ome lor vours tomorn 

$20 to $3 



Fall Hats and Furnishings 

'p IIK XEW Stiff Hats. Soft Hats, Caps, Shirts, Neck- 

we;ir. 1 loisery and Underwear are waiting here at 

your >-.rs ice — the largest and most comprehensive stocks 

cr «.lispla)ed. Better make your selections now 

;t<<i>nments are at their l)est and all the smartest 

are to be had. 

KNOX HATS S5.00 

ROSWELLE HATS J^S.OO 

REGAL SHOES ^3.50 

EMERY SHIRTS ^1.50 

LONDON NECKWEAR 50f^ 



^ C \^^ :■ ' ■ ly customer a short while ago: "You folks ^ 

--H all the boys' suits sold in Duluth. at least, ^ 

^ to all the parents who take real pride in their boys' ap- ^ 

% peararuc--. 1 used to live in Philadelphia and thought ^ 

tDuhith st »res much inferior to the ones back home and % 

they w cr.- Itefore this store began. Don't see why any- %t^ 

^ one 1 even think of buying boys' clothes in'ordi'n- ^ 

2 ary si >re>." This store certainly appeals to people who ^ 

^ ku'nv and care. ^ 

^ Thaf $5 Suii With Two Fair of Panfs ^ 

^ G^^^"'' -^"" ^. P''*-'^*>' §'-*^^^^ '^^^ ^"'^" the values at the 
% Oak Hall--it also emphasizes that though you some- 

^ '..n:.'^ sec >imilar offers advertised elsewhere, investiga- 
^ i;un proves that they only seem similar. Right now — a 
^ good store of school clothes is verv valuable to j-ou — 

and the (^ak Hall rises to the occas'ion. Suits for boys 

- !*> years — appropriate styles. 

R >ys' Sc'iiu' 
$8.50 to 

Rus-iinn ar.J Sailor 
vear^ SlO.OO to 



Suits — 7 to 18 years, 



I 
I 



at price- 



$3.59 
$3.00 

iiats. Caps. Sweaters, Shoes, Hosiery, Blouses, etc.. 



Suits — 2fi to 10 



!ike to pay. 






THE GOSD flOTHES STOriE. 



Qpen Lafe 
Etery 

Saturilay. 




Superior Street st Second Avenue West. 



Meet 

Your Fribnds 

Here. 



JJ0t^f 000^0 0^S^ 





c2 ''5 .^TA -^if jfX. ffl"%. .4""^ "Vai 

,0061 

%^ ^ ^ .... .:| DoiiMeDIsc 

^'' .^s^: ,.n Records 
^. ,:^^'^' i On Sale 

"^ft^ Saturday 

Two Selections for 6Sc 

COLUMBIA 10-INCH DOUBLE-DISC RECORDS. 

A i ■■ K. ..--IkliiiiU.i— .N,a l>. Ciiiyer. Temr Sol,), orch. .\c.'.)niD Fre^'prici- v n/,n«« 

.IS, I'l' ■. ■.■ *'"•'' ^I- Miiyew and Utiinr IJurr 

,,,- .„ tl^o ^I'l^ cjpyrlgliteO. adultlunal prire 4c) 

,. .\ .. 0%h tc^mp"" ^"'"- "^^ ''■' """^ '"^ "'^"'l "'*> G!ri-.S. R Henry 
•"^^t ,'.'•;:'"-• V''";!' r's f ' o r^^'^' i-'^"'* ■«l''-' ^ ■ It.' BlglU- ■ UttlV Clri ro^'M^'^'^ ''™"* 

'Two slJe, oopyrig^.tfU. addllioMa! ■pri.VVr) """ ^"^ ^'""' 

-Ky— Edit!) Kli.Kiley. Barlloue and Tenor Duet. Orch 4o.-omp.... 

.,,.„., ., ,., , ">n« slrte cpyrlghted. additional prk-e. 2c) Wr-^n o. mrlan 

AS.... When tUe Uloum 1.^ ,x> the Ueathei-Wm. Oould. Vocal Quartet, male voice.. Orch. 

My ■ ' •i:;«::<:haun^; ■ blcoti.' ■ "Vocai' Quartet, male " rlAces.' Orrh^"A,i;^^i;'p. *'*''*' 

,,..„ ^, , , , ■'■Vone'3i:iVcoWrii!ii't;d;'adduionai'price.'2ci U™a3vrU-k Quartet 

ASM fonrlMK' tl.^ .Vnehor-Paul Uodney Ba«i Solo. Orch. Accorap Frederick Gunther 

Thr. |)i.vr-i;.UT. .1. I>,der. Rn*s Solo. Orch. .\cc.mp Kn^Trirk Pnnt «J 

A899 i:.. d ily... sweet Day-Kate Va>,naU. Contralto Solo Orch Accomp ''■ Miss MeHe tJo«^ 

A»0) Tho II ir.^ .. .r Then^TulUu., C. 0-Kane. V,«;.l Quartet, MUed voleU: Orci^ .\'vom" 

0,u, a lUam' ;f SutulUne^-.- b! " Swene;; " ' li^ritono" and Tenor Du^ero^'jJ. A.^comp^""'^ 

. : ^"■Aia'^nuBourii^-Hou.-noWman;;;::;::.:;:;::::::;:::;:::::::::""'*^^^^^^ 

iVLunlno Hag lT>»o-Stei,. --Ci.aM. J. Jchnwn .'. .'. Prince-f Band 

(Two »ld(w copyrlgliied. addltlontil price, 4c) 

COLUMBIA 10-INCH DOUBLE-DISC BLUE LABEL RECORDS. 

A10J2 High IJfe <Twu-.Step)-rjnlllo Murillo. Pianoforte Solo rmlllo MurlUo 

Utmor (Polka de salon)— EmlUo MuriUo, Ilanoforle Solo F^mlllo Muiillo 

A!W3 Jn:wdU-Mrs. Norton. Vocal Quartet, male voices, Unaccomp. .. .Archibald Brothers Quartet 

x.,.,s 71 u y'*^ Vocal Quartet, male voices. Un:-.ccomp Archibald lirottur» Quartet 

A.»04 Clip Hands -.Icymo re Kurth. Mezzo-Soprauo Solo. Orch. Acconip Miss «;race La Eue 

Doe« .\Q>l).)dy Hero Know Nancy— Harry L. Newman and Sidney Grant. .Vlewio-Sopraao 

Solo, Orch. .Vccuup mIss Grace La Rue 

COLUMBIA 12-INCH DOUBLE-DISC RECORDS. 

A.-.222 Made ' No.-tiir.ie>— Briiiley UlchaPli. Violin. Flute and Harp Trio.Stehl, Lufsky and Scbuet^e 
Ad..ration-KclU I!.it..«skl. Violoncello .Solo. Orch. Aocoiup. .... Uaiig Knmold 

A.',22. L..da d. Lanm,enn,,or-Sele..tl ;n-DonlzetU ^ l ! ! ! ; l ; i^,e-« Mmu^ Znd 

Alda— Triumphal March— ^ er< II Prince's Band 

A5224 la) Old Negro Song ••Scandullre My Namel" (b) Two "Play Song»"— •'SatMy Night" 

.... '^'^"■''V' ""'^" Soprano Solo, Banjo Accomp. by Veae L. ()s=raan Kitty CUeaham 

Wlien MnlUidy Sings (A Poem)— Paul Lawrence Dunbar. Descriptive RecltaUon 

, ,, ,■ ■, ,;■».■■..■, m , '^"'y Cheatham 

.-1 Minima mla clie vo-s»pe— E. NutUe. Ten»r S lo, in N'eapoUun, Orch. Accomp F Daddl 
TurantolU Itemlulscenze drtl" ant'ca NapoU— N. M. Calace Prlnce'g Orclieittra 

EDIVIOMX, 

330 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 




HERALD^ West 

19ULUTH DEPARTME 




BRANCH OFFICES! 



i 



A. Jenaen, 380 ATorth 57th At«. W. J. J. Mornn, 316% BTorth Central Ave. 




was let some time ago to the American 
Bi'idge company. 

W. J. King has the contract for the 
brick work on the sheds. As soon as 
there Is much headway made on the 
steel construction, a force of men will 
bo put to work laying brick. 

It is planned to have the buildings 
completed Jan. 1. 



WANT RINK ON 
PLAYGROUND 



West Duluth School Children 

Will Petition Park 

Board. 

A movement is on foot among the 
students of the Irving grade and Du- 
lutli industrial high schools to petition 
the park commission to turn the sum- 
mer playgrounds at West Duluth into 
a free skating rink this winter. 

The idea worked out well last year 
in the instance of the summer plaiy- 
grounds at the We.st sr.d near the 
Bryant .school. Tlie ground was flooded 
and was one of the most popular .spot.s 
for children afternoon and evenings in 
the western end of the city. 

Kvery effort last winter to secure a 
free skating rink at West Duluth met 
with failure. It is said that several 
sites were offered to the park fr*-e of 
cliarge to be used for a skating rink 
However, nothing was done along this 
line. 

Ine Western Curling club at West 
Dulutli maintains a skating rink, 
wliich is not only oi>en for member.^ 
but also for the general public, but 
admi.^sion is oliarged. Outside of this 
and a small rink at Oneota, maintained 
by the Oneota Hoys' club there were 
no other skating places at West Du- 
lutli except the river. 

Tlie children of the Irving school 
will probably bring the matter before 
the park liuard at an early date. The 
grounds, it is argued, might as well 
be utilized during t!ie winter montlis 
as well as summer. 

Akltrman Harncs of the Eighth ward 
brought tlie matter lief ore tlie coun- 
cil recently. He introduced a resolu- 
tion in which tlie council requested tlie 
park board to look into the matter. 

West I>iiluth parents who would not 
allow tlieir cnildren to .skate on the 
river are al.so in favor of the free rink 
On the summer i)h\vgiounds. 



Returns From Fiiilaud. 

Rev. Gustaf Oberg, pastor of 



the 



Swedish P,innleh Lutheran church. 
Fifty-third avenue west and Wadena 
street, is expected to return tomorrow 
from a trip-to» Finland and other North- 
ern countries od Europe. He has been 
gone tlie greater part of the summer. 

FORMteTAStOR 
TO VISIT HERE 

Rev. C. A. Aldeen Will Preach 

at Swedish Baptist 

Church. 

Rev. O. A. Aldeen of Jamestown, N. 
Y., who for many years served as pas- 
tor of the Third Swedish Baptist church 
of West Duluth, and who left here 
about four years ago. will be in Du- 
luth to preach to his former congre- 
gation at both morning and evening 
services on Sunday. Sept. 25. 

Mr. Aldeen was very active in church 
affairs when in Duluth and he is said 
to be one of the most popular m,inister3 
of Jamestown. 

FIRED AT POLICEMAN. 



Revelers at New Duluth Take Three 
Shots at Officer Brouilette. 

In an attempt to make an arrest, 
Officer Brouilette of New Duluth near- 
ly lost his life last evening about 11 
o'clock. ^ ' 

Three sti-^ajigers, leaving a saloon, 
were creating a disturbance on the 
street, and when Officer lirouilette saw 
them and walked towards them they 
filed tiiree. ahots at him and ran. 

He was about 100 feet from them at 
the time and. lh.e sliots went wild. Tlie 
men have not been apprehended. 

Coiitraet Let for Car Sheds. 

Work began tiiis week on the steel 
frame car .sheds of the Duluth. Missabe 
& Northern railroad at Proctor, The 
.sheds will be'^0 feet wide, 600 feet 
long, and #iU fcQst in the neighborliood 
of $60,000. The contract foi- the work 



mu A FEW DAYS MORE AND 
THEN THE 




^9 




indows 



1 5 EasI Superior Si. it Will Pay You to Wait. 

Our competitors may try to steal our namfc, but they cannot 
deliver the goods we do at our prices. 

Our goods are all brand new and strictly up-to-date and of 
the very best workmanship and quality direct from the factory. 
Our army of clerks are working early and late opening case after 
case of brand new merchandise. 

We Will Be open to the Public in a Few Days — Watch For An- 
nouncement — at 15 East Superior St.,. Opposite the 
Bijou. Vv^ith a Complete Line of the Following: 

ill ic 

ISTS, 
ERWEAR, STOCK- 
SWEATERS AND 
SHOES 

You may expect the Best Goods at the Lowest Prices, and you 
will not be disappointed, 

MEN'S AND YOUNG MEN'S. SUITS AND 
OVERCOATS, all of fhem are Union Made, 
sfrictly up-to-date and the best; UNDER- 
WEAR, STOCKINGS, NIGHT GOWNS, PAJA- 

M*S, HATS AND CAPS, SWEATERS, SHOES, NECKWEAR, ETC. 
CHILDREN'S SWEATERS, SHOES AND UNDERWEAR. 

We are in daily communication with many manufacturers, who 
are offering us their overstock of up-to-date goods at practically 
our own price, enabling us to sell you good», at retail for less 
than the regular wholesale price, 4 

NEW BARGAINS NEARLY E^ERY DAY. 
REMEMBER— NOTHING BUT THE BEST. 
WATCH OUR WINDOWS ANDvYQl? WILL 
NOT BE DISAPPOINTED. '' 

I guarantee every article sold by me to be a bargain — to be 
absolutely first-class in every particular, an^ t<> be exactly as per 
our representations. Should you buy any goods from me not 
fully up to your expectation, I will take the same back and re- 
fund the purchase price. This broad, binding guarantee fully pro- 
tects you. We know the value of satisfied customers. Once you 
deal with us you remain forever a staunch friend. 

15 EAST SUPERIOR ST. M. COOK, Prop. 



M 



ENTERTAINS SOCIETY. 

Mrs. Jauies Pickard Hostess to Hive 
No. 893. L. 0. T. M. M. 

Mrs. James Pickard of 5119 Ramsey 
street entertained the members of Hive, 
No. 893, Ladies of the Modern Mac- 
cabees yesterday at an afternoon tea. 
The afternoon was spent in playing 
cards, A prize was awarded to Mrs, 
William Pangborn. Refreshments were 
sorved. 

Among those present were: Mrs. R. 
Little, Messrs. Josepli Haley, Mrs. J. 
H'.. Beagle, Mrs. William Pangborn, 
Mrs. H. O. Smith, Mrs. E. Youngren, 
Mrs, George Emerson. Mr.s. J. Schnei- 
der, Mrs. James Graves, Mr.-<. A. Tucker, 
Mrs. J. V. Turner, Mrs. Leo Hannot, 
Mlrs. R. Day, Mrs. Sarah Rook, Miss 
Anna Hoffman and Miss Marlon Tucker. 

Routine Meeting. 

A routine business niCL-ting of the 
West Duluth Commercial club will be 
held this evening. A few committees 
are to make reports on matters which 
have been pending for some lime, but 
as far as known, no new business will 
ome up. 



Aged Man Breaks Leg. 

Allen McLean, 80 years old, fell 
heavily on a sidewalk on Central ave- 
nue this afternoon and sustained a 
broken leg. He was taken to tlie Du- 
liith hospital. McLean lives with his 
s >n. Duncan McLean, fireman at No. 8, 
residing at Fifty-seventh avenue west 
and Sixth street. 

West Duluth Bi'iefs. 

Special Saturday tie sale 35c, three 
for $1. Values 50c, 75c and $1. The 
Great Eastern. 

Mr. and Mrs, Clarence Osgood, who 
were married Tuesday by Kev. J, W. 
I.oiighridge of the West end, will make 
ilieir lionie In the Ilialto apartments, 
I'ifty-third avenue west and Ramsey 
street. Mr.s. Osgood was formerly Miss 
Mamie Hendren. 

Rev. E. B. Collier, pastor of Holy 
Ai>ost!es Episcopal church of AVe.st 
1,'uluth, will leave tomorrow for Tower, 
Minn., where lie will conduct services 
Sunday. He will return to Duluth in 
time to preach in the evening. There 
will be no morning preaching service 
at the West Duluth church. 

The funeral of May. 4-inonths-old 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Mc- 
Kinnon of 313 North Fifty-second ave- 
nue west, wlio died yesterday morning 
was held this afternoon from .St. James 
church, with burial at Oneota ceme- 
tery. 

Tlie Young People's Society of Our 
Savior's Norwegian Lutheran church, 
lield a social last evening at the 
cnurch. Fifty-seventh avenue west and 
Wadena street. There was a good pro- 
gr.am of speaking and several musical 
numbers. 

The choir of Holy Apostle's Episco- 
pal churcli will meet this evening at 
the rectory, 634 North Fifty-eighth 
avenue west for practice. 

H. J. Kauffman of Minneapolis is the 
guest oi' West Duluth friends for a 
few days. 

Who's your tailor? Ed V. Price & 
Co.. at Keefe's toggery. 

Watch repairing. Hurst, West Duluth. 



FOUR KNO\n DEAD IX 

ROCK ISLAND WRECK. 



Denver, Colo.. Sept, 23. — Westbound 
passenger train No, 27, on the Rock 
I;jland road, due in uenver at 8:25 this 
morning from Kansas City, ran into a 
washout about 2 o'clock this morning 
near Clayton, Kan. Four trainmen are 
known to be dead and It is reported 
tliat some passengers were killed and 
a number of otliers injurt^d. The 
known dead are: 

ENGINEER FRANK PICKENBAUG. 

CONDUCTOR J. W. USHER. 

FIREMAN WILLIAM MILLS, 

BAGGAGEMAN HUFFMAN, pinned 
under the wreck. 

The engine and mail car plunged in- 
to twenty feet of water, the second 
coach tiMi scoi'.in tr the -<niokpr. 



COLOMBIA AT OUTS 

WITH VENEZUELA. 



Bogota, Colombia, Sept. 23. — There 
has been a rupture between Colombia 
and Venezuela, 

The Venezuelan government has tel- 
eg'raphed the members of the Venezue- 
lan legation to leave Bogota and await 
instructions at Panama. The nature 
of the complications is not known 
here. 




LATE 
TO CLASSIFY 

One Cent a AVorrt Kaoh Insertion. 
Xo Advortisciuent Less Than 15 Ceul« 



..;iSS HORKIGAN'S HAIH SHOP NOW 
on Superior street, over the Oak Hall. 

RENOVATE YOUR BASEMENT, 

warehouse, factory or barn with 
whitewash or fireproof paint by the 
spraying process. Zenith 'plione 721, 

FOR RENT — SEVEN-ROOM HOUSE, 
gas, bath and laundry. 602 East 
Si.vth street. Inquire at 602^ East 
Sixth street. 

FOR RENT— SEVEN-ROOM HOUSE; 
water, bath, gas and electric light; 
stove heat; J20 per month. Apply 
Massachusetts Real Estate company, 
18 Phoenix building. 

WANTED TO RENT — TWO YOUNG 
men would like two or three rooms 
In private family. Located on Sec- 
ond, Third or Fourth street, between 
Lake avenue and Sixth avenue west, 
C 484, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED — RELIABLE 
young lady would like position as 
stenographer; just left business col- 
lege; wlil work for small wages. B 
427, Herald. 

WANTED— LADIES' CLOTHS IRONER 
at the Model Laundry, 126 East 
First street. 

FOR RENT — FINE EIGHT-ROOM 
brick house; strictly modern; cen- 
tral location. Apply Massachusetts 
Real Estate company, is Phoenix 
building. 

FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
rooms at 25 Second avenue west. 

FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOM 
suitable for two; every convenience. 
119 East Third street. 

EVERYTHING THE BEST AT MISS 
Kelly's HalrdresBlng Parlors. over 
Buffers. 

Protect the family, oy life Insurance. 
PINEO. Penn. Mutual. 409 Columbia. 



MARRIAGES. 

Jesse Droat and Edith Mllkins, 
Ciiarles Schabbe and Rose Koshlnk. 
John Hoven and Annie Shaw. 
James W. Winn and Catherine 
Blackwell. 



BUILDING PERMITS. 

To A. E, Mortlne, frame cot- 
tage. West Fourth street, be- 
tween Forty-third and- 
. Forty-fourth avenues 

To Bert Olson, frame cottage, 
Vlnland street and Midway 
avenue 

To Gopher Real Estate com- 
pany, frame store, St. Croix 
avenue 



1300 
1.000 
4,000 



^'Cwrect Dress for Women and Girls." 



StyHsh and Sturdy Garments 
For Growing Girls 






-^ 



I' 



f 



In Girls' Wear, as in women's wear, we feature 
the shapeliness and perfect tailoring of Gidding 
garments— ihe careful attention directed to sizes and 
proportioning eliminates practically all alterations, 
and gives the youthful miss a swagger and well dressed - 
appearance. 

JUNIOR COATS 

(Sizes 12 to 20 Years. 

Tailort^d Coats, in swagger manni.sh models witli 
semi-fitted back, double-brreasted front and convert- 
ible ''Presto" collar, that may be worn in ulster, or vel- 
vet-faced coJlar-and-lapel style. These coats come in . 
the Nobby Scotch Donegals, Boucles, Diagonals, Zibe* 
lines and similar hK,^avy materials. We also show 
Trimmed Coats in regulation Norfolk Styles, Military 
Styles with cape effect and innumerable novelties in 
Fancy Cut, Braid Trimmed and other styles — also 
Misses' Polo Blanket Coats, s/^lf-plaid trimmed and 
lined, and Misses' Chinchilla Coats. Coat Prices $7.50 
to $30.00. 

4 

A Coat which we are especially 
featuring Is a Plain Tailored Mannish 
Style in heavy Scotch and English 
Coating Materials, made with the 
Lapel-Ulster convertil>le collar. This 
we consider to be one of the greatest 
values in Girls' Coata, that we have 
ever heen privilt^ged to handle. 

aiUNflOR. SUITS 

' Shapely styles in Two-Piece Tailored Junior Suits 
' — single or double breasted styles, plain or braid trim- 
med; in fashionable materials such as Basket Weaves, 
Chain Weaves, Unfinished Serges and Worsteds — 
Lined will: guaranteed satin and warmly interlined; 
suitable for late fall and winter wear — Prices $16.50 to 
$30.00. 




F'or Sctiool or College 

We are featuring a line of Girls' and Misses' Tail- 
ored Cloth Street Dresses, fashioned for good looks 
and practical wear — Nobby and becoming styles in 
S»erges, Worsteds and Cheviots; plain colors, plaids 
and plaid-trimmed models; — also braid or silk-trimmed 
styles — All sizes from 6 yrs. up, including odd sizes, such 
as 15's and IT's.— Prices $7.50 to $30.00. 

Peter Thompson Suits — Fall lines in regulation 
braid and emblem-trimmed styles in black, navy and 
novelty Peter Thompson Suits — sizes 8 to 18 — at $10.00 
to $29'50. 

Dainty party Dresses for the g^ay Debutante, or her slightly 
younger sister — airy little confections in white, or dainty tinted 
chiffon, marquisette, voile or crepe de chine — handsome hand- 
embroidery or other Dainty Trimmings, put on the finishing 
touches. Price $29.50 and up. 

Stylish Coats for Little Tots . 

sizes 2 to lO Vears. 

.\n army li Styles for Wee Girls; Beautiful Little Coats, in 
Plain Tailored Styles or Fancy Models, and pretty Russian ef- 
fects — also Coats with large Revers, Fur-trimmed styles and Braid 
trimmed styles, in all manner of plain materials and Pretty Mix- 
tures. Prices $5.75 to $18.50. 

Corduroy. Velvet, Plush and Caracul Coats are considered 
ultra stylish for the Little Toddler this season, and in these, 
black predominates; altho pretty styles are shown in other col- 
ors — Heavy Silk-cord Frogs, Hand-embroidered Satin revers, or 
white over-collars and cuffs of lace are permissable trimming 
touches. Prices $7.50 to $18.50. 

Chinchilla Coats are staple favorites, and are enjoying their 
usual popularity; they are here in large numbers, in the regular 
chinchilla colors, such as Golf Red, Oxford, Navy and Tan. The 
Coats we show are mad'e of unusually good qualities in Germania 
Worumbo and imported Chinchillas^^8.50 to $18.50. (All 
sizes from 2 to 6 years.) 



Infants' Wear 

The Gidding nfant-Wear 
Department is replete with 
every necessity for the Cradle 
Infant, or the Tiny Tot — who 
has not yet reached the age of 
Five. 

Coats, Dresses, Skirts, Blank- 
ets, Bonnets. Mittens, Bootees, 
Toques, Sweaters, Night 
Clothes, Knit Goods, Under- 
wear, Novelties, Toys, Baskets, 
etc. 



HEAD WEAR 

Fall lines of Hats, (apM and 
Tam«, for school wear are now 
complete! Selections Include 
nobby MuHhroom style-s, and 
many otlier "pert" design.s in 
Cloth, Felt, Velvet, (hinehilla. 
Mole and F^ur. Prices, 75c and u». 

SWEATERS 

Fall and W tuter Svreatera are 
all well settled In their places; 
and among them are Swetiiers of 
pvery I.euHrth, SI«e, Color and 
^^eavej Latlieti', .Mlaaes' and Chll- 
dren'u Slsea, Including: Special 
Styles In Full Faahtoned S^veat- 
en* for HtKh School GlrU — W om- 
en's and Glrl.s" Sweaters. 94.50 to 
92R.OO Small Children's Sweat- 
en at 75c aad up. 



I- 
i > 



J 



tmrnim^m 



*■ :i 




1 



ma. 



\ 



M ~ ■ ■ W 



mut if i*Ti. nj r-« -T -ii WTi rrm 



EC 



II 




Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 23, 1910. 



S 



THIEF MADE A 

CLEAN SWEEP 



^ I*- 



J. T>. Blfegel, proprietor of the Key- 
Btone Loan company at -2 West Supe- 
rior street, claims now tliat the valii^ 
of the diamonds stolen from his place 
Wiilnesday evenini? will amount to 
15.000 instead of JL'.OOO, as the police 
wtre first informed. He stales that 



the window containing the precious 
stones was completely cleaned out. The 
lobhery was of the boldest kind, the 
thief working in full sight of hun- 
dreds of people who were hurrying 
along Superior street at 6 o'clock in 
tlie everiing. The proprietor was in 
the back of the store trying to sell an 
overcoat, ond it Is thought that the 
customer was a confederate of the man 
wiio made the big haul from the win- 
dow. Siegel saya that he has small 
hope of recovering tho diamonds. 
■- • 

24 Styles of Brown Suits $15 

At the 3 Winners Clothing company, 
115 East Superior street. 



CLOQIET CHILDREN PIE 

OF SIMMER COMPLAINT. 

Cloquet. Minn.. Sept. 23.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Two children died here 
this week from summer complaint. The 
8-moiith-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph Bonneville passed away 
Wednesday night, and on Friday morn- 
ing was" buried from the Catlioiic 
church. Madeline Buck. 8 months old, 
a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Bufk. died Thursday morning, and in- 
terment was made Friday morning 
from the church on the reservation. 



f 



■I THE BAYHA STORE-FOR REAL VALUES]' 



Special Offerings for Saturday's Selling 

Our Special Offerings are exceptional bargains, considering the fact that reg- 
ular prices in this store are lower than you -will pay for the same quality in other 
stores. Take advantage of these specials. 

Regular $1.10 A/arm 
Clocks, Saturday at 65c 






,-4^ 



-rl 



m 



Individual Salt Servers 
Set of Six, only 23c 

We are offering for Satur- 
day's special selling a very 
attractive Colonial style In- 
dividual Salt Server, exactly 
like cut. This is the famous 
Cres-cut line and is noted for 
its rich clear crystal glass — - 
These sets are worth 50c. 
Saturday only — 
at 

I-iuiit one •set of six to n oustonicr. 
No U'ltphoiie or C. O. D. orders. 




23c 




JAQUES MEN 
ORGANIZED 

Charles J. Hector Will Be 

Chairman of Campaign 

Committee. 



This Clock is fully war- 
ranted as a time keeper; is 
heavily nickel plated and has 
good clear alarm gong. They 
sell in all stores at $1.00, 
our aSturday special 
only 

No 'Phone or C. O. D. Or- 
ders. 



65c 




Rug Department 
Specials 

Bissels Carpet Sweepers— With best Hog 
Bristle brushes; finely finished cases; 
rubber tires, and mechanically well con- 
structed; worih $3.50, spc- tf ^ QC 
cial price 4/ I • • */ 

Room-size Axminster Rugs — They arc a 
well knrnvn rug: made from fine wools; 
liave flat end hems; come in Oriental 
arid Floral designs of benntiful color 
combinations; regular price C "f 7 ^C 
$25.25, priced special at... 4^^ I •*/*/ 



Colonial Glass 
Candle Sticks 

^^oKTH Gr.c e.\ch. 

SI'KCI.VI. AT .HOC. 

Our Colonial design, of rich, 
clear crystal glass; heavy and 
poc'd proportions: stands 9 in. 
high and is 5 in. wide at th« 
b.tse. Exactly iike cut. 

No "phone or C. 0. 0. order* 
—Limit t'AO to a customer. 




Drapery Department 
Specials 

Novelty Curtains for Dining Rooms and 
Bedrooms; come in combinations of 
Green, Red, Yellow, Blue, or Pink, or 
Cream ground; they are worth KQr 
$1 a pair, specially priced, a pair..*'-^*' 

Lace Curtain Stretchers— Strongly and 
smoothly made; have nickel plated pins; 
are full size; regular price is ^Qf 
$1.25, special at */• V, 



Exclusive Agents for 

Cole's Original Hot 

Blast Heater. 



Bean Pofs 



;i-«it. «izo. 

WORTH 2r.c 
SPECIAL AT i:Jc. 

Heavy Rock Ware Bean Pott, 

full 3-quart size, that usually sell 

at 25o— Special Saturday at 13c. 

No 'phone or C. 0. D. orders 

— Limit one to a customer. 



Exclusive Agents for 

Cole's Original Hot 

Blast Heater. 




A $38M Steel Range With 
i6'inch Oven for $21.75 

A range bargain that we feel satisfied will be a starter 
for the fall season. We are also satisfied that you can't du- 
plicate this range any place in the country for the 
money. 

Remember, it's a high-grade steel range, interlined 
with asbestos, has heavy fire-pot fitted with duplex grates 
for burning wood or coal. The oven is a 16xl8-inch size. 
Fully guaranteed as a baker and fuel saver. 

COMPLEn ROHSEFUIIKISHBIS 



Your old stove taken as 
part payment. Balance pay- 
able on easy terms. 





Sfisond Ave. W. uid First SL 





■^ 



Millinery 






\re the best by all odds which the house has heretofore made; to quote the 
words of a Visitor on one of the opening days, ''Every Hat is stylish without 
being extreme, and practical with the word 'smart' spelled m every fold of 
it. inake-up " W<^'ve specialized on Hats to sell from $7.50 to $15.00. We re 
proud of the collection and invite you to come and criticize or compare with 
what you may have seen elsewhere. 



Our Garment Section 

Holds a most enviable reputation for price lowness— that you know— 
ask anvbodv, they'll tell you that here you can alwa>^ obtain the best 
without paving the most. A correct gathering ot Fall buits, <^oats 
and Dresses await your choosing— are you ready? It's time to prepare. 



Silks 



h Splendid imitation 
of a Rajah, (six new 
shades) and a 27-inch 
Kimono Silk; all new 
5Uc quality, 



39 c 



Umbrellas 

Two special lots * 
Regular price $1.25, 

$1.00 

Regular price $1.50, 

^ J. a^O 



Ribbons 

Something new; wir- 
ed edge "Aero-plane," 
stays in place, 

1 9c and 
25c 



Ribbons 

The most beautiful 

line of plaids, Persians 
and fancies; worth to 
65c for 



35c 



Underwear 

Largest and best line 
we ever had; every- 
thing for everybody; 
upwards from 




Children's Hose 

"Black Cat" and 
"Gordon" brands; 50c 
cashmere ones, tomor- 



row 



35c 



Children's Hose 

Cashmere ribbed; 
sizes to 914; regular 
prices 25c, tomorrow 



19c 



Gloves 

Kid, Mocha and Cape 

— In the long lengths; 
worth to $3.75, tomor- 



row 



$1.98 



Nine of Twelv^ Counties Are 

Represented at Conference 

in Duluth. 



; Imbued with a spirit of confidence 
and resolve tliat it is not frequently 
manifested at gatherings of Demo- 
cratic leaders in Minnesota congres- 
sional districts, two score or more 
friends and supporters of Judge Alfrei 
.Jaques, volunteer members of his con- 
gressional campaign committee, held 
two conferences at the at. Louis hotel 
yesterday. 

At these conferences all the phases 
ot" the situation as it relates to the 
jnobable outcome of the congressional 
election were gone over in detail; weaK 
.spots in the Republican candidate's 
fences were located; plans for concert- 
ed action in behalf of the Democratic 
candidate were discussed and agreed 
upon; and when the confreres ad- 
journed they said they felt that there 
is every reason to look forward oon- 
fidently to the election of Judge Jaques 
in November. 

Frank Cra.«sweller of Duluth called 
tlie meeting to order in the morning, 
with W. H. Skemp of Cloquet, serving 
iu: serretary. Each of the twelve coun- 
ties but three was represented by one 
or more friends of the candidate. In 
the morning those present devoted the 
time to a discussion of the situation 
and its possibilities, and in the after- 







J 




CHARLES J. HECTOR. 



noon the congressional campaign com- 
mittee held an executive meeting. Thd 
committee is constituted as follows: 

Anoka county — Wiiliiim A. Blanchard 
of Anoka. _^ 

Aitkin — Freeman E. Krech of Aitkin. 
Carlton — E. S. SchJebe of Cloquet. 
Cook — Thomas I. Carter of Grand 
Mara is. 

Isanti — A. P. Yngve of Cambridge. 
Itasca — William Houlihan of Grand 
Rapids. 

Kanabec — Thomas B. Vickery of 
Mora. 

Koochiching — Duncan T. McPhee of 
International Falls. 

Lake — John Dwan of Two Harbors. 
Mille Lacs — A. M. Anderson of Millo 
LacB. 

Pine — Paul Perkins of Pine City. 
St. Louis — Andrew Nelson of Du- 
luth. 

The committee organized by electing 
these officers: 

Chairman — Charles J. Hector of Du- 
luth. 

Secretary — John,T. Pearson of Du- 
luth. 

Treasurer — Bert Fesler of Duluth. 
The chairman was authorized to ap- 
point a committee at large and such 
other committees as may be necessary 
to the successful management of the 
campaign. 

It has not been decided where head- 
quarters will be established, but the 
Intention of the committee is to find 
quarters and to open them without de- 
lay, as the campaign is to be pushed 
steadily and energetically in St. Louis 
and every other county in the district. 
Offleem Meet. 
The officers of the committee held 
a meeting this n^orning and t«ok up 
some of the questions of detail that 
must be disposed of before the cam- 
paign will be formally opened. As a 
matter of fact, however, the campaign 
ha.s been on In earnest ever since Judge 
Jaques announced tl»at he was a can- 
didate, and the situation today finds 
the Democratic congressjonal nominee 
in a position of advantage such as few 
candidates enjoy at this stage of the 
fight. 

Duluth Democrats are exceedingly 
well pleased with the start that has 
been made and feel that with Judge 
Jaques' interests in the capable hands 
of the officers selected by the com- 
mittee yesterday, there Is every justifi- 
cation for the faith that Is in them. 

Every member of the committee and 
every man who attended yesterday's 
conference, brought word to Judge 
Jaques that in the counties from which 
tliey came there exist conditions which 



If YouNeed 
Something 

Ver>' choice for a gift you will do 
well to come in and see us. We 
have a beautiful line of gold, silver- 
ware, diamonds and latest novelty 
goods and would be pleased to 
show them, whether you buy now 
or later. 

T. E. Reinhart 

7 East SuiM^rior Street. 




Zenith 2S43 



Melrose 1201. 



FURS ! FURS ! 

Tills little announcement is a per- 
sonal invitation to our opening, con- 
tinuing all this week. We will give 
special discounts on all furs pur- 
chased or ordered during the open- 
ing. Pay us a visit. Have your 
furs repaired now. 

THE aUALITY Fl R HOUSE. 
Opeu EveisingTM U^tll 9. 

H. S. WI«:\GER. 
203 West Superior St., Vpstalrg. 



Get the Best: It Pays! 



Th»e only way to turn wardrobe money to really 
practical account is to buy selected articles of apparel — 
buy the best ! 

Every garment ^vill be animatingly full of pleasure — comfort, 
with the added self-confidence any one feels — knowing she is 
stylishly gowned. 

Such a woman is always at her best in a social way. 

Our store friends follow this rule to their own great satis- 
faction. 

Fashion Dictates in Autumn Apparel: Ready 

-, , that from collar to hem show the individuality that 

StlttSC comes from but "the select few" makers in all 
America. The Suits at ?25, $30 and $35 are es- 
sentially different from suits of other stores at similar prices. 

As for the higher priced models, they too, have that quiet su- 
periority that knowing women take in at a glance. 

Pay $29.50 for a chic basket weave model that Jooks as if it cost 
nearly twice as much — due to the excellence of the materials, and the 
wonderfully fine tailoring. Colors so far — the dull r<.d of the falling 
leaf, snuff brown and black. 

For $50 a hand-done model that come? from the tailors bench — 
having all the elegance of best materials and the charm of its "custom 
tailoring" — Exclusive at the S. & B. Co. 

We are showing a rich selection of Autumn Suits ct $35, $37.50 and 
$45. . 

There is hardly a day that New Dresses 
Dresses^ don't arrive here. That this is to be the 

greatest Dress Season in years there is no 
doubt. We have made ample preparations for it and can show 
you hundreds of new and delightfully practical One-piece Mod- 
els. 

For instance, we have in the inexpensive lines 

Silk Poplin Dresses at $19.50, in lovely Autumn shades. 

We have no less than six different and distinct lines of one-piece 
silk frocks, at $19.50, 

Chiffon Evening Dresses with low neck and sho;t sleeves, for as 
little as $32.50 and on up to the Imported models. 

The influence of Paris is apparent even in the inexpensive kinds. 

Woolen Dresses, self trimmed and prettily braided after the man- 
ner of Paris in thcJr velvet sailor collars, besides their Persian silk fash- 
ion touches, $19.50 to $32.50. 



This past week they have been coming and going 
CJoatSl "^'''^^^ clock-like regularity. Customers tell us we 
have models delightfully different from any 
store in town, and back up their opinion by selecting the partic- 
ular one that takes their fancy. No question about the exclu- 
siveness and quality of S. & B. Coat models. 

Mixt Coats in tans, golden and russet brown and other typical 
Autumn shades, from $21.50 to $45. They are the l<ind woman finds 
indispensable for athletic and motor wear. 

Coats of black Broadcloth, extra heavy, body lined with good qual- 
ity satin, full length, large pockets and button trimming, only $19.50. 

Individual Models — All made on this side of the .vater, but follow- 
ing closely the trend of Paris Fashions. From $29.50 up. 



Informal Millinery Display 

Showing the latest creations from master designers. 

Our Millinery staff is very busy turning out simple and elab- 
orate Hats — foUow^ing closely the accepted Paris fashions. 
There are a bewildering variety of turban and mashropm shapes. 

Some models of satin, beaver' and velvet, with but scant 
trimming, yet the effect is very rich and pleasing. Picture IIat3 
with drooping brims, others of irregular outline that commemo- 
rate the styles of the Empire — some of them being really super- 
latively large. 

The exhibit, as a wdiole, is informative and correct as show- 
ing the authentic models for Fall and Winter. Come, and wel- 
come, without feeling any buying obligation whj.tever. 



Important Sale of 
Silk Hose! 

The hosiery buyer, on his 
recent New York trip se- 
cured a prize assortment of 
lovely Silk Hose, in black 
and white, pink, light blue, 
tan, gray, yellow, gold and 
some other new Autumn 
shades. 

Values Up to $2 

a Pair: on Sale 

at 95c 

While we sell more Silk 
Hosiery tU^n all other Du- 
luth Store — we want you to 
realize such values as these 
come to Duluth but rarely— 
in all probability not again 
this season. 



Up to $6 
Corsets $2 

Now that the Corset and 
Undermuslin departments 
are under new management, 
you are being treated to a 
series of clean-up sales — ex- 
traordinary in point of eco- 
nomical opportunities. 

Just now it is Corsets — dis- 
continued models in the Red- 
fern, La Grecque, American 
Lady and C. B. Corsets. They 
have sold heretofore as high as 
$6— Saturday, $2. 

Muslin 

Combinations 

at V3 Off! 

because they are mussed 
from display, and show 
traces of handling — other- 
wise ultra desirable. 

$2.00 values— $1.33. 

$2.50 values-^1.67. 

$.V00 values— $2.00. 

$5.00 values— $3.33. 

$9.00 values— $6.00. 

From $12.00 and up— at sim- 
ilar reductions. 



SOMETHING NEW 

Pajamas — Sleeping Suits 
of high grade outing flan- 
nel, finisht with military 
braid, at $2, ^2.50 and 
^3 the suit. 



More New School Dresses 

They came this morning 1 

Wool Challie Dresses in pretty blues and sober tans, with the new Kimona sleeve — unique 
Persian pipings in the way of trimming, pleated skirt and only ^14.50. 

Brocaded Blue Serge has the Oriental sleeve with a delightfully sensible hobble pleated skirt, 
trimmed with fancy buttons and Persian bands, at ^19.50. 

Youthful Blue Serges with sailor and standing collars of black satin, leather belt, delightful 
touches of green as trimming and gold buttons at $21.50. 

Frenchy looking chanticler red diagonal Dresses, with black satin fold around skirt, at 
$32.50. Lace collar and cuffs and trimming touches that couldn't come from anywhere but 
Paris. 

Stocks of New Juvenile Coats, Suits and Dresses 

Now at Their Best. 




fi/Sj^U/Ui^ 




''The Quality Store.'' 






•m^ «- 



mm 



n 



promise well for Mm In the campaign. 
In was brought out in the remarks 
made by the visitors that In many 
communities where Miller received 
large pluralities at the primaries, the 
s-^ntlment was strong against Miller, 
t:ie explanation being that the voters 
cast their ballots for Miller for the 
purpose of beating him at the polls 
with a strong nian like Jaques, rather 
ttian taking the risk of nominating 
an unknown on their own ticket. 

Many Republicans, it was said — and 
tlie vote shows the truth of the asser- 
tion — did not vote on the congressional 
ticket at all, preferring to wait until 
the November elections, when they can 
settle the pending question with a dl- 
rcjct vote for the Democratic candidate. 
The vote given Taylor represents 
largely the element in the Republican 
party that can't stand for Miller and 
didn't know enough about McKnlght to 
give him a vote. 

That Judge Jaques has already made 

good progress In his campaign was 
agreed among the visitors yesterday. 
I-(e has been around the district quite a 
bit, quietly getting acquainted with the 
voters and letting them learn his atti- 
tude on public questions that are In- 
volved in a congressional candidacy — 
particularly this one. The general Im- 
pression he has made, according to all 
reports, is that he is square and right 
On every issue that touches the welfare 
cf the people. 

Not only has Judge Jaques given the 
\oterB an opportunity to learn his 
\lew8 and convictions by personal in- 
terviews and by means of literature 
\vldelv distributed, but friends have 
written hundreds of personal letters to 
their friends in all parts of the district. 
These letters are proving to be pro- 
ductive of good results, some of them 



surprising and indiciUive of a flood of : over the Eighth with tremendous force 
antl-Mllier sentiment that will sweep I in November. 



NOW IN OUH NEW STORE— 103 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



NEW AND 
STYLISH 



SHOES 



FOR FALL 
and WIN- 
TER Wear 



Ties, Pulpwood, Piling 

And Other Timber Products. 

McLEOD-DAYIS TIMBER CO., 

515 Lyceum BuUdinK. 
nulnth, Mian. 




:,, ■ «. »T^ .M I- 



Everything that is good — with best 
values and correct styles of the latest 
designs. 

Our line of Shoes at $3.00 a«id $3.50 
are exceptional values, with complete 
lines of higher grades. 

The strongest line of SCHOOL 
SHOES for values and wear — both 
high and regular cut. 

WE GUARANTEE CORRECT FIT 

Bring along your old shoes and 
have them repaired with best work- 
manship and material. 

The SUFFEL GO. 

OPPOSITE riTE ASD TEIN-CENT STORK, 

103 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 



I »tf 



1 DEFECTIVE PAGE 





'f 



F 



I I 



I 



Friday, 



THE DUtUTH HERALD 



September 23, 1910. 



NEWS AND VIEWS OF POLITICS 
AND POLITICIANS 



I Chance to Elect a Democrat to the House From the Strongly 
Republican Fifty-Third District— "Tom" McKeon Returns 
From Vacation Trip, Eager for the Fray— Tawney's Defeat 
and How It Is Viewed— Minnesota Democrats Prepare for 
the Battle. 




Thd rifty-thlrd legislative district 
Is faoe to face wltli a post-primary 
situation that is extremely Interesting:. 
Thla district includes the counties of 

liubbard. Wadena 



Wndtna Count}' 

Ilai« 
Mixed Sltuatlou. 

ary. wfi- 

dolph 

editor .': 

defeated 

for tlie 3»' 

!» tiie liu .... 

Bertha. Todd 



and Tudd. It is 
longr and slim, with 
a notch on its raid- 
die eastern bouud- 
•? Cass county juts out. Ru- 
Ti of William E. Lee and 
Prairie Leader, was 
. -> oi>tion candidate 
James Joiinaton. who 
:it. Joiinston lives at 
nmiy, and is opposed to 
.the county option program. The vote 
was :i,057 for Johnston and 1,979 for 
Lee. In the legislative fight. L. H. 
KIce of Park Hav)iils. Hubbard county, 
an aiUi-optlon candidate, and W. T. 
ijtone. also oi Hubbard county, but an 
optionlst, wore nominated for the 
liou.se 

Tills leaves " i 1 na wltliout a legis- 
lative candid n the llepuhlican 
ticket, for J • ^s of Long Prairie, 
&!i optlont-^t lefeated. Wadena 
lias a Dem.i . . candidate for the 
house, however, on the Democratic 
ticket. Although Wadena is a strongly 
Republican county,- there Is reason to 
beiieve that Its vote will not be cast 
for a count\ n candidate. The 
alternative Is ct iha Ueinocratic 
candidal- either Frank F. 
Latta or ^sler, for Wadena 
■will not bj U.T, >■>-.] to be without re- 
resentation in the legislature. 

L. M Davis i.s 'i>'-> ! '•^mocratic nomi- 
nee for state se: 

Walter T. Len St. Paul, one of 

the active work Uamsey county 

Kepublicanism. an ; who is city and 

county chairman oi that organization, 
is in the city. 

• • « 

Thomas J. McKeon. who has re- 
a vacation trip and is in 
■vs he Is confident taat 
•iXhi as the Democratic 
Mjminee for judge of 
probate. Mr. McKeon 
will get into the game 
Like FlghtiaK. without delay and will 
let the Republican can- 
didate know from start to fini.«;h that 
he has a fiirht n: his hands. In all the 



turn'^d from 

ligluing tr'-- 
he can wi: 

>loKeon 



i.^ lived in the county 

^ a Imitted popularity. 

I candidate for an 

i.s say that's not a 

an element of 



Consres^ilouui 
Xa .MiuufHota. 

eubject 



years tha' 
and in spr 
l:e has never 
office, but ht- 
handicap— 
etrength. 

"I was i.". < :::cago when the Cook 
county Democratic convention was in 
«esslon." said Mr. McKeon yesterday. 
•There Is a live lot of Democrats. They 
kept things stirred up every minute of 
the time and gut some real enthusl- 
asn; started. In contrast to this con- 
vention. I found another Democratic 
county convention a very tame affair 
next day, when I was In West Bend. 
In 1. The Democrats of St. Joseph 
county were very tame Hoosiers. They 
didn't ha\ o any sort of a fuss." 
• « • 

The defeat >f James A. Tawney in 
the First congressional district pri- 
maries Is the most important indica- 
tion of Minut - ■ntiment on the is 

;e of insurgency, 
Lii the opinion of 
the state press and 
politicians who have 
been quoted on tlie 
has happened to 
Tawney in the prlm.irjes is likely to 
happen to a number of other Republi- 
can representatives from Minnesota in 
the November elections, for the spirit 
<>f Insurgency is expected to flourish 
and grow between now and election 
day. 

The following article, which ap- 
peared In the news columns of the 
Pioneer Press, bears on the situation 
In the First district, as distinct from 
the situation existing in the Fourth 
and Fifth districts: 

The defeat of <_'ongressman Jamea 
A. Tawney of l!ie First district by 
Sidney Anderson in the primaries 
Tuesday may r-'suU In the election 
of II. Il Buck 'f Winona, the Demo- 
cratic candidate, who was nominated 
without opposition. The Democrats 
yesterday said they believed this 
■would be the result, and many Re- 
publicans said the same. 

Buck was rt *he tleld long before 
Anderson's name had been men- 
tioned. Buck has been in politics 
for many years and although he has 
not been seeking office he has been 
well known. While the progressives 
were seeking a candidate and even 
after Anderson had got Into the field, 
it was a common saying among both 
Republicans and Democrats that If 
Tawney would be beaten at all It 
would be by the Democratic candi- 
date. In the l»i>8 campaign Tawney 
had a smaller margin at tlio gen- 
eral election than at the primary. 

It Is believed that the Tawney or- 
ganization will largely swing to- 
wards Buck at the election in No- 
vember. If Anderson is elected it 
Is probable that he would be re- 
nominated and re-elected two years 
from now Four years out of public 
life would mean Tawney's political 
finish, that all his dreams of con- 
tinued power in congress, of the 
speakership or of being senator 
would be shattered forever. But with 
a Democrat elected In a district 
which \n normally heavily Republi- 
can there would be a possibility of 
Tawney 3 nomination and election 
two years hence. If there Is a subsi- 
dence in the wave of progresslvlsm 



The bitterness of the campaign has 
added to the chances of the Demo- 
crats. The campaign of the progres- 
sives was entirely a campaign 
against Tawney and his record, and 
the accusations against him have 
not been the most pleasant. The 
Tawney people w^iU not forgive and 
forget at once. 
That the defeat of Tawney is not a 
\ictory for Anderson, but rather an 
acceptance of Anderson as a medium 
by which to rebuke Tawneyism, is 
emphasied by the Winona Independent, 
which says: 

The man James A. Tawney by 
training and natural equipment is 
so much better able to serve the dis- 
trict tlian Sydney Anderson that be- 
tween the two men there could be 
no hesitation In choosing, if that is 
all that were to be considered. But 
that was not all. 

James A. Tawney. the confidant 
of Taft. Aldrich and Cannon was not 
cc)nsidered I lie proper person to rep- 
resent tills district. 

The vote of Tuesday was a rebuke 
to Mr. Tawnej . tlie reputed friend 
of the big interests and the cham- 
pion of the standpat Idea, rather 
than an indors/ment of Sidney An- 
derson. An.v other man running 
against Mr. Tawney. unless he was a 
nortorious scoundrel and blackleg, 
would have defeated Mr. Tawney as 
easily as Anderson. 

It was simply an idea, and not a 
personltication of an idea that de- 
feated Mr. Tawney. 
The Prtston Times is convinced that 
the Firs:t district has been wiped off 
the map by the defeat of Tawney, whom 
it praises as a man faithful and mightv 
in tiie councils of the nation. As to 
the causes of Tawnej's downfall, the 
Times finds the muck-rakers, place 
seeking demogogues, personal foes and 
{>owerful interests responsible. Con- 
tinuing, the Times says: 

Insurgency and Democracy are in 
the air. The fires have been lighted 
and must burn themselves out. The 
defeat of Tawnev and other able men 
Is but the capturing of the outposts 
by a species of insurgency which 
spells Democracy and which bids fair 
to sweep all before it in November. 
The congressional vote in the First. 
which gave Anderson nearly 3.000 more 
votes than Tawney. seems to afford 
sound basis for t!ie Times' November 
ft- recast. 



The executive committee of , the 
E>emocratic state central committee met 
> esterday at St. Paul and went through 
the formality of electing tha officers 
chosen by the state com- 
mittoe at its recent 
meeting, when James 
Gray of Minneapolis was 
made the party nominee 
for the governship These officers are: 
Chairman. Frank A. Day of Fairmont; 
secretary. Harvey W. (irlmmer of St. 
Paul; treasurer, F'red B. Lynch. Mem- 
bers attending the meeting were be- 
sides the officers, D. D. Daly, Olivia; 
Martin O'Brien. Crookston; Tim O'Con- 
nor, fc)t. Paul; H. A. Lund, Minneapolis; 
W. R. Hodges. Sleepy Eye; William 
Gausewilz. Owatonna; J. A. Rieter, 
Rochester; Fred Schiplin, St. Cloud; S. 
J. Mealy. Monticello. 

Mr. Gray was unable to be present, 
having accepted an Invitation to make 
an addres-s at the county fair at Austin. 

Campaign plans were discussed and 
the executive committeemen left with 
the belief strongly fixed in their minds 
that Janits Gray will surely defeat 
Eberhart and maintain Democracy's 
prestige in the state. No obstacle 'to 
tne Inauguration of a strenuous cam- 
paign now remains and one of the very 
liveliest fights in the political history 
of the state is expected to occupy the 
attention of the voters from this time 
on. 

• * • 

St. Clouds attempt to inaugurate the 
commission form of municipal govern- 
ment has met with the same fate ns 
that experienced In Mankato at the 

first attempt, a 



Democrats 

Pill 11 
Caiiipaigu. 



St. C'lond 
Fallii at the Vivnt 
.Vtteinpt. 



majority voting 
in favor of the 
new scheme, but 
enough to give 
the proposal the necessary 60 per cent 
of the whole vote. There was a de- 
ficit of ninety votes. The other charter 
amendment, providing for the estab- 
lishment of a municipal court, also 
failed to get 60 per cent of the full 
votp. Friends of the commission form 
In St. Cloud are confident that on »^be 
next trial enough votes will be cast 
for It to put It Into operation. To that 
end a campaign of education will be 
carried on. 



Governor John Burke of North Da- 
kota, who now has the support of the 
Grand Forks Herald, the Minot Re- 
porter, the Fargo News, the Steel .^ 

Ozone, the Wlll- 
Barke Iston State -.nd 

MnklBK War on the the Grafton 
Bo»«. News and Times, 

among other 
Republican papers of the FlickertxU 
commonwealth in his candidacy for re- 
election to the governorship, has be- 
gun an energetic campaign and is 
meeting with Ju.st such a favorable r.*- 
ception as has been accorded him bv 
the voters In the two preceding cam- 
paigns. 

In a speech at Tower City Tuesday 
evening Governor Burke put the real 



Marabout Throws and 

Scarf§j— Reg. $9 Value- 

-*. 

Combination silk and Marabout, fine messaline silk 
with Marabout bands all around edge and two rowAJ 
through center. In all the new shades. 



at $5.98 



"Very faahionable for (all to wear tvlth dre.tMea aqd 
sultn. Kxceileot value at «».00. Special $5.»S. 




Lake A\'enue, Michigan and Svperior Streets. 



Lace Dresser Scarfs — Regular OC/* 
50c Value— Special at LiOxj 

A welcome opportunity to many to supply their 
own needs, as well as to anticipate for holiday gifts. 

Fine quality in a variety of pretty patterns 
— good 50c value, special Saturday at 25c. 



T- 



'C 



Fascinatitig Topcoats Sz^^~ $25.00 




Rough Manni.sh Matierials made into the most feminine Top- 
Coats the fashion jvorld has seen for many a day. 

Thoroughly tailored styles, of course: but lifted out 
of the realm of Mannish Models v^'ith touches of velvet 
fancy braids and big buttons and a hundred delightful 
differences of cut expressed; strapping in queer stylish 
pockets, cuff and sleeve treatment so distinctive, yet so 
artistic, that the wonder is some dress artist didn't think 
of it before. 



Smart Plush Coats at $32.50 

Made of fine soft plush, lined thronghout with soft satin in dain- 
ty colors. 

A very stylish and serviceable garment — 
special value at $32.50 



New Arrivals in 



Tailored Suits 

$29.50 



Special 
at 



In smart tailored and semi-dressy 

styles; made of- sedges, cheviots, 

zibelines, and fancy mixtures. 

Coats lined with guaranteed 

satins; regular values up to 

$35.00, special at $29.50. 

Women's Russian 
Coats 



Pony 



Made of fine ajglected skins; beau- 
tifully worked; lined with best Skin- 
ner satin; full length. 
Regtilar $75.4)0 

value, special. .• . 



$59.50 



Stylish Serge 
Dresses $15.00 

Just plain tailored styles; made of fine 
quality serge. 

Serge Dresses 
at $25.00 

Made of fine quality serge; black and 
colors; new Mikado sleeve and modi- 
fied hobble skirt; a very stylish affair. 

Cliildren's Nobby 
Plaid Dresses 

$2.75 

dy serge; 

$8.50 



Prettiest MiUinery ^l^^""" 

Our $5.00 to $15.00 Hats Are Masterpieces 





: . 












I 

! 


' 
1 




' ' !■ 






1 

1 

1 

J, 


1 




'1 


r-- ■ 




* 





Every Hat at $5 to ^15 you buy, no 
doubt — is worth it. Never before have hats 
like the Freimuth $5 to $15 hats been offered 
— you would never be reminded of the low 
price by their looks, so artistic and 
refined are the conceptions. 

For tomorrow's selling we 
have ready a large variety of 
smart models in Trimmed 
Hats and Street Hats — all the 
new coloring!; and shapes — 
copies of Paris models pro- 
duced in our own work rooms. 
The best styles ever offered 
in Duluth at. . . . .?5 to $15 

Misses' and 
Children's 



Millinery 




** 




n 




r 








^ 


%m 


\ 


■ 



















Charming styles in Misses' Trimmed 
New College Shaggy Hats, new Arrow, Seaside and Rosa 
touched off with silk scarfs, priced at $2.75 up to $6.00, 

Misses' Crlocke shaped Beaver Hats — also Satin 
and Felt Hats $2.50 to $10.00 



In neat styles; ages 6 to 14 

years; special at 

Pretty Sailor Suits — Of sturdy 
nicely tailored; 6 to 14 
years ; special at 



Boys' Footballs 

Just received, a. new lot of 
Rugby Foot Balls. 

The regular $1.25 kind- 
special— QSir 

Saturday »/0\/ 



Girls' Dolls 

A beautiful line of fine Im- 
ported Dressed Dolls. 

Values up to $2.00 — 
special Sat- 
urday, at. . 



$1.23 



$3.00 Large Cluster 
Hair Puffs at._ 



$1.75 



Linen Handkerchiefs, 



Made from excellent quality hair — our regu- 
lar $3.00 leader — special Saturday, $1.75. 



19c 



Hair 

Nets 



Extra Large Silk Hair 
Nets — Tied ends; regular 
10c quality, spe- 
cial, each 

Or six for 25c. 



5c 



Strand 
Barretts 

Latest style Strand 
Barretts; special priced 
for Saturday 

15c sorts, 10c. 
25c sorts, 19c. 



Men's 
Pure 

Reg. 25c Value — Special at . . 

Fine pure linen, soft finish "Unlaundered" with hand-embroid- 
ered initial, sold regularly for 25c; special for Saturday — at 
each — 19f^. 

School Hsindkerchiefs, Regular OCp 
5c Kind— Special, 6 for __. ^Dl/ 

Elegant quality sheer lawn "cross barred" — just the kind for 
the Little Miss to take to school; special Saturday, 6 for 25^. 



25c Cuff and Collar 
Pins— Special at 



lOc 



Fine quality gold plated Collar or Cuff Pins, 4 
to 6 on card — special 10^. 



Hat 
Pins 



Fancy Rhine Stones 
Hat Pins; plain or com- 
bination colored stones. 

Regular 75c and 
$1.00 values, at. . 



Mesh 
Bags 



-1 



50c 



Fine quality German 
Silver Mesh Bags; kid 
lined. 

Reg. $3.75 
value, at ... . 



$2.75 




We Like to Talk to You About the 

''Harvard Mills' 

&1) Underwear 

Nothing in our establishment offers a better subject. It is 
inviting to look at. It is difficult to keep within bounds when 
describing it. It is one of those products about which you can 
tell the truth. No need to draw on your imagination. 

Beautifully finished garments. Ample measurement. Per- 
feet fitting. An extensive range of shapes. Great variety of I 
Fabrics, all of the finest material. Vests, Dravv#-s, Tights, Cor- 
set Covers, and Combination Suits. 4 

Our assortment is most complete. We recoSimend some of 
the most popular Styles, as described belcnvin detail. 



I Women^s iJThe? Shopping Bags 



Regular $1.75 
Value— Special for 
Thursday at 




$1.19 



Fall Selections in "Harvard Mills" 

^J^^"^^^^ (Hand Finished) 

^^ Underwear 

I^FM-'^^^ a ^^^ ^ovf Complete. 

nw, V^^^A C'^ i'P Embracing as many as twenty-five differ- 
I'll /W \5^\ '"* styles, in eight or ten distinct proportion- 

1^1 isri' I f f-A ^^ ^'"^ *''^^ women of fashion demand 

11- Jnllf i v'ya Underwear that fits like a glove — yet is elas- 

^ l/iV^s^i' If/ ^^ enough to give with every motion, and 

VII \V- iv ^^ ^* ^"^^ ^^^^^ lightweight and warm. 

/jfwvVw^?!] In our research for perfect-fitting under- 

Vt!«X^^^^H.?^ wear that answers these requirements, we 

\>rT3^» "2^ have chosen the famous Harvard Mills, hand- 

•53 finished underwear as the acme of excellence, 

and as worthy to be sponsored by the Gidding Store. 

Every quality, proportion, and weight, has a name of its own- 
once you have selected the garment that suits — all that is neces- 
sary thereafter, is to ask for the name that designates that particular 
garment, and your underwear troubles are over. 

Women's Union Suits $1.00 to $5.00 

Separate Pieces 50^ and up 

ChiWen's Union Suits at $1.00 and up 

Separate Pieces 35< and up 



Harvard Mills — Medium weight, 
fuiest combed cotton Vests, 
Pants, Tights, Corset Cov- 
ers * -S* 

Extra sizes * -75 

Union Suits (all shapes) $1.25 

Extra sizes $1.50 

Harvard Mills — Heavy weight, 
fleeced, combed cotton Vests, 
Pants, Tights, Corset Cov- 

vers $ '^^ 

Union Suits (all shapes) $1.25 

Extra sizes $1.50 



Harvard Miils— iledium weight 
Merino, 50 per cent wool, 
White V^sis, Pants, Tights, 

Corset Ccjiyers^ $1.00 

Extra sizes »-t....:v3». . . .- $1.25 

Union Suits (aU shapes) $1.75 

Extra sizes $2.00 

Harvard Mnis-;^:^eavy weight 
Merino, $0 j)er cent wool, 
White and .'Natural Vests, 

Pants. Tights $ .75 

Extra sizes $1,00 

Union Suits (adl shapes) $1.75 

Extra sizes $2.00 



Genuine Morrocco leather; 8, 9 and 10-inch; all 
metal, gilt, silver, guu metal oi leather covered frames, 
with gilt or gun metal trimmings; single or double 

strap handles; some leather lined, 
others carabol or morie lined. 
Inside purse to match; a good 
$1.75 value at $119. 

A gold plated, twro-inch Script 

Initial free wit h each bag. 



A Great Special in 

Perfume 



Corylopsis, Honey Suckle and 
Sweet-Bye-and-Bye Odors; sold 
the United States over at 50c 
per ounce, special for Thursday, 

1-Ounce 
Bottle- 
Special at 



25c 



Women's Stylish Street and Dress Shoes 

Gun Metal and Patent Colt-Qur $3.00 <fr ^ Cfi 
Lejaders— Special Saturday at %lp^«0\/ 

Smart Gun Metal for street wear with cloth or kid tops; heavy 
Flexible Soles in Button or Blucher style; stylish Patent Colt with 
cloth or kid tops, Blucher or Button style. 

These are our Regular $3.00 Leader Shoe 
Special for Saturday — only — pair — $2,50. 




i 



Issue of the campaign up to the peopla 
In these words: , . ^, 

Alexanded McKenzie is making hl3 
last stand for the control of North 
Dakota. He has removed his head- 
quarters from St. Paul to Bismarck 
and thi.s a sure sign. He used to 
make the politicians come to .St. 
Paul to see him; now he goes Lo 
them If his candidate Is elected to 
the office of governor, he will have 
control of his great machine again 
and you will have difficulty in get- 
ting rid of him. He will put state 
institutions back into politics and 
people will lose all they have gained 
in the past tour years. You people 
can take your choice as to whom you 
want In the governor's office after 
the next campaign, a representative 
of Alexander McKenzie or a repre- 
sentative of the people. 
Oovernor Burke is accompanied on 
his tour by Col. M. A. Hildreth. Demo- 
cratic candidate for congress, who In 
his speeclies devotes his attention al- 
most exclusively to national issues and 
the record in congress of L. B. Hanna, 
■who Is In mu'-h tne same position In 
North Dakota as C. B. Miller In Minne- 
sota, for he "played ball' with the 
•'old guard" in congress like a league 
player. 

The North Dakota Democrats wil! 
center their attack on Hanna, as the 
other Republican candidate, H. T. 
Helgeson of Milton, is an out-and-out 
Insurgent. T. D. Casey of Grafton is 
li.e other Democratic candidate for 
congress. His county adjoins Helge- 
son's. 

Hanna Is expected to make a stump 
speaking trip in a few days. 
• ■ 

A Nan of Iron Nerve. 

Indomitable will and tremendous 
energy are never found where Stomach, 
Liver, Kidneys and Bowels are out of 
order. If you want these qualities 
and the success they bring, use Dr. 
King's New Life Pills, the matciiless 
regulatuis, for kesn brain and strong 
body. 2'>r c* rill drusrai-sts. 



PUMPMAN TREED 
BY HUNGRY WOLVES 

Ed. Quinn of Cloquet Has 
an Unpleasant Ex- 
perience. 

Cloquet, Minn., .Sept. 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — r Edward Quinn, who 
lopks after the city's pump house at 
Spring lake, about a mile from the 
city, had a very unpleasant experience 
a few days ago. Quinn goes out early 
In the morning and .spends the day 
there alone, usually, unless his young 
son, Edward, Jf., or some one else hap- 
pens to come out. Mr. Quinn has oc- 
casionally seen a wolf prowling 
around at a distance, but thought not'a- 
Ing of It. 

A few days ago three of the brutes 
came sneaking 5Bpon him suddenly from 
the bushes, andjjhe -took to a hay stack 
and was trg^jd "Miiere for three hours, 
or until the lean wayfarers tired of 
waiting for him to come down. He 
was unarmed and had not even a club. 
The forest flres this year destroyed 
about all the fooid that the bears and 
wolves depend ujion, and It is thought 
that a scarcity of food Is reason for 
both being spen '^uite frequently out In 
the clearings of late. 



compiled by the Bureau of Indian Af- '■ race. During the fiscai year 1909 there 
fairs, can be accepted as a criterion : were 3,395 births and 3,175 deaths 
of the general condition of the red 1 among 101,717 India^iM. 



It was estimated there were 300.545 
Indians in the United States, exclusive 
of Alaska, during the last fiscal year. 






DULUTH'S BEST CLOAK AND SUIT STORE. 




i^^ 



7 West Superior Street, 




The Cost of High Living 

Is an easy problem if you buy your 
clothes at the 3 Winners. You are 
sure to save $5 or |10 on your suit or 
overcoat at this store. 



The Reason 

The 3 "Winners are doing such a big 
business Is because they give you more 
style, more quality and more value 
than the high rept stores do. 

— * ) «. • ■ 

GROWTH Ofr INDIAN RACES. 
T\Lishingion Post: The Indian has 
at least paused in his passing from the 
face of the earth, if the statistics con- 
cerning births and deaths among about 
one-third of the Indian population of 
the United ^at^iiy which have Just been 



9^ ^^ 

I Women's Tailored Suits 

I Distinctive New Fall Sivles — Exclusive With Us. 

All tlijc very latest patterns for fall are revealed in our special showing 
of high-grade tailored suits. You will find the choice of fabrics unsurpassed 
and the tailoring above criticism. We call particular attention to our range 
of prices for Tailored Suits 

$15.00, $20.00, $25.00 and up to $75 



Ask to be shown our $25 Tailored 
Suits, usually $39.50 and $45. 
Beautiful modes, lined with Skin- We are featuring this season a spe- 
ner's Satin, 5-1 inches long. Peculiar- cial "Friedman" Suit at $25. It ad- 
ly adapted for Duluth wear. ^'ertises itself. 

Furs of superior quality at pleasing prices. 



I 
; 
I 



Seal Plush Jackets, Regular $35 
values for $22.50. 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



i 



-i- 



WANT CAR LINE 
TO CEMETERY 



Directors of Cemett y Associ- 

aiions Interview Street 

Railway Manager. 

street cars may be used in Duluth 
for funeral piiri><>st'S in the nt-ar fu- 
ture. If the .Iti.ials ot Hie Duluth 
Street KalUvay ctMnpany act on the 
■ugestions n»a«lo to General Manager 
Herbert Warren by a joint coniniliiee, 
reprtsentinK two local cemetery assu- 
clatinns. , 

The conimiit.o. wliich waitecl upon 
Mr. Warr. ti V\ oilntsday afternoon, 
stated tliat :t was a ditticult matter 
now lo K" " ■ '">^ "Jf ^'"^ cemeteries, 

©gpeclally Inion and Lutheran 

cemeteries .^^ Uermantown and that 
with the street car, much better ac- 
commodations could be provided at 
considerably less expense. 

A. Thorsen and C. «.;. Anderson, di- 
rectors of the Union cemetery asso- 
ciation, and A M. Nelson and Axel 
Person of the Lutheran cen.tery. coni- 
prised the committee which Inter- 
viewed Mr. Warren in the interest of 
a new street car line to Hermantown. 
They pointed out that with the com- 
pletion of the new- Hutchinson road, 
close at hand, a s-hort out to Herman- 
town would be prt.'vlded, with a grade 
of 4 per cent, which would make the 
road suitable for trolley cars. Tlie 
cemeteries are about four miles dl.'^lant 
from the city and wlien tiie new Hutch- 
inson road la completed this fall, there 
win be an excellent thoroughfare all 
the way. 

The bridge over Millers creek at 
Thirteenth street and Piedmont ave- 
nue will have to be repaired before 
Street cars can run over It. If the 
Hermantown line is built, according 
to General Manager Warren. It will be 
an extension of the Fledmont avenue 
line, which now terminates at Twenty- 
third avenue west and Tenth street. 

Mr. Warren told the members of 
the committee that he could not prom- 
ise how soon tlu> Hennaniown line 
would be built, but said that the of- 
ficials of the company have the matter 
under consideration, as well as a num- 
ber of otlitr extensions of the lines. 

BVEA (iLEK ( LIB WILL 

HAVE AITIVE SEASON. 

The Pvea Glee club Is getting ready 
for a busy fall and has made plans tor 
a bazar, to be held Oct. 24. The final 
arrangement." f'r the affair have not 
been completed. 

Charles Holmer has been selected as 
director again this year. The club is 
planning to hold a concert week In 
November at the Episcopal church at 
the West end. The concert will be for 
the benefit of the building fund for the 




a - - J -f Saturday night and enjoy a most delightfully cooked and served repast. Beau- 

/\tldlCl 1116 tiful antumnal decorations are ariistically arranged throughout the rooms pres- 
rj^ II 191 f ¥X» entiner a beautiful scene that vies with nature's own natural 

1 able d Hote Dinner 



enting a beautiful scene that vies with 

paintings. Orchestra music will combine with a most sumpt- 

uc'us menu to m;ike the evening most enjoyable. 



FORECAST TIM. 

S.\Tl Rn.VY. 

Duluth, Superior and vi- 
cinity, including the Me- 
saba and Vermilion iron 
ranges: Generally cloudy 
tonight and Saturday; con- 
tinued cool temperature; 
moderate to brisk north 
easterly winds 



Otarrvstinnj taken ftt 8 • m , m w« 
rt^ufini to «<■ \rvA 

t..o«Ait^. oi continuotii \inc9. pi^ ll.r.iuf 1. (luiAU iJ rqutf air iHtvwr 

IkOtHCUMv. or dullt-J I>nr» pftMi Uiiiiuch puinu wl rutimi irntprralt:rr . iK^jr 
nitl b* il»»wn o»Jy (or l^ro. (»r#ltiif 'JO*. ■'■.! IIKJ' 

StMfeOL'. tnJrfttr VUU u( »rathrr Q_) iitmi. ^ p«n>y cioutljr, ^ 
fMuJjt. (g)r*in. (^fcfu*. . (^ i«r».rl n«i.-.il.|[ Aifo.l fly Willi l»ir widJ F.r^l 
f^ur'. trn>p( rvturr. tccond. 24 K<jur raihf.ll. i( <l rriualt .01 inrh. iNjrd, MiA't 
rl<K>ly t'* 10 rni\r% prr hwur or nior^ 



WIND SCALU. 

Mile* pir 
hour. 

Calm to 3 

Light 5 to 15 

Moderate 15 lo JS 

I'risk 25 to 35 

High ■. S5 to 33 

Gule 60 to 63 

Uuriicane 65 and attoT* 

H. W. RICHARDSON. 
Co«ai ForcMtter. 



PROGRESSIVE FIRMS 
THAT BOOST THE 
WEST ENO — ES 

^— ^-■■■^■■^-™~" till your 

orders promptly witn re- 
liable goods and tlrsC 
class w'orkmansMip: 

CLOTULNG. 




Much cooler 
weather prevails at 
the Head of the 
Lakes. 

A cold wave from 
Northwestern Can- 
ada is following 
vesterday's rains. 
*rhe cold wave will 
probably moderate 
Saturday, but mean- 
while the wind is 
coming from the 
lake, and last night 

an overcoat was appreciated. 

A year ago today it was cool and 

clear. 

The sun ro.se at 5:55 and will set 
at 6:06, making twelve hours and 
eleven minutes of sunlight. 

Mr. Richardson makes the following 
comment on weather conditions: 

"Much cooler weather prevails this 
morning In Minnesota, Nebraska, the 
Dakotas and Manitoba in connection 
with a strong high-pressure condition 
that has advanced to the latter prov- 
ince from Alberta during the last 
twenty-four hours. In the meantime 
light to heavy rains have fallen over 
the upper lake region, the Missouri and 
upper Mississippi valleys, due to the 
influence of the disturbance central 
over Western Mexico and another from 
the Red river valley to Eastern On- 
tario. This latter depression has also 
caused warmer weather over the 



/eastern lake region and Upper Ohio 
valley. The rapid changes in pres- 
sure throughout the Northwest favor 
unsettled weather conditions at the 
Head of the Lakes during the ensuing 
tliirty-six hours. The Northwest storm 
warnings (.ordered at 10 o'clock last 
nighty were lowered at 10 a. m. today." 
General Koreeants. 

Forecasts for the twenty-four hours 
ending at 7 p. m. .Saturday: 

Upper lakes — Brisk north winds; un- 
settled, with showers on Michigan and 
Huron tonight and possibly on south 
portion Saturday; partly cloudy on Su- 
perior. 

Upper Michigan — Fair tonight and 
Saturday; frost tonight with colder in 
east and south portions; warmer Sat- 
urday. 

Wi^^•consln — Partly cloudy with prob- 
ably showers tonight or Saturday; 
cooler tonight and in southwest por- 
tion Saturday. 

Minnesota — Partly cloudy tonight 
and Saturday; cooler tonight in soULh 
portion; warmer Saturday. 

Iowa — Showers tonight or Saturday; 
cooler tonight. 

North and South Dakota — Partly 
cloudy tonight and Saturday; warmer 
Saturday and w-est portion tonight. 

Montana — Partly cloudy tonight and 
Saturday; warmer tonight in north 
and west portions. 



peratures for twenty-four hours and 
the minimum for twelve, ending at 7 
a. m. today: 

Max. Mln. 



.'J2 

.06 

.68 

.52 

.58 

,72 

.64 

.62 

.52 

.82 

.72 

.81 



The Temperatures. 

Following were the maximum 



tem- 



AbJIene 

lilpena 

AtlaiiUc City 

Batllefoni . . . 

ISisEuarck 

Ituise 

B ston 

Buffalo 

CaleaO' 

ChHrieston .... 

Chicago 

I'orpus Clir'.iti 

Denver 68 

Ilea Muine* 64 

Det'iLs L.ake 58 

Dodge M 

Dubuque T6 

DULUTH 56 

Duraugo 78 

Eastport 60 

}:klmonton 52 

Escanaba 60 

("■alveston 84 

Grand Haren ...72 

Green Bay 68 

mitteras 82 

Havre 68 

Helena 52 

HuuEhton 66 

Huron 72 

Jacksonville 88 

Iv.ainlo:ps 76 

Kansas City 82 

Knoxvllla 88 

lA Crrsse 72 

Louisville 82 

Madison 74 

Marquette ^ 62 

Medicine Uat . .60 



68 I MemDlila . . . 
52 I Miles City . 
62 I Milwaukee . . 
42 ' Miniicdoaa . . 

4U I Mixlena 

54 ' .Montgomery 

48 .Montreul 

48 I .Uuorhead 
88 New Orleans 
6S I New YorH 
64 I NurUi Platte 



..90 

,..52 

...66 

, . .46 

...60 

...94 

...54 

...62 

. ..»2 

...68 

...78 

...94 



74 Oklahoma 

48 I'hoetilx ISO 

62 metre 68 

38 I*!ttslHirg 74 

62 Pert Arthur 64 

62 Prtiand, Or T6 

40 QuAppeUe 52 

S8 Raleigh 80 

44 Kupld City 64 

40 Koseburg 78 

60 H<«well 92 

78 St. Louis 84 

58 St. Paul 66 

56 8»lt Lake City... 66 

72 iSau Diego 72 

84 I San Francisco 66 



38 
44 

46 
72 
62 
64 
64 
58 
64 
62 
44 
60 



Sault Ste. Marie,.. 60 

Sheridan 52 

Shrevei>ort 02 

Spokane 68 

Swift Current 52 

Tampa 90 

Toledo 66 

Washington 74 

Wllliston 48 

Wiiineraucca 72 

Wlrm^jeg 94 

Yellowatone 54 



70 
46 
62 

a2 

42 I 

70 ! 

40 

44 

76 

5r. 

48 
74 
C4 
46 
62 
38 
58 
3u 
64 
40 
4(i 
64 
68 
52 
50 
62 
50 
00 
42 
68 
50 
36 
72 
58 
64 
30 
40 
86 
34 



Extensive Showings Smart 
Millinery $5 to $10. 

THE woman who wishes to pay $10 or less for her 
Fall Hat should come here. For Saturday's sell- 
ting we present the strong^est line of cleverly designed 
millinery to be found anywhere. It is truly remark- 
I able the grace and beauty that our designers have 
I worked into ^ur moderately priced hats. 
Jaunty suit hats or chic somber-coloried and bright- 
hued turbans; depicting the high style ideas of the 
masters are shown here. The exclamations of sur- 
prise at their exquisite beauty are quickly follow^ed 
by expressions of complet«e wonderment when the 
# price ticket is examined and the cost ^^ 

found to range from $10 to ^f%J 



church building. Which is being remod- 
eled at Twenty-eighth avenue west 
and First street. 



AT WELL- 

This is the 



BUY YOUH t_-l.uTHES 
bergs, the quality store, 
store wiiere you get something tor 
your monev. Just received a full line 
of clothing and nien't^ furnishings. 
1H21 \Nest S'Uperior ttreet. 



SAYS BRANCH 
IS IN PROSPECT 



ELElTRiC StrFLlES. 

-You'll not be shocked at your electrical 
bill and supplies it bought at Peter- 
Bons Elec Co.. >-m W- Sup. St. 



FIRE L\SLttA.NCE. 



Protect your home in 
pay losses promptly. 
\\ esiern iicalty Co., 



companies that 

We have them. 

VJ22 W. Sup. St. 



GROCERS. 



VIRKN & SWAlNtiO.., FINK GR -CER- 
les; prompt delivery. 2iii) W. 3rd at. 

Ijavldson & Olson, dealers in staple and 
fancy groceries; full line fruits and 
vegetables. 1S14 Pied. Av. Zen. 2148. 



HARDWARE. 



Postmaster Declares West 

End Will Have Good 

Carrier Service. 

West end residents, who have been 
aroused over reports that the post- 
office department at Washington will 
curtail the carrier service at the West 
end, need not be alarmed, according to 
Postmaster A. P. Cook. 

'•The West end has been promised a 
postal station with ten or more car- 
riers ot its own and an efficient serv- 
ice," said Mr Cook, and stated that the 
matter was now in the hands of the 
officials at Washington. 

Postmaster Cook, while admitting 
that four of the sixteen routes at the 
West end or west of Seventh avenue 
west, had been cut down to one de- 
livery a day to provide for the carriers' 
vacations, stated that this was brought 
about because of the failure of- con- 
gress to appropriate the $200,000 asked 
for by 
year. 



financial secretary, and Mrs. S'orenson, frost 
treasurer. I crop. 

Itev. James Sanacke of Minneapolis, 
superintendent of the Red River Valley 
district of Norwegian-Danish M. E. 
churche.s, will preach at the First Nor- 
wegian-Danish M. E. church at the 
regular service Sunday morning. There 
will be other special services. 

At a lueeting of the trustee board 
of the First Norwegian-Danish M. E. 
church this week, John J. Moe was 
elected president; A. Jorgenson, sec- 
retary; O. A. Anderson, treasurer, and 
Andrew Otterson, treasurer of the 
building fund committeee. 



Blue Serge Suits $15 

At the 3 Winners Clothing company, 
115 East Superior street. 



NEGAIXEE NOTES. 



did considerable damage to the 

The funeral of John Sagarllck, the 
young Austrian, who was killed at the 
Stephenson mine, when he ran his mo- 
tor car through the gate of the third 
level and dropped eighty feet to the 
bottom, was held Tuesday with inter- 
ment In the Negaunee cemetery 

Many of th farmers here expect to 
harvest a fair crop of potatoes, though 
it is reported from many sections of 
the country that this year's crop will 
be far below normal. 



Women^s Masterly Tailored 
Coats at $18 50 

GARMENTS that reveal closest attention to detail in 
their construction. Coats that are tailored in strictest 
accord to Fashion's dictates from stylish materials as 
cheviots, broadcloths, tweeds, homespuns and fancy mix- 
ture cloths. Some are made with notch, some storm, some 
shawl and some with military collars — all finished through- 
out in a superior manner and looking the part of values 
worth $5 more, but awaiting selection ^ 1 O tl,f\ 

Saturday, at ^ 1 0«9vr 

These Coats at $25 Surpass 
Values Offered Elsewhere 

WE liave made special endeavor to excel in coats at this figure 
and have gone to one of the most prominent manufacturers 
•with an unusually big order. This enormous quantity buying of 
ours was the factor in keeping the quality to the highest notch 
and at the same time bringing the price to the lowest ebb. Coats 
are made from broadcloths, kerseys, cheviots, Scotch tweeds and 
double faced cloths. They are plain tailored or trimmed with vel- 
vet pipings and buttons and are not to be 
had elsewhere, except at from $5.00 to $10.00 
higher than our price of 



$25 



Negaunee. Mich.. Sept. 23. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The blueberry ship- 
ments still continue from the lake 
shore, east of Marquette, but the aver- 
age number of cases handled daily 
by the express companies here does 
not exceed fifty. The recent heavy 



GRAFTON, N. D., ABOLISHES 
SALE OF FIRECRACKERS. 

Graftcm, N. D., Sept. 23.— (Secial to 
The H&rald.) — An ordinance abolishing 
the .sale of fire crackers in Grafton 
was adopted by the city council and 
will become effective Immediately. The 
ordinance is drawn up along the same 
line as those already in effect in other 
cities of the stale, and is the culmin- 
ation of a long campaign against the 
use of the crackers on the Fourth of 
July, a number of bad accidents hav- 
ing happened in recent years. 



JOHNSON & PETERSON, BUILDERS' 
haruware; full line carpenter loola. 

Foreberg-Henry Co., dealers in bulld- 
ers' harawuie and tools. Cor. .^»lh 
Ave. W. and 3rd h-t. Zen. 1-1 -tS-^. 



LlNtH ROOM. 



THY MY LUNCH— JUST LIKE MOTH- 
bra. 2005 W. Sup. St. Open all night. 



MLSIC. 



PIANOS. OKU.S.NS, MUSICAL MER- 
chandlsc; Victor, Edison grapho- 
phones. A. F. Lundhol m, 1^28 W. Sup. 

"b. Jentoft, musical Instruments and 
furnishings; repairing a specialty. 
2103 West Superior street. 



the postofflce department last 



MEAT DEALER. 



FOR FllKSH AND SALT MEATS CALL 
at Trousdai, 2103 West Third street. 
Both phones. 

A BROMAN, FRESH AND SALTED 
meats; deliveries promptly. Zen. 1634; 
Mel. 1044-L. 1S3J West First street. 

BUi VDUR FRESH A^Tj SALT MEATS 
at Larson _.ros., 2Mh Ave. \\ . and 
Third St. Zen. 1462; old, Melrose isa. 



Several West end citizens have ex- 
pressed their opinions on the plan of 
having the service cut down in some 
districts to one delivery a day. They 
say that the matter of a branch post- 
office has hung fire for nearly two 
years and as yet nothing seems to 
have been done about it. They are 
growing weary of the delay. 
» 

West End Shortrails. 

Mrs. J. McDonnell of 172S West First 
street entertained at her home yes- 
terday afternoon for her sister, Mrs. 
Burley, who will leave in a short time 
for the West, where she will make her 
home. , ^ . ^^ 

Emll Sund, former proprietor of the 
Scandinavian hotel in Cloquet, is mov- 
ing his family to the city and will 
locate In the West end. 

The annual meeting of the Ladies 
Aid Society of the First Norwegian- 
Danish M. E. church was held yester- 
day afternoon at the home of Mrs. 
p. H. Hanson of 2217 West Third street. 
Officers were elected as follows: Mrs. 
p. G. Hanson, president; Mrs. John 
Hauer, vice president; Mrs. P. Morte- 
rud, recording secretary; Mrs. Gilbert, 



/^ 




We Sell Hats As 

Well As Suits and 

Furnishings 

What is more, we have just the 
Hat that will look best on you. 
Our prices in this direction, as 
in the suit department, are very 
reasonable. 




Women's and Misses' 
Wool Dresses $13.50 

THE necessity of a good wool 
dress has been firmly voiced 
by the recent cool days. The de- 
mand for garments of this sort 
has been quite heavy in the past 
day or two and comment as to the 
superiority of our values are rife. 
Unusual interest is shown in 
models from serge and panama, 
either plain tailored or trimmed 
with braids and lace yokes — col- 
ors are navy, brown, black, cadet 
and tan — specially priced. Sat- 

^;t"...": $13.50 



Very Attractive Street 
Dresses $18.50 

CHARMING models from broad- 
cloth, serge jmd panama in 
shades of reseda, tan, gray, blue, 
brown and black. Some styles are 
plain tailored, while others are 
prettily braided, embroidered or 
made with dainty lace yokes. 
Skirts show the new hobble effects 
or are in full pleated models — 
very special valu'^s 
at 



$18.50 



CHAS. MORK & CO. 

1930 West Superior Street. 



J 




Boys* School Suiits $4.95 



GARMENTS that ar 
Intended for scho 
which are made up so 
from such pretty mat 
many are adopting th< 
wear. They are cut f 
mixture cloths In shac 
brown and blue — per 
garments for boys fron 
8 to 15 years — at. . 



e primarily 
ol wear, but 
good and 
?rlal9 that 
■m for best 
rom newest 
es of gray, 
rectly fitting 

$4.95 



Russian and Junior Suits 
$3.98 and Up 

STRICTLY high-clafis garments 
from all wool cassimeres and 
worsteds — medium and dark mix- 
tures — tailored and finished with 
utmost care and precJBlon — stylish 
little garment for boys and selling 
at $3.98, $4.98 and up. 



75e Knickerbocker Pants 50c 

A SPECIAL purchase of 25 doz- 
en boys' kniclcerbocker 
trousers — dark mixture cloths of 
medium weight — regular 75c 
values — Saturday special '^Or* 

New Hats and Caps for Boys 

LATEST Fall shapes for the lit- 
tle fellow of 3 years or his big 
brother of 15 — In each Instance 
the newest model and shown In 
wanted shades of red, blue, brown 
and gray; priced at $3.50 7CJ^ 

down to $1.50, 98c and / OC 



FRBE: — Every boy who visits 
our second floor "Boys' Store"' 
Saturday in company with either 
parent or guardian will be pre- 
eented with a useful souvenir 
free. 



"PLLMBLNG AND HEATING. 



JAMES GORMAN— YOUH PL.MBEit 
estimatts furnished; Jobbing work 
promptly attended to. The shop 
where prices are right. 1 Twenty- 
third avenue west. Zen. phone bO(. 




PHOIOGKAFHERS. 



MAKE A SPECIALTY OF FINE 
camera portraits, enlarging views. I 
also handle a full line of iramts. O. 
E. Moilan, 2302 VV. Sup. St.; Zenith 
phone Ib2^-D. 



ROOFING, CORNICE AND SKY- 
LIGHTS. 



ROOFING ANL> SHEET METaI^ 
work, tin and coppersmiths. C. L. 
Buriuan. Zenith phono 424-A; old 389S 
Melrose. 2005 West First street. 



XO^/IORROW 

$1 D©WN-$1 TO $2 A WEEK-NO INTEREST 




Peter Thompson Dresses, at $4.98. 

QUITE the practical and serviceable dress for 
school, street or house wear, are these pretty 
new Peter Thompson dresses that are designed for 
girls from 6 to 14 years. They are made from good 
ierf;c and trimmed with soutache braid and pretty 
Insignias. Skirts are full pleated. Suits ^A QO 

shown in navy and red special, Saturday at. .«F^»»'«-» 
Other wool dresses in new one-piece styles — plain 
Dolors and plaids at from $3.98 to $12.50. 

Dainty Wear for Infants 

THE babys own department is on the second 
floor. Here its every need has been carefully 
and studiously attended to. All the little things 
that combine for the little one's comfort are shown. 
Dresses of every material and chaiacter, skirts, 
bootees, sacques, bonnets, blankets, baskets and 
trinkets of all kinds are now ready at lowest prices. 



Juniors' Stylish Coats for $13.50 

ir^ OATS for the school misses that have unusual 
V>» charm and style worked into them. Made 
from splendid quality all wool cheviot of medium 
v/elght — they are made with embroidered velvet col- 
lirs and have self lined yokes. Shown In seml-fltted 
raodels In shades of blue and brown they produce a 
most serviceable garment Indeed ^1 ^ '^O 

Other coats from higher grades of novelty mixture 
cloths — dark, medium or light colors — finely tailored 
end llnished throughout — selling at $14.98. 

UNUSUALLY high quality junior coats from 
heavy cheviots — fitted with the "Presto" collar, 
which may be worn as notch style wMth long revcrs 
or quickly adjusted to the high neck military or 
auto collar. Just the garment for 
ibr the stormy weather, at 



$19.50 



"P. & W/' $3.50 Shoes for Women Are Better 



RESTAURANTS. 

TRY ONE OF OUR SQUARE MEALS. 
Open all hours. Twentieth Avenue 
cafe. 



SHOES. 

IF VOU WAN'r^iUALrTY, BUY YOUR 
Shoes at Jutlu's. 2013 West Sup. St. 



TWO 
TWO 

LAKESIDE Lots, 50x140 feet, at Fifty-second avenue east. All lots overlooking the 
lake and nicely wooded; water, sewer and gas in the block. Prices $100 to $425. Sale to- 
morrow, Sept. 24th, afternoon, 1 to 7 p. m. Take a Lakeside car to Fifty-fourth avenue east, 
where our salesmen will meet you. 

C- F^RAIMCIS COLIVIAN 

421 IVIAIMHAXXAIM BLDG. 



P ANTON & WHITE Special Shoe for wome 
best to be had in Duluth. For a long time 
the medium priced shoes, and our outlet today 
pairs. We go to a foremost Eastern shoemak* 
who is noted for snappy styles, comfortable mc 

Our Fall stocks are now complete and sho 
metal, vici kid and calf skin models, in either 
styles with high or low heels — all sizes and w 
at ■ 



a at $3.50 are the very 
we have specialized on 
is for several hundred 
IT for these shoes — one 
dels and best leathers. 

w patent colt, gun 
button or blucher 



idths- 



$3.50 



i 



Lowest Prices for Repairing Shoes 



Men's Half Soles, sewed 75c 

Men's Half Soles, nailed flOc 

Men's Heels S.^ic 

Boys' Half Soles, sewed «5c 

Bojs' Hall Soles, nailed BOc 

(Slae* 2^ to RVz.) 



Women's Half Soles, sewed 60o 

\^'omeu'H Half Soles, nailed 45c 

Women's Heels 25c 

Misses' Hnlf Solea, sewed 50c 

Uubber Heels, attnehed, pair 



.40<- 



Watch the Comer Windows ! 



^riT* -t^ jg 



a^ 





t 



tmt^i^^lm 



jaX 

















1 


















i 

1 


1 








— 


' 






> 


• 






1 




! 

1 


t 






1 
1 


' 
1 


' 






\ 

t 

;i 

■1 


i 






1 
t 

i 





6 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



Asthma and Consumption 

Duffy's Pure Malt Whiskey Gave 
Health and Strength When All 
Else Failed. Six Bottles Have 
Made Mr. Nash Feel Like a 
New Man. 

lie recently wrote : "Last Janu- 
ary, a year ago, I caught a severe 
cold while working. 1 coughed all 
the time. I sent for my doctor, 
and he said I had consumption 
and asthma ; he gave me some 
medicine which did me no good. I 
saw your advertisement in the 
paper and decided to try your 
medicine. I have taken 6 bottles 
and it has done me so much good, 
and has given me lots of strength. 
I am still taking your Duffy's Pure 
Malt Whiskey and I recommend 
it to my friends and will continue 
to do so." James W. Nash, Cot- 
tageville, Ky. 

Thou.sands, both men and women, like Mr. Nash, praise Duffy's 
Pure Malt Whiskey for restoring them to health. 

Duffy's Pure Malt Whiskey 

Is a wonderful remedy for ail diseases of the throat, lungs and stom- 
ach, and all run-down and weak- 
ened conditions of the body, brain 
and nerve. It builds new tissue, 
quickens the circulation and aids 
in driving out all disease germs. 
It is prescribed by doctors and is 
recognized a> a family medicine 
everywhere. 

CAUTION — Wh»n you Mk your drugolst, grooer 
or dealer fnr Duffy' Pure Malt Whistcey. be sure you 
ttt the genuine, it is an absolutely pure medicinal 
malt whjsli.'y. and U sold IN SEALED BOTTLES 
ONLY — never In bulk. Prices $1.00 a laroe bottle. 
Look for the trade-mark, the ''OM Chrmist." on the 
label, and make sure the seal over the cork Is un- 
broken. Write Medical Department. The Duffy Malt 
Whiskoy Co., Rochester. N. Y.; for an illustrated 
■edieal booklet and doctors' advic*. both sent free. 




Mii. J AM J. 



.N . \ s a . 




THE STOTT SRIQUET 



^ 



!£^) 



•*^- 



^sep 



THE "STOTT 
BRIQUET" 

is a solid ch unk of 

pure anthracite 

screenings securely 

welded together 

by a newly 

discovered process 



lii-'-,-..^----^ 



■<^-^i 



m 



THE ''STOTT 
BRIQUET" 

is about tico inches 
square- 'it is the 
easiest fuel to 
handle, the best 
in heat giving 
results 



aved 

In Your Coal Bill 

n You Use 

Stott Briquets 

THE IDEAL ECONOMY FUEL 



Used m open grates, in furnaces, surface burning 
stoves, kitchen ranges, laundry stoves and hot water 
heaters, they ESTABLISH A NEW STANDARD OF 
FUEL VALUE. 

Ask your fuel dealer about Stott Briquets — if he 
does not handle them, write us and we will direct 
you to a dealer who can supply you. 

Be Sure to get Directions for burning 
from the Stott Booklet— at your dealer's 

Stott Briquet Co 

Superior. 



. conmur 



D]cbar(I$on5BoyntonCcr$ 

"^ 'C^ Fresh -Air Heaters 




and j^kha^dscn Boilers 



have a deserved reputation. Thousands are 

in use all over the United States. Are the 

best heating apparatus possible to make. 

They heat where others fail— give best satisfaction. 

Send for descriptive circulars* 

SOLO BY KEALY-MeFADYEN PLUMBING & HEATING COMPANY. 327 W. FIRST ST. Phonei I7«. 



POLITICS IN 

THEJUTURE 

Will There Be New Progres- 
sive Party for Next 
Campaign? 

Political Prophets Are Giving 

Serious Heed to the New 

Conditions. 



Washington. Sept. 23. — Whether or 
not Col. Roosevelt has constructed a 
platform which is so radical, if not 
revolutionary, that the regulars will 
refuse to stand on it and whether this 
means that beside the two old parties 
there will be in the field for the next 
presidential election a new liberal or 
progressive party made up from the 
progressives gathered up everywhere, 
is a question which just now is giving 

the political prophets much concern. 

It is one thing to attract the a.p- 
plause of the multitude, and it is an- 
other thing to garner in the votes of 
those same men who did the shouting. 
Col. Bryan found that to be true. And 
set- 
Without doubt there are a lot of 
progressive senators and represent- 
atives who will come out from under 
cover next December. In fact, tliey 
are coming out right along. They have 
felt that the party was not keeping 
up with the development of advanced 
thought among the people, but they 
have hesitated about declaring them- 
selves as tlie recognized insurgents 
and progressives have done. Some of 
them philandered for a time, flirting 
with the liberal element only to be 
warned back into the ranks of con- 
servatism by the demands of the regu- 
lars where the latter were in undis- 
puted control of the party machinery. 
Hut the whole country seems to be in 
the mad rush toward a more radically 
representative sjstem of government, 
and the former president is leading the 
movement. He is excelled by no one 
in making an accurate, shrewd esti- 
mate of the state of public opinion. 

Col. Roosevelt has discovered what 
the people want. The acclaim which 
met his recent utterances apparently 
proved that, and he is the man to cast 
his fortunes with the powerful public, 
whose applause makes or mars the 
fortunes of those who appeal to it. 
The movement is bound to grow. It 
will gather strength dailj% and there 
is little probability that anything can 
stop it. If the movement is one cal- 
culated to bring prosperity to the 
country. It will endure; If it be the 
lure of false prophets. It will pass 
away. But in any event, a large and 
perhaps controlling element of the 
people is determined to have a change 
I'erhaps it would be as well to recog- 
nize that this is their temper now as 
at some later time. 

Scnalwr Onen on Popular Rnie. 
Senator Robert I.. Owen of Oklahoma 
ha.s Issued what he is pleased to call 
The Code of the People's Rule. This was 
l^rinted as senate document 603 (Sixty- 
tirst congre.«s, second session). It con- 
sists of an Introduction of "various stat- 
utes, etc., relating to the people's rule 
•system of government, and for termi- 
nating the abuses of machine politics, 
viz.: An adequate registration svstem; 
socret ballot, direct primaries, public- 
ity of campaign contributions, corrupt 
practices act, publicity pamphlets, ini- 
tiative and referendum, recall, Dea 
Moines plan of city government, short 
ballot, etc." Accompanying the code 
was a copy of Senator Bourne's speech 
on Oregon's system of popular govern- 
ment — "the best system in the world 
today." 

Senator Owen declares that "the 
people's rule Is not, or should not be, 
a partisan question. In Republican 
Oregon, South Dakota, Montana and 
Maine and In Democratic Missouri, 
Oklahoma, Arkansas and Nevada, the 
people have become already compara- 
ly free from machine control, or are 
about to achieve that distinction." 
Forestry ProfltM. 
Anyone who expects to get rich out 
of practical forestry, by planting trees 
and waiting for them to grow, will 
probably be disappointed unless he hap- 
pens to be growing eucalyptus in 
California. The forest service has re- 
recently put out leaflets showing the 
cost, methods and profits of growing 
loblolly and short-leaf pine. It clanns 
that loblolly will make a tree eighty 
feet high and containing seventy board 
feet of lumber at the age of forty 



years. The wood Is "coarse-grained, 
icnotty and largely sapwood." Shortleaf 
pine makes better lumber, but it is of 
Slower growth. In crowded, unthinned 
standi,, the pine will yield about 13.000 
board feet of Juiat>er to the aacre in 
fifty years. At- fT.SO per 1.000 feet on 
tae stump, which l.s probably not too 
lii-tle to estimate It at, this would give 
$07. oO an acre^ which is less than $2 
per year per -Acre, not counting any- 
tliing for seeding, ctransplantlng. thin- 
ning and other wt>rk, beside interest 
on the -noney. Prom an economic point 
of view, the foresft service should be 
able to find somettkng more worthy of 
offering to the public as an investment. 

MANY TONS 
OF LUGGAGE 

Special Baggage Rooms Pro- 
vided in English Country 
Houses. 



Wcek-End Guests and Their 
Remarkable Ward- 
robes. 



DOCTOR 
ADVISED 
OPERATION 



Cured by LydiaE.Pinkham's 
Vegetable Compouad 

Galena, Kans, — "A year ago last 
March I fell, and a few days after 
there was soreness in my right side. 
In a short time a bunch came and it 
bothered me so much at night I could 
not sleep. It kept 
growing larger and 
by fall it was as 
large as a hen's egg. 
I could not go to 
bed without a- hot 
water bottle applied 
to that side. 1 had 
one of the best doc- 
tors in Kansas and 
he told my husband 
that I woiild have to 
be operated on as it 
was something like 
a tumor caused by a rupture. I wrote 
to you for advice and you told me not 
to get discouraged but to take Lydia 
E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound. 
1 did take it and soon the lump in ray 
side broke and passed away."— Mrs. 
R. R. HuEY, 713 Mineral Ave., Galena, 
Kans. 

Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Com- 
pound, made from roots and herbs, 
has proved to be the most successful 
remedy for curing the worst forms of 
female ills, including displacements, 
inflammation, fibroid tumors, irregu- 
larities, periodic pains, backache, bear- 
ing-down feeling, flatulency. Indiges- 
tion, and nervous prostration. It costs 
but a trifle to try it, and the result 
has been worth millions to many 
suffering women. 

If you want special advice writ© 
f orit to lW[rs.Pinkliam,L.ynn,MasSt 
It is free and always helpful* 





i 


lit* 


y 


:;^'::':\ '*' 


i 


WW 


fr 



London, Sept. 23. — Like the rest of 
society, smart American women are 
flitting about here, ther« and every- 
wJiere just now and tlieir luggage is a 
source of amazement to those uniniti- 
ated In the requirements of the mon- 
daine. One morning not long ago at 
Ciiaring Cross Mrs. John Jacob Astor 
laad to pay ?160 for excess on luggage. 
A conspicuous feature in the consign- 
ment was the number of hat boxes 
wliicii arrived at tlie station in charge 
of a maid. Some were round, meas- 
uring three yards in diameter. All told 
there were a dozeji or more. 

Kach box was insured. One whicn 
apparently contained an extra precious 
creation, the maid desired to carry 
into her own-second-class compart- 
ment, but the officials had a word to 
say on the subject as its dimensions 
required tlie room of two passengers. 
Alter some considerable d'scussioii, it 
was eventually placed In tlie van with 
tlie othors. All tliese interesting boxe.s 
were of compressed cane in a lovely 
shade of blue, an entirely new idea, as 
Idllierto compressed cane boxes have 
been turned out -in the inevitable gin- 
ger tint. Mrs. Astor's liad silver clasps. 

Before going to Scotland, where they 
now are, Mrs. Batty and her family 
were at Trouvilie for a very brief lioli- 
day. Her luggage weiglied something 
like a ton, but as it included lier chil- 
dien's tlie amount was not so very ex- 
cessive, though the excess fare was. 
An A^^^ul CataMtropbe. 

During June the Sackvilles had a 
pastoral play at their famous seat 
Knole Park. One of tlie amateurs tak- 
ing part in It was Miss Clara Frewen, 
niece of Mrs. George West. On the 
morning of the festivity to the horror 
of everyone concerned in tlie perforii- 
ance it was discovered that Miss 
ii'rewen's slieplierUess hat, an exquisite 
thing after Watteau, designed especial- 
ly for tne play, was not fortlicoming. 
Telephoning was continued with almost 
uninterrupted vigor during the morning 
and a gieat deal tiiat was unparlia- 
mentary was said. Eventually it was 
discovered that the, liat had been sent 
to Miss Frew«n'8 cddi'ess in London. 
That it might reacli Knole Park in 
time It was nei^ssary to have it dis- 
patched by a special train which was 
arranged for by telephone In less than 
a quarter of an hour by Lord Sack- 
ville himself, who happens to be a di- 
rector of the railway company. The 
hat arrived at the identical Instant It 
was required and though the festivity 
In question did not go off as smoothly 
as It should have *one the hat was in 
no way responsible. 

At various country seats In England 
and Scotland during the last year or 
two, special luggage-rooms have been 
built for the baggage of smart women 
folk. These are no Jerry built or make- 
shift structures, but securely and sub- 
stantially erected quarters, dry, warm 
and fitted with electric light in which 
with all safety the precious belong- 
ings of the wealthy social butterflies 
may be deposited. 

ProvlMion for Health Fads. 

Not only does the baggage of the 
fashionable woman of the day include 
frocks, hats and toilette accessories ga- 
lore, but provision has also to be made 
in It for the paraphernalia connected 
witli her health fads. Nine out of every 
dozen mondaines, with or wltliout the 
consent of their doctors, take the 
sourmllk cure. Everyone now Con., 
eludes that the only safe way to pro- 
ceed is to make it at home. This means 
a special apparatus with various uten- 
sils which further Increase the things 
which have to be taken for even a 
week's visit. Besides, there are the 
pliyslcal culture Instruments of tor- 
ture, as they have been deflned, the 
dumb bells, planks and rubber articles 
with which the fashionable matron and 
debutante of the day exercise day in 
and day out. 

Arthur Balfour tells a good story 
against himself Id connection with a 
recent visit he paid to a country house. 
At all times a light sleeper, he was 
awakened one morning during the small 
hours by stamping and pounding punc- 
tuated by an occasional groan from 
the room adjoining his. Thinking his 
neighbor was either a maniac or seri- 
ously ill. he got up and put his ear 
to the keyhole. The noise and the 
groans continued. It seemed advisable 
to arouse the household. He went to 
his liost'a bedroom and explained the 
situation. 

Cause oX the Noises. 

"Good heavens, old chap. Is that all 
you woke me up for," was the response. 
"That room Is occupied by my wife's 
nieco and Lu (the hostess) tells me 
that the girl performs certain exercises 
to develop her throat and neck which 
necessitate her making the weird 
noises you no doubt hear. Lu never 
dreamed old man that the noises would 
reach you." 

A year ago at the local railway sta- 
tion for Sunningdale park there were 
five tons of luggage belonging to pros- 
pective guests of Mr, Winans awaiting 
delivery. None of those who owned it 
was slaying at the park more than a 
week. 

The duchess of Roxburghe, who likes 
to do things differently from her 
country women. Is said to have gone to 
Norway with one compressed can 
trunk and a handbag which she often 
carriei herself. Perhaps, like the 
duchess of Maralborough, who wore 
.such simple, Inexpensive little gowns 
during the last season, she, too, ia try- 
ing to set an example In the matter 
of economy and simplicity to her com- 
patriots. 



TAFT LAUGHS AT THIS ONE. 

Former Governor and Isaac Isaac- 
son Take a Hand at Poker. 

Beverley, Mass., Sept. 23. — President 
Taft is getting a lot of good laughs 
these days out of the following poker 
story: 

A former governor of Idaho was 
playing in a euchre game with Isaac 
Isaacson. 

"If I were playing poker I'd bet iJlO 
on this hand," said Isaacson. 

"Well," said the governor, "if you 
will give me a queen I'll bet you ?100 
on my hand. 

Issacson gave the governor a queen, 
smiling as he thought of the four kings 
he held. When the betting was over 
Isaacson laid down his four kings and 
reached for the money. 

"Softly," admonished the governor. 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



WH '^ m * 



:*^ 



=^^ 



I 



i^ I ■ 



*••• 



September 23, 1910. 




vJopyrigiii Halt bciianucr (X Aiarx 



YOU'LL find here in our store "the 
greatest show on earth" of good 
clothes; more first prize winners 

than anywhere else; all the high-class, thoroughbred 
styles; and you can just as well take a first premium 
as not. 

Hart Schaffner & Marx 

new styles, new colorings, new all-wool fabrics, perfect 
tailoring; let us show you how well we can fit you in 
these perfect clothes. 

Suits $18 to $35 Overcoats $15 to $40 
Crothcraft Suits and Overcoats $10 to $25 

This store is the Home of Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes, Manhattan 
and Wilson Bros. Shirts, Stetson and Mundheim Hats, W. L Douglas 
Shoes, and Skolny's Clothes for Boys. 



m 

i 

i 





i 

i 
f 












t 


















i 






J 






i 

1 





i, 



in 'linrf i>M>'i ^, 



^ 



i \ 



KENNEY & ANKER, 



409-41 1 West Superior Street, 
Duluth, Minn. 



showing four aces and pocketing the 
RtakeiJ. Isaacson gazed sorrowfully at 
the governor, then asked: 

"Say, governor. I don't mind the 
money, but I wish you would tell m© 
what you wanted of that queen?" 

HE WOULD RIDE 
HORSE TO A BAR 

Ex-Husband of Grace Van 

Studdiford Proves a 

Bad Actor. 

St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 23. — Charlie Van 
Studdiford, whose divorced wife, Grace 
Van Studdiford, the actress, recently 
tiled a bankruptcy petition showing 
assets of $1 an debts of $25,000, tried 
to ride into the Laclede hotel bar liere 
on horseback. Policeman Murphy pro- 
tested, but Van Studdiford refused to 
t?.ke l.he policeman seriously. The po- 
licemcin then took Van Studdiford 
bcdily off to jail. 

Murphy was standing near the hotel 
when he saw a well groomed Individual 
force his horse upon the • sidewalk in 
front of the bar entrance. Murphy ran 
down to protest. 

"Here, you can't do that!" shouted 
the policeman. 

"WoU, I don't care; the horse and I 
believe 1 can." replied Charlie. 

"Woll, I mean I won't let you do It," 
said Murphy. 

"Oh, you got the number wrong.' 
said the horseman. "I'm Charlie Van 
Studdiford." 

"Any relation to the actress?" asked 
Murph}', as he grabbed the bridle. 

"Oh, yes; I'm her cousin; only she Is 
not an actress; she's a singer." 

"Woll, anyhow, you're getting to be 
a bad actor and whoever you are you 
had hotter get off the sidewalk with 
that horse," ruled Murphy. 

"Nil," said Charlie. "I can't let my 
steed stand." 

There was some further dialogue 
which resulted In an automobile patrol 
being summoned. Van Studdiford once 
■was Tfealthy and married Grace Qulvs, 
the opera singer. She an Van Studdi- 
ford were divorced more than a year 
ago T^'hen she filed suit at Clayton, Mo., 
and -was granted one of the famous 
"ten-minute divorces," 



A REPUTATION SHATTERED. 

Denver Post: Gordon Scott bought a 
new table for his office in the Symes 
building the other day. When It was 
delivered, he decided that It was too 
well varnished. 

"It was too smooth," said Mr. Scott 



yesterday to a couple of friends. "Why 
the first day I had It a rty lit on It, 
slipped and broke Its neck and threa 
of its arms." 

Heretofore Gordon Scott has borne a 
reputation for truth and veracity. 



rtb». 



The Best Shortcake 

you've a rigVt to enjoy — but you know you can't 
make superior shortcake with an inferior baking 
powder. Better in every way than others, Rumford 
Baking Powder absolutely proves that the best 

Can Be Made With 

its aid, and the most delicious and digestible you've 
ever tasted as well. It adds to the skill of the cook 
— to good fruit and the good materials used in 
the baking — just that needed final touch to make 
perfect shortcake. Remember to ask today for 

Rumford Baking Powder 

The Wholesome Powder — No Alam 



o 



STEEL PLANT LOTS FOR SALE 

oisj e:asy payments 



BY 



THE CIARNEGIE LAND GO. 



107 OAK HALL BUILOiNQ. 

t^>^.n^->^m www,.«»«, ■■- » ..- "i ~ irM- Vir M -| f W MM > l 



Call or Wrttt Ui ttr ParHttilirs. 



l'>iiBi^iBn 



1 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



i- 



t 



A 



.. 



" 



WILL BE HOT 
CAMPAIGN 

Ohio Politicians of Both 

Parties After the Rural 

Vote. 



Write for Our Special Stove Catalog— 

Your Credit Is Good. 



Count Much on Impression 

Made in the Country 

Counties. 



Columbus, OI>io, Sept. 23. — It seems to 
be pretty well .-settled to tlie Ohio view 
that the country vote Is the thing. One 
doesn't need to liai k back many moons 
to aiscover that ll is tiulle possible for 
a man to be elected governor of this 
Slate without carryluK the cities. And 
wlien the country vote is out and vot- 
ing pretty much one way. tlie majori- 
ties are sonu-what larger than when 
t!io rural persons are Indifferent or 
' Si. lilting their votes and the cities are 
voting pretty much one way. 

in 1908 the Democrats, on the state 
ticket, polled a healthy vote In tlie 
country, but made the biggest gains 
In the cities, clovernor ilartnon's plu- 
mllty was about 2U.OO0. Three years 
previous Joliu M. I'attlson didn't run 
•well in the cilk-s. t.ul liad the country 
vote with him and lie was elected by 
about 44.000. 

Both parties are after the country 
vole this year all right. Whatever 
time Governor Harmon had had from 
his cffuris to settle the strike at Co- 
lumbus has been spent at county fairs 
an. I tarmers" reunions. Ills speeches 
have not been political, but his re- 
c^i'tions have bfL-n iui>si cordial. Not 
being a Goveni'r, Mr. Harding has not 
aiit-nded as many of these reunions, 
but lie Is golnR to try to overcome that 
handicap by so fashioning the cam- 
paign as to make it possible for a large 
percentage of liie rural vote to get 
under the spell of his oratory. 
Tour in Back Countlea. 
Th© Republican niaiKi.t,'er3 have 
tlit.ught tlie tiling out and have de- 
citled to exlen.l Mr. Harding's roposed 
auton.oblle tour in the back counties 
to within two wet ks of the election. At 
If.i.-^t two speeches a day are to be 
rnude by the candidate, but he will not 
have the entire burden on his shoul- 
ders. For Mr. Harding is generous. He 
■wants the other candidates on the 
ticket to liave u chance to be heard and 
Is going to lak. s* voral of them along. 
^•ot tliat he : 'n^ favorites, but 

he has plcke-i f the best speak- 

ers from the bumli for places on the 
p'.ogrum with hlin. The others will go 
along, but the siieeches will be made 
bv Mr. Harding. (.IranvlUe W. Mooney. 
candidate for scretary ef state; I G. 
p.nman, the mo.st popular attorney 

freiieral who ' M that office since 

t was creatC(! . Governor Francis 

1\'. Tread way. wno lias grown amaz- 
Inglv In public estimate during Ms 
public career, and Kcnlck W. Dunlap, 
candidate for another term as dairy 
and food commissioner, who Is est)e- 
cially strong on lieart-to-hetart talks 
to farmers. 

After campaigning In the country 
till two weeks before election day. 
Mr Harding will turn his attentlojn to 
tlie cities, taking' time to run out to 
the suburbs in ills automobile semi- 
Oi'caslonally. ^ , * 

The Democrats are preparing tor Jvi.st 
as hard a campaign as if they didn't 
have the Republicans scared at the 
Start. Their press bureau has been at 
work for a long time. Their speakers 
are being coached to put in heavy 
licks. Governor Harmon, who has a 
Bplendidlv developed talent for choos- 
ing words that make his utterances 
fairlv stand out from printed pages. 
V. Ill "be heard from. Atlee Pomerene. 
forceful, eloquent and popular, will 
travel with the governor much of the 
time. Tliere are other good speakers 
on the ticket. 

Demoi-rnil*' Spefikers. 
"Within the last U-w d.iys it has been 
announced that Champ Clark and Ollle 
Jnmes will speak, probably at the open- 




w 



w E'¥IE SPEIMT 40 YE^IHS iUIiLBliO W Ik ¥^ST idlSliESi and we are proud to know that Duluth 
& is getting to be one of tlie most important Units of the Gately System. It makes us feel 
good to know that we sell more all wool clothes than any other clothing store in the world. We 
know that the clothing we sell is far superior to much of the clothing sold at retail— because the 
clothing we sell is the best for the price— md-At expressly for us by fiw@lw© of the largest 
Tailor Shops in America. 



Special Values at $20 
and $25 

This is a feature here. A large number of 
men have practically fixed $20 or $25 as their 
price, and we recognize this fact and the im- 
portance of it by securing the best values ob- 
tainable at these two prices, selected from 
"Morse Made," "Athletic Cut," "Character," 
"Nipson System" and '"Kampus" clothes. We 
insist— you get the best at $20 and $25. 



All Wool $15 Suits 

We are fully satisfied that we offer the best 
values in our all-wool $15 Suits in the North- 
west. Our experience has taught us that in 
order for us to do a successful business, we 
must take the best possible care of the buyer 
who wants a $15 suit. We have seen to it 
that the man who buys one of our $15 suits 
gets value for every cent of his $15. 



Clothes for the Boys 

Our Strictly Youths' Suits, from 16 to 19 
years of age, show that snap the boy who is 
*'just out" of his short pants wants, and well 
within his means, $10 to $15. 

Boys' Knickers and Sailors — Ages 5 to 17 — 
all-wool fabrics, in blue serge, the new browns 
and gra>- fancy cheviots and worsteds, $3 to 
$8.50. 



Our 54-inch Black ^TRESTO" Raincoats and CONVERTIBLE Dress Overcoats will give you a world of satisfaction in 
damp weather and for evening wear. Our Fall Overcoats are sifted down to practically black and brown— 44 to 46 inches 
long. For the early buyer we announce that our Winter Coats are arriving; and chief among them is the 52-inch "PRESTO" 
and ^'CONVERTIBLES." Price range on coats $15 to $30. (Men's wear, main floor.) 



ladies' and Misses' ^\ O C A ,^ CJ 7 CA 
Suits and Dresses.... «Pl^-9v ^^ i'li.W 



Ladies', Misses' 
and Junior Coats 



$7.50 «o $37.50 



Ladies' and Misses' 
Fur Sets 



$12.50 «o $150.00 



Mens and Women s 
Shoes $2.50 to $5 



Mens Hats 
$2.50 



Chiett Shirts 

Arrow Collars 

Wilson Bros. Neckwear, Etc. 



Millinery, $^.50 to $12.50 
{W omens Wear, Third 
Floor) 



8 Kast Superior Street 



i 



Ing at Canton. Mr. Harding's an- 
nouncement that the battle would b-a 
fought on the Taft administration and 
the new tariff la\y has led the Demo- 
crats to select some foreign speakers 
who are expert on both subjects. 

For the first time in his life Brand 
Whitlock will make what can be 
termed political speeches. W^hltlock, 
mayor of independent Toledo, will 
stump for Harmon. Newton D. Baker, 
who fought hard to have the Demo- 
cratic state convention indorse some- 
one for United States senator, has ten- 
dered his services to the committee. 

An early September forecast gives 
the state to the Republicans. Harmon, 



/ 




J ^ 



^^"'^l 





See the Quaint Sights 
of San Francisco 

Enjoy her gaieties and splendid scale of 
living— with the background of California's 
blue skies and golden sunshine. 

Make the trip a pleasure from start to 
finish by traveling in the 

San Francisco 

Overland Limited 

over the 

Union Pacific 
Southern Pacific 

Standard Route of the West 
Electric Block Signals Excellent Dining Cars 

For reservations and literature, 
call on or address 



H. F. CARTER. G. A.. 

21 South 3rd St^ Minneapolis. Minn. 



Riepublicans declare, is not nearly so 
strong as he was two months ago. 
Inactivity in regard to the Columbus 
strike has cost him many votes. The 
unions are opposed to him because he 
has brought troops to this city and 
because he has not driven the local 
street car company into arbitration, 
which everyone ought to know, he 
lias no power to do. Then the buisness 
interests are assailing him because he 
has not taken a more active part in 
putting down the lawlessness liere. 
Republican Charges. 
The Republicans will charge that 
Rjirmon, who has been heralded as a 
patriot is as much of a politician as 
jany man in Ohio. They say that lie 
(has proved this In his connection with 
the street car strike, which more and 
more every day becomes an Issue in the 
.state campaign. 

The Democrats are planning a red- 
hot campaign. They are talking of 
bringing charges agtiinst the state 
board of public works, which has been 
in the control of the Republicans for 
vears, and which has provided some 
nice soft berths for party workers. 
Chairman Nichols is also digging up a 
lot of editorials which have appeared 
in Harding's paper in recent years and 
are using them against liim. Some of 
[these editorials attack Roosevelt and 
others Taft. Foraker himself, his old 
I friend, not escaping at times the shafts 
of the Marion editor. Harding is not 
alarmed about this, however. 

Both Republican and Democratic 
leaders express the opinion very free- 
ly that the Socialists will poll a larger 
vote in Ohio this year than they ever 
have before 



WAS FIRST 
iLDPROBS 

Original Weatlier Forcasler 

Now Getting Credit From 

Scientists. 



the flrst Old Probabilities — that is the 
first man to make observations of 
weather conditions, and from them 
reason out what kind of weather was 
due and likely to make its appearance 
in the next twenty-four hours, and to 
give the people warning of storms. 
Every scientist in this country and 
Europe is now willing to admit that 
Espy was the flrst man to define the 
theory of storms and from his obser- 
vations predict the coming weather. . 

Ml". Espy was a young man when he 
cam.} to Harrisburg from Ohio, where 
he was born, and took charge of the 
old Academy at Front and .South 
stre<its, where he taught for years and 



Defined Theory of Storms 

and Gave Warning of 

Them. 



made by him in making his weather 
calculations. 

From Philadelphia Espy went to 
Washington, but he ne rer forgot Har- 
risburg, and he came back to this city 
and settled down after his Washing- 
ton experience and married. The late 
Alexander Stephens or Georgia was 
the first one to extend a helping hand 
to Espy in Washington, and from 1854 
to ISGO Espy, a^.sisted and encouraged 
by Stephens, promulgated his discov- 
eries to the world. As usual, in his 
own country Espy was coldly received 
by the scientists, but the French and 
Engli.sh were more liberal and encour- 
aged him to keep up hi.s work. Through 



COFFIN'S DANCING 
ACADEMY 

Beginners' class every Monday even* 
ing. I'rlvate class Tue.sday eveninff. 
General class Thur.sday evening. 
18 LAKI2 A-VENLE NUKTU. 



stre.jts f ''^^re 'le taugni ror jeais cu^^^^^ ^j^^ Washington newspapers 

resKled In the house built by Maclaj * induced to send out through the 



DIVORCE SLIT WHICH 



INVOLVED MILLIONS. 



Harrisburg, Pa., Sept. 23.— In Harris- 
burg there dwelt and perfected liis 
theory of forecasting storms, one James 
Pollard Espy, who Is gradually get- 
ting the credit from scientists of being 



one of Pennsylvania's United titates 
sena.tors He was a scientist, a me- 
teorologist and a student of conditions 
that produced changes in the weather. 
While In Harrisburg he was continu- 
ally engaged in making calculations 
from his study of cloud conditions, and 
bv .«ome he was regarded as a trifle 
defi<5lent in the brain pan. It was here 
that he wrote his boc.ik on "The The- 
ory of Storms," the flrst step looking 
to a general study of weather condi- 
tions. 

From Harrisburg E.spy moved to 

Lanca.ster for a short time, and then 
moved to Philadelphia, and conducted 
a private school on Chestnut street, in 
one of two old frame houses that stood 
on <:;hestnut street, above Broad, on the 
site that was afterward occupied by 
the mint. One part of the house was 
his home, the other he used as a 
school. Espy's Harrisburg relatives 
say that the fence in the rear of hl.s 
house was covered with chalk figures 



were induced to send out through the 
'country forecasts of the weather, as 
1 made by Espy, and those were the flrst 
I weather bulletins ever known. 
I Mr. Espy's work was practically done 
I when the war broke out, and he moved 
j back to Harrisburg and occupied a 
large brick mansion on Front street 
that is now being remodeled lor a resi- 
I dence for Bishop Da Itngton of the 
j Episcopal diocese of Harrisburg. In 
! tearing out the partitions and remov- 
j ing the accumulations of years from 
' the attic of the old house the work- 
' men came across a number of examples 
I of Espy's calculations, but, not know- 
! ing their value, they tctssed them aside 
j and they were los t.^ 

' RACE SUICIDE REPORTED 

FROM RURAL ENGLAND. 

London Sept. 23. — A new and graver 
turn is given to the race-suicide prob- 



lem In England by the discovery that 
the decline in the birth rate is reach- 
ing down into the sturdy working" 
classes in the rural districts. In the 
County of E.s-sex, for instance, the rat© 
of births is more than two points lower 
than It was only two years ag<J. The 
decline seems to be steady from year 
to year. An extended inquiry Is to b« 
made In all the country districts In 
the hope of finding out and, if pos- 
sible, remedying the conditlon.s. 

According to the annual report of 
the county medical officer of Essex, Dr. 
Thresh, the birth rate last year was 
22.8',, as opposed to 25.1 a couple of 
years ago. 

Dr. Thresh says he hopes "the com- 
mon sense of the people will before 
long put an end to the decline, which 
is a serious meiuico to the prosperity 

of the country." 

_ « 

The most meager, undersized adver- 
tisement you ever print will Impres* 
some people, will remain in somo 
minds, as the measure of your store—" 
as representing your store. 



m 



(461) 



ir- 



Los Angeles, Cal., Sept. 23.— Twenty- 
five million dollars was Involved in the 
divorce suit settled by J. G. Hutton, 
when he granted Mrs. Eleanor Milbank 
Anderson Tanner a decree and the cus- 
tody of the most scientifically reared 
baby in the world. ^ - * 

Mrs Tanner is heiress to the fortune 
amas.'sed by Jeremiah Milbank, founder 
of Borden's Condensed Milk company, 
and is the daughter of Mrs. Abraham 
\rchlbald Anderson, in whose posses- 
Pion-the fortune now lies. She married 
Tanner in 1904. and Betty Tanner, now 
5 years old, was born here. Tanner 
loved the baby, and although he was 
charged with "wilful neglect," friends 
say that he gave up only when he 
found that he was not to be allowed 
to kiss his own daughter. 

The reason the kiss was barred is 
because germs roost on lips, and Betty 
has never yet been kissed on her lips. 
The child la kept in a germ-proof, 
sterilized, antiseptic house, and other 
"eeientlflc precautions were taken to 
■guard the child's health because her 
mother announced some years ago 
that if Mrs. Tanner died without chil- 
dren the Milbank millions would go to 
charity. 

FOUND LITTLE VISITOR 

WASJiOT A WEASEL, 

Danville. Pa.. Sept. 23.— A little ani- 
mal that found its way into the cejiar 
and finally domiciled itself in the heat- 
ing system in the home of B. F. Cohen 
of Danville, took in the whole range of 
pipe throughout the house, and created 
no end of excitement. Mr. Cohen de- 
cided it was a weasel and concluded 
to build a fire in the furnace and heat 
the pipes. But when the fire went out 
It was found the animal was still m 
the pipe, as frisky as ever. 

It was here that Policeman Vorls 
was called to the rescue, as were a 
number of Danville residents. The at- 
tack was well planned. By the llgnt 
of the lantern, and far in the pipe. 
Quite out of reach of a man's arm, the 
animal could be seen. Expecting some- 
thing of this sort, the party had come 
provided with large mill tongs. Seiz- 
ing these, Harry Hixon reached into 
the pipe and dragged forth the animal. 
\s it fell to the ground, Frank Walker, 
by an agile movement, placed his foot 
upon its head. , j.. x. 

The family moved out of tne aouso. 
, Th9 weasel was a skuuiis 



«? jT^fy »?j)|J ,'! 1 1. Wfji'ii «'.g*M^?«{V'*'4 




BROWNS IN TOWN 

You will never experience the height of clothes 
perfection until you become a wearer of 

Fitwell Clothes 

The new Fall Suits and Overcoats are now ready for your in- 
spection; every man ought to see them. We offer an immense variety 
of handsomie patterns at — 



*15»20'25 

The patterns are exclusive, not many of a kind, but the greatest 
variety of browns in town. 



Uja-W.-QUeCBIO-BJ'S'T. 




■^•^^■imw^wp 



> 
< 

1 


> 

1 

1 


t 



f 



i.^- imm . I ■ g; 



'k 



9^ 



P 



8 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



THE DULUTH HERALD 

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER. 

— ESTABLISHED APRIL 9. 1883— 

Publishtd tvery evening except Sunday by 

THE HERALD COMPANY, 

Herald Building. Opposite Postofflce Square, 

422 and 424 West First St.. Duluth. Minn., 



September 23, 1910. 



Entered as lecoud-cjM* matter at the Duluth postofflce under the act of con- 

crea of March 3. ISTS. 



TBLEFHOKES — Bell and ZenHh: 

Business Office. 324. Editorial Rooms, 



1126. 



OFFICIAL PAPER CITY OF DULUTH. 

« - 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 

(By mail payable In advance.) 

Dally, one month 35 I Daily, six months 12.00 

Dally, three months. .|1. 00 | Daily, one year 4.00 

SatiirtlKy llernUl, one year $1.00 

UVeklj lleriiM, uiie year 1.00 

^Remittances may be made by check, postofflce onler, registered letter or ex- 
•«*«» or.Ier. M:ike all remittance* payable to The Herald Companj. Give post- 
•mce addrtss m full. Indudlm; state and ouiinty. 

BY CARRIER— CITY OR SUBURBS. 

Dally, one week | .10 

Daily, one month 45 

Daily, o^ie year 5.00 

Sutwcrlt'ers wlli confer a farrr on the circulation depKrtment bj calling 324. 
Wbrr 'phoiie. and making known atiy complaint of ser.lce. 

It Is Imp rtant when desiring the address of your paper changed to give both 
Ine old and new addresses. 



The Duluth Herald accepts advertising contracts with 
the distinct guarantee that It has the largest circulation 
of any newspaper published in Minnesota outside the Twin 
Cities. Its value as an advertising medium Is apparent. 




above all, engage in the free discussion of public ques- 
tions. The schoolhouse thus became the public place 
owned by all the people, the common ground for the new 
sort of democratic association. The city was requested 
to open the public schools, and after much agitation the 
school board was given $5,000 to try the experiment. 
All sorts of people came into the clubs — people who 
could not be induced to come into a church or social 
settlement or any other private association. For the 
people felt that the schoolhouse belonged to them. Both 
men's and women's clubs were formed, and these not 
only held meetings, gave entertainments, organized ball 
clubs and the like, but entertained one another with con- 
certs, plays and dances. The older women's club in one 
school contained among its membership old stock Aineri- 
cans, Jews, Irish Catholics, and even one negro woman. 
All of the clubs, of which there are now forty, are or- 
ganized in a league of civic clubs, in the executive com- 
mittee of which is a Jew, a Roman Catholic, two Re- 
publicans, two Democrats and three independents. One 
of the chief secrets of the success of the movement has 
been its platform of open and free discusion of all sub- 
jects, not even politics and religion being tabooed." 

The .schoolhouses ^re in use for school purposes about 
a sixth of the time. The rest of the year they are idle. 
Why isn't Rochester's plan a good way to make them 
yield their highest possible dividends in civic good? 



THE OPEN COURT. 

(Readers of The H#rald ♦re Invited to make free tise 
or this column to cxpres* Ihtlt Ideas abo\it the topics 
of general Interest. Letters should not exceed 300 
words— the shorter the belter. They must be written 
on one side if the paper only, and they must be ac- 
companied In every case by the name and addreat of 
the writer, though these need not be published. A 
signed letter Is always more effective, however.) 



AN UNKLND SUSPICION. 



MINNESOTA AND THE GREAT LAKES. 

When the Federal government spent millions to im 
prove the Great Lakes waterway, and thereby made pos- 
•ible an enormous cheapening in freight rates, every part 
of Minnesota benefited through access to this cheap 
waterway by way of the port of Duluth. 

When the railroads got possession of all the principal 
Tcssel lines, and by getting a monopoly of the dock fa- 
cilities in Duluth achieved complete control of the situ- 
ation, they immediately began raising lake freights. 
When that was done, every section of Minnesota began 
paying tribute to this monopoly. 

Duluth has determined to break the monopoly by 
establishing a city dock system, where independent ves- 
sels can discharge their cargoes and thus give Minne- 
sota the benefit of the low freight rates to which it is 
entitled and of which it was robbed by a railroad 
monopoly. 

Duluth should be backed up in this project by the 
whole state. The state has a chance to do something 
tangible and effective by turning over for use as a part 
of the dock system that is to make Duluth a free port 
the old state elevator site in the West end which it 
bought many years ago and will never be able to use. 

The state could well afford to give it free, consider- 
ing the benefit it will be to all parts of the common- 
wealth; but Duluth isn't asking that. The state paid 
$11,000 for it, and it should sell it to the city of Duluth 
for that price. It is worth more, but the state oughtn't 
to try to make a profit on a deal that means "so much 
for every consumer within its borders. 



SENDING HELP TO OHIO. 

In response to an urgency call for assistance in Ohio, 
where Governor Harmon is threatening the Republican 
forces with an overthrow even more complete than that 
of two years ago, President Taft said yesterday that he 
would send into the state some of the prominent leaders 
of the party. 

Cannon, Aldrich, Hale, Tawney and Smoot would 
make a good team for that enterprise. They are surely 
"prominent leaders" of the party, since they have had 
a ring in the elephant's trunk for some years. 

And they ought to be powerful campaigners at this 
stage of the game — for Harmon. 



To the Kdltor of The Herald: 

Many of the teachers who are obliged 
to talte examinations, are wondering 
wJieMier the principals, many of whom 
have been advanced from the grades, 
have qualified. It would only be just 
that they .should meet the require- 
ments of the grade teachers. 

^ . ^ A SUBSCRIBER. 

Duluth, Sept. 22. 

'EXPLAINING AWAY 

THE MAINE RESULT." 



GRAY FOR GOVERNOR. 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

In your editorial yesterday "Explain- 
ing away the Maine result," you quote 
'Opposition to Prohibition." as one of 
the conditions in Maine leading to the 
the defeat of the Republican party. 

^ly judgment is that you are right 
in agrevjing with the Chicago Tribune 
mat the Ihiuor question entered some- 
what into the result; that without doubt 
it had something to do as one of the 
causes of the change from Republican 
to Democrats party rule. But to be 
strictly accurate we must place an ad- 
jective before the word Prohibition to 
designate its caaraccer. "Opposition to 
(Repablltan) Prohibition" would more 
exactly describe the state of mind o£ 
the people of Maine. 

Maine will now come under Demo- 
cratic Prohibition regime". The very | heen dissipated by the nomination of 
sense oi! incongruity that comes to | ex-Mayor Gray, one of the Flour City's 
your mind as you read this term is the ni<j:n popular residents. Every citizen 



Lind'a Selection a WiHC One. 

S;t. Paul Dispatch: More significant 
than that and of first importance, per- 
haps, is the fact that Mr. Gray was 
the substitute tendered to the commit- 
tee by Mr. Lind. Being unwilling to 
be a candidate himself, it v.as up to 
Mr I.ind to provide a substitute and 
relieve tiie party of its embarrassment 
as far as possible, •n oftering Mr. 
Gray he uas undoubtedly made as wise 
a selection as could have been hit upon. 
Mr. Gray has qualifications that are 
not possessed by others of the candi- 
dates talked of. He is better known 
to the people of the state than any 
of them. He is lavorably known, and 
he can make a good speech. While he 
may not be elected, and perhaps his 
suj-porteis have slight expectation that 
he will be, he is a creditable candidate 
and will pull more votes in all proba- 
bility than any other man wiio has 
betn talked about since Mr. L.inds re- 
fusal to make the race. 



\%'hlrlwlnd an a Campaiemer. 

Crookston Times: James Gray, 
formei- inayor of Minneapolis, and who 
wai named by the Democratic commit- 
tee at St. Paul today as candidate for 
go\ernor of Minnesota, to fill the va- 
cancy on the ticket caused by the 
refusal of John Lind to accept, is a 
whirlwind as a campaigner. He was 
eleoted mayor of Minneapolis when 
practically unknown. 

la a Pleasant Surpritie. 

St. Cloud Times: The nomination of 
ex-Mayor James Gray of Minneapolis 
as the ]>emocratic candidate for gov- 
ernor, comes as a pleasant surprise. 
Since it became certain that ex-Gov- 
ernor Lind would not accept, it has 
been feared that no one could be found 
wh> would fill his place with reason- 
able hope of success. This fear has 



L 



TWEN TY YEARS AGO. 

Taken From r.he Columns of The Herald of This Date, IS93. 



1 



••♦George W. Kimbc rly, wlio left Du- i citizen.-. They have just completed a 
luth two years ago for California for ! "^at little cottage for the residence of 
the benefit of his health, is much bet- their teacher and liave ordered a beau- 
ter and is going into business in Colo- tiful fiag for their schoolhouse. This 
rado. will be In charge of a color guard of 

boys who will keei> It floating while 

•••Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Mitchell of ' »*chooI is in session and furl it when 
Lexington, Ky , who have been spend- ' school closes. Patriotic lessons will 
ing the summer in Duluth, left yester- i also be taught in the school. 

day for their home. " i 

\ ^ •••The property of the Empire Iron 

Company of Duluth. which filed arti- 
of incorporation yesterday, with 
a capital stock of $200,000, lies four 
miles south of Ely and consists of 160 
acres. There is a good outcropping of 
iron ore. The incorporators are: A T. 
Scarlet. S. F. White, Nels Hall, W. A. 
Holgate. E. .J. McLaughlin, R. P. Ed- 
son, T. C. Himebaugh, Daniel G. Cash 
M. Kilgore. 



•••Mr. and Mrs. N. Johnson and chil- : , 
dren of Chicago are spending a few ! ^'^^ 
days with Mr. and Mi-s. Bendix at the 
Hotel Argyle. Mr. Jc hnson is a mem- 
ber of the Johnson Chair company. 



♦♦•Miss Mary Sercombe, having re- 
covered from her llhiess, has moved 
from the Silberstein Ac Bondy building 
to the new Long building for the pur- 
pose of establishintr a rtf^wc^t^ioUi^c 

school. 



establishing a dressmaking 



i« '.Vt^'!!'!^ I'^H- ""J Canosia township, 
is entitled to the banr.er on account of 



•••David Ogilvie has sold the row of 
six fine brick dwellings on Sixth ave- 
nue west and Fourth street, built by 
him last year, to George S. McManus. 



i^fi.'^'^'"'^*'^!* shown in the cause of edu- | The i)rice is understood to have been 
cation and the patriotic spirit of its 1 about $38,000 



A SHOCKING LETTER. 



WHERE DOES THE CONSUMER COME IN? 

Railroad men told tlie interstate commerce commis- 
sion yesterday in Chicago that the more business they 
do the smaller is their margin of profits, and that there- 
fore the greater the increase in their traffic the higher 
freight rates must go. 

To which Commissioner Lane aptly replied: "As 
the country develops there will be more and more freight 
delivered to you, and as conditions are now the rates 
constantly must be increased, according to the argument 
of railroad officials. I regard it as a serious menace 
to the Western country, if the rates constantly are to be 
increased. We must work out this problem on lines other 
than by the proposed method of raising the tariffs. If 
not, there is no time when we can say the maximum 
has been reached." 

According to the railroads, the more prosperity, the 
more business; and the more business, the higher freight 
rates must be: thus working it out so that prosperity is 
an injury to the consumer, who pays the freight. 

Clearly, Commissioner Lane is right when he says that 
some other way of working out the problem than cumula- 
tive freight rate increases must be devised. 

Meanwhile, Governor Stubbs of Kansas was address- 
ing a meeting at Topeka, at which delegates from Middle 
.Western states adopted resolutions declaring for the 
physical valuation of railroad property as a basis for 
fixing freight rates. 

There is no other way to reduce confusion to order 
in the railroad rate situation. All attempts at adjusting 
freight rates without the physical valuation of railroad 
property are shots in the dark. 

The railroads are entitled to earn reasonable dividends 
on a fair valuation of their property — no more and no 
less. If, as railroad men say, a valuation of railroad 
property would disclose a total greater than the amount 
of railroad capitalization, that would be a reason for in- 
creasing rates providing present rates could be shown in- 
sufficient to return reasonable dividends. On the other 
hand, if the valuation is less than capitalization, the valu- 
ation, not the capitalization, should count in fixing the 
dividends to which the railroads are entitled. 



MAKING SCHOOL BUILDINGS USEFUL. 

A schoolhouse. in which the people have a large sum 
invested, is used six or seven hours a day, five days a 
week, during eight or nine months of the year. 

The dividends on that invc^ment come through the 
education of the children, and in the past the people have 
been satisfied to accept that return without analyzing it. 

But the business of education is the only business 
known on which satisfactory dividends can be earned 
with so little use of the plant — except possibly the 
churches, wliich are used but a day or two each week, 
and only a part of those days. 

About the most interesting development of the 
realization that the school plant can be made to re- 
turn larger dividends in public service is that of Roches- 
ter, New York, where the schools have been turned into 
public club houses. The process is described by Ray 
Stannard Baker in the American Magazine: "The great- 
est step of all, after 'boss' political control was elim- 
inated in Rochester and the people really began to dom- 
inate, was the movement, originated in 1907, by which 
the people began to take possession of the schoolhouses 
for their own use as community and social centers, where 
the people of the neighborhood could meet in the even- 
ing, get acquainted, organize clubs, conduct social en- 
tertainments, plays, dances, concerts, banquets, fairs, and 



POVERTY IN WALL STREET. 

Wall Street is "pulling a poor mouth." It is sending 
out such stories as that brokers are not realizing in com- 
missions a tenth of their office expenses. 

That's pretty poor picking for Wall Street. It means 
less unbottling of champagne, less splurging with auto 
mobiles and steam yachts — all at the people's expense. 

But what is Wall Street's loss is the people's gain. 
Wall Street's poverty does not mean that any of the 
nation's wealth has disappeared. It means that the 
people are using their spending money in other ways. 
They are not using it tt) bring prosperity to the nation's 
greatest gambling joint. 

Wall Street, in so far as it is an exchange where 
securities are bought and sold for investment, is a 
legitimate enterprise. But it couldn't hold its present 
level for five minutes on the business that simple in- 
vestment brings it. Gambling on a large scale, with the 
industries that support the people and that the people 
support as the pawns, is what brings prosperity to Wall 
Street — and the j. eople are not gambling. 

The sign is wholly good. If it is permanent, it is 
better still. Wall Street always has been a losing game 
for the people. It is true that while some have lost 
others have won, but the public has been the spoil of 
professionals, and in the end the public has lost heavily. 
Otherwise, there couldn't have been so many diamonds, 
automobiles and steam yachts, and so much champagne, 
as Wall Street has enjoyed in the past. If the game were 
"on the square," which it most emphatically is not, the 
"kitty" — commissions, in politer language — would still 
leave the people loser. 

It is by no means wholly bad news, therefore, to 
read these saddened reflections from the New York 
Financier, a Wall Street organ: "We venture to say 
that on no form of investment in the United States is 
the present rate of return as low as on what may be 
termed 'Wall Street.' By that we mean the income de- 
rived from commissions on current transactions in stocks 
and bonds. Nobody has ever calculated how many mil- 
lions of dollars are represented in the cost of seats on 
the stock exchange, or in the expensive office plants, 
heavy rentals, etc., but the total must be enormous, and 
the fixed charges in proportion. The office organiza- 
tions of the majority of stock exchange firms represent 
years of patient and persistent work, and the expendi- 
ture of heavy sums of money in attracting a clientele. 
If we include as ramifications the numerous subsidiary 
concerns, and in fact the whole Wall street fabric and 
what is dependent on it, we have a sum which con- 
servatively might run into the hundreds of millions. 
Mence when we begin to figure that the whole source of 
profit on which this huge branch of modern business 
rests is from commissions and the profit derived from 
the sale of securities, and that for months past the com- 
missions earned on the stock exchange fall far short of 
paying a minimum interest on the cost of the seats, to say 
nothing of the running expenses, we begin to realize what 
a dull stock market means. Day after day the sales on the 
exchange fall below the half-million mark. Even with this 
ruinously diminutive total a large proportion at least 
represents professional trading, without tangible profits. 
The public is in the habit of clamoring against Wall 
Street and its influences, but Wall Street for the last 
year has been a mighty small factor in the life of the 
United States. If speculation and legitimate trading do 
not revive soon the map of the greatest financial center 
in the country is bound to undergo significant changes." 

In other words, Wall Street cannot continue trying to 
live off itself. If the people do not resume contributing 
to its support, it will have to reorganize down to a basis 
that will care for legitimate investments. And that will 
be a great benefit to the country. 



THE HELPFUL CONSUMER. 

The Payne-Aldrich-Taft tariff increased the revenue 
taxes on tobacco. It sounded well when the provision 
was published. Tobacco is a good thing to tax, and the 
tobacco trust is able to pay heavy taxes and should be 
made to do so. 

Word comes now, however, that the tobacco trust 
is up to its old trick of passing the burden on to the con- 
sumer. It's nothing new, of course; all burdens are 
passed on to the consumer sooner or later. But the in- 
cident is a pretty good illustration of the fact that when 
the people fancy that they have escaped taxation when 
they provide for revenues by indirect taxes they are 
grievously mistaken. 

The tobacco trust is paying the new taxes, but it is 
reducing the size of tobacco packages so that while the 
consumer will pay the same price as before, he will get 
enough less tobacco to make up for the tax — very likely 
a little more, so that the trust will turn the new taxes 
into a source of profit for itself instead of an expense. 

All of which, sooner or later, is going to convince a 
lot of people that the only just tax is an income tax that 
must be shouldered by the persons taxed, and that can't 
be passed on to somebody else. 



straw that shows the general drift of 
tne current in Democratic ranks in re- 
lation to the enforcement of prohibi- 
tory law. It is a forecast of the failure 
of prohibition when left in the hands 
of an unsympathetic political organiza- 
tion, be it liepublican as in the past, 
or otherwise. 

In event of failure in Democratic 
hands tiiere will be only one thing 
left to do in order to give a fair and 
complete trial to prohibition, and that 
is for a Prohibition party to lake tlie 
reins of the state government in 
Maine. If it should have the success 
that Sheriff Pearson had in keeping 
Kennebec county, Me., dry, all doubts 
as to the power of a party who really 
wanted to, make Proiilbitlon prohibit 
would disappear. Yours sincerely. 

GEOR(iE L. BRJGGS. 

Dulutli, Stjjt. 21. 

\%'itli ApoloeieM to Francoiti V'lIIon. 

Chicago Tribune: Madriz has fled, 
but where is Zelaya? Where, chang- 
ing the geography of our inquiry, Is 
Castro? Where Ig Kuropatkin, and 
where is that unfortunate admiral 
whose misfortunes in the Sea of Japan 
made perfect the imperfect ^ingllciza- 
tion^ of his name as Nobodygotoff? 

We know where Laura Jean Libby 
Is, but where is Marie CoreUi? Where 
is Capt. Streeter, where is Richard 
Yates, where, even, is Len Small? 
Where is Alexieff and where is Gorky? 
W^here is Charles Warren Fairbanks? 
Where is Abe Ruef? Where Is young 
Mr. Gates, and where is Ci*. Lindly? 
And Boni de Castellane, Heywood and 
Moyer, Jean de Reszke, Sir Thomas 
Llpton, Clara W'ard and Pattl, the Bar- 
oness Cedarstrom? W^here is Oyama, 
where Yuan Shih Khai? Where is 
Pennypacker, and where is Paul Re- 
dleske? Where is James J. Jeffries? 
W^here is Dudley Foulke? 
Where is Curtis Guild, where is Von 
Buelow, and where is Charles Major? 

Marquis Ito has passed to iiis reward, 
but where is Nogl? Where is Walter 
Wellman? Where is George Ade? 
Where is Ben Odell? Where is Frank 
Black? We know where Ballinger is, 
and we have a notion where he ought 
to be, but where of late is Giff Pinchot? 
Where Abdul Hauiid and where is liie 
shah of Persia, lately unshawed? 
Where Is the grand lama of Tibet? 
W'here Is Stoessel, court-martialled 
hero of Port Arthur? Where is Loubet? 
W^lere is Morales? Where is Dr. Mary 
Walker? 

Richard Harding Davis has just come 
up for the third time, but where is 
Rudyard Kipling? W .ere Is Lord 
Dunraven, and, it may be pertinent to 
ask by this time, where is the earl of 
Euston? Where Is Mary Ellen Lease 
and where is Larry McGann? We have 
heard from Weyler recently, but where 
is Garcia? Dead? No doubt. And 
Cissie Loftus? W^here is Eugene Cowles? 
And Alton B. I'arker, sage of Esopus? 
Where is Hershberger and where is 
Bert W^aters? Heffelfinger we hear 
from. Where is Muley Haftd, and where 
is the Mad Mulah? Hobson we keep 
track of, but where is Wainwrlght? 
W'here is Schley? Where is Dr. Cook? 
Where is Capt. Loose? W'here Is Carrie 
Nation? Where is Raisuli? 

These men and women made a noise 
once, but we wail with Villon — "Where 
are the snows of yesteryear?" 
■ ■■ ■ 

Maine! 
O Maine! 

Lets hear it again! 
Sing it and shout it emphatic! 
"Bully for .Alalne! 
Maine, that has gone Democratic!" 
'Ran for the boys who have taken the 

stand. 
Sending a thrill through this larruping 

land! 
Oh, for to shake every man by the 

hand 
From Sagadahoc 
Clear to Wytopitlock; 
From Cork to Tignish. 
And old Antigonish; 
We'd like for to pat every man on the 

baek-o. 
In Pugwash, Oquossoc, Aziscoos and 

Quaco! 
We'd like for to fill up a temparance 

noggin 
For old Androscogogln, Buctouche and 

for Joggin! 
And to drink down great bumpers of 

two per cent grog 
To Mooselucmeguntic and old Umba- 

gog! 
And to whoop it up good with the bal- 
loting league 
Of Togus, Katahdin and Passadumkeag! 
As to Hirobsamcook, Welokennebacook, 
We've only to soy that you sure used 

the hook! 
And we wish we'd been there the ex- 
citement to see 
When they heard the returns from old 

Parmachenee! 
But oh, as we weren't. 

Let us chortle: Oh, what a 
Slambanglng you gave them 

l.i Damarlscottfil 
And oh, what an antic 
They cut in Megantic! 
At Mattawamkeag we will bet they 

were frantic! 
So Maine, good old Maine, 
We are tickled with you, 
From Kittery Point up to old Cari- 
bou! 
Hurrah for Showhegan and Schoodio 

again! 
Hurrah for you all down In bully old 
Maine! 
— Paul West In New York World 



of Minneapolis, no matter what his 
politics, respects James Grav, and 
speaks of him as an honorable, high 
mirided gentleman. Some years ago 
he was prominently before the public, 
but of late Jias been engaged as pdi- 
torial writer on the Minneapolis Jour- 
nal — a fact of itself, which tells its 
own story of his ability. 



Gray Should be Elected. 

Wlllmar Journal: The Democrats 
have selected James Gray of Minne- 
apolis as their candidate for governor. 
He is a well known newspaper man, 
wan mayor of Minneapolis and gave 
the city its cleanest and best adininis- 
irar.ion. Has the ability to be governor 
and should be elected over Eberhart, 
W'hom La Follette says is only the rail- 
roal errrand boy. 

More Than State-vt-ide Repute. 

Lincoln State Journal: The Demo- 
cra;s of Minnesota never put up a 
cleaner or better man for governor 
than the man placed on the ticket last 
week by the state central committee, 
as a substitute for John Lind who re- 
fusod to run. James Gray is a news- 
paper writer of more than statewide 
reputation. Some years ago he served 
a l.jrm as mayor of Minneapolis, and 
did a little graft-killing which greatly 
offended the "liberal"' element, but won 
the respect of decent people every- 
wlu-re. He Is not a crank, but a man of 
san<j moral convictions who would 
rather be right than hold any office on 
earth. 



Abler and a Credit to State. 

Winona Independent: James Gray, 
the Democratic nominee for governor, 
is said t be one of the best writers and 
n.ost learned men in the state and is 
also a public speaker of extraordinary 
ability. If the gubernatorial contest 
Is to be fought out on the question of 
which is the abler man and which will 
refloct the most credit on the state, Jim 
Gray will win over Adolph Eberhart 
without a struggle. 



Im a Strons Candidate. 

Moorhead Citizen: Mr. Gray was 
formerly mayor of Minneapolis and is 
on the editorial staff of the Minne- 
apolis Journal. He is a strong candi- 
date, a good campaigner and a vote 
getter. All Democrats and independent 
voters who believe in continuing the 
good government In this state that we 
hav; had for tlie past six years under 
a Democratic governor, sliould get to- 
gether and boost for James A. Gray 
and not only elect him but every can- 
didate on the ticket. Everything is in 
our favor and let the good work go 
on. Be sure to boost for our candi<iate 
for governor and every other candidate 
on the state ticket and wlijle you are 
doing this, do not forget the county 
ticket. Mr. Grays keynote speech 
will be made at P'ergus Falls on Sept. 
27. 



Joy in Maine. 

Portland Elastern Argus: Glory bel 

"W^e are the people." 

Carry the iiev(?s to Beverly. 

It was a landslide all right. 

Gentlemen — Governor Plaisted! 

'Tis a long lane that has no turning, 
and grafters. 

It was a bad day for protection graft 
and grafters. 

On with the Democratic dance; let 
Joy be unconfined! 

You cannot even fool all Maine Re- 
publicans all the time. 

At this writing it looks as though 
Maine had gone "hell bent" again! 

The Ricker-Fernald combination can 
now drown tlieir sorrow in Poland 
water. 

It has been a long, hard, up-hill tug. 
Brother Democrats, but we have got 
there at last! 

Maine starts the Democratic ava- 
lanche. Now watch it go thundering 
along through state after state. 

The Democrats of Maine send greet- 
ings to the national Democracy. Long 
live Jeffersonlan Democracy! 

The Republican party of Maine has 
got what it has long deserved — and 
thousands of Republicans say Ameul 



Si!einu; llio (.rem lllixy.ard at Sea. 

Willliim Insli.s in Haiper's Weekly: 
The roaring and shrieking of the temp- 
est, the thunder of the waves, that 
jarrod the whole fabric with a shock 
like earthquake, made fitting accom- 
paniment for the gloomy thoughts that 
possessed me. Htano, friends, life itself 
— all seemed lost. Only one thing re- 
mained: to meet tiie end quietly, with- 
out any cowardly complaint. I fell 
into a sort of mental stupor, while all 
my physical energies were concen- 
trated in hanging on to my position 
on the windward side of the cabin, my 
feet braced against the deck, my hands 
boosted Inside the edge of the berth. 
Now and tiien came a lull in the fury 
of the gale, and I could hear a faint, 
wailint; cry like the call of little tur- 
key chicks strayed from their mother — 
peep! peep! poe-ee-eep! Here was food 
for speculation. What in the world 
could it be that made a noise like little 
turk-eys? To solve that riddle imme- 
diately became the most engrossing 
Ihinij. After much search I discovered 
the Hource of the sound; the wind was 
blowing against the companionwav, re- 
bounding from that, and whistling 
through the keyliole of the cabin door. 

A door In the bulkhead swung open, 
and In came Manuel, smiling affably 
and reassuringly. 

"Ah-h-h!" he exclaimed, "ver' bad 
storm. Dees morning I begin maka da 
soup you lika so moch, Meest' Inglees. 
Ah-h-h! Loavely pea soup wit' ham- 
a-bone. All morning da soup pot on da 
galley stove she sim-mer, smi-mer, 
slm-Tier. Den, a twenta minute a 
twelve, com da greata, beega blank-a- 
da-blank of a wave an' knock da sheep, 
an' ell my bee-yootiful soup is gone to 
— , all over da galley wall!" 

There is not enough room on this 
page to describe the long siege of hor- 
ror that settled down upon us. It lasted 
for two days and a half. One bv'one 
the pilots came down into t!ie 'cabin 
to put on dry mittens and hang up the | 
wet ones that were freezing their fin- 
gers. No fire could be made for two 
days; for should another knockdown 
happen, the scattered coals might set 
fire to the ship. I don't think anybody 
ate anything from Monday's breakfast 
until next day; but my niomory as to 
meals at this time is vague, inasmuch 
as f<.»ar (not seasickness) had driven 
away from me all Ideas about food, 

l^uqueHtionably Guilty. 

New Yorli Press: Mrs. Harry Lehr, 
at a luncheon in Newport, ridiculed the 
assertion of a French novelist that men 
object to cigaret-smoking women be- 
caus'j their sense of smell is so exceed, 
inglj' delicate and keen. 

"If man's sense of smell were really 
so e:ctraordinary," said Mrs. Lehr, 'he 
couldn't stand his rooms and clothes 
and mustache all saturated with stale 
toba(5co and whisky fumes. 

"Man's keen sense of smell! And yet 
how well the average man is hit off by 
the story of the tramp arrested for 
vagrmcy. 

"As the tramp stood up In the dock 
the magistrate said to him: 

" 'Well, my man. what is the charge 
against you?' 

" 'It'ragrancy, your Honor,' the tramp 
replbjd." 



New Y'ork World: The most amaz- 
ing letter that ever had the approval 
of an American president is that of 
Secretary Norton to an Iowa politician. 
It is at once a confession, an apology 
and a surrender. Worst of all it is 
a ghastly spoils proclamation, with a 
suggestion of bribery by patronage 
and with no avowal of principle what- 
ever. 

Mr Taft's confession is in these 
words: 

"While Republican legislation pend- 
ing in congress was ojtposed by certain 
Republicans the president felt it to 
be his duty to the party and to the 
country to withliold Federal patronage 
from certain senator -i and congress- 
men who seemed to be in opposition to 
the administration's efforts to carry 
out ttie promise of the party platform." 

Mr. Taft's apology surrender and 
promise of spoils are thus shamelessly 
stated: 

"The president feels that the value 
of federal patronage aas been greatly 
exaggerated and that the refusal to 
grant it has probably been more use- 
ful to the men affected than the ap- 
pointments would have been. In the 
preliminary skirmishes in certain 
states like Wisconsin and Iowa and 
elsewhere he was wiling, in the inter- 
est of what the leaders believed would 
lead to party success, to make certain 
discriminations; but tie president has 
concluded that it is :»is duty now to 
treat all Republican congressmen and 
senators alike wilhoui any distinction. 
He will not follow the usual rule in 
Republican congressional districts and 
states and follow the ecommendatlons 
made by Republican < ongressmen and 
senators of whatever t hade of political 
opinion, only requiring that the men 
recommended shall be good men, the 
most competent and the best fitted for 
the particular office." 

Here is an open avowal of the inde- 
cencies that scandalized the Buchanan 
administration and or tlie sordid fa- 
voritism that broughi Grant's second 
term to a humiliating close. Yet bad 
as was Buchanan's I'anile war upon 
the Douglas men and demoralizing as 
was the attitude of G.'-ant's parasites 
toward tlie liberals, th? country was at 
least spared on both occasions presi- 
dential penance like he above. 

Written for Mr. Taft and presum- 
ably approved by him, this shocking 
letter neve^heless is signed b.y an- 
other. In ^k h cases there is always 
the possibility of rnisiinderslanding, if 
nothing worse, and for a day or two 
there will be ground for hope that 
there may be a disavo^val. It has been 
found necessary durirg this adminis- 
tration to sacrifice one secretary to the 
president. Periiaps tht; fate of another 
lias been sealed. 



A MOMENT WITH THE WITS. 



Catholic Standar<l: "Mr. Roxley had 
nothing but praise for your work for 
him before the congressional commit- 
tee." said the friend. "Yes," replied 
the lobbyist, gloomly, "nothing but 
praise. " 



Brooklyn Life: Chapley — How did 
she happen to refuse you; I thought 
you were her favorite? 

Dasl.ley — Well, the favorite didn't 
win, that's all. 



Waehintgon Star: "W'hen a man 
asks me for advice," said the good- 
natured person, "I always find myself 
getting into a discussion." 

"Well," replied Mr. Sirlus Barker, 
"most of us ask for advice because we 
would rather argue than work.' 



la 



New York Sun: Knicker — Bread 
to be sold by weight. 

Bocker — Then my wife can make us 
rich. 



Ideas: Druggist (to his stout wife) 
— Don't come in just this minute. I 
am about to sell six bottles of my 
fat-reducing mixture. 



Judge: "Pa. what's public opinion?" 
"It is the greatest force we have in 
this country except when It bumps up 
against the United States senate." 



Pittsburg Post: "Flag of truce, ex- 
cellency. " 

"What do the revolutionists want?" 
"They would like to exchange a 
couple of generals for a can of con- 
densed milk." 



BoBton Transcript: Sapleigh — Ah, 
speaking of electricity, tliat makes me 
think — 

Miss Keen — Really. Mr. Sapleighl 
Isn't it remarkable what electricity 
can do? 



Toledo Blade: Bobby — Honest, 1« 
there twins at your house? 

Tommy — Honest! An' they're just 
alike. 

Built jest the same way. or are they 
rights and lefts? 



RefleftionM of a Bachelor. 

New York Press: Grief seems to un- 
derstand every language on earth. 

A girl will tell how a man made 
love to her when she did to him. 

To read one of his love letters a 
year after he wrote it is beyond the 
heroism of any man. 

The professional man who can't 
mako a living can go around sneering 
at th.e business man who can. 



The ^Vollde^ of *e|»teniber. 

The wonder of September — the hills so 

far and high 
With trees that shoulder lazily against 

the glinting sky, 
And little winds that romp and dance 

and whirl across the way 
And fling the dust in gayest wise as 

rivers fling their spray. 
O, one would go a-gypslng and sleep 

beneath the stars. 
And heal his heart of sorrowings and 

free his soul of scars. 

The marvel of September — the reach of 

garnered fields, 
The winds of morn that shake the corn 

with clash of inj stic shields. 
The fair sunshine like amber wine that 

drips from far above 
As though 'twere poured from out a 

hoard of fellowship and love — 
O, one we'uld go a-gypsying, nor stay 

lii.s truant feet 
Till he had lost the shtdowed wall and 

lost the city strict! 

The glory of September — the flowers 

near the wood 
That flame all bold in red and gold 

and show that life is good. 
The very weeds that jurst to bloom, 

and cac'a a wondrous thing 
As delic:^.te and full oC charm as anv 

bloom of spring 
O, one would fain go gvpsylng and put 

his soul In song 
And brother all the bo;iny blooms tliat 

see him trudge along! 

The gladness of September — the joy of 

all t!ie earth 
When harvest lands and eolemn 

woods stand ir, their fullest 

Avorth, 
When peace Is breatlied across the 

world from shining East to West 
And sleepy sighs come from the skies 

ancT lull the land to rest — 
O, one would go a-gyps:"ing and wander 

here and there 
And never more have any thought of 

fr-ii.tings or of care! 

The stillness of .September — that is the 

best of all. 
The hush that comes across the hills 

and tells us of the fall, 
"With crickets piping ii the dusk and 

golden stars abo''e. 
When night comes ir, on feet that 

tread as soft as tnose of love — 
O, one would go a-gypsylng and sleep 

beneath the stars 
And heal his heart of sorrowings and 

free his soul of ^cars! 
— W^. D. Nesbitt in Ciicago Evening 
Post. 



Some Krl'io. 

Truth: An America! and a High- 
lander were walking <ine day on the 
top of one of the Scotch mountains, 
when the Scotchman, wishing to Im- 
press the boastful "cousin," produced 
a famous echo to be heard In that 
place. When the echo returned clear- 
ly after nearly four minutes the proud 
Scotciiman. turning to '.he Yankee, ex- 
claimed: "There, mon. ve canna' show 
anything like that in your country." 
To which the other replied, 'I guess 
we can better that some, stranger. 
Why, in my shooting lodge in the 
Rockies, when I go to bed I just lean 
out of my window and call out, 'Tiine 
to get up; wake up!' i.ntl eight hours 
afterward the echo comes back and 
wakes me." 



Washington Ian: 
spare the money 
lend It to you if 
keep it too "long. 

Gayboy — I'll undertake to .^pend 
every penny of it before tomorrow. 



Sutton — I can't 

very well, but 111 

you promise not to 



Cleveland Plain Dealer: "That wom- 
an ad^ross there carries her head very 
high." 

"Oh, yes She's been arrested twice.* 
"Suffragette?" 
"No. NarraganseU Pier gambler." 

• 

Pointed l*ura;;;ra|>IiM. 

Chicago News; How funnv a joke 
len t when its on you! 

Ancestors come in handy to inherit 
money from. 

It takes a pretty smart widow to 
pretend she isn't. 

And a man is judged by the society 
that avoids him. 

After all, the average man doesn't 
lose so very much money. 

The man who isn't proud of being 
honest is ashamed of being poor. 

Some men live in the country, some 
in the city and others just board. 

Never do until tomorrow the mean 
things you contempiate doing today 

If a woman hasn't anything else to 
brag aljout .=!he boast.« of her ailments 

The man who wants but little here 
below should patronize a cheap board- 
ing house. 

A woman may be able to make 
money go further than a man but she 
can t make it go as fast. 

Airship racing is dangerous sport, 
but some of us just cant resist the 
temptation to butt Into the high-flyer 
class. 



An Old Partnertiblp Threatened. 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: If meat 
prices go any higher the intellectual 
bean will have to give up all further 
associatit.n with its lifelong side-part- 
ner — pork. 



AMUSEMENTS. 



TWENTIETH CENTURY VAUDEVILLE 

BIJOU 

—ALL THIS WEEK- 
LINO — Europe'! Latest Oancing Sensatlcn 
HALLEN and FULLER & CO.— Presontna ' 

Lesson at II p. m." 
HEIM CHILDREN- Youthful Prodigies 
JOHN DILLON— The Mirthful Songster 
KRETORE— The Mad Musician. 
ROXY end WAYNE— In The Cowboy From 

Texas." 
MOTIOGRAPH— Exclusive Pictures. 
SCHNEIDER'S ORCHESTRA. 

Matinee every day, 10 and 20c: Every Nlahf 
at 8 and 9:30. lOc, (5c and 25c. 

Order Seats, both 'phones, eld 1919; 



"A 



new 1855. 



Next Weeli- -POLLY PICKELS' PETS"— 15 
People, Mostly Girls— 6 Other Star Attractions. 



Bultver I.ytton and the Medium. 

Escott's Life: The possibility of 
communicating with his daughters 
spirit attracted him to Home; the vul- 
garity of one of Home"3 female clients 
began to repel him. This ladv, as 
Lytton used to tell the story," had 
been brought Into converse with her 
departed husband's spliit. 

"Are you," she asked, "quite 'appy 
dear — as 'aj^py as when vou were with 
me?" 

The reply came; "Oh, 
'appier." 

"Then, indeed, vou must oe in 
•eaven," sighed the lady. 

. "?^?y!. returned the gentleman; 
In elL 



far, far 
be 
•I'm 



NEW 



Both Phones 2410. 




THEATER 

Second Ave. East anil Superior Street 
ADVANCEO VAUDEVILLE 



Seats on Sale for 

One Weelt 

Ahead. 

Matinee 25e 

Fxcep! SnniUyt. 

NiBhts— I5e, 25e, 
SOe and 75e. 



Old Soldier Fiddlers. 

Onaip. 

Felice Morris & Co. 

Grant 4 Hoag. 

The Morati Opera Co. 

A. 0. Ounean. 

Forbes a Bowman. 

The Kinodrome. 

The Concert Orchwtra. 



LYGEUM 



TOMGHT A 
S.4TrKI).4Y. 



-THE GENUINE MOTION PlCTURES~OrI 

Jeffries-Johnson 
Contest 



50e. 



Matinees — Children, 25c; adults, 
25e, SOe and 75e. 
Lad t V_Matjnee^ aturday. S eat*. 25e 

Sept. 27 to Oct 2— THE FIERI 



PLAYERS. 



• 



T^r 



I 

r 



-* 



I ' 
i > 

I i 



— ■ ' 

I 



.•iadMtflM 



i 



r—"-" 



A 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH. HERALD 



September 23, 1910. 



MARINE 



ARE MAKING 
RECORD TIME 

8,000 Piles Will Be Driven 

Id Less Than Two 

Months. 



Duluth Firm Doing Rapid 

Work on Soo Ore 

Docks. 



government engineer's office here, not 
later than Oct. 20. 

Sault Passages. 

Sault Ste. Marie. Mich.. Sept. 23. — 
(.Special to The Herald.) — Up. Thurs- 
dav: Alberta, 12:30 p. m.; Elwood, 
Maida, 2: Hamonic. 3:30; Thomas Ba:- 
iura. 6:S0; Australia, 7; Matoa, 8; 
Shaw 8:30; Poe, Bryn Mawr 9:30: W. 
G. Mather. Winona. L. C. Smith, 10; 
.Schiller. Admiral. 11; Sam Morse, Sa- 
liara, Iroquois, midnight. Down, 

Thursday: Morgan. .Tr.. Briton. Malta, 
noon; .1. K. Upson, l-.i::50 p. m.; Math- 
ews 1:30; Xielsoii, Crowe. 2:30; Walsh, 
4; l>e Graff. John Kei.ss. 5; Centurian. 
Kinmount. 7:30; Scottish. Hero, 8:30; 
Mataafa. 9; Murphy, 11. Up, Friday: 
Windlar. I a. m. ; Cornell. Nasmyth. 
1:30; Lann, 2; Joseph Wood, M«'reland, 
a; Olcott, 3:30; Maricopa. Bell, Town- 
send, 5:30; W. Moore. 6; Perkins, 7; 
Fulton. 8:30; Luzon. 9:30. Down, Fri- 
day: Adriatic, Neptune. 1 a. m.; Core, 
Hagna. 2 a. m.; VVidener, Turret Cape, 
2:30; A. Stone. Byrea. 4:30; F. C. Ball, 
5; Octorora Alva. 6:30; H. H. Brown 
7:$0; Lauglilin, 8:30; Pollock, 10j30. 



It looked for a time as though the blaze 
would prove serious. 

The chemical was first used, but it 
was later necessary to throw some 
water on the burning parts 

r.lectriciana are doing some work at 
the church. In installing some new 
wire they are supposed to have left a 
short circuit last night. 

The water tlirowu in the attic leaked 
down througli the plaster and it was in 
this way that a greater part of the 
damage was sustained. The cost of 
repairing is estimated at from $200 to 
$300. 

The fire will not Interfere with the 
chicken pie supper that was planned 
for tonight. The regular services will 
also be held both Sunday morning and 
evening Rev. J. A. NcGaughey of the 
V. M C A. will preach. 



PENINSULA COUPLE 
WED IN ENGLAND 

Calumet, Mich . Sept. 2^.--r(^peclal to 
The Herald.) — The following announce- 
ment was received here t>t^e^flay from 
London, Eng.: 

'•London. Eng., Sept. ''Sr, 1910. 

Married— St. Margarefsin fhe Field. 
Dr L A Farnham and Mi.ss Edwina 
Danleil. Those present; Mrs Susan 
Daniell, Mrs. Ernest Datiiell.. Mr and 
Mrs John Daniell. Miss Mlarion Darnell 



and Mr an! Mrs. S. Rus.sell Smith." 

Dr. Farniam left Calumet for Lon- 
don It^ss than two week.s ago, accom- 
panying Mr. and Mrs. Rus.sell Smith, 
who are on their wedding tour. His 
brida had been with her mothtr. Mra. 
S:tsan Daniell. and party In Europe 
several months. Mrs. Farnhara is one 
of the popular and beautiful young la- 
dies of Laurium's elite set. Mi.~s Ma- 
rlon Daniell Is a sister -.'f tlio b»ide 
and John Daniell is a brother. Mrs. 
J. A. Ten Broeck. wife ^t Rev. Ten 
Broeck of Christ's Episcopal ihurcli 
of Calumet is also a sister i>£ Mrs. 
Farnham. 

Dr. Far.iham i.s one of the be-^t known 
and most successful of Calumet's p»iy- 
.sicians. He has been located hero 
about four years and was associated 
with the Calumet Public hospital, Lau- 



rium, as house physician atout one 
year. Previous to coming to Calumet 
Dr. Farnham was physician end mine 
surgeon at tlie Trimountain nine 

Dr. and Mrs. Farnham .are expected 
to return to Calumet on Oct. 1 8. They 
will be at home to their friends in 
Laurium after Nov. 1. 



bring this to about 100 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

AT BUSINESS COLLEGE. 



Students of the Brocklehural Busi- 
ness college met last evening and or- 
ganized an athletic association to be 
called the "B. B. C. club." A mem- 



l>ership of over sixty was sf cured at 

the meeting and there are other names 1 prominent and active In the city 



handed in to 
members. 

The equipment of the college In- 
cludes a gvmnasium which the mem- 
bers propose to utilize, and also intend 
to form basket tial! teams and arrange 
for other competitive games. It is also 
the Intention to have social affairs once 
a month. The members have the use 
of the gymnasium after school hours, 
evenings and Saturdays. 

The officers elected last evening wer© 
as follows: President. Charles Lln- 
kein; vice president, F. Frank: secre- 
tary Herbert Bradbury; treasurer. Miss 
Eva' O'Neill; trustees, the faculty of 
the college. 

The association is extremely en- 
thusiastic over the new organization, 
which promises to be one of the most 



J^^i i i i t0J^JJJ^^^ ^ i # # # ^ 



m^j00^^ 



Ono ot the qui' kt-i.s .iibs of pile driv- 
Ing for dock consinicliun purposes that 
has ever been recorded, is being done 
at th» present time. it» the work on the 
Soo dock, cast of Giassy Point, Su- 
perior. 

The work began two weeks ago, 
Btid with 8,000 piles to drive, it is 
cxiected that the job will be completed 
by Nov. 1. The piles vary in length 
from eighteen to seventy-iwo feet, aiid 
ate of norway piiw utui tamarack. 

The Interlsatc DrvdKo & Dock com- 
pany of thi.-* citv is doing tlie work, 
which will l>e one of the quickest jobs 
ever done in tlie cuiinlty. Tliere arc 
five pile drivers at work, and the woru 
n being rushed with all possll)le speed 
hv Manager Whime.s. As there was a 
delav In beginning on account of the 
objections to the Soo right-of-way 
ttirough Billings Park. 



Detioit I'assai^es. 



Detroit. Mich.. Sept. 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Up Tliursday: Steamer 
Troy, 12:10 p. in.; Stralhcona. 1:20; 
Cr*rman. Krupp. 1:30; Lehigh. 2; Van I 
Hise. Ball Brothers. 2:50; c. W. Cham- 
berlain, 3:45; Bixl^y, 4:25; ritackliouse, 
r>;10; Truesdale. 5:30; Viking, 5:45; 
Peter Wlilte. 6:20; Colby, 7:40; Lewis- | 
ton. Saranac, 8:05; Sylvania. McGreyor, i 
10; Saunders. 10:15; D. G. Kerr, 11:40. 
tH>wn Thursday: Crescent City, Heffel- 
finger. 11:50 a. m.; Marina; 12:lo p. m.; I 
-\lpena, 1; Hebard, 1:20; Andaste, 2:05;' 
Vulcan, 3:15; W. A. Hawgood, 3:30; P. 
Minch, 4:30; Blnghamton. 5; Waldo, 
5:10; Normania. 5:55; Robbins. 6; Sax- 
oiia, 7:10: Myron. I'age. Go.shawk, 7:30; I 
Livingstone, 7:35; Sierra, S; Langell and j 
barges, 11: Steel King, 11:4'>. j 

Up Friday: Victor, Constitution, 
Leonard Miller, 1.30 a. m.; Wawatam. I 
lUfd. 2:30: C. T. Hutchln.son. Sheadle, i 
4:2o; Tampa Cliemung. 7:30; Ward I 
.\mes S:30; Alfred Mitchell. Sharpies.! 
;»:J0; ".lex Cuddy. It): Ugdenshurg, Watt, j 
Hollev, Warner, Thompson. 10:30; Mari- i 
tana. " Martlia. 11. Down Friday: La 
Salle 1 a. ni.; Islipemiiig, 2:30; John' 
Mitchell, 3: Manoia, Maida, 3:30; Car- 
negie, 4; Saturn, 7:15; Vance. Griffin, 
7:30: Tavlor. 8; Flagg. Warrlner, Mc- 
intosh. S:40; Pric-e. Well.s, Onoko. 10; 
Hoyt. North Sea, Gales, Cliamplain, 
10:30; Douglass. Houghton, 11; Wain- 
wright, 11:20; C. W. Klphlcke (arrived 
witli grain), 11 :50. 



SUGGESTIONS 

ARE IN ORDERl 

Col. Filch Wants Advice on 

Sl Louis River 

Survey. 

Col. Graham D. Fit'.h h-fore asklnj 
an examination of tlie St. Louis river, 
Irora the hea-l ■' '''•' r-vesent project 
rtar the north .Spirit Lake up to 

New Duluth, .11, .1 Uuni thence to the 
^tone quarrie.^ near Fond du l.,ac. de- 
•-irc.'s in compliance with liis instruc- 
tion from Waslvinston. to secure tlie 
I pinions of tliose who are interest'.-d 
in llie Improvement and wliose knowl- 
edge upon «fhe subject would be of 
value. Those Interested are invited to 
submit any facts they may have to tlio 



HAT PIN 
HINTS 

Our Window Specials: 
Sterling Silver Hat Pins— 

.00 



$1 



Port ot Duluth. 

.\rrivals Uranus, C. O. Jenkins, Mor- 
rell. J W. Rhode.s, F. Wilson. Ream, 
Ireland. Senator, coal; Castalia, Roeh- 
ling. Fairbairn. Thomas. Tomltnson. Co- 
ralia, McDougail. light for ore; Dela- 
ware. Reshtigo. Zillah, J. J. Boland, \ 
light for lumber; Buffalo. Tionesta, | 
package freight. j 

Departures: McDougal, Coralia. A. E. 
Stewart. Gary, Tomlinson. .\shley. Sen- 
ator. MoGean, Sellwood. John Ericsson, 
John Fritz, ore; J. P. Morgan, Eddy, 
liglit; Paris, grain. 

m ■■ 

Take a Look. 

If vou have never seen 3 Winners 
clothes, come in and let us show them 
to you. It will be a pleasure, we as- 

RENDEZVOUS 5 



FOR MILIT! 



0. H. Clarke Wants State to 

Rehabilitate Fort 

Ridgely. 




Solid Gold Hat Pins— 

$1.75 

Appro|)riate Gifts for all 
occasions. The Best at the 
price of the ordinary. 



Cow Stable Now Adjoins 

Monument to Fort's 

Defenders. 






Bagley fe?Co., 

Known Sinee is>»."t aN F. O. Day 

Ai < o. 

JEWKI.KKS nnti !S 1 1. V Kit SMITHS 

315 \Ve»t Su|>.-rlor Street. 



It's No Joke 

Approaching baMnesi is a •eiiou* 

matter. Woodbury's Treat- 
, ment works w^onders. 

FRES SAMPLES TO AI^I, 

Are you satisfied to see your hnlr become 
{tliinner and more straggly every day? Don't 
you know that dry. fadeil hair is dyintr bairl 
JDon't you know that constant dandruff fairly 
ptrangrlcs the hair, cansiut; it to come out by 
!the handful? Conditions like these must be 
overcome or you will soon be a rexular scare* 
jcrow. 




That Fort Ridgely. historic ground 
near Morton, Renville county, which 
has played an Important part In the 
annals of Minnesota, should be ac- 
quired by the state and rebuilt for use 
as rendezvous for the state militia, is 
the opinion of O. H. Clarice of the 
Clariie-Wertin company. 

Mr. Clarke is starting a movement 
which he hopes will rtsult in the ap- 
propriation by the legislature of a suf- 
Hcient sum of money to rehabilitate the 
fort. 

•Old Fort Ridgely," said Mr. Clarke, 
"is historical ground and should be ac- 
aulred by ttie state of Minnesota. The 
fort should be rebuilt. It can be used 
by the statu militia as a post or ren- 
dezvous for Its annual encampment. 
There is everything at the fort to make 
a first-class military post. It has ar- 
tilierv and rifle r-.-.nges and Is one of 
the most healthful and the most beau- 
tiful places in thf state of Minnesota. 
• I believe the old fort can be rebuilt 
cheaplv and substantially by the us»^ of 
cement blocks, i do not know the own- 
ers of the land, but 1 believe the state 
is owner of five or si.x acres which for- 
merly comprised a parade ground. The 
federal government is maintaining a 
cemetery at the fort and has spent 
some money in enclosing it with an 
iron fence and erecting a monument to 
thr- memory of those who were mas- 
sacred at the lower Sioux agency in 
1862. 

"1 believe that the state of Minne- 
sota erected the monument to the de- 
fenders of Fort Ridgely. It Is protect- 
ed bv an Iron fence. When I visited 
the i:>lace two years ago It was not 
cared for and weeds had overrun every- 
thing. A cow stable was within forty 
or fifty feet of the monument. It cer- 
tainlv had a dismal appearance and 
was not pleasant to look upon by one 
who remembers the exciting incidents 
that occurred on the ground where the 
monument Is erected. 

"1 Intend to bring the matter to the 
notice of the newspapers in the coun- 
ties near the old fort, to the Old Set- 
tlers" association and to the surviving 
members of the little band that valiant- 
ly defended the fort in the Indian out- 
break of 1S62. I believe that the 
Daughters of the American Revolution 
will assist In pushing the mutter to a 
successful finish. We will endeavor to 
place our arguments before the repre- 
sentatives and senators from districts 
near the old battle ground and we hope 
for success." 



M 



i 



DMi't h» tlia bott of hU JokM 

Tou can easily avoid this dreadful condi- 
tion, for now Woodbury a Combination Treat- 
inent is prepared for home use. (It is no 
lon««rnece»»ary to visit the Institute). Just 
think what this means to you I NOW, right 
in your home, you can use the trsatment that 
Is backed up by nearly half a century's expe- 
rience at the famous Woodbury Institute. 
Woodbury's Combination Treatment makes 
the hair rrow when all other preparations 
fail. It cures dandruS and overcomes aU 
other disorders of the hair and scalp. Send 
a two cent stamp to The Woodbury Co., 47 
West 34th Street. New York City for sample, 
booklet and specialist's advice all FRES- 

Lyceutn Pharmac-y and L^nox Oru| StOfS, Dis- 
tributors for Oulutn. 



FIRE DOES BUT 
LiniE DAMAGE 

Defective Wiring Causes Small 
Blaze at Pilgrim Con- 
gregational Church. 

At an early hour this morning a flre 
which is supposed to have started from 
defective wiring In the Pilgrim Con- 
gregational church, Liake avenue and 
Second street, resulted in about $300 
damage to that structure. 

Tlie flre deiiartment ma,de a nulck 
run and caught the fire before It had 
gained much lieadway. The blaze 
started on the flrat floor of the struct- 
ure and raplrtly ascended through the 
wall In which it started to tiie attic. 



New Belts, 
35c and 25c 

P.itent Leather Black and Red 
Belts, with or without I'ersian 
combination — ^ 

35c and 25c 





COR.f/ffSTAy£f^Sr^''Sl/P£/f/nJFSrjRF£7: 



New Depts of 
Hair Goods 

Halrlights and Hair ^ "^r 

Rolls ^''^ 

Puffs of real human hair ^{^^ 
— $1.25, 98c, 75o and -*ww 

Switches at »::.50 « 1 ^Q 

and '•' ■ •*'*' 




ening and Display of Women's 

resseSjFurs andMiUinery 

OU ARE WELCOME to look to your heart's content. No insisting clerks to ask 




what you are after. You are given the freedom of the store and every possible courtesy 
will be shown you, whether you are ready to buy or not. It's "show" time now and 
you are .the audience, so do not fail to attend or you will miss a great "showing" "' 



in 



deed. 




be Annual Exhibit of 

( — 

Autumn 
iner 

$5 and $6 





Dresses for Street or 
Evening Wear 

$12.50 to $22.50 



Our lovely new creations are attracting: the 
widest attention this season. Our Millinery 
opening has been the mecca for hundreds 
For many seasons we have been famous for 
our trimmed hats at these, prices and every 
season our productions CKcel those of pre- 
vious years. Come and see. 

We Copy the Latest Parisiatt Models and 
thus you are assured of the newest and most authoritative French styles at our fa- 
mous prices. If you have never worn our handsouxe hats;^we earnestly invite you to 
come tomorrow and see. .-;^.> - t' 

Not a mere handful of a few hats, but literally hundreds of Ready Trimmed. a.s 
well as untrimmed. Hats, each one distinct and exclusi^JMi;^hiirdly two alike especially 
those of $5.00 or over. 

Illustrious exhibit of Tailored Street Hats at $2.00. $2.50 and $.300. No matter 
how exacting you may be in choosing your new Fall Hat. we ^/^./^% ^''J, f^" ^.^ 
suited in our millinery salon. The tailored Hats we feature at $2 00 to ^J^J^J- ^re 
certainly brimful of style in every way, and at these moderate prices one ot th.m 
ought to fill your need of an early Fall Street Hat. There's styes forj^oung and 
middleaged, as well as for the elderly, who usually want small hats 

Tailored Turbans at $1.95. $1.50 and 

Untrimmed Shapes in Many Styles at From $1.25 to $3.95-Shapes covered 
either satin, silk, velvet or beaver strips, i" both large and small styles, can b- cho.a^^ 
here from kmong fortv-five different blocks, each picked with extreme .are, in various 
colors, tops or facings, including some with Persian facings. 

Hats for Girls of All Ages. 50c to $2. 50-The young miss can f^.^ily be pleased 
e in selecting her headwear tor Fall and Winter. Dozens of ^^tyles of feU and 
:et hats for the girl 10 to 16, as well as headwear for the m s-s of f ^o fj ^^ 



Dresses that are so superior in cut, line 
and general beauty as to entirely out-class t le 
usual ready-to-wear frocks. Look at the handi- 
ness of finding just the dress you want to st?p 
into. Look at the saving, for the Dress<;s, 
one and all, are indisputable proof of the fact 
that it pays to buy the gown at Kris & Rose 

Serge and Broadcloth Dresses 
—$16.30, $14.50 and 

Voile Dresses, with silk drop 
at 



Dresses at, 



$12.50 
$22.50 
$12.50 



young aiivi 

$1.25 

overid with 



Taffeta 

at 

Misses' Serge School Dresses, Fcter Thump 
sons and other — Sizes 1.3, 14, 15, 16, 17 ;in 
18; priced at $14.50, $12.50, 
$10.50 and 



$8.95 



Coats to Fit the Slender 

Miss as well as the 

Stately Figure 




of 



here 

velvet hats tor the gi 

quiring a smart -different" girlish hat than the common run, w 

new display of Misses' Hats. 



ill do well to see our 



The selection of your Fall Coat here will indeed be a pleasure instead ot a 
burden to you. Besides showing an extensive assortment of countless styles, we've 
made our prices so reasonable that you can rest assured the coat you particularly 
desire will not cost more than you expected, yea even lass. 

Black Coats— $16.50, $14.50, $12.50, I Misses' Coats— Sizes 14, 16 and 18— 
$10.00 and $7.50. I $14.50, $12.50, $10.00, ,$9.50, 

Colored and .Mixtures Coats— $19.50, , $8.95 and $7.50. 
$18.00, $16.50, $15.00 and $12.50. I Girls' Coats— Sizes 6 to 14— $2.95 up. 



$12.50 Willow 
Plume Sale at 
$7.98 




u still have 
ance to buy 
>f tliose beau- 
tiful lustry, large 
fluffy Willow 
Plumes, in either 
black or white at 
Seven Ninety- 
Eight. After this 
lot is exhausted, you will be re- 
quired to pay $12.50, if not more, 
for the same kind, for Willows 
are going up in price rapidly 

There's now only about twenty- 
five of these Plumes left — all per- 
fect—full 20 inches long— black or 
white — its like handing you a five 
dollar note gratis when we offer 
them at the remarkable low sale 
price of 



$5.00 
Taffeta 
Sample 

Waists 






•Ni-.. 



Gem 

company's full 
line of travel- 
ingmen's sam- 
ples, botight by 
us at a discount 
of 40 per cent. 
In this lot are 
included mes- 

saline and taffeta Waists, in black, navy, 
wistaria, rose, gray and brown; open 
front or bck, beatitifully trimmed with 
lace or plain tailored— splendid values 
at $4.00 to $rxOO— choice— Sample Sale, 
at— 






Handsome New 
Stylish Suits at 

$1 A .50 



.f -x 



r 




The New Hobble 

Effect Skirts 

Are Here 



Black Voile Skirts — In the new 
styles; full assortment of sizes, 
3o you can be fitted without al- 
terations; at 
only 

Black and Colored Panama Skirts 
— In medium and large sizes; at 
$6.50, $5.95, ^5.50fl»^ CQ 




These are values Indeed. 
With every necessity of life 
on the steady higher climb 
of cost, the news of lower 
prices on Women's Suits 
(which are a necessity to 
women's attire) will be wel- 
comed by many. 

These Suits we offer at 
$14.50 are made up of a fine 
quality worsted, satin lined, 
medium length coat and the 
new style Skirts; black, 
navy, gray and brown shades 
— instead of $20.00 they're 
offered at only 

$14.50 

Suits of many other styles 
and designs in Serges, Broad- 
cloths, Homespuns and Wor- 
steds in black, navy and 
gray at i>rices ranging from 

$16.50 
to $27.50 




Pure Wool Full Size 

Blankets 
at $3.50 

Large size Gray Blankets 
— Strictly wool through- 
out; actually worth $1.00 
more than our price. To 
introduce our new Fall 
line of blankets and 
quills, we're offering tiiis 
special blankci 
at 



Plaid Wool 
Gray, white, 
tan 

Full size Cotti>n 

— In gray 

Ht 



$3.50 

Blankets — 

$4.50 



Blankets 

75c 



Quilts — Made of fine sati- 
nettc and filled with piire 

full 



not 



cotton, no shoddy; 

size; warm and yet 

to heavy for 

general use. 

Other Quilts of nudium 

and large sizes — $3.50 

$3.50 down ^ 1 ^S 



$1.98 



to. 



and 



Pink and Blue Crib 
Blankets — For baby — 
Teddy Bear design; $1.25 



value, 
at 



98c 



WILUIJUI. tit- 

$6.50 



»3.00 Nun's Vellins Walut*, $1.08— White Nun's 
Veiling Waists for fall and winter wear, all- 
over embroidered, also Jap silk waists In hla<;k 
and white — values $3.00— Sample S 1 .9o 

Saly price ^ 

■1.75 White and Colored Tailored WaMts QA/* 
—choice at .* ''*'*' 

Included In this lot are black and tan walst.'i, 
made up of a flae repp, and also white tailored 
walst.s — with embrokiered trimmings. OAc 

Sample Sale price ,*^ww 

Our regrular stock of waists Is /complete for 
fall an^ winter, and you will find many new 
novelties here In th» way of Persian, Net, Mes- 
aallne, Plaid Taffeta and other matsrials that 
are new and correct In style, as well as reason- 
able in price. 




^-i-^r. 



-mm 



^«M««^^^ P 






4 



^ 

^"W 



Shoe Worth and Shoe Talk 

The constan'. advance in the co.st of U'aihpr lias caused a 
similar advance In the price of most shoes. In many instances 
where the price has been advanced, cheaper materials are be- 
ing sub.ftituted. Unless the manufacturer or the retailer bear 
the burden of the greater cost of production, the c(jnsunier 
must pay more lor her shoes or wear less durable, less stylish, 
less comfortable shoes. 

$2.50 and $;J.OO were the original price of Kriss & Rose 
Company's Shoes, and these prices have never changed. Un- 
less the cost of leather shall still materially advance, our prices 
will remain the same, so will the materials. The same excel- 
lent quality and workmanship will be inalntained tnroughout In 
Kris & Rose Company's Shoes. 
Accept no substitute. Price* Al- 
iva ys the Same 

Women*!* Qoodyear welt Shoes 
In the new short vamp styles, 
all leathers and nianjtf O 50 



1 



-*T » "•* .It' , i tmim ^ i l iO' O ' 



oe inaiiiTainea iiiruugiioui in 

$2.50 and $3 



styles, 93.00 an 1 . . 

nadrllfTe Women's 
Shoes, 93.00 and 

'•Nn Lite" Women's 
Bho-es, f:!.nO ani. . . 
"Beraalda" \>'omen'3 and 
Mls.ses' Shoes — C 1 *f^ 

»1,08 and 4>1.« J 



$2.50 
$2.25 



Mlaaea* School Heel Shoes — 
sizes 2H to 6 — patent and 
gun metal calf, natural wide 
last, button or lace, Oood- 
year welt — 
price 



$2.50 



Boya* Klioea 91.S0 

GiriM' .Shoe* 91.25 

Children's Shoes 98e 




i 



J 



-IK- 




«r ^w 



p 



10 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



September 23, 1910. 




ONCERNlNe 




Young Men and 



By MISS EXPERIENCE 




they had done tliat artist job in fifteen 
minutes. 

"When the fun was over we all ac- 
knowledged that W'^* had had a lefsson 
in dealing with ilie property rights of 
an Indian. 

"Some months later I met the Sioux 



chief. He gravely reached out a hand. 
•Your young man wanted to be an In- 
dian.' he said. 'My young men made 
him one Was he satisfied?' 

"I answered that I thought he naa 
indeed taken the lesson to heart 



' 



^ 



Uoirt ??e Too 

Ella D.— Men arc 
creatures,Vt0 7»ay Uie 
they are not obliged 



AnxiouK- 

Queer, obstinate 

least, and where 

to court and win 

take 



Mrs. Frances Squire Potter, who will 
deliver a series of lectures before the 
Twentieth Century club during Octo- 
ber will be the liouse guest of Mrs. J. 
L. Washburn while in the city. Mrs. 
Potter wlil also be the guest of honor 
at the opening club reception of the 
year, which will be held Wednesday 
afternoon, Oct. 5. 

This visit of Mrs. I'otter's to Du- 
luth will be the first since she re- 
signed from the faculty of the Min- 
nesota university to become corres- 
ponding secretary at the New York 
offices of tlie Women's Suffrage asso- 
ciation. ■ If signed that i>ffice at 
the do- "trr first year and this 

year Mr> tciit-r has accepted a lim- 
ited number of lecture engagements. 
Tile first will be presented in Duluth. 
Mis. I'otttT has spt^nt the summer 
renting at Elmira, N. Y. 

Tlie subject for the first lecture, on 
the evening of Oct. 1. will be "The 
Proi'hets of Israel." 

Friday, i K-t 7. at S o'clock, her sub- 
ject w. The Stage and Demo- 
cracy." t evening of Oct. 10 she 
will speak on "New Tendencies in the 
Suftruge Movement." 



FIRST AMERICAN 

WOMAN AVIATOR 



YOUNGEST GOULD CHILD 
RETURNS TO AMERICA 



MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 



Invites Mrs. Crane to Speak 
at Annual Meeting. 

Mrs. Caroline Kartlett Crane, who 
will he in I>uhith from Sept. SO to Oct. 
4 has been invited to .idciress the mem- 
bers of the State Medical association 
at the annua] meeting to be lie'.d at 
St. Paul. Oct. 6 to 7. The St. Ixiuis 
County Medical association, of which 
Dr. <;raham is presidtnt. are much in- 
terested ^*ls. Crane's visit to Du- 
lutii ui: most iieartily indorsed 
her wo I r\ 




a woman's love they seldom ever 

the trouble to do so. Now, since you 
have already invited the young man 
twice to call, do not invite him a third 
time under any circumstances. He is 
not too bashful to call upon other girls, 
so tliere must be a lack of fascination 
or entertaining (jualities about you 
wiiicli the other girls of your set 
posse.v-s. Were I you and I admired the 
young man so I would study the 
charms, graces and talents of those 
girls until l, too, possessed them, and 
better. 

I Would not confine my hopes to this 
one young man, but rather to achieving 
some art or talent or fascination wiiich 
would draw the attentions of many ad- 
mirers, and girl friends, too. Y'ou can, 
if you truly are in earne.'-t. Make your 
.'-peaking voice gentle, soft and meilow, 
and never show by siirug, look, insinu- 
ation or word that you could possibly 
feel jeaiou.'i of your girl friends. In 
fact, possess no jealousy. I truly believe 
you .spend more time in showing t!ie 
young men that you like them than in 
making sucji a success of your life, 
charms and talents that the young men 



iroiild be only too eager to prove to 
you how much they liked you. I say 
this, not to hurt your pride, but rather 
to make your pride in proper tune 
with your desires. Nothing makes a 
girl appear more emptv and foolish, 
nor a man more conceited than to have 
fiome girl run after him and give the 
attentions to him that he should be 
anxious to bestow upon her. 
» * ♦ 

JealouKy In Iuipr<ifitnl;Ie. 

Caroliiie — Don't emphasize to your 
friends before others the things you 
■"Aould not waste time doing. Why waste 
time talking about it, either? You per- 
<:eptibly show you are jealous over the 
individuals who are doing tilings "you 
would not waste time doing " Why 
waste time taikliig about it, either? 
You perceptibly siiow you are jealous 
over the individuals who are doing 
;hing8 "you have not the time for." 
I'lii-i Joes not injure the talented, but 
rattier advertises their ability to the 
decided detriment of your own- The 
less von mention tliose who sliine 
more than you do the ."-nveeter you will 
appear, the less people will observe 
your painful jealousy and the fewer 
"knocks" you give the broader your 
mind will grow. If you can't give a 
considerate compliment don't expose 
your crippled slate of mind. 



Good 



1 aste and Si 



imp 



licity 



By ALVA ARMSTRONG. 



DULUTH DELELGATE 

To Speak at Round Tables 
at State Meeting. 

Mrs. F. L. Barrows of this city, who 
will attend the annual meeting of the 
Minnesota Federation of Women s 
Clubs of this city, will be a speaker at 
the round table of the civics commit- 
tee, wliich will be conducted by Mrs. 
Caroline Bartlett Crane. Mrs. Barrows 
w^ill give a flve-mlnute talk on the 
work of Neighborhood House in Du- 
lutli. Mrs. Harrows will also be one 
of the speakers at round table on "A 
Clean Hume and a Clean City. ' whic'n 
will be conducted by tiie iiome econ- 
omics committee. 



ENGAGEMENT. 
Miss Barbara Patrick 



Will 



Wed Dr. Floyd Clark. 

Mrs Mi'vlieii F. .Tamar, .Tr.. 
an informal tea this afternoon a 
was aiinoanced the engagement 
sister. Miss Barbara Patrick, 
Floyd Clark o{ tliis city. 



gave 
which 
of her 
to Dr. 



Ladies' Night at Club. 

LaJits' nighl at the Kitciii Gamml 
clui> wii] be observed this evening. 
During one night of the year the mem- 
ber.-- arr;.nge a jiarty in (.-ompliment to 
the lailies as guests and this event will 
be enjoyed this evening. Dancing will 
be the amusement fioni 8:30 o'clock on, 
and the i^ffalr wlil be one of the most 
Imporlai.; vf :iie week's social events. 
♦ 

Informal Afternoon. 

Mrs. John Carson entertained in- 
formal Iv yesterday afternoon at her 
home. 1»2T West Third street, in honor 
of Mrs. Long and Mrs. Ritclile of I'ort 
Arthur. 



MME. FRANCOIS RAICHE. 

Mme. Francois Kaiciie is the first 
American woman to take an aeroplane 
into the air. She is the wife of a 
builder of Hying maciiines who is mak- 
ing his lieadquarlers at the Hempstead 
I'hiins aviation field. Mme. Raiclie lias 
had tlie ambition for some time to go 
up in tlie little bl-plane wliich her 
husband had been constructing since 
August last. It Is not the smallest 
bi-plane on the Hempstead field, but it 
looks very small beside some of tne 
machines there. Mme. Baiche went out 
at 7 o'clock in tlie morning dressed in 
corduroy skirt witli leather coat and 
cap. She wore goggles. After two 
preliminary runs across the field she 
lifted the front plane and rose into tiie 
air. She came down very ciuickly, a 
gust of wind liaving destroyed iier 
e<;uil:brium. The machine struck on 
the riglit skid and this was cracked. 
Tiie forwiird plane was injured and 
Mme. Kaiclie was thrown from ner 
seat, t!ie machine passing over her. 
Slit scrambled to her feet and ran 
down li.e field after the aeroplane and 
shut off the engine. She was not hurt 
orul not in the least disconcerted. Mme. 
Riiiche is a native of Illinois and much 
interested in sports. 




In Honor of Bride. 

M:ss Gertrude Br>. vvii cntertaintn 
Infoimallv last eveu.ng at her hornt, 
812 East' Second street in honor of 
Miss Ethel Corbin of Kvcleth. formei- 
ly of this city. Miss Corbin's wedding 
will take place thhs month. 
- » «• 

Personal Mention. 

Miss Margaret Anneke will leave 
Boon for a few weeks' visit in New 

York. 

♦ • • 

C. R. Patrick, formerly 

First Baptist church of 



The 

pastor 



r 



Dm €ns«l$' Art 
6aikrie$ 

r)ealers in Fine Oils, Water Col- 
ors and Rare Prints. 

We make a specialty of Fine 
Picture Framing. 

C> :r lit >v goods are now ar- 



^ 



iv; 



tngels' m Store 

b Kant S^aperlor Street. 



this city and now chaplain in tlie 
United Slates army stationed at Samoa, 
was in the city yesterday and today, 
the guest of friends. 

* » * 

Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Duncan are in 
Chicago for a few days. 

* • * 

Miss Helen Williams of 931 East 
Fourth street has returned to St. 
Mary's sciiool at Faribault. Slie was a 
guest at a iiouse party at St. Paul for 
a few days on her way. 

* • » 

Miss Hope Washburn and Miss Mai-- 
garet Barrows have gone East to at- 
tend Dwight school during the year. 

* * « 

Miss Florence Hyland has returned 
from a visit at her home at Stoughton, 
Wis. 

« * * 

Miss Ruby Elsesser of Minneapolis 
has returned to lier home after a 
months visit with her aunt, Mrs, W. R. 
Peer. 

» * • 

Mrs. Thomas E. Blanche of 1210 East 
Second street has returned from a visit 
at St. Paul. 

* « * 

Miss Anna Spennard has returned 
to her home at West Dulutii, after a 
visit witii her brother, George Spen- 
nard. 

« « • 

Mrs. E. N. McGiffert and Mrs. Alex- 
ander Guthrie have gone for a lake 
trip en a freighter. 

• • • 

Miss Dora Dorfman of 12 East 
Fourth street left today for Chicago, 
where she will enter the Michael Reese 
hospital for nurse's training. 

• * * 

Mrs. A. M. Hunter of 107 Me.saba 
avenue has gone to Hlbbing for a few 
days' visit with her son. J. W. Hunter. 

• * * 

Mrs. Long and Mrs. Rltclile of Port 
Arthur are the guests of Mrs. Leving- 
i ton of 1927 West Third street, 

• ♦ • 

Mr. and Mrs, W. B. Silvey will be at 
home for the winter at M,rs. J. B. 
Culver's apartment in the Belvldere 
[ flats. Mrs. Culver will be tlie guest 
I of Mrs. ^V. R. Stone, and will later go 
I for a visit to St. Lrouls and from there 
I to California to spend the winter. 
I « « • 

Mrs. Alex Wilson and children of 
Houston. Tex., who spent the summer 
the guest of friends at Hunter's Park, 
have returned tc> the South. 



GLORIA GOULD. 

Gloria Gould, the youngest of the 
children of George Gould, arrived with 
! her parents from Europe this week 
j and returned to her studies. Little 
I Gloi ia has a governess and wlien .she 
I li; older she will probably go to a 
finishing school. She inherits much 
! of the beauty of her mother who was 
' the lovely Edith Kingdon, well known 
I as a member of Augustln I)aly's com- 
pany. 



and In summer more especially is it on 
advantage to vary the nature of the 
foou taken, and to live to a large e.\.- 
tent upon fruits and vegetables and 
cooling fare. 

Those who find it difficult for one 
reason or another to obtain a summer 
holiday should at least give themselves 
the benefit of a change of diet, even if 
change of air is denied to them. , 

A simple thing recommended liy 
doctors as an invaluable aid to diges- 
tion and a powerful helping to keep 
the system in order, is a glassful of 
very hot water sipped tlie first thing 
in the morning, and another taken late 
in the day. In making a temporary 
chtinge of diet it would be a good plan 
to begin by substituting for the morn- 
ing cup of tea a glassful of almost 
boiling water sweetened with sugar. 
This can be sipped from a teaspoon un- 
til the water lias cooled down suffici- 
ently to drink from the gla.^s. Tlien. 
again, cold porridge or brown broad 
and butter and fruits might replace 
toast or white bread, iiotted meats, 
bacon, etc., on the breakfast table. 

In many homes where food in rela- 
tion to liealth is studied,- a practice is 
made of drinking only before and after 
meals, not during the meal Itself. In 
a doctor's household the early morning 
glassful of hot water is followed by 
breakfast without drinks of any kind, 
but afterwards more hot water is 
sipped. At lunch the beverage is hot 
or cold vv-ater flavored with the Juice 
of a lemon. 



fiat, with the river here and there 
fringed with cottonwoods and young 
growth on one side and a low range of 
bluffs on the other, when trouble over- 
took us. 

"We had twenty wagons and some 
fifteen horsemen in the party, about 
forty-five men in all; strung out as 
usual at midday, for distance of two 
miles or more along the trail. All were 
in sight of each other, tliough, when 
a bunch of Indians broke from tlie 
hills not far away and made a dash 
for the middle of tiie train. 

"Tho leading drivers and horsemen 
were mostly soldiers recently dis- 
charged. The^- had been traveling in 
close order, aS ihey should do. and the 
Way they got into action was good to 
see. 

"They wheeled their wagons Into a 
circle The drivers unhooked the 
horses, and nearly every man was 
mounted. When I and a number of otli- 
ers came galloping down to them from 
the extreme front, I found myself at 
the head of 'a troop of • more than 
twenty men. 

"As our party was nearly equal to 
that of the Indians, we did not hesitate 
to charge down the line. Two wagons, 
near togotlier, but separated widely 
from anv others, were plainly the ob- 
ject of attack. The Indian.v were lying 
on their ponies' necks and going for 
those at top speed. 

"The drivers of the wagons, one of 
which was Joneg. had stopped their 
teams, and seemed to be sitting para- 
lyzed on their seats. We had muz;;Ie 
loaders fn those days, anc! a full min- 
ute before we got within rifle range 
of the wagons the reds had reached and 
surrouiuled the hindmost. 

"That wagon was Jones'. We knew it 
by its black cover, and at tliat instant 
the Incident of the headdress popped 
into my mind. 

"Wanting to prevent useless blood- 
shed. I halted tife men. 

'• 'Those Sioux are after the feather 
jiggery,' I said to them. 'Come on, but 
don't fire unless fired upon.' 

"The men aagreed, and on we went. 

"We were nearly within gunshot of 
the Indians, when they scattered away 
from the wagon, which they had pretty 
much demolished, and rode straight at 
the river. It was but a couple of hun- 
dred yards to cover, and thty Hashed 
into a thicket of young trees and 
were out of sight in a twinkling. 

"But we had seen that they had 
Jones with them, tied on one of iiis 



Till: EVENING STORY 



horses which they had cut loose from 
its traces. They had taken to cover 
prepared to flgiit. and tliougli we 
wanted mightily to rescue our man, we 
should have been more than foolhardy 
to rush into that grove 

"We wanted to make some immediate 
move to save Jones, but the situation 
of the whole train was a grave one. 
I wa-? uneasy and undecided what to do. 

"Riding cut a little way in front ot 
my men, wiio were sitting on their 
horses ready for action. I halted, and 
wav.Hl my hat at the Indians as a sig- 
nal that I wanted to talk. 

"I got no response. 

"Much concerned for the fate of 
Jones, I rode along tlie trees tov.'ard 
the mounted men. 1 believed that the 
captive had met death in some cruei 
fashion, and that we should find his 
body quickly. 

"I beckoned to the men to come on, 

and was about to enter the under- 
growth, when 1 heard the cracking of 
bushes and halted, a horse was com- 
ing — Jones' — bestridden by a painted 
Sioux, wiiose hands were tied behind 
his back, and who was vigorously kick- 
ing the horse's ribs witli his heels to 
urge it forward. 

"'Hello,' called this Indian, in a fa- 
miliar voice ^Conie untie my hands.' 

"Joyfully I recognized Jones in that 
toggery, and rode up to him. 'Are you 
hurt?" I asked. 

" 'No,' h« grunted, spitting at the 

greasy red paint on his lips. "They 

; wanted that war bonnet — I didn't know 

' enough to know it — too scared. Tliey 

1 couldn't find the thing in time to get 

away from another band of reds that 

j were on tlieir tracks, so they did this 

to me. I B'pose they thought t'wair 

funny. I wanted to holler, but I 

daren't.' 

"By this time the men had come on. 
and liearing his last v,-ords, and look- 
ing at llie comical figure he cut, they 
burst into yells of hilarity. 

"Jones v.'as a sight to behold. The 
reds had stripped him of every rag of 
his clothing They had daubed his 
body in grease mixed with mud, painted 
his "face In red and green, and .sawed 
off his liair, except a tuft of seal 
lock. Tliey had fastened a dirty 
skin band round his forehead, and 
stuck on a doaen crow's feathers, in 
imitation of a war l^onnet. For clotJi- 
ing he had on a torn old buckskin 
sliirt and a pair of moccasins 



Taste is simpliciy. One little fact 
which will, no doubt, give the word 
simplicity and what It means more 
value in" your eyes is that simplicity, 
to the uncultured eye. appears as noth- 
ing, while to those who know it Is 
of priceless value. The perfection of 
taste to an artist in clothes is in good 
simple lines, and tc make the simplest 
clothes on faultless lines is the aim 
of all good dressmaking. 

Take, for an example, the fact that 
among the best ciessmakers of the 
world, whose charges are highest, the 
more simple the clothes are made the 
greater the charge, as the value lies in 
their want of complication, and their 
freedom from an excessive amount of 
trimming Simile oiothes have a much I 
higher art in cut, taste and knowledge 
of designing, and only workers with 
inferior taste use decorations in place 
of line. Simplicity means the harmony 
of one line with another. 

I would remind .ou never to put on 
an unnecessary aniount of decoiations 
and furbelows. Always remember that 
simplicity in clothes is the very best 
thing to be had ir the world of fash- 
ion. You can always cover up bad lines 
with trimming, what is left must be of 
the best and yet ieave enough room 
for you to mean something in your 



clothes, and not look as though you had 
bought your good looks at the price- 
of yards of cheap lace and shoddy rib- 
bons. 

I am going to tell you another rule 
of good taste which is constanly being 
broken. I do not want you to thinlc 
that because a thing is fashionable in 
one place that people all over the 
world can wear it in the same way. 

For example, let us take the one 
piece dress adapted for the charming 
idea of the Moyen age dress. It grew 
in a few weeks to be a hideous fash- 
Ion, shapeless and without one atom of 
gracefulness and simplicity about it, 
and became a kind of uniform worn by 
every one, because every one else wore 
it, whether it was becoming to the 
wearer or not. « 

Many of the designs were a disgrace 
to the original. Like all imitations 
it had lost all traces of original lines. 
Alwavs avoid such styles and never, 
wear a dress or hat because every one 
else is wearing it, but choose one that 
will suit you. If the style which is 
prevalent suits vou, there is no reason 
why you should not copy it, providing 
that it is In good taste and has fcoi 
been so used as to make it objection- 
able. 



,. 



'! 



r 



Opening Display oi 

Exclusive Millinery 

Prestnting ouv importations of French models from 
the naster milliners of Paris — exqtiisite selections 
from their most tasteful designs for the coming Fall 
and Winter Season. 

SUPPLEMENTED BY 

An assemblage of entirely original designs and skil- 
ful adaptations produced in our own workrooms. 



. «ii* 



-%■ 



Sibbtff 






scalp- 
buck - 



And 



ABBETT'S DRDG STORE SPECIAL THIS WEEK 

SPONGES, CHAMOIS and BATH SUPPLIES 




Manictire SoisMtrw, >flpp*r», 
IJufTers, etc. — Don't mlnn wee- 
lus oar KiiowinK in above 

Uut'K. 

W. A. ABBETT, 

li lilg Mores; Mnln Slorei 

20,-. WF.sr SI pi:ni<m s^T. 




PEMNG 



NEW CLOAK AND 
MILLINERY STORE 




STER'S 



Formerly La Fcrtc's 



Formerly La Ferlc's. 



"=J 



J' 



More Than He Wanted 



By G. T. Hart. 



Ladies! i ou sliould go to Mrs. Vogfs 
hairdressing parlors at 17 East Supe- 
rior street, upstairs, for your shampoo 
and manicuring, only 25c. 




Brtnj your eye troubles to me. My modem 
mclh (b and long experience in fluine glasses 
oorreiUy sliouJil makt- ihU cflUe a home fcr all 
si^ecUilo wearera. KUtli.g clJliiren's cyea la my 
specialty. 

ARTIFICIAL EYES CARRIED AND INSERTED. 

Office over Oak Hall, crriicr r1 Second avenue 
naat and Superior street. Room 110. Zenith 
pUoo* 2343 D. 

A. L. MOR^BERG 

OPTOMETRIST AND OPTICIAN. 



The Doctor 



To Cure a Uunlou. 

The pain of a bunion may be relieved 

by wearing a boracic acid poultice at 
night and a loose shoe during the day. 
The swelling should be protected by .a 
circular pad witli a central hole. Paint 
with liniment of iodine. In cases of • \- 
trenie deformity the only thing that 
can bring about a cure is an operation. 
* * * 

Diet and Health. 

A mere change of diet will often be 
enough in itself to save doctor's bills, 



French Hair 
Shop and 

Hair 

Dressing 

Parlor 



F.Teryiliii.g ik"t .-.j,,1 l(«it in dty. Let us have 
ys iir <T\Wr for Iint-!;Lile Wig iiud Toujiee for toll, 
laiiles itJiii gentl'-mc:; 



New 



G. MOISAN, 

■Phcne 2401. 212 WfSt First Street. 



*.t»-> 



R. KROJANKER 

The only Re- 
liable Furrier 
In the city. 
Established 
22 Years 



irasjAJOaB. 



THE FUR SEASON 

Is rapidly advancing and we are 
showing all the newest and prettiest 
creations of Ladies' Coats, all 
lengths, Scarfs and Muffs, separate 
or In sets, in all the most fashion- 
able furs — Mink, Lynx, Black Fox, 
Black Wolf, Blue Wolf, Baum Mar- 
ten, American Marten and Isabella 
Fox, etc. 

Our remodeling and repairing 
done in our own workrooms, under 
our personal supervision. 

R. KRO*JAIMFCER, 

LliAill.VtJ FLKIIIKR, 

4 hlaut Superior Street. Corner 
Lake Avenue, I'pstalrs. 



"Once, when I was leading a bunch 
of emigrants,' said the old scout, "I 
picked up a feather headdress among 
the sage bushes. The baudy thing liad 
been dropped by an Indian who'd been 
chasing elk, as I could see by the 
fresh hoof marks. It was really gorg- 
eous, made of eagles' tall feathers, 
with a band of buckskin trimmed In 
weasel skins and red ribbons. 

••1 picked it up and carried it to 
camp. There was a young fellow 
who'd been buying Indian gear of all 
sorts wiienever we struck a bunch of 
reds. I gave him the bonnet, and he 
spent tlie evening admiring it, and 
then packed it away in a chest In his 
wagon. 

•The next morning, just as we were 
hooking up, a single Indian came rid- 
ing into camp. He recognized me and 
came direct to me. He was a Sioux 
chief. He wanted that headdress. He 
told me that he had thrown the bon- 
net down when he was chasing elks. 
He had gone back for it, and found, 
by the tracks, that one of my young 
men had been there and carried his 
property away. 

"I frankly confessed that I had 
picked up his gear, and told him 1 
would get it for him. But when I 
went to .Tones, the man who had It, 
told him the circumstances, and asked 
for the bonnet, he laughed. 

" 'I've got the war bonnet," he said, 
'and I'll keep it till the Injun can 
prove his property in court.' 

"There was no use arguing with 
him; he simply refused to listen. 
Much disgusted, I was compelled to 
explain to tlie Indian, telling him the 
man who had it considered it lost 
property, and Its ownership un- 
proved. 

" Lost.' he exclaimed, wondering! y. 
"My property lost on my trail. There 
is no man of my nation who would 
take up property so found.' 

"I felt the sting of that all right. 
The Indian had seen me talking to 
Jones. He rode up in front of him and 
sat looking at the man for a full 
half minute, Jones returned his stare 
with a gesture of profound contempt, 
the Indian wheeled his pony and rode 
away. 

"There was trouble ahead. For a 
time I kept a sharper lookout than 
usual, hut as several days passed, and 
we were jogging along at twenty 
miles a day, the business passed out 
of my mind. 

"OnQ day we were moving along a 



■Willow Plumes 

Half-Priee 



$6.25 Willow Plumes . . 
$11.00 Willow Plumes. 
$18.75 Willow Plumes. 
$25.00 Willow Plumes. 

V $30.00 Willow Plumes . 
S37.50 Willow Plumes. 



$3.12 
$5.50 

.$9.37 
$12.50 
$15.00 
$18.75 



24 West Superior Slrccfj 

Saturday, Sept. 24tli 




$18 New Fall Suit 



on 



NOTE: The following })rices will remain the same 



It is of great importance that we create the right impression 
this occasion with the people of uluth, therefore we are going 
to pay you to come to this store Saturday by giving you values 
that you will remember for a long time to come. When you read 
over each item we quote on this page, we are sure we have con- 
vinced you that this is the right place to do your trading 



For Saturday 
very nobby line 
Suits in black 



the 
for 
cial 



kind that 
$18.00 and 

Saturdav — 



we offer a 

of new Fall 

and colors — 

usually sell 

$20.00— spe- 



v^ 



$10,98 J 



all next v.-eek. So if vou can not come Saturday, come any day next week. 






BEAUTIFUL HAND EMBROIDERED 

BABY CLOTHES 




From $8.00 to $12.00 New 

Opening Piice 



Fell 
§4.95 




^Si 



-Our 



^ 



We are going to pay you to come and get acquanued wiith us on Saturday, Sept. 24, 
by g-iving you $8.00 to $12.00 Fall Hats for $4.95. Every lady who buys one of these 



new 

that 



hats gets a 
is the way 



real bargain and becomes 
make it pay us to give 



we 



a real booster f c r the Ginster store and 
$8.00 to $12.00 Fats for 




V. 



These hats are all the newest and latest creations in 
York. We have them of every description — large or 

tifully trimmed with Wings, Aigrettes and Plumes, made cf siiks, velvet and 
ters plush. We especially invite attetnicn to our large sele tion of Turbans 
small hats. Do not forget — just to get acquainted, we offer $8.00 to $12.00 Beauti- 
fully trimmed hats for Saturday, September 24th, from 8 in the morning until 10 
o'clock at night, for 



Fall Millinery and have only just 
small, fancy and tailored — black and 

hat- 
and 



reached us from New 
ail latest shades, beau- 



M^aC'V 



r 



m»' i» 



$15.00 NEW FALL COATS $9.98 



At the 



SKERWIN LINEN SHOP, 

aZ4 .New Jersey Buildlnff. 



$cF*<la 



Mll..\CK BRO.VDCI.OTH COAT, fuU 54 Inches long, some lined to "waj.'^t 
others full saiin lined, made in the very latest style, best 
workmanship and perfect fitting — regular $15. OC value — 
opening sale price 

$25.00 New Fall Coats for $19.50. 

$20 BL.\CK COATS FOR »14.«5. 
WK OFFKR for this big sale a very 
fine lot of Black Broadcloth Coats in 



$25 COVERT CO.\T«!>, $10.05. 
BE.41TIFIJL LI^iE of AU- 

wool Covert Coats, guaran- 
teed satin lined — full length, 
made of an elegant <iualiiy 
covert, regularly $^§,95 



sale price . 



the very newest 
lined, others full 
tively worth $1:0; 



style out, 
lined, posi- 
sale price. 



so^ 



;f 



$14.95 



$25.00 FALL DRESSES $14.98 



HANDSOME DRESSES AT $X4.98 — Here's a great opportunity to 
seclre a or.e-piece dress at a big saving in price. Tli'ese garments 
are made of fine French serge and chiffon Panama, also black all- 
wool t)lack and white check material, very latest fall '^ortrl« in 
brown, na^ y, black and green — regular $25 00 
garment — you can save Just $10.05 by buying on-e 
at 

A MAGXIFI'CEXT SHOWING of One-piece Dresses, made of 1 ea ..ti 
ful quality -ncssallne. also fine French serges and chiffon Panama 
in all the latest fall colors, such as new blue, brown, navv. green and 
black — every garment is made in the newe.si fall 
fashion, and every garni-ent is worth $27.50 and $30. 
Fpecial openii.g sale price 



$14.95 



$18.95 



GREAT SALE OF PETTICOATS 

Silk, Satin and Heatherbloom 

$6 Silk Petticoats for $2.95 ! 



THIS PETTICOAT is made of (Chiffon Taffeta 
with deep flounce and dust ruffle— in all 
letding fall shades and black— reg- $2.95 

ular $6.00 seller — special v— •«■«- 

$2.50 SPIN GLASS SILK PETTICOATS, $1.19 
—Black Spun Glass Silk Petticoats^ with 
deep flounce and dust ruffle — splen- CI^-fQ 
did wearing garment, $2.50 value ... .V*»*«' 
$3.00 HEATHERBLOOM PETTICOATS, 

Genuine lieatherbloom I'ettiooats, in 

and all colors— prettily made, $3.00 e| 70 

value; special opening sale price yAmau 

$2.50 SATIVB PETTICOATS, $1.20 — Fine 
French satine, very rich luster — deep 
and tailoivd ruffle — $2.50 value - 
for 



$1.70 

Mack 



shirred 

$1.29 



$5.00 


CHILDREN'S COATS -^ 


All-wool 


Children's 


Coat.. 


..853.98 


$6.00 


All-wool 


Children's 


Coat... 


..^54.45 


$7.00 


All-wool 


Children's 


Coat... 


.. 855.45 


$10.0C 


) All-wool 


Children's 


. Coat.. 


.«7.95 



$2 TAILORED WAISTS $1.19 

FI.\E WHITE LINENE TAILORED \V.\ISTS, 

prettily pleated fiont and back, 
perfect fitting — regular $2.00 



$25 NEW FALL COATS $19.50 



Vi 



yor CAN SAVE just $5.50 by selecting 
one of these nobby Coat.s here Satui-day — 
they come in black and colors, very r.ewtst 
models — some are half lined, others ful Jii.f d 
with best satin — not a gar 
ment in the lot worth lesi 
■lan $25; opening sale price 



I 

$19^ 



value, for. 



AN EXTRAORDINARY fine Linene Tailored 
Waist — full plaited and prettily 



made, 
for. . . 



12.60 valut 



NEW FALL ST\'LES In Linene Waists blin3 
embroidery front, stiff collars ^ ~' 
and cuffs — regular $3.00 value — 
for 



$1.19 

ne Tailored 

$1.89 

i^'alets, bling 

$2.19 



A VERY SWELL Linene Tailored W 
white, entire front of blind em- 
broidery. Lack trimmed with 
plaits, negular $3.50 value, for.. 



ist. in 



„a«^ 



il 

I 



$2.50 



'J 



24 West Superior Sltrcct. 
FormcFly La Ferte's. 



GINSTER'S 



24 West Superior Street. 
Formerly La Ferte's. 



.k. 

I 



s;aiij»v. ^ 






THE JEWISH 
HOLIDAYS 

Rosh Hashanah Falls This 

Year on OcL 3 

and 4. 



Day of Atonement Will Be 

Observed on OcL 

13. 



In 
waa 
and the 
wa3 ea- 



On the evening of Oct. 3 and the day 
Of the 4th the Jevvi.sh people will ob- 
serve the Rash Hashanah. or New 
Yfar'.s aay of the year StJTl. 

The meaning atul purpose of thia 
festival Is ,noi - i. lorth explicitly in 
the Bible; but reatleis ai'e lofi to infer 
them trom the Scriptural titles of the 

«.lay, "Tiie Memorial of Blowing of 
Irumpeis (Lev. xxiii:24) and the Day 
of Blowing the Trumpet (Numbers 
•xxix:l) as well as from tiie lai-t that 
the Jewish New Year is the seventh 
now moon of Use Hebrew calendar. 
t;ie Biblical age every new moon 
regarded as a solemn occasion 
teventh, the sacred number, 
pccially so. 

It became the day of the blowing 
of the trumpet — parexcellence — re- 
minding iho Israelite thai a new period 
of time t>eglns; and that no occasion 
cnuld be more appropriate for the en- 
deavor after a new life for amend- 
njent and revonciliation with God. It 
•waa the day of memorial, when Israel 
lelt ium.self held by God In merciful re- 
riemberance. But if Israel would have 
God mindful of him, he must be mind- 
ful of his responsibilities, to Him and 
to man's higher nature. The symbolic 
act of sounding the Shophar; or ram's 
horn, which Is performed in the syna- 
gogues In obedience to the scriptural 
Xirecept is Intended to bring nome to 
the Israelite this aspect of the day's 
meaning. 

It is a solemn accaslou. though not 
a mournful one. 

The l)0r of Atonement. 

The Jewl.-.h festival, the Day of 
Atonement Vom KIppur, the holiest 
day In the Jewish calendar falls this 
year on Oct. l;{. The Hebrew date is 
the 10th of Tlshri. The festival Is or- 
dained In Levltiiu.'^ XVI 29-H and 
XXIII i6-32. in both passages it is 
atyled "A Sabbath of Solemn Rest." 

Tlie purpoo^e of the Day of Atone- 
ment Is clearly indicated by Its name. 
It Is intended lo complete and crown 
the work of the penitential season, be- 
gun on the hrst of Tishri (New Year), 
by finally reconciling the soul with the 



Almighty. Impliclty trusting in the 
Divine forgiveness, the Israelite be- 
lieves that his contrition, if it be real- 
ly sincere, will atone for him, will 
make liim "at one" once more with 
his Heavenly Father. The day, then, 
is devoted to a supreme effort of peni- 
tence, to a mighty endeavor after com- 
munion with the Almighty. It is spent 
in prayer and meditation. 

It is kept. too. as a fast, in obedi- 
ence to tile command given in each of 
the two passages above cited, wher-s 
the expression ■afllici his soul" must 
be understood, as it is throughout the 
Bible, as synonymous with fasting. 

The chief, the real aim of the Day 
of Atonement is the reformed life. All 
the external elements of the day's ob- 
servance — its worship and austerities — 
are intended to promote this supreme 
purpose. 

The Fea«t of Tnbernacle». 

Tlie feast of Tabernacles is to be 
celebrated by the Jewish community 
on Oct. 18. 

It is called in Hebrew "S'uccoth" and 
falls upon the lotli of Tishri in the 
Hebrew calendar, and lasts eiglit days. 
The eighth day is called 'The Day of 
Solemn Assembly. 

This feast is ordained in Exodus 
xxiii, 16: xxxiv, 22, wheie it is called 
"The Feast of Ingathering," and in 
Leviticus xxiii. 34 and Deut. xv 13. In 
Leviticus it says, "i'e shall dwell in 
booths seven days — that your gener- 
ations may know that I made the 
children of Israel to dwell In booths, 
when I brought them out of the land 
of Egypt." This passage, it will be 
noted, sets furth the historical signift- 
canco of the feast. Its agricultural 
character is suggested by its other 
name, "The Feast of Ingathering." 

The Israelite who. in obedience to 
the Divine Command, left his house 
for the week of the Festival, and took 
up his abode in a booth or tabernacle, 
and lived through, as it were, an im- 
portant epocii of hi.s people's history, 
as theieby replenished the springs of 
Jewish sentiment. He wa.s also there- 
by taught to remember that just as 
Israel in the wilderness was protecte<i 
by God. so is he being guarded in his 
earthly pilgrimage. God's love is ever 
with his children like a protecting 
cloud. 

Tlie second name of the Festival the 
Feast of Ingathering, almost explains 
itself. The holiday comes in the au- 
tumn, at a lime when tlie husbandman 
in Palestine had safely garnered the 
produce of his lands. It was the time 
of the thinking of God as the giver. 
And so the lesson of gratitude for the 
blessings he had and of re.sponsibility 
for tlie right use of them was each 
year written upon liis heart. 

Services on all of these iiolidays will 
be held at the Temple Emanuel, Dr. 
Lefkovit.s preaching at each service. 
Special music will be rendered by the 
choir, consisting of Mesdames Dwor- 
shak and Walsch. Mias Hyland and 
Messrs. Suffel and Kotzcny. 



a St. Croix avenue resort by swallow- 
ing bichloride of mercury, is still lin- 
gering at St. Marys hospital. It is 
stated, however, that there is no hope 
of her recovery. 

HIM Talk Saved Htm- 

Martin Geraghty saved himself from 
ten days In the couiay jail by putting 
up a "spiel" to Judge Windorn. He 
declared that he had not been arrested 
for fourteen months and on his prom- 
ise to go to work he was allowed his 
freedom. 



PERSONAL 



all the hay 
Isle Royale. 



fever patients have left 



DO NOT Miss 

The Opening 

of tlie 

Jolicoeur Millinery Shop 

Tomorrow, Sept. 24. 
1322 Tower Ave. 



toward the Taft administration was 
outlined by Mr. Bannard. 

"In niv opinion," said he, "the Sara- 
toga convention will adopt a resolu- 
tion stiongly endorsiiig the administra- 
tion of President Taft. In accordance 
with (lie president's expres.^ed wisli. no 
menticn will be made of any renomina- 
tion iu 1912." 



lapsed into uncon.»<ciousne«<s this morn- '■ Aberdeen. S. D., on Oct. 10. The tarlflta 
ing after declaring he had orders. Cork- ; were filed by the Chicago & North- 
well is not expected to live through tho, western, the Chicago Milwaukee A St. 
day ' Paul, the Chicagtj, St. Paul. Minneapo- 

Funeral corteges, carrying bodies of ; Hs & Omaha, the Great Northern, the 
the victims of the dlsiiater. slowly Minneapolis & &t. Louis, the Mmne- 
wended their way through the streets, apolls, bt. Paul & bault 
of Bluffton today amid i.he tolling of i 



bells. Business was at a standstill. 



ROOSEVELT GOING EARLY. 



Hugh .T. Hughes, editor of the Farm, 

Stock and Home Journal of Minne- 
apolis, is in the city. 

Rev- R. S. Read has gone for a trip 
down tlie lakes. 

E. H. Sandus of Houghton is at the 
St. Louis. 

John A. Healy of Hibbing, Republi- 
can nominee for the legislature, is in 
the city, a guest at the St. Louis. 

K. K. Albert of Winnipeg is at the 
Spalding. 

Charles T, Beale of Marble is at the 
Spalding. 

Carl Dandrea of Hibbing is a guest 
at the Lenox. 

J. F. Bird of Kansas City has re- 
turned from his summer home at To- 
ben's harbor. Is!o Royale and is a guest 
at tlie Lenox. Mr. Bird says practically 



at 



Col. Expects to Win the Fight 
Saratoga. 

New York. Sei)t. 23. — Col. Theodore 
Roosevelt has decided to go early to | 
the Saratoga convention. He will start i 
from New York for .Saratoga at 12:40 : 
on Sunday. His early callers today 
included Paul Morton, former secretary 
of the navy, ajid Col. George W. 
Dunn of Binghampton, ex-rfiairman ol 
tlie Republican state committee. 

The utter rout of the "old guard" 
is predicted today by Col. Roosevelt 
himself. He expects to have 100 ma- 
jority. Reports from all parts of the 
state have been received at Sagamore 
Hill. 

The attitude of the Roosevelt forces 



Rhodes .Seholamhip Examination. 

Cliicago. Sept. 'SZ. — The lUlnoi.s com- 
mittee on the selection of a Rhodes 
scholar announced today that the next 
qualifying examination for the scholar- 
ship will be held here Oct. 25 and 26. 



ROLLER SKATING 

TONIGHT 

Music tonight and every night except 
Monday and Saturday. 

Saturday and Sunday M^ttneen. 

LINCOLN PARK ROLLER RINK. 



MAN BLAMED FOR 

FORTY DEATHS DYING. 



ORDER HEARING 
ON DULUTi RATES 



Ste Marie and 
the Northern Pacific. Advances in rates 
on flaxseed and flaxseed proiiucts from 
.St Paul and Minneapolis, Minn, and 
Missouri river transfer points to uu- 
luth, Minn, and Superior, Wis, will be 
Investigated at St. Paul on Oct. 13. 

DIES OF INJURIES. 



Fort Wayen. Ind.. Sept. 23. — Motor- 
man 3. F. Corkwrell of the Southbound 
Wabash valley interurban car, who is 
being blamed freely for the wreck near 
King.'iland, Ind., which cost the lives 
of forty persons. Wednesday afternoon. 



Commerce Commission Sets 

Oct. 13 for Ming Up 

Flax Protest 

Washington, Sept. 23. — Certain im- 
portant commodity tariffs filed with 
the Interstate commerce rommisslon by- 
Western and Northwestern railroads 
are to be inquired Into by the com- 
mission before definite action Is taken 
respecting them. 

Inquiry into proposed advances of 
grain rates from points in North Da- 
kola and South Dakota to St. Paul. 
Minn., and Chicago wi ! l>e held at 



Bert Peterson of Iron River Suc- 
euDibs to >^ oiiads on Head. 

Iron River, Wis.. Sept. 22. — (.SpeciaJ 
to The Herald.) — Bert Peterson, who 
while temporarily Insane tried to com- 
mit suicide last Monday and inflicted 
serious injuries to ills head by using 
a hammer, died at St. Joseph's hospital, 
Ashland. Tuesday. The remains were 
brought here for buriai and the funeral 

took place today, 

• ■' 

Deujr JapaoeMe I'lot. 

Tokio. Sept. 23. — Official and positive 
denial was made today of the recent 
statement of the Hochi Shimbun tliat a 
conspiracy against tiie life of the em- 
peror had been discovered among some 
of his own subjects and the plotter* 
arrested. 




CITY BRIEFS 



Diilttth-Made 

Tiiwing-Stewart Co.. 



Boukn. 

Phone 114. 



DRINKERS 
COINS 



Temple Services. 

Regular Sabbath services will be 
held this evening at 8 o'clock at the 
Temple Kmanuel. The sermon by Rabbi 
Lefkovit2 will be on "The City" founded 
on tile play recently seen in Dulutii. 
■ 

Vegetable Uinplay. 

The exhibitioti of vegetables grown 
at Glon Avon is on display at the Com- 
mercial club. The display was recently 
exhibited at the Harvest Home festi- 
val at the Glen Avon Presbyterian 
cliur;h. 




The Poison of Alcohol Shatters the 

Nervous System and Dethrones 

the Reason. 

THEY LOSE THEIR MINOS 

This Condition Is Brought About 

Gradually and the Drinker Is 

Not Aware of It Until 

Sometunes It Is 

Too Late. 



DRINK 



HABIT 
IN 



CURED 
THREE 



DAYS 



New Pavlne Job. 

The board of public works will re- 
port to the council Monday night upon 
the paving and grading of Fifta street 
between Fourteenth avenue east and 
Woodland avenue, recommending that 
tiie work be ordered. The estimated 
cost of impiovlng it with tar macadam 
Is $ J0,.327.«.',. A sanitary sewer in Well- 
ington alley oetween Michigan and 
Grand Porks avenues, estimated to cost 
$1,167.50. will probably be ordered also. 
The work will not be done this year ani 
the advance assessments will likely not 
be levied until late in the winter. 



Case In UlniuiMSed. 

John Epple. arrested yesterday for 
an alleged violation of the pound or- 
dianuce, was discharged in police court 
tliis morning. It was claimed that iie 
allowed his cow to run at large. 



The Xeal internal treatment cures 
the drink habit in three days by neu- 
tralizing the poison of alcohol in the 
blood and ridding the system of it 
by a rapid process of elimination. No 
hypodermic injections are given and 
a plain contract to effect a perfect 
cure in three days is given each pa- 
tient agreeing to effect a perfect cure 
at the institute or in the home^ 

Call, write or phone The Xeal In- 
stitute, Superior, Wis. Everything 
strictly confidential. Bank references 
furnished. 



Complete Fall Show- 
ing of Quality 







For Men, Women 
and Children 

The -most satisfactory shoe 
service in Duliith. 

The Wieland $3.50 Shoes 

for women are all made espe- 
cially for our trade on the most 
up-to-date lasts and patterns. 
All styles, priced 

S3.50 

WIeiand High School Shoes 

designed especially^ for the 
young miss; 11 to 15 year.s; iu 
all leatliers; special at $3.50 and 



Fined For BlaMtlag. 

Andrew Berg wa.s found guilty In 
police court yesterday afternoon of 
blasting without giving tiie required 
warning. He paid a fine of $20 and 
costs. Anotiier charge against him was 
dismissed as were the charges against 
A. W. Carlson. 



Youth in Arrested. 

Ed Murphy, la years old. was ar- 
rested last evening on a warrant 
charging him with embezzling $3.3.36 
from the Sllberstein & Bondy com- 
pany. It is alleged that he collected 
the money on C. O. L>. orders and failed 
to account for it. He was not ar- 
raigned in court this morning. 



Killed in Idaho. 

The police received a telegram from 
Laclede. Idaiio. this morning asking 
them to try to locate a brother of Dan 
Ryan, who was killed there yesterday 
by a falling tree. The wire stated that 
he is supposed to have had a brother 
who was employed on the police force 
here about four years ago. Chief 
Troyer says that he was not on the 
regular force, but that he may have 
teen working as an extra. The dead 
man was oM years old. 



No Hope of Recovery. 

Lurlle Hutciiins. 23 years old. tlie 
woman who tried to commit suicide in 



Wieland School Shoes 

for children; latest models, ser- 
\ iccable aufi comfortable styles. 
Priced. $1.25, $1.50. $1.75 and 

High Cut Jockey Boots for 





115 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 



persons have owned 
FiSCHea pi«aoc before 
you. This is an tnaitress- 
ive guaranrcs of superi- 
ority, because no other 
mak« can lay claim to 
such a tremendous total 
output. The affection 
which masic lovers 
everywhere feel for this 
old. world-standard 
friend is without a par- 
allel In the history of 
pluno faoUdias. 

Howard Farwell & Go. 

120 E. Superior Street, 

W. J. Allen, Mgr. 



UMBRELLAS? 



You want the best — you want one of our 
Moulton Wireless — of course you do. They're 
rain-proof and sneak-thief proof. Ask why. 




LET vs mak:e the duttoxs for yovr new dress. 




QUARTERLIES 

Your copy is ready — it will cost you but 
5<; if you buy it at the same time you buy a 
l.'lc pattern. It's a great book. See it! 



117-119 WEST SLPEHIOR STREET, ULLLTH, MINN. 



RAINCOATS 



Go 

For 



V2 



Women's 

A.ND 

Misses* 

Indispensable for School or for Business Wear ! 

WE SOLD a lot of them this day-— and we'll sell a lot more of them tomorrow 1 No need 
to tell many, of you that Kenyon Rain Coats are the best of rain coats — many of you know that. 

You also know that a good Rain Coat is useful every month in the year — you will 
also recognize the fact that the styles offered are the very cream of the seaiion's 
best. They'U be just as good next spring as now. -:- -:- -:- 

And just because we want to clear our racks to make room for Furs— you can take your choice at 
HALF PRICE! 



RAIN COATS $6.25 

RAINCOATS $7.50 

RAIN COATS $12.50 



There Are Fine Styles 

for Women 

and for Misses. 



$18.50 RAIN COATS 



$9.25 



{ $22.50 RAIN COATS $11.25 

( $35 . 00 RA IN COATS $17 .50 



$7.50 for $10.00 Tailored Skirts 

OMORROW we shall place on sale a tir.e assort- 
ment of women's dress skirts at $7.50 — the regular 

dJ ^ *>C^ P"*^^ ^^ these skirts is $10.CX)— just to stimu- 
S»» •*^\/ late Saturday's business, we offer choice at 
$7.50. Choose trom grey, navy and black, abo light col- 
ored mixtures. 



T' 



$6.50 for $8.50 & $ 10 Net &. Taffeta Waists 

TOMORROW we shall offer a fme new lot of taffeta 
waists in black and colors, also pretty net waists in 

black and colors — regular prices ranged C^^ ^C\ 
$8.50 and $10.00— special for Friday only H»W.*^\^ 
$6.50. There is a fine assortment of sizes — you'll be 
greatly pleased with the showing. 



No One Else Seems to Even Try to Give Sucli Style and Value in Suits at $25 to $35 

PERH.\PS we might be perfectly safe in saying that the suits at from $18.50 to $45.00 are :ill unequalled— for 
really does seem -that other houses do not try to give such values as we do! 

You see some stores bend their greatest efforts to the high-priced end of the business — and a few •tores 
seem to look principally to cheap prices without being very particular about style, workmanship, quality. 

BUT we've been so careful in our buying — and we've worked so hard to get the truly good sorts in uncommon styles, 
that we know we can please where many stores fail 
confidently? 



Will you not let us show you the new things of which we speak 



so 



FINE FURS 

The kiniis that are safe to buy — 
and which reflect good judgment 
on the wearer are here at 
FAIR PRICES. 



ChUdren*s Coats— New Models Just Unboxed 

Today we have put in stock some children's coats which are well worth a special trip down 
town— the styles are very clever— they are made up of heavy Kerseys, Cheviots, Chinchillas, 
and Scotch mixtures— with yokes and sleeces lined, or lined throughout with flannel. 

There are also double-faced coatings — prices range $6.50, $7.50, $8.50, $10 and up to $15. 




I 



- 



■ M*' 



LOVABLE GOWNS 



Beautiful and becoming dresses 
of silk and of wool materials. 
Prices, $15.<J0 to $65.00. 
SEE THEM. 



There Are Many More New Hats That Will 
Have a First Showing Tomorrow 



Y 



OU'LL surely enjoy this display — some hats which were to have been .shown in our 
opening are now ready — and you'll be first to see them! 

The hats are becoming this season — you can tell that by trying 
on a few tomorrow — and while there is a great range: of shapes — 
from trim little Hindoo Turbans to large flaring picture hats of 
the Van Dycke, Reynolds and Gainsborough models — it will be easy 
here to select a hat which exactly suits you. 

The Suit Hats at $6.00 to $12.00 

Are Especially Clever— And Tl«}re 
Are No Two of Tlieni Alike Here ! 

T/iere are trig little tunbans— there are fetching little 
Cloche models— and there are stylish Madame Sherrya — the 
tilt at which they are 'worn, as well as the trimnang, giving 
aaucinesa or demur eness as taste may desire. 

The "Hats Elegant*' at $15.00 to $65.00 
Are Patterns of Magnificence! 

The experience of our milliners in catering to fine trade in 
metropolitan style centers gives them a decided advantage. They 
know instinctively the. refinement and individuality you desire— 
they understand the art of simplicity— and our pattern hats and the hats from our own 
workroom bespeak their abihty! You are invited to look at— to try on new models ex- 
clusive here. 




Buy Materials for School Dresses Saturday 



WE HAVE made special preparation:; on materials just for 
the purpose — weaves that are firm and wear well — 
those that are shape retaining and the designs and colorings 
that are so appropriate for the purpose 

See those extra value serges at 59c, 75c and $1.00 a yard— 
C/^-^ then there are pretty plaid cliecks and ^1 Crt 
^VIC stripes at from 50c to $1.50 the yard. «pl.«/\/ 

Dress Goods Remnants 

1/3 to 1/2 OFF ! 



yi 



BARGAIN SQUARE 

I_ASX DAY OF" THE 13IG SAX^E 

*HERE is yet time to profit by i't — it's a big sale that 

you'll share in with delight — there are many pieces long 
enough for women's one-piece dresses — there are others 
that are just right for boys" suits, coats, waists and pants — 
and there's ever so many that will be fine for girls' coats 
and dresses! 

what you like — and find a bargain. The goods 
worth just as much to you as though cut from 
the full piece at full price which, would be 
at least from one-third to one-half morel 



Find 

V3 



are 



V2 




EACH FOR WOMEN'S 
2Sc to S5« 

HANDKERCHIEFS 

Many .styles in fine Celtic lawn and 
pure Irish linen — initialed, embroid- 
ered and lace trimmed. 



$3.20 for $4.50 Blanke1:s 

SHOWN IX THE EAST WINDOW. 



Saturday we place on sale several 
hundred pairs fancy plaid blanke:s — 
wool flniah — pattern, colors and weave 
look like our $9.00 and 
$10. 00 fine wool blan- 
ket.s — measure 68jc84 
Inches; warranted fast color; see -Sis- 
play in our window — these sell \n a 
regular way at $4.50. Kxtra special 
at $3.20 the pair. 



$3.20 




$3 a Dozen Napkin S>pecial 

FUOM THE LINEN DE1»T. \ 

A epecial purchase of over two hun- 
dred dozen napkins — fine, snow white 
line — .size 22x22 to 24x24 Ir.ches. In 

this lot, there are nap- 
kins worth $8.00 and 



$2.00 



$3.25 the dozen — for an 
extraordinary offer, on sale tomorrow 
at $2.00 the dozen, or $1.00 the half 
dozen. Be sure lo see these tomorrow 



EACH FOK \% OMEN'S 

65c to 9Hr 

HANDKERCHIEFS 

Borne of these are slightly mus.sed 
and soiled — but you save as much 
as 48c and the cost of laundering is 
almost nothing. 



Ty 9 '~^ .* » ■ n J. ' W . m^^ M 



New Scotch Flannels For Waists 35c the Yard 

AT THE WASH GOODS DEPARTMENT 

These are half wool fabrics which will not shrink and will not fade^ 
therefore they are ideal for women's waists — for boys' shirts and children's 



dresses ! 



New designs and colorings for fall are here at our Vi/^ash 
Goods department! Pay only — yard 35^ 



SHEPHERD 
CHECKS 



15c 



Wool yft'octs 

a yard wide 
fectly. 



in black and white — 
and they wash per- 



New Bathrobe Flannels 

25<« TO 45e THE VAUD. 

Imported RObings — In great deraand for bath 
robes — a blaixket finish that won't rou.tjh up— 
plaids, florai«i stripes and Persians — very ef- 
fective — 25c to 45c yard. 



WILL YOU LOOK AT OUR NEW WOMEN'S 

Hygienic and Foster's Fine Shoes at $5.00 

These high-grade slioc5 are of ihe very best French kid — patent and gun metal 
leathers— dull kid or black cloth tops— hand turned — made of high-grade materials- 
hand lasted Work and styles that will fit and wear— $5 the pair and quaUty guaranteed. 

School Shoes for Live Boys and Girls 

$ 1 .50 to $2.50 

You can buy shoes for lc.->s momy — but the/U 
not be worth buying — and you can pa}^ more money, 
but you can't get better shoes for bo;,'S and girls. 

We have the proper natural last;; — in many 

styles — and in mamy leathers and in all sizes! 

And we'll take time to fit them properly 1. 



Our $3.00, $3.50 
and $4.00 Shoes 

Look like and wear better 
than many women's shoes 
selling at 50c to $1.00 more 
the pairl 





': 






















i 








i 




^ 




J 




; ( 




» 








« 





















• 




















■ 


1 








■ 












i 








1 
* 



f 



T- 



12 



HOW TO 
GROW HAIR 




SniPLE, SAFE AND RCLIARLE 
WAY THAT I'HOUrCES SIR- 
PHJSJXti IIESILTS. 



KEW 



DHIG CRVSTOLIS. CAUSES 
BIG STIR A>10\G HAIR 
SPECIALISTS. 



fl.OOO Iti:\\AHD if They Fnll. 



Cut Out Free Coupon IteloM' and Mail 
Today. 



Tlicse who hmte borome prrraaturely gray or who 
•re tr ubleil - ulp or balr dijicaseg, sucb ai> 

ra!Iins hair. biliU.ess. itohing stalp. etc., 

know full 'Xnil 111* humlllntlon that they raus«. 

Tliere U no nwil. howrter. of etich rontlitioiui. Tlicse 
trouble Cdii be fluU'kly ovenome by Cry^tulis. the new 
flnig rtveiitly tlbtoicred at the Ci'tslo U;Uiratorlc» at I 
8oraiitnn, Pa. Since Its tilsi-nerj-. a little over a j 
jear agi. rrystulis has been fonml to contain marvel- ' 
»u» prc't)enies for pixiducing a mw growtii of Ualr. i 
In subjecting It to vi-.riDUs lefts In the worst ca«cs 
of baKIm-^s. duiiiiruff. Itchlni; s«alp, etc.. the results ' 
obtaiiird ly the evperlmemlng cherulsis wire c n- j 
»lilere<l almi'St miraculous. In every case It was ' 
fouuil Uiat where there were uny hair n".ts left It I 
wuulil prriluce a nev ai.d luiuriasit growth of hair I 
In frum four to sli weeks' llrae. dray or faded | 
balr was often reslond to' Its natural c. lor in from , 
10 to M d.iys' time. In minor cases of scalp and' 
hair dl!i*rse. such aa dandruff, falling hair. Itching ] 
•calp. eti-. . It was found Uiat -iliese umialural con-J 
dlUoii* Wire o rrev-ted and t fttii coiiipletely cured ly , 
two or lliPde appUcatlciw. The disci.vei-y of Cry^t.'lls I 
wit], without doubt, iiut an end to the troublesome ■ 
•o&lp .inU lialr iU»e;'.»es (hat i.rc becoming fo com- i 
mo:i with the American pecple. Wcmen who lia\i 
been f a-eil Into wearing fal.se hair will greatly wel- 
come tills manelous product, as, U9i<le from Its 
Biany other Tlrtues. It adib a l<eikUlL''i!l gloss and 

hiitie to the old hair. Berldes. It cuitalns no oUlscllool; Mabelle 
4nd has a tendency to make tlie lialr light and fluffy, j xen Tl'aillir 
1h« m.inuger* of the fresKi LaU ratories have such' — ' 

•troiig fallli In fr>st lis we ha.e been autlioriiej to 
make Ihe f. llo»i;ig remarkable offer: They will 
foifelt ll.OOo In gold if they fall to prove thai 
Crystdla actu.»lly grows liaJr. Tluy will forfeit 
$l,OCi> In gcU If any one can prove tliey wtre 
not the first dls«vverer9 ■ f fry>Ui)Li. Tliey will 
forfeit Jl.neo in gold If it can I* proven that It 
ctmtaln.i any lil. dye or coloring matter of any kind. 
They will fcrfrtt $1,000 in gold If every ttstlniMilal 
kiid iwern sfatemef.t which they publish is not alw- 
lutely genuine. Arrangements ha\e Iwen made with 
the Lalxratcrie* to furnish free information in re- 

tard to the new pnve«8 to all I>uluth Herald rcad^r^. 
Icrely <-ut out and send In tlio coupcn below, aiij 
jou will rvelve free jartlculars of tills manel.ui 
new product by lelum mall. 



Baldness. Dandruff, Itching 
Scalp. Etc 

FREE CRYSTOLIS COUPON 

Cut cut this coup n today and mail U) ("reslc 
I.ab»>nitor!es. r>ept 13 J. Scrantcn. Pa., f' r free 
liU'irmatlou rcganllng Cnstolis. the new dii- 
e v( ry f'T growing hair. Good tomorrow to all 
IKilutli Herald rfaders. 

Coupin No. i41. 



MANY WILL SEEK A 
HIGHER EDUCATION 

Large Number of Virginia 

Graduates to Enter State 

Institutions. 

Virginia, Minn., Sept. 23. — (Special to 
Tlie Hctaia. — Tlie I'oUowirg giU'luates 
o£ tlie Virginia liigh school will study 
In liiKher insiitutions for the coming 
school year as follows: 

Albert L. Shipley, University of Min- 
nesota, completing yeai ; Adolph F. 
Holiner, University of Minnesota, acad- 
emic course, fnuuli year, i^eighion K. 
Simons, L"nivcr.><ity of Minnesota, law, 
fourth year; Henry A. Sincock, Xorih- 
western university, medical course, 
foiirtli year; Harry G. Neff, Wabash 
college, Crawford.svtlle, Ind.. classic.il 
course, tiiird year; Edward Berg, Uni- 
versity of Washington, Seattle, engi- 
neering; Elodie B. Johnson, Chlca<?o 
University, classical course. thiid 
year; William J. Hooper. Soutli Da- 
kota college of mines, civil engineer- 
ing, first year; Daniel L. Mahoney, Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, dentristrv, sec- 
ond year; Charles Butler, Toronto Uni- 
versity, Canada, civil engineering, first 
>ear; Gerald Roskillv. University of 
Minnesota, medical cour.^e, second year; 
Xaiy M. Savolainen, Duluth normal 
school; Ray Simons, Macalester col- 
; lege, academic course, second vear- 
' Grace A. Bonner, St. Cloud no'rmal 
e E. Brooks, Kindergar- 
-,. ^ , - scliiiol. Grand Kapids, 

Miih., llrst year; Hattie C. Lipke. I)u- 
lijfh normal school; Helen 1. Obere" 
riiomas normal training school, De'- 
troit; flllda L. Roberts, Duluth normal 
'•hool; Blanche A. Wilcox, University 
Minnesota, first year; Grace E. Wif- 
Lniver.'--ity of Minnesota, first 



very close contests are 
Trebiicock, tlie present 
of the Third district In 
has one majority over 



knov.n. J. p. 

coniir.issioner 

Itasra county, 

E. Hanson of 



Bovey, liis opponent. Every precinct 
has been heard from and the friends 
of tlte present commissioner confi- 
dently claim his nomination. Mrs. 
Whipple of Grand Rapids has gained 
the Republican nomination over Mr.«. 
Booth, the present county superintend- 
ent of schools, by a small margin. R. 
A. McQuot of Coleraine seems to have 
won by a scratch over F. F. Price, the 
present county attorney. These are on 
the Democratic prlmar.v ballot. Glen 
Strader is being congratulated on his 
splendid race for the nomination for 
county treasurer. At last reports he 
was over 400 vote ahead of his com- 
petitor, Keo La Rue. M. A. Spang, 
the present popular county auditor, 
was renominated on the Democratic 
ticket. He will have for his opponent 
C. R. Gates of Coleraine, who was 
nom.lnated on the Republican ticket 
without opposition. 

GOOD OPENINGS 
OFFERED AT TOWER 



Beaver Bay has ijiot reported yet and 
Willie the vote there is small, it mav 
decide the contest. It is believed, how"- 
ever, that Fowler has secured the 
nomination. 

Tiie Cook county vote on congress- 
man was: Miller, 70; McKnight, h; 
Taj lor, 8. 



of 
cox. 



year. 



ITASCA COUNTY 
FAIR IS OPENED 




Large 



List of Exhibits 
I Good Attend- 



and 



ance. 



Rapids, Minn., Sept. 23. — (Spe- 
The Herald.) — The nineteenth 

Itasca county fair opened yes- 

under 



Woolens that cost the whole- 
sale woolen house from $3.00 
to $4.50 per j-ard, he must sell 
to merchant tailors for $6.00 
and $7.00 per yard to make 
money. We get the same wool- 
ens direct from the mills, buy- 
ing in full case lots for a large 
chain of stores, paying cash, 
thus getting a big discount from 
the miller's price, eliminating 
the wholesalers' business entire- 
ly. We want you to know, when 
you get a suit or overcoat from 
us, that its value is from $25.00 
to $30.00, also we guarantee you 
satisfaction in quality, workman- 
ship and above all — a fit. 

THINK IT OVER. 




333 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 

Zenith, 2436. 

J. H. McMULLEX, Mgr. 



Grand 
clal to 
annual 

terday under a clouded sky, with rain 
tlneateninsr to spoil the attendance. In 
spite of the threatening weather en- 
tries have been coming in at an un- 
usually fast rate, and in tlie afternoon 
streams of rigs from the country 
wended their way to the fair grounds 
witn their loads of articles to be 
proud of. Quite a display of agricult- 
ural products is made. The live stock 
e.xiiibits are coming in. but most -.-.f the' 
stock will be brought in earlv today. 
Secretary Graffam of the association 
states that never in the historv of the 
fair association have the exhil/itors 
been so prompt in entering their ex- 
hibits as they have this vear. 

A most interesting progVam is sched- 
uled for today and Saturday. A spe- 
cial train will be run from Kellv Lake, 
both today and Saturday, leaving tliat 
place in time to connect with the train 
leaving Vliginia in the morning, and 
returning in the evening in time to 
connect with tlie same train going 

I north, stopping at all intermediate 
stations. It is expected that there will 
be large crowds here from the range, 
especially that portion of it which lies 

I In Itasca county. The program for 

I Saturday will be as follows: Forenoon 

I juuging exhibits and viewing exhibits; 

1 afternoon, 1 o'clock, baseball game, 
t'trand Rapids Juniors vs a team picked 

I trom the best players of the Range 
junior teams; 2:1'0 pace and 2:35 pace 
or trot; speaking by Mr. Hugh J 
Hughes and others; high trapeze per- 
formance by Prof. Benz; music by 
Grand Rapids band. 

Saturday the gate will be free for 
all school children. Sept. J. A. Van- 
dyke of the schools of school district 
No. 2 states that all the pupils of 
Bovej-, Coleraine, Taconite and other 
schools will be brou.ght to the fair in 

a body, coming on the special train 
which will be run on that day. 

Only two townslrlp exhibits have been 
entered, one from Ardenhurst and one 
from the town of Deer River. Both 
have magnificent displays. 

TROUT LAKE BOAT 
HOUSE DESTROYED 



Commercial Ciub Will Make 

Known Excellent 

Chances. 

Tcwer, Minn., Sept. 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — A largely attended spe- 
cial meeting of the Commercial club 
was held Thursday evening at the 
Vermilion hotel. The minutes of the 
previous meeting were lead and the 
matter af the club combining in a 
grand effort for a club edition of the 
local paper to be especially strong as 
an advertising medium was discussed. 
A committee of three is to be ap- 
pointod by the president to superintend 
this matter. 

The secretary was instructed to ad- 
vertise in the Duluth dailies and Min- 
neapolis papers the fact tliat Tower 
offered openings for a tinner, taxider- 
mist and cornetlsl band leader who 
has a trade. 

A plan to interest the pupils of the 
I'.igh school in literary work and pub- 
lic speaking was carried, and a com- 
mittee namtd consisting of N. J. Ben- 
son, J. W. Thompson and J. E. Robert- 
son, with F. E. Kolb, F. C. Burgess 
and W. H. Congdon as alternates, to 
confer with Supt. Cartwrighi of the 
public schools to Interest the students, 
and prizes are to be offered by the club 
for the best efforts. A public enter- 
tainment is to be given early in De- 
cember, at whicii time this particular 
contest would close. The proceeds of 
the entertainiTient will be used for a 
public library fund. 

Free delivery of express matter, 
telephone service, waterworks. et<,., 
were discussed. The road from Tower 
to Biwabik has been traveled by a 
committee with an automobile, and the 
committee report.s the road in good 
order for automobile travel, and the 
club's president, F. E. Kelb, will ex- 
tend the glad hand to all aut<imobile 
parties coming in, and the club will do 
its best to make the stay ct such 
parties very pleasant. The road is re- 
ported passable from Tower to Ely, as 
machines from both towns have re- 
cently made the trip. An Ely machine 
this week made the trip from Ely to 
Duluth, lo8 miles, in good time. 

The club will hold its next regular 
meeting- Oct. 3 at the Vermilion hotel. 

FOWLER LIKELY 
TO BE NOMINATED 



LEFT WITHOUTA RELATIVE. 

Death of Stranger in Grand Rapids 
Hospital Leaves W ife Alone. 

Grand Rapids, Minn., Sept. 23. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — A sad death oc- 
curred at St. Benedict's hospital. James 
Arthur Barton, who had been pianist 
and oornetist with the Bob and Eva 
McGinley company, was taken 111 with 
typhoid while the company was play- 
ing here, and they had to take him to 
the hospital for treatment. He died a 
few days afterward, his wife coming 
from New York to be at his bedside. 
The funeral took place from the 
Kremer undertaking parlors. He leaves 
Ills wife, two sisters and one brother 
to mourn his loss. Barton was a na- 
tive of Northampton, Eng. While Mrs. 
Barton was here attending to her hus- 
band she received word that their 
t'aby. aged 2 years, had died suddenly 
in New York. Mrs. Barton herself is 
an orphan, and she Is left without any 
relatives in the world. 




—OF THE— 









ifir! 




01 



im T5 



to Saw© [ii@ini©,YS 



CONCERT A SLCCESS. 

Event Held at Eveleth Attended By 
Big Audience. 

Eveleth, Minn., Sept. 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The concert held last 
evening in the Monitor Hall, under the 
auspices of the Ladies Aid Society of 
tlie First Presbyterian church, proved 
a huge success, many attending from 
the surrounding towns. The vocal 
solos rendered by R. M. Dungan, Mrs. 
E. K. Medlar, Miss Mulligan, all of 
Eveleth, and Miss Mary Shesgreen. 
Donna Louise Riblette, Mrs. E. A. Bat- 
son of Duluth, were well rendered and 
received much applause, the vocalists 
being compelled to respond to manv 
encores. 

The violin solos rendered by Henrv 
L. Lavick of Duluth. were well re- 
ceived and he was forced to respond to 
encores. Piano solos were rendered 
by Miss Polly Bullard of Eveleth and 
Miss Nell Brown of Duluth, and 'their 
efforts brought forth much applause. 



Thousands of dollars' worth of high- 
class Clothing, Furnishings, Hats and 
Shoes for men and young men now 
being disposed of at fifty cents on the 
dollar, and even less. 



s 



r 



Hats 

-^ew fall soft an(i 
stiff hats, reg. $3.00 
grades — choice 





Appears to Have Won the 
Contest for Repre- 
sentative. 

Two Harbors, Minn., Sept. 23. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — The contest at 
the primary election between M. S. Mc- 

Mahon and B. F. Fowler, both of Two 
Harbors, for the Republican nomin- 
ation for representative of Lake and 
Cook counties in the legislature, is 
having a very close finish. The com- 
plete returns from Cook county were 
received by wireless this morning and 
are: Fowler, 65; McMahon, 20. Count- 
ing all the precincts l.eard from in 
Lake count v, the total vote now stands: 
Fowler, 287; McMahon, 281. This 
leaves Fowler with a majority of 6. 



E\ ELETH CITY BAND 

LSSIES CHALLENGE. 

Eveleth, Minn., Sept. 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Much rivalrv exists be- 
tween the Eveleth City band, which 
was organized about five months ago, 
and the Fayal band, which is an old 
local musical organization. Since the 
organization of the new band, the 
members of each have been having 
petty differences, and to settle the 
arguments that exist J. Moroni, leader (i| 
of the City band, has challenged Prof. ; \| 
Scott, leader of the Fayal band, for a 
musical contest. The terms of his of- 
fer state that he 'will give the Fayal 
band, fifteen days to prepare for the 
contest. At the concert the bands are 
to play three pieces for a side of $200 
the money to be deposited in a local 
bank. Much Interest Is being dis- 
played by the residents in the rivalry 
that exists between the two bands and 
are anxiously awaiting the outcome of 
the City bands challenge. 

c I . 

Gilbert Gainn. 
Gilbert, Minn.. Sept. 23.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The population of this 
village is certainly growing as indi- 
cated by the fn-Ilowing births the last 
few days: Mr. and Mrs. George 
Crothers, boy; Mr. and Mrs. Martin 
Godeco, girl; Mr. and Mrs. Hugo Lls- 
chkl, boy; Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Rakko 
boy, and Mr. and Mrs. Broosl, boy. 

-• — .. 

n. & I, H. Couduetor DIpn. 
Two Harbors, Minn., Sept 23. — John 
^-.P'^^^^^^^^f'^-^yednesaaiy evening at 
<:40 at the home of his parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Cotter. The cause of 
his death was aneurism, from which 
disease he had suffered for the past six 
months. 



Shirts 

IMonogram and El- 
gin Shirts worth up 
to $1.50 — choice 



Salurday's Eitraordinary 

01 A I lOOdoz. new 
_Jji' " Fall NECK- 
TIES, worth f\, 75c and 50c, 
Manufacturer's Outlet Sale — 




Hose 

Carter & Holmes 
and Wilson Eros.' 
fancy imported 
Hose, 75c and 50c 

values — 




—a 




Mii0am»amtvim>. 




Union Suits 

Men's fine fall and 
winter weight 
Union Suits, worth 
up to $4.50- 



Underwear Special 

Sensational winter underwear 
special; 65 dozen Shirts and 
Drawers; all wool and some 
silk mixed; worth up to $3.00 
a garment — choice 



Suspenders 

President Suspend- 
ers, sold everywhere 
for 50c; our price 



^ 



t; 



\ 




Boys' Suits 

125 Boys' Suits; 
size 3 to 14, worth 
up to $7.50— choice 



Athletic Club. 

Chisholm, Minn., Sept. 23 At a 

meeting of the students of the high 
^'^■'I'P*'^ .^" athletic club was formed 
with officers as follows: Frans Talus 
president; Arthur Hayeks, vice presi- 
dent; William Rahja, secretary; Frank 
Neally, treasurer; John Hirstlo, man- 
ager; John Mahan, reporter. Mr Ma- 
han was elected captain of next year's 
baseball club. 

w 
TT. Hibbliig Doctor to Leave 
Hlbbing, Minn., Sept. 23. — Dr.' C G 
McMahon has accepted a position in" 
Copper, Tenn., where he will assume 
charge of a large hospital that is con- 
ducted by the Copper Mining company 
In that part of the state 




Fat Defeating Extraordinary 



Free Instruction 
in Roller Sliating 

Given every afternoon and evening to 
beginners 

at Lincoln Parte Roller Rink. 



Disastrous Blaze Occurs 
Early Thursday Eve- 
ning. 

Coleraine, Minn.. Sept. 23.^— (Special 
to The Herald.) — The Ingalls boat 
house, refreshment booth and lake side 
cottage were burned at 5 o'clock last 
evening. Of the thlrty-flve boats 
stored, only one canoe and five boats 
were saved. The gasoline storage, the 
launch house and three launches were 
kept from the flames by the timelv help 
of the fire department. The fire was 
caused by the bottom falling out of 
the soldering pot which Edward Ingalls 
was using in constructing a tool box. 
Insurance was carried to the amount 
of $_MI00 on the building and the boats 
and $500 on the tools. The damage Is 
probably twice the amount of the in- 
surance. 

This is the second time this com- 
pany has lost their Trout Lake boat 
house by fire. A year ago last March 
all was lost In an incendiary fire. This 
company now proposes to erect a fire- 
proof boat house and dock in tlie 
spring constructed of steel and con- 
crete, and Install a lleet of steel boats. 

RAPID PROGRESS 




DIRECTORY OF 
AMUSEMENTS 



M HERE TO GO TONIGHT. 



^^'CEUM— The Jeffries-Johnson fight 

ORPHEUM— Vaudeville. 
BIJOU— Vaudeville. 



Advertise in The Herald 



Being Made on the High School 
Building at Gilbert. 

Gilbert, Minn., Sept. 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Much progress is being 
made on the high school building by 
Graham Young, the contractors of Hlb- 
bing, and the brick work on the first 
story is about completed. The work 
is being done under the direction of E. 
A. Graham, who has taken up his resi- 
dence here. A crew of fifty men is 
b'-mg employed on the building and 
many more will be put to work as soon 
as the cold weather sets in, and the 
interior work Is commenced. 

VERY CLOSf] CONTESTS. 

Results in Several Itasca County 
Fights Now Known. 

Coleraine, Minn., Set. 23. — (Secial to 
The Herald.) — The smoke of the pri- 
mary election contest has sufficiently 
cleared away that results In several 



Margaret Knolly 

SLENDER Margaret Knolly, now, if 
you please. The fascinating leading 
lady of the Bijou, now more fascinat- 
ing than ever, astonished all her 
friends on Broadway the other day by 
presenting to their admiring gaze a 
svelt and willowy form in place of the 
plump, not to say fat, outlines wi;h 
which she gaily sailed away to new 
triumphs and foreign shores last Jan- 
uary. After a good deal of diplomatic 
cross-examination from interested fat 
acquaintances the secret was cautious- 
ly whispered to a few dear friends, 
with the result that everybody knows 
it now. It was not exercise, nor fast- 
ing, nor sea air, nor worry about her 
new venture that had brought about 
this wonderful willowy change in the 
charming Margaret; no, none of these; 
nothing but a simple mixture which all 
good druggists are familiar with and 
can supply at small cost, to-wit: One- 
half ounce Marmola, one-half ounce 
Fluid Extract Cascara Aromatic, and 
three and one-half ounces Peppermint 
Water. "Grown folks need a tea- 
spoonful after meals and at bedtime,' 
explained the now slender Margaret. 
•'It is simply wonderful. , It lakes off 
the fat quickly, ae much as a pound a 
day, and keeps it off. You can eat 
what you like, too. In that respect 
it Is unlike anything of the kind I ever 
heard of, and besides it has another 
splendid feature — it is entirely harm- 
less, and will not cause wrinkles. I 
think it is about as essential a toilet 
article for the woman who is fat and 
wants to get thinner as face powder. 
In order to get the best results, how- 
ever, you should buv the Marmola in the 
original package and mix it in with 
the other two ingredients after you 
get home." 



GRAND ARMY NIGHT 

AT THE ORPHELM. 

Those who attended the performance 
at the Orpheum theater last evening 
will not soon forget the experience 

It was Grand Army night, and the 
reception given the Old Soldier Fid- 
dlers was one to be long remembered. 

The lower right-hand boxes were oc- 
cupied by the members of the Gorman 
Post fife and drum corps, and scat- 
tered through the parquet and balcony 
were nearly 100 more veterans of the 
Civil war. From all of the boxes were 
draped huge American fiags, giving the 
theater a holiday appearance. 

The performers were given an ova- 
tion when the curtain rose on their 
act. Part of it was doubtless intended 
for them, but no small part of it was 
also meant for the grey-haired men 
who sat in the boxes and the parquet 

Tlie playing of "America" was most 
Impressive, and it is doubtful if the 
national anthem has ever been ren- 
dered with more real fervor than it 
was last evening The theater was 
completely filled, and every man and 
woman in the audience stood rever- 
ently throughout the number, many of 
them Joining in. 

The fife and drum corps escorted 
the performers to the theater, where 
they were the guests of the manage- 
ment. 

Grand Army night was a most suc- 
cessful event. 



b« screamingly funny and gives the 
v.iriou8 members of the company fine 
opportunity to dl.splav their individual 
talents. Thursday and Friday will be 
dovoted to a revival of Anthony Hope's 
'Ihe Prisoner of Zenda" and Saturday 
and Sunday will be given over to a 
dramatization by Augustus Thomas of 
.^h^,'\*,'"^ Harding Davis' famous storv, 
Soldiers of Fortune," in which Robert 
E^eson first achieved stardom. This 
should prove a most acceptable trio 
Of plays for the week and the scale of 
piices will be the same as during the 
rtcent visit of this company to the 
Lyceum. 



-»— 1 



moows 



^ 



At the Glass Block Store, 




-i- 



PIERCE PLAYERS IN 

•BOYS OF COMPANY B." 

On next Tuesday evening the Pierce 
Players will return to the Lyceum for 
an engagement of six nights, during 
which time they will present three 
well known dramatic successes. 

"The Boys of Company B" will be 
the Initial offering, opening Tuesday 
and continuing Wednesday matinee and 
night. This charming comedy of mili- 
tary life will perhaps be best remem- 
bered as the piece in which young 
Jack Barrynaore scored so heavily at 
the Garrick theater several years ago. 
It Is by Rida John.-^on Young, who Is 
also the author of "The Lotterv Man" 
and "Brown oX harvard," it is said to 



NEW BIJOU BOOKING 

ARRANGEMENT POPULAR. 

The enlarged Bijou bill this week Is 
dtllghting big audiences every after- 
noon and evening. The change made 
in the booking arrangements see.ms 
to have had a beneficial effect on the 
standard of the attractions offered. 
Lind. the Impersonator, is making a 
big hit with the audiences this week. 
j His act Is uique and different from any 
other act of its general type now play- 
ing the vaudC'iHe circuits. 

A Fall Opening of Special Import- 
ance. 

Fall openings are a leading topic of 
in'.erest in Duluth the^e days. The new 
fall styles in dress are enjoying wide- 
spread attention, and the bett time to 
study them and to become posted Is 
at the fall opening. An event of more 
th:in usual importance will be held to- 
morrow, when the Menter & Rosen- 
bloom company, at 122 East Superior 
sti'eet. will hold its formal exhibition 
of fall styles in mens and women's 
clothing. The millinery will be a 
feature worthy of note. 

The Menter & Rosenbloom company 
mjikes a specialty of a plan by which 
mem and women who wish to dress v.-ell 
can do so without taxing their in- 
comes. They do this by allowing cus- 
tomers the advant.age of a charge ac- 
co ant by means of which purchases 
ar.» paid for on easy terms. The local 
store of this successful company has 
beoome very popular, and their plan 
appeals to more and more people every 
yeir. 

WARNS DEMOCRATS 

NOT TO DEPEND ON 

REPUBLICAN SPLFT 

(Continued from page 1.) 

year. We must have a program of 
our own, looking tov.-ards better gov- 
ernment than the Republicans have 
gi^'en us. 

"The Republicans abused their prlvl- 
lej,*es and wasted their opportunities. 
In a little more than twelve months 
thijv were so utterly demoralized that 
on "the 19th of March. 1910, after we 
clipped Mr. Speaker Cannon's claws, 
he angrily declared there was no 
longer a Republican majority In the 
house. 

"The most potent cause of Repub- 
licain dissension is the tariff question. 
The Republicans promised to revise 
thi) tariff downward la order to set in; 



GROWING MORE EXPENSIVE TO 
COURT MY LADY NICOTINE 



The high cost of living is getting 

fiercer every year. 

The tobacco trust has cut down the 

size of the packages of Its "coffin 
nails." Packages which used to con- 
tain twenty cigarettes now hold only 
fifteen and sell for the same price. The 
first of the smaller packages have ap- 
pealed in Duluth anti internal revenue 
officers have been notified that the to- 
bacco trust intends cutting the size of 
all of its package goods. 

As usual the tariff is responsible. 
Manufacturers are fcrced to cut down 
their packages of "i)ills' in order to 
meet the increased revenue tax im- 
poped by Mr. Aldrlchs tariff. In the 
future only real plutocrats can afford 
the luxury of a "snlFe. ' This will af- 
fect seriously the plots of lady novel- 
ists whose heroes usually are worthy 
young men but who have more looks 
than salary. No longer will Harold, 



having gotten in, they revised It up. 
They have given absolutely no relief 
whatever to the consumers of the land, 
but most of the Increases were real 
Increases, made by st ch skillful artists 
as Senator Aldrlch, and placed every 
time where they wc uld do the most 
good to the interests and most Injury 
to the consumers. 

"Straw'* From Beverly. 

"Some twenty-three Republicans in 
the house and seven Reupblicans in the 
senate revolted against the stupendous 
confidence game which the standpat- 
ters were attempting to play upon the 
American people and warned them of 
the consequences. Straws shows which 
way the wind blows, and a few days 
ago a very large straw blew out of 
Beverly in the 8hap<' of a letter an- 
nouncing that henceforth and forever 
the Insurgent Republican statesmen 
would have an equal chance at the pie 
counter with the reg ilars. 

"Last spring, so [ have been In- 
form.ed, when an Insurgent asked for 



CASTOR HA 

For InfEuicfl and Children. 

The Kind You Have Always Bought 



Bears the 
Bignatore 



^<^^2L^/^^;i^^ 



the young stock broker, or Percy the 
chauffeur, be able to dally wi{h a 
"coffin spoke, " while Angeline the giu© 
trust's daughter, gazes Into his limpid 
eyes and tells him what the world 
means to her. There's Just one hopa. 
however, for the lady novelist. ino 
swimming school for scandal stuff la 
the latest thing in red blooded fiction, 
and it is somewhat difficult for a here, 
to puff at a 'pill" while swimming ten 
leagues under water with the heioine 
on his back. 

Some folk may regard this condition 
as coming under the adage that it s an 
111 tariff that doesn't bring anybody 
any good. In the meaiaime voung men 
and old ones, too, are regarding the 
lady in the . igarette posters .is a fickle 
Jade. They think she has plaved them 
a scurvy trick. The cost of ifving and 
T. R. are two things that you can't 
beat. Somebody please pass ...© 
"makins" 



any place for one of his constituents, 
he was Informed that he had no right 
to expect patronage unless he lined up 
for every legislative proposition eman- 
ating from the administration. 
People "Tokeo" in. 

"So the administration has com« 
down off its high horse, and instead 
of bullying the Insurgents, is tempting 
them back by offering them a share In 
the savory flcshpots of Egypt. 

•The people of the United States de- 
serve to be treated honestly and fair* 
Ly, which has not been done in ta« 
matter of the Payne-Aldrich-omoot 
tariff bill. On the contrary they wer* 
taken In and done for." ' 

baskeFball team. 

Cloquet, Minn., Sept. 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.)— The Cloquet high school 
will have a good basket ball team this 
year, but no football team. Evelyn 
McKenna, the only man in school who 
played on last year's basket ball team 
is temporarily managing affairs in thia 
sport and the boys are practicing every 
night In the gymnasium of the Lin 
coin high school building and trvina' 
out prospective plf-Vers. Last year 
the school had one of the best teams 
in this part of the state, and William 
Todd, manual training teacher, who 
coached the boys, will take up the work 
later on and looks forward to a suc- 
cessful winter for the Cloquet team^, aa 
there is some splendid basket ball ma* 
terlai among the boys this year. 








\ 




Feet Tired — 

S© Tired ? 



TIZ Blakes Sick Feet Well No Mattel 
WhHt Alls Theiu. 



•^ - 



r 






M 



» '■— - 




ROMANCE OF 
COURT LIFE 

Long Search for Bavarian in 

United States Is 

Ended. 



Inheritance for Man Who Is 

Now Old and in 

Need. 



TIZ acts at once and makes tired, 
achln^ic. swollen feet remarkably fresh 
tind sore proof. 

It's the sure remedy, you know, fox 
•veryihlng that grets the matter with 
your feet. It's for sore feet and for 
■weaty, bad-smelling feet, and foi 
corns, callouses and bunions, too. 

"For years I have been troubled 
with sore and tender feet; .<*ulTered In- 
tense painii. Have had the as,slstance 
of physlclan.s without relief. I bought 
• box of TIZ, which worked a iierfect 
cure as It lias with u g:reat many of 
my friends. I would not be M-ithout 
tt. All It requtrti.s la to be known to 
be universally used." — A. F. Druetzcr, 
Chicago. 

TIZ Is not a powder. Powders and 
other foot remedies clog up the pores. 
TIZ draws out all poisonous exudations 
•which bring on soreness of the feet, 
and is the only remedy that does. TIZ 
cleans out every pore and glorifies iha 
fe«t — vour feet. 

You'll never limp again or draw up 
your face in pain, and you'll forget 
about your corns, bunions and cal- 
louses You'll feel like a new person. 

TlZ is for sale at all druggists, 26o 

f)er box, or it will bo ; ent you direct, 
f ^ou wish, fryui Waiter Luther 



Sixty 
Muiiiol! 




s 



OF MERIT ! 






If you care v. !:at sort of shoes 
you wear, sir, or what you^ pay 
for them, we ask your consider- 
ation . 

It matters not what your par- 
ticular shoe rc'iuirements may 
be, we're right sure that we can 
show you "Just your Shoes." 

We've shoes on snappy new 
lasts for swell young men and 
shoes modeled and built for 
comfort and durability, for con- 
servative men. It's the shoe 
value we offer you, together 
with our experience and care- 
ful shoe service, that we hold 
out as an inducement, while ask- 
ing for your Fall trade. Drop 
down and see ours tomorrow 
before buying. 

Men's and Women's 

$2.48 «"' $2.98 

"Look for the Blue Sign." 

NELSON'S SAMPLE 
SHOE SHOP 

Corner Third Avenue West aiid 

Michigan Street. 

Lonsdale Building. 



;T„ mm 



==Tl 



Pittsburg, Pa., Sept. 23. — A romance 
of Bavarian court life has been brought 
to light by a devious search by Gustave 
Prince, an international lawyer of this 
city, who has just found Max Lutz in 
Iowa, and notltied him that he is lieir 
to $1,000 left by a maid of honor of the 
Bavarian court. The case is of more 
Hum passing interest, because of the 
sidelights It throw.s upon a famous 
European court and the romantic story 
entwined around tiie career of the poor 
lintel porter, wiio expects to liave liglU- 
cv.vA his remaining days because of his 
iniierilanre. 

I'ririce's long -searcli for Lutz ended 
just a few days ago. and witliin a lew 
days I'rince will send to Germany 
proof-s of the identity of Lutz and the 
inheritanie will be sent to Lutz within 
a lew months. 

In Ills long search Prince discovered 
that Lutz wu.s boi-n of parents high in 
Uavarian court circles; his father was 
A German army officer and his mutl-.er's 
sisters were maids of honor to the 
<iueen of Lavaria. Lutz- himself was 
reared in tiie palace of King Ludwig I 
ot Havaiia, and entered I'aris with the 
vietorious German army when the 
Franco-I'ru.ssian war was ended. 

l.,utz is now about at the entl of his 
'•areer. He is 60 years old and poor, 
\Vl:en told he wouhl be given $1,<M>0 t.e 
wrote in iiis letter to Prince; '"1 will be 
ylad to gel the money. It comes just 
when 1 need it." 

liorii ill .Muiiiebi. 
years ago Lutz was born in 
Hi.s father and mother were 
separated, the mother living in Municli 
and the father commanding one of the 
detachments of the army that guarded 
the Franco-Prussian frontier. The 
child was bandied back and forth and 
the bitterness engendered in liira still 
exists. 

•When I was with my mother I had 
much work to d<j and was not treated 
well,' he wriues. "When 1 was sent to 
fiiy father I had more work and was 
treated worse." 

Things went from had to worse. 
When still very young his aunt Itosa. 
whose family name he does not once 
ineniion in his deposition, took liim to 
live with her. 

He spent happy days then in the 
palace of King Ludwlg, where his aunt 
had much inlluence. Another aunt was 
there much, and the two made the little 
hoy liappy. 

The mother demanded the return of 
her child. Ho found home life unbear- 
able. When still a youth he saw the 
Havarians recruiting for the titanic 
battle with France. 

His patriotism was stirred and he 
joined the colors. Long marches with 
the German army sapped his strength, 
but he doggedly stayed with his com- 
mand until it can.ped under the walls 
of Paris. When that city capitulated 
Lutz was almost a physical wreck. He 
was no longer of use to Germany and 
he was dismissetl from tlie army. 

He did not wish to return to his 
home, for there he expected but little 
happiness. He was now too big to be 
the pet of women o£ the Bavarian 
court, and anyway he did not know 
in what circumstances liis aunts were 
placed. 

Came to Anierloa. 
With other enthusiastic emigrants he 
embarked for America to seek his for- 
tune in tiie West, which was then 
being opened. In 1873 he landed in 
New York and without writing a line 
to Germany he plunged into the fron- 
tier. 

I..ut2 worked bard, but had little suc- 
cess. In 1889, after he had been mar- 
ried in America, he remembered his 
aunt In Bavaria who had treated him 
so well, and he wrote her, recalling his 
happy life at court. 

.She responded and told him she 
would not forget him. She said she 
did not have much money, but he 
would get a part of what she had. 
Lutz thought no more of the money, 
and in 1889 wrote his last letter to 
his aunt. 

When she died several months ago 
this letter was found among her ♦be- 
longings. It was time-stained and 
blurred, and the executors could hardly 
rer.l it. Yet it was the only clue to 
Lutz's whereabouts. 

Tliey wrote to Prince telling him 
Lutz had mailed the letter from Terry- 
town, Benton county. They did not 
oven know what state the Benton 
county referred to was in. 

Prince wrote to postmasters In every 
Benton county he could find mentioned 
in the postal guide. He even wrote to 
Flcrida. All replied that they never 
iiad heard of a Terrytown, nor a man 
called Lutz. 

Found At Last. 
Prince asked the postal department 
to aid. They went back to records of 
1889. and there found that there was 
a postoftice called Terry in Benton 
county, Iowa, at that time, but that the 
office had been changed to Walford. 
Prince wrote to Marengo. Marengo 
replied that Lutz was not there tiow, 
but was known and was probably 
working in Washington, Iowa, as a 
hotel porter. 

The trail was getting so warm that 
Prince, when he wrote to the post- 
master at Washington, enclosed a 
letter for Lutz. It was delivered. 
Lutz readily proved his identity. 

He swore to numerous questions 
asked him, and every answer confirme»i 
the theory of Prince that he had found 




IL 



Uuluth'sfletropolltan Cafe. 
The Best in Everything 

LNTEKT.\IN.\1EN'T BV 

FLO CUSHMAN and 
FLAATEN'S ORCHESTRA 




*!<!.f(;otta result* b«cj.use it diiatej. 
No other method thoroui.Hily cleiinMS. 
fhysaiana •ndorse this ucvr dilatios 
principle. IXilators made of Oennau 
•ilver, cannot corrode or break . Ea' h 
Health Sfrin^« UAtted for conuec 
tii'a with douche) baa allowlngccBStantj 
rfow. Aalc jour dnisi;'»t for Thel 
Health or wnd ■tamp for Free 
il!iiMra:e<l book. Correapnndeuce 
TOiifiilertial— plain BciIed letters. 
THE HEALTH CO..90 We.t Street. New Yo* 
FOH SALE BY E. M. TREADWAV. 




N. J. UPHAM CO., 



6088cuR£S 

RHEUMATISM 



6088 

Purifies theBkKMi 

If the blood is purified you 
arc cured of 

Rheumatism 

and other ailments that 
come from impure blood. 
Ask your druggist for the 

Best Blood Purifier Made 




GUARANTEE : 

The makers of 6088 author- 
ize your Druggist to refund 
your money to you if re- 
sults are not satisfactory. 



STORKS AND HOUSES FOR KENT. 

Property for sale in all parts of 
the city. 



18 THIRD AVENUE "WEST. 



MATT. J. JOHNSON CO. 
Mfr.4sT.PAUL,JMlNN. 



Cash or Credit 



i- 



Menter & Rosenbloom Co. 



Lowest Prices 




Ladies' 





Coats, Millinery, Waists, Sldrts, Etc. 
n's. Boys' and Children's Clothing 



Morning 
Afternoon 
Evening k 




f 




24 



Momii^ 
iUtemoon 
Evening 




A showing of new and up-to-date styles that 
is a pleasure to look at. A showing that will 
convince you how well we are prepared to 
supply your clothing needs for Fall and W inter. 

¥/e cordially invite you to come on Opening 
Day and see the new things at their best. Its an 
opportunity that you cannot afford to pass up. 

We also want you to det posted on our liberal plan o£ 
selling— a plan that allows every man and woman to 
dress well in the easiest and most economical way. 

We've got the best goods — sell at lowest prices— allow 
the easiest terms— and give you the square deal every 
time. We do all of these things because we want your 
trade and if you give us the opportunity we will gladly 
convince you that we deserve it. 

Come and get acquainted. The Opening Day will give you 
a splendid opportunity. You're Invited— and expected. 



Men's 
Men's 



Overcoats, 
Hats, - 
Raincoats, 



Men's Suits, $15, 

$18, $20, $25 

$10 and up 

$1.50 to $4.00 

$15 and $18 



Men's 

Boys' and Children's Suits, $4 up to $15 




Ladies' Fall Suits, $15, 
$18, $20 to $35 
Ladies' Fall Coats, 

$12.50 up to $25 
Ladies' Fall Hjits, - $3 to $12 
Ladies' Silk Waists, $4.00, $5.00, $7.50 











122E.SupcriorSt 



I 



I 



Open Saturday Evenings 
Until 10:30 o'Clock. 




the right man. Not a proof of identity 
was lacking. 

» 
The I.a«t of a Fiend 

"Would liave been about as welcome to 
A. Cooper of Oswego, N. Y , as a mer- 
ciless lung-racking cough that defied 
all remedies for years. "It was most 
troublesome at night," he writes, 
"nothing helped me till I used Dr. 
King's Discovery which cured me com- 
pletely. I never cough at night now." 
Millions know Its matchless merit for 
stubborn colds, obstinate coughs, sore 
lungs, la grippe, asthma, hemorrhage, 
croup, whooping cough, or hay fever. 
It relieves quicalv and never falls to 
eatlsfy. A trial "convinces. 50c, Jl.OO. 
guaranteed by all druggists. 

ARE INSISTING 
ON COMFORTS 



English Homes Slowly Being 
Americanized By the 



one wall, acros.'?, ahd down the other. 
No, I am not going to have white tiles; 
they must be green." 

The architect turned white and 
green and then turned on her. 

•But you can't buy green tiles here. 
If you could, you wouldn't be able to 
get enough of them to go round." 

"Green tiles," she sternly command- 
ed, "green tiles," and secure with the 
last word she dusted out -of the archi- 
tect'.s office. 

That was three months ago, and she 
hasn't been able to get enough green i 
tiles yet; nevertheless, she lives In 
hopes of some day emerging from her 
bath as a pink rose might peep from 
a bunch of green snjllax. 

But the most wonderful of the ar- 
ticles known in the domestic life of 
America is also being imported to 
England. 

Not long ago a wealthy hostess who 
has a flat in Mayfair led her guests 
mysteriously, and in Indian file, to th« 
back regions of her domicile. Sudden- 
ly, she threw open a heavy marble door 
and the guests peered within. 

What was it that lay before them, 
glistening in the electric light? What 
was It that in size and color resembled 
the diamond pendant that hung from 
the throat of their hostess? 

A horrible suspicion came to them. 



Perhaps their seemingly sensible 
friund was in secret a psychic, and the 
tin e she could spare from her social 
dut.ies she spent In crystal gazing! 

She finally relieved their anxiety. 
"This," she said, as she swayed the 
door gently, "is my new American 
safe. And that — that is ice." 

yome day we may get flats w-ith ele- 
vators — lift.=< they call them here — but 
the day is still afar off. Real comfort 
is oonsldered not quite respectable^ you 
know, in England. 

WILL MEET IN 

SAN ANTONIO 



sion and to secure th 
by free di.scusslon. 

Second only to the i 
in importance, the 
congress has been a 
Western development 
twenty yeai^. It coi 
forum" for the West 
mental policies, projec 
and industrial devel 
liest means for their u 
freely discussed. 1 
represents at its me 
talized commercial si 
states west of the Mi; 



e desired results 

national congress i 
rrans-Mlssissippi 
potent factor in | 
during the past ' 
islitutes a "free ] 
. where govern- 
ts of commercial 
ipment and the 
tilizatlon may be 
he organization 
etings the crya- 
Mitlment of the 
sslssippl. 



Women. 



London. Sept. 23.— It Is only within 
the last few years that the English 
matrons have so far relaxed their con- 
servative attitude towards things 
American as actually to cross the At- 
lantic. As a result of the Increasing 
numbers who do visit the United 
States, domestic architecture here Is In 
the throes of Americanization. 

One of the most prominent English 
architects confessed the other day that 
he was being browbeaten and bullied 
by a certain lady because after re- 
turning from a visit to New York she 
found that her new house in Park lane 
was not to be In the interior the rep- 
lica of a Fifth avenue mansion. 

Of course they f4uarreled most fu- 
riously over the bathroom. In his 
plans the architect had provided an 
ascent of three steps to this august 
chamber. 

"I won't have it." said the lady. 
"Who ever heard of a flight of steps 
leading to a bathroom in America? 
They don't have them; I'm not going 
to. Furthermore, everyone there has 
a bath attached to every room. No, 
1 am not going to have tiles half way 
up the wall; It U to be all tiled, up 



Don't Persecute 
your Bowels 

Cut out cathartics and uirtiatiTes. They U* trutal 

.-- hanh— -unnecesMiry. Try 

CARTER'S LITTLE 
UVER PILLS 

Purely ve««*aUe. A«a 
gently on the livet 
eliminate bile, an<l 
•oothe the (Ui< 
mernbrane ct 
dt tl>e bowel 
Car* Cob- 
•bpatioB, 




iidiHtnUA* »ai loiictatiea, a* osilUooi know. 
Small Pill, Small Do»«, Small Price 

•; Genuine must bear Signature 




Call for Trans-Mississippi 

Commercial Congress Is 

Issued. 

San Antonio, Tex., Sept. 23. — An of- 
ficial call has been issued for Trans- 
Mlssisslppl commercial congress, which 
is scheduled to meet in San Antonio, 
Tex., on Nov. 22-25, and the announce- 
m-jnt is being scattered broadcast 
throughout the Middle West. Commer- 
clil clubs, boards of trade, chambers 
of commerce and the various other 
civic organizations together with may- 
ors of cities and governors of states 
are being importuned to get busy at 
i once and select delegates to the con- 
vontion. 

The governor of each state has the 
pi)wer to appoint twenty delegates; 
the mayor of each city is empowered 
to appoint one delegate; each civic 
organization is entitled to representa- 
tion on the scale of one delegate for 
every flftv members with a maximum 
ot ten delegates, and each foreign 
country will be asked to send a dele- 
gate to the convention. 

Among the men of not who will ap- 
pear on the program at the coming 
' convention are Philander C. Knox, sec- 
i r.jtary of state; Hon. John Barrett, di- 
rjctor of the Pan-American bureau; 
VtTilHam J. Bryan, Arnold Shanklin, 
counsel general to Mexico; governors 
of the various states and representa- 
tives from Latin-American countries, 
livery effort Is being put forth by the 
executive comtnlttee to make the twen- 
ty-first congress a Uv« practical se*- 



"BUrflNE 
"Too many Americ; 
tlet.h century," said 
an address in New 
wrong idea of buslne 
i3, really, honest ser\ 
Ice — nothing but that 
"But too many men 
as a certain seaside s 

"A friend of mine 
shop to buy a flannel 
bathing suits were all 
for him. 

' 'They're marked 
friend said thought 
here might do if it w 



SS." 

ins of the twen- 

lacob A. Riis, in 

York, "have a 
ss. Now business 
Ice — honest serv- 

look on buslnes.^ 
honkeeper did. 
.i.slted this man's 
bathing suit. The 

a little too large 

unshrinkable,' my 
fully. 'This one 
ould shrink. But" 



" 'I'll ask father about it,' said the 
young attendant. 

"And then, behind the partition, my 
friend overheard this dialogue: 

'• 'Father, a gent wants to know if 
our unshrinkable bathing suits won't 
shrink a little anyway." 

" "Is the suit too large for him?' 

" '^es. father.' 

" 'Then of course, it will shjink. 
Why don't you try and have som« 
head tor business, Willie?' " 
• ■ 

The store that lakes a lot of pains 
to make its advertising serviceable 
to you has earned your favor and in- 
terest. 

e 
THE IDEA! 

Apropos of the unexampled extrava- 
gance and luxury of New York's multl- 
milllonarles. Mrs. August Belmont said 
at a dinner at Tuxedo. 

"Then there's younk Knickerbocker. 
Look at young Knickerbocker now. 
He has nineteen regular servants at 
Ills town house, and yet since Kinff 
Edward's death he has hired four ex- 
tra ones — colored ones, you know Just 
to bring up black-edged letters and 
to look after visitors dressed in mourn- 
ing." 






■ 


; 






._ 




L„ 






















t 

i 
t 




» 




1 








f 
















■^^r— w^^p-^iip 




I 



1 










i 

4 










\ 
\ 










1 










t 1 











14 



Friday, 



LATES 





FARRELL TO 
CLEVELAND 

Says He Will Investigate Stall- 
ing s Charges Against 
Chase. 



The HaKue in a tlrive from BobV).v Boy- 
ir. I'^xpllcit was third. Harrlgan pay- 
iiif,' $26.80 in the ^2 miituals, won tlie 
thiid race from the heavily backed fav- 
orite, John Griffin II. Jack Weave-- 
Kok the second race. Helmet, w^ell 
bncked, was beaten in the fiftli by Beau 
Chilton, paying $16.(50 In the mutuals 
by a length, in one of the most excit- 
ing finishes of the meet. 




Chase Says He Is Being Im- 
posed Upon By Club 
Manager. 



New York, Sept. 23. — The vapor of 
IfoKslp that has surrounded the quarrel 
of Hal Chase, captain of the New York 
American league baseball team, and 
George T. StalUngs. manager, wa.s 
cleared yesterday by a statement from 
Frank J. Fairell, president of the club. 

ytallings was in conference with 
Parrel 1 yesterday In obedience to a 
telegram, summoning him from Cleve- 
land, and took ilu- opportunity to make 
grave cluirges. He accu.-^ed Chose of 
Withholding his best services >>n the 
field and of quitting when txe was most 
needed. 

President F'arrell though the charges 
80 grave that he took the first train 
for Cleveland, where the club now is, 
to make a complete investigation. 

In f.xplanation of the situation. Presi- 
dent Fariell made last night the fol- 
lowing signed statement: 

•It Is up to me to deal with Stallings 
as I see fit, as Chase is too groat a 
ball player to have his reputation 
blackened by such charges. 

"There have been recently many mis- 
leading reports about my club and a 
change in Its manager. 1 desire to say 
now thai George T. Stallings is still 
manager of the team, that while he is 
here in New York, the club is in charge 
of my secretary, Thomas Davis, and 
that I have not appointed Hal ("base to 
manage the team to succeed Stallings. '" 

Mr. Farrell left for Cleveland last 
nieiit. . ^ ,,. 

"If Cliase is guilty of stallings 
cliarges. tiiere is no place in the Ameri- 
can league for him. If he Is not guilty. 
he should be promptly cleared of the 
charges, that he may stand vindicated 
before the public." said Mr. Farrell. 
Mr. Stallings dtnies he gave out the 
statements printed in the last few days 
attributed to litm or to the players 
the club, in reference to Cliase 
lug tl'.o club In mid-season in 
He also denies there 
mutiny in Chicago 
Chase never was 
that Chase never 



Standing of tiie Clubs. 

Won. Lost. Pet. 

Chicago 92 43 .683 

Pittsburg 81 57 .587 

New York 80 68 .581 

Philadelpiiia 71 68 .510 

Cincinnati .' 70 72 .493 

St. I.ouis 55 80 .408 

Brooklyn 55 83 .393 

Boston 48 91 .344 

■ > ■ 

Games Today. 

Cincinnati at Boston. 
St. l..ouis at Brooklyn. 
Chicago at New York. 
Pittsburg at Philadelphia. 

RECIU'IT IS BUMPED BY 

BKOOKLYX PLAYERS. 



of 
desert- 
Detroit. 
was a row and 
last Monday, as 
in the game. Also 
plaved with a semi- 
in the time he was 



Hal 
and 
that 
best 
has 



Brooklyn, N. Y., Sept. 23. — Brooklyn 
took tiie first ganie of the final series 
with St. Louis yesterday, 6 to 3, by 
hammering Hearn, Bresnahan's new 
find, liard all the way. Score: R. H. E. 

St. Louis 3 — 3 3 1 

Brooklyn 10 2 2 1 x — 6 12 

Batterels — Hearn and Phelps; Bar- 
gfr, Scaiilon and Miller. Umpires — 
O'Day and Brennan. 

BIG TOWNS SPLIT 

A DOUBLE-HEADER. 



New York, Sept. 23. — Chicago and 
New York split even in yesterday's 
double-neader. each game being marked 
by a score of 5 to 1. The Cubs won 
because of Drucke's wiklnesa and tlie 
Giant's victory was due to Keulbach's 
poor control. The Chicagoans' three 
wild pitches were responsible for as 
many runs. 

IMrst game — 
Score: 

Chicago 

New York 

Batteries 



.101 10000 2- 
.001000000- 
Pfeister and 



R. H. E. 

-5 9 1 
-1 9 1 
K 1 i n g 



Drucke and Myers. Umpires — Klein 
and Kane. 

Seco!;d game — 
Score: R. H. E. 

Chicago 010000000 — 1 5 2 

New York 04001000 x — 5 7 

Batterels — Iteulbach and Kllng; 
WlHse and Myers. Umpires — Klem and 
Kane. 



KADIXCJ IS MAKING 

GOOD ^MTH PITTSBURG. 



professional team 
sick. 

"In response to a telegram from me 
calling him to New York, George Stal- 
lings appeared in my offices yesterday 
morning to give his version of the re- 
ported trouble in the New ^ ork Ameri- 
can league club of whlcli he is man- 
ager. To my surprise. Mr. Stallings 
made grave accusations against 
Chase, first baseman of the team, 
Its captain. Mr. Stallings charges 
Chase has not been giving his 
services to the club and that he 
been guilty, in baseball parlance, of 
•laving down,"' said Mr. Farrell. 

•No ball player can afford to have 
this reputation and the reputation of 
his club smirc!;ed by such charges and 
I have decided to go at once to C leve- 
land, where the team now is playing. 
to make a thorough Investigation of 
Mr. Stallings' charges, and, If 1 tma 
they are true. I shall lay the entire 
matter before the national commlssloii 
and ask that Chase be punished. I 
owe such investigation to the public 
and the players. " ^ 

Cbnae Say* He Ih Slek. 

Cleveland. Sept. 23.— Hal Chase, when 
Bhov.-n the Associated Press dispatches 
from New York In regard lo the com- 
plaints made against him by Manager 
Stallings. gave out the following 
statement: , , 

"This trouble has been growing for 
some time. The ttrst real break came 
In Detroit when our club came Uest. 
At that time I was not feeling well. 
1 was troubled with dizziness when I 
started to run, and asked for a lcav(2 
Of absence which was granted by Mr. 
Stallings. I started for New York an.l 
the papers the next morning carried 
Blories to the effect that 'Hal Chase 
had deserted the New York team." An 
Interview was printed with Mr. Stal- 
lings in one of the papers. 

"It was alleged that 1 had merely 
served notice on him a half an hour 
before my departure, that I intended 
to leave the team. 

"I then joined the 
One day I dropped 
which any player 
drew a roast from 
the roast had been 
bone-headed play. I 
that I deserved It. 

"The climax came In the 
of the series at Chicago, 
club lost. With Daniels on 
myself at bat. the signal 
for the hit-and-run. 1 swung at the 
ball, tipped a foul which the catcher 
caught. Daniels having started for 
third base, was easily thrown out. 

"Noting was said by Mr. Stallings 
then or later. That evening I went to 
the tiieater. On my return to the 
hotel, I met one of the New York 
baseball reporters out on the way to 
the telegraph ofllce. Having asked 
him what the excitement was, he ans- 
wered: "I have an Interview with Mr. 
Btallings to the effect that you are 
laying down on the team." 

"Mr. Stallings later verified the 
statement, and admitted he was fjuoted 
correctly. Of course such event.s 
Could not put one In a pleasant frame 
of mind. 

"Stallings always has shown a ten- 
dency to go behind a mans back. I 
feel and know that 
have the support of 
the New York team.' 

Asked If he knew when Mr. Farrell 
would reach Cleveland, Chase an- 
swered: 

"I have heard nothing from Mr. Far- 
rell in regard to the matter." 



Philadelphia. Pa., Sept. 23. — Pittsburg 
hit Ewings delivery hard and drove 
him off the rubber in the third in- 
ning and won yesterday's game. C to 
5. Kading, formerly of the Eau Claire, 
Wis., club, made three hits, including 
two two-baggers, in his first three 
times at bat. Score: R. H .E. 

Pltt.«burg 30 20 10000 — 6 14 2 

Philadelphia ....000005000 — 5 9 

Batteries — PhlUippe and Gibson; 
Sheltler. Ewing and Dooin. 

(INCINNATI TAKES 

ONE; DROPS OTHER. 

Boston. Mass.. Sept. 23. — Cincinnati 
won the first game, 4 to 3, In eleven in- 
nings yesterday, but was, beaten by 
Boston. 7 to 5, In the second, the con- 
test being called at the end of the 
seventh Inning because of darkness. 
Scores: 

First game — R.H. E. 

Boston 0001020000 — 3 9 5 

Cincinnati 00210 0000 01 — 4 10 1 

Batteries — Brown. Graham and Rarl- 
den; Gaspar, Fromme and McLean. Um- 
pires — Rlgler and Emslie. 

Second game — R. H. E. 

Boston 14100 1—7 11 4 

Cincinnati 300100 1 — 5 6 3 

Batteries — Ferguson and Rarlden; 
Gaspar, Rowan and Clark. Umpires — 
Kigler and EmsHe. 



AMERICAN ASSOCIATION 



club in St. Louis. 

a ball, a thing 
might do and I 
Mr. Stallings. If 
brought on by a 

would have felt 



first game 
which our 
second and 
was given 



Standing of the Clubs. 

Won. 

Minneapolis 105 

Toledo 89 

Columbus 8] 

St. Paul 8( 

Kansas City 84 

Milwaukee 74 

Indianapolis 69 

Loul.svllle 60 



Lost. 


Pot. 


59 


.640 


74 


.546 


75 


.537 


78 


.f.2(; 


79 


.516 


91 


.441) 


96 


.41S 


101 


.373 



Games Today. 



Minneapolis at St. Paul. 
Iiulianapolls at Louisville. 
Milwaukee at Kansas City. 



INDIANS DROP FIRST 

OF OPENING SERIES. 



in this trouble T 
every member of 



NURSERY SELLING 

STAKE IS FEATURE. 



Lexington. Ky., Sept. 23. — Good fleld.^ 
a big crowd and fair weather favored 
the third day of the fall meeting of 
the Kentucky association. The feature 
the Nursery selling stake was won by 



Louisville, Ky.. Sept. 23. — Louisville 
won the opening game of the tinal ser- 
ies of the season yesterday from Indi- 
anapolis by batting fSeorge hard in the 
first and second Innings. Higginbothain 
managed to keep the visitors' h.lts 
well scattered and was given high 
cla.^s support. Score: R. H. E. 

Louisville 3 2 1 X— 6 9 1 

Indianapolis ...00 002 00 — 2 9 o 

Batteries — Higglnbotham and Allen; 
McKee. George and ilowley. Ijmpires 
— Weddidge and Chill. 

SITTON ALLO>\>^ NO 

TOLEDO PLAYER ON THIRD. 



Toledo, Ohio. Sept. 23. — Columbus 
shut o it Toledo yesterday through the 
effective pitching of Sltton. Not one 
of the Toledo players reached third 
base. Score: R.H. E. 

Toledo 00000000 0—0 4 3 

Columbus 100000 100 — 2 4 

Batteries — West and Hartley; Sltton 
and Cartsch. Umpires — Hayes and Bie:- 
halter. 

FORCED RUN WINS 

A TEN-INNING GAME. 



Kansas City, Mo.. Sept. 23. — Kansas 
City defeated Milwaukee yesterday I 
to 3 in a ten-inning game. With two 
Hien out, Smoot singled. McGlynn then 



HE proof of a Gordon Hat is in 
the wearing. The color, shape 
and style lasts. No discoloration, 
no sagging brims, no creased or 
dentedcrown in Gordon Stiff Hats. 

Gordon Hats, $3.00 

The Gordon DeLuxe, $4.00 





THE DULUTH HERALD. 



September 23, 1910. 



ORTING NEWS 




THE DAY 



The world's biggest cheese Is said to 
weigh 4,029 pounds. The former rec- 
ord was held by Ed Dunkhorst. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Uncle Joe Cannon has received an 
offer of $3,000 per week for ten uphol- 
stered weeks in vaudeville. Kid Can- 
non Is doing right well, after that K. O. 
by congress. 

♦ • • 

"Why do young men go to college?" 
writes In a friend of Zodle's. 

Until the new football rules have re- 
ceived a thorough test, It will be Im- 
possible to answer that question, friend 

of Zodle. 

♦ • • 

A holstein cow given to President 
Taft by a Wisconsin admirer has 
failed to reach Washington as yet. Do 
vou suppose that fighting Kid La Fol- 
iette has had a iiand in tliis? 

♦ « • 

Cornelius McGlllicuddy Is the real 
name of Connie Mack. By common 
consent of the scorers and Mr. Mack, 
the name was amputated several 
"yaars " ago. 

♦ ♦ • 

A young lady writes In to ascertain 
If baseball players are generally called 
bv their names or by nicknames. 

"The managers generally give the 
players names when they call them, 
Floradora. 

♦ • • 

Kansas City, Mo., Is to organize a 



walked three players, forcing In the 
winning run. Score: R. H. K. 

Kansas City ..0000020011 — 4 7 2 
Milwaukee ...0200001000 — 3 8 
Katterles — Brandom, Ritter and 

James; McGlynn and Marshall. Umpires 
— Owens and Cusack. 



Gnnie Postitoned. 

.M Minneapolis— St. Paul-Minneapo- 
lis game postponed; rain. 




public pawnshop. TJie town went broke 
betting against Jack Johnson. 

* -* • 

R. U. Weight asks whether there 

are any ladies' football teams, and 

whether hobble skirts could be worn 
with perfect equanimity. They are 
generally worn with brocaded waists. 
However, be that as it may, under the 
new rules It would be perfectly pos- 
sible to play a corking good game In a 
straight jacket, and your suggestion 
as to the hobble aklrt Is a good one. 
as it would add picturesqueness and 
considerable eclat to the game. Eclat 
is what we need to enliven the game. 

• • • 

A telegraph tick says the Kentucky 
racing season is open. There is one 
spot upon this morbid sphere where 
the grandest horse In the world, the 
thoroughbred, is given happy and 
hearty welcome. 

« « • 

The other night a boxing show In 
New York was opened by Jack Mc- 
Kenna and Jack New York OBrlen. 
Jacks are always good openers. 

♦ ♦ • 

The Dixie Kid, colored, fast black, 
held the welterweight championship 
for about three days. Some men, to 
borrow from J. Caesers working 
manual, are born great, others have It 
thrust upon them, and others have It 
rudely snatched away. 



Frank Klaus of Pittsburg develops, as 
some predict. 



Stuudiiig of the Clubs. 



Philadelphia 

Detroit 

New York . . 

Boston 

Cleveland • • 

Washington 

Chicago 



Won. 
. .95 
. .80 
,..79 
,..78 
..65 
. .59 
..58 



Lost. 

42 
60 
60 
60 
77 
80 
80 
99 



Pet. 
.693 

.571 
.568 
.566 
.458 
.425 
.420 
.305 



St. Louis 43 

Games Today. 

New York at Cleveland. 
Boston at Detroit. 
Philadelphia at Chicago. 
Washington at St. Louis. 



FORD AND KALER 

HAVE PITCHERS' BATTLE. 

Cleveland, Ohio, Sept. 23. — New York 
defeated Cleveland 2 to 1 in a pitchers' 
battle between Ford and Kaler. The 
first run was scored by La Porte on a 
pass, a sacrifice and two infield hits. 
Wolter scored in the ninth on his hit, 
steal. La Jole's error and the squeeze 
plav. Cleveland scored in the ninth on 
Callanhan's double and La Jole's single. 
Score: R- H. E. 

Cleveland 00 0000 1 — 1 6 1 

New York 00000001 1 — 2 7 2 

Batteries — Kaler and Land; Ford 
and Mitchell. Umpire— Evans. 




(BY BRUCE.) 

Now that Sam Langford has the 
very bright prospects of a match with 
Johnson, fans over the country are 
wondering what chance the stubby 
Boston black has with the ebony title 
holder. 

The best informed of those who fol- 
low pugilism do not concede the Tar 
Baby a chance — except that chance 
that may come as the result of a 
lucky punch. Langford is a good lit- 
tle man, but Johnson Is a very good 
big man, and there you are. You nev- 
er did see a good little man that could 

beat a good big man. 

Langford would probably beat all of 
the other heavyweights. This talk of 
liim being afraid of Al Kaufman, does 
not sound in the least good. He ran 
out of the Kaufman match In Phila- 
delphia, and deserves to be branded as 
a quitter or coward; yet, just the same, 
in 'P'rlsco Langford offered to bet a 
large slice of his own money that he 
would beat Kaufman, and seemed 
eager for the chance to get it on. 

Johnson would cut the little man to 
pieces, at least so think those who 
have seen them both fight, and should 
be In a position to judge. Johnson 
is bigger In every way, has longer 
arms, can probably hit as hard as 
Langford, and in addition has greater 
science than the I..angford boy. 

Langford's courage Is to be admired, 
and he can j)robably give the cham- 
pion a harder figlit than any of the 
heavies getting money under false 
pretenses. There are many who be- 
lieve that Langford really believes lie 
can beat Johnson. If Woodman and 
Langford really bet ?20,ooO on the re- 
sult, they must have some confidence 
In the ability of Sam to beat the big 
black. 

At that, there are a lot of people 
who want to see I.Angford hook up 
with the larger smoke. 
» - - 

Ketchel Very Bad. 

It is I'umored over the waves of 
pugilistic gossip that Stanley Ketchel 
is in worse condition than the general 
public wots of. 

Here is a lad of 23, who should just 
be coming Into his full power as a 
fighter. Well, If reports be true, he 
Is nearer a hopeless physical wreck. 
Various press dispatches have told of 
the wine Ketchel has drunk, and of the 
late hours he has kept; but other re- 
ports hint at graver dissipations than 
the wee sma' hour habit and the big 
bubble thirst. 

It is whispered that the middle- 
weight champion has taken to the 
drug habit, and at the i)resent lime Is 
but a shadow of the Ketchel that 
walked through the middleweight 
ranks. 

This Is not the first time, by any 
means, that there has been a story 
about Ketchel using drugs. The sec- 
ond time he fought Papke, and was 
soundly beaten, by the way, several 
stories were printed about Ketchel 
"hitting the pipe' during training 
time. Training and drugs hardly go 
very well together. 

If Ketchel is as bad as they say 
he is, he will never be the dashing 
pugilist who astonished the public only 
a few years ago by his brilliancy. The 
world Is old, but some will never learn. 
How many champions have gone by 
the dissipation route? This Is a very 
busy afternoon, so we haven't the time 
to count. There are a lot. 

With Steve Ketchel out of the wav. 
there is hardly a man In sight, in this 
country at least, to dispute the prowess 
of Billy Papke. He is the very best 
we have, and there was always a dis- 
pute as to which was really the bet- 
ter man, Ketchel or Papke. 

W'ith Ketchel out of the running, in- 
terest in the middleweight division 
may lose some o£ its interest, unless 




are auw\c luc nrci^ci ¥if.-.|-,*.v ......w. 

Thomas may be all that is claimed for 
him, but It is dollars to bakery dough- 
nuts, leaving mother and her cooking 
out of the argument, that Papke 
would polish the Englishman. 

And by the way, I'apke is on the 
high seas at the present time, bound 
for Australia, if he is successful in 
tiie bush country, he will proba^aly re- 
turn by way of England, and if the 
Thomas boy wants to fight, well, he 
will undoubtedly have the chance. 

ToDimie's Tender Knee. 

Like Speed Boy Achilles of the Heel 
and Toe league. Tommy Burns has a 
weakness. We mention one to be 
charitable, as Thomas has more than 
that number. 

His greatest physical weakness 
seems to be his bum knee. The other 
day he Injured it further playing la 
crosse. The dope at the present time 
is, children, that Tommy doesn't care 
to mingle with I^angford, not in the 
least, has all the money that is need- 
ed, and for the reason of not meeting 
the Tar Baby in London town, had the 
knee story sprung. 

That may be all to the wrong, and 
after all Tommy may have been sin- 
cere in his offer to meet Langford. 
But if Burns fights I.a.ngford, he Is 
mighty apt to get licked. 

Burns at the present time is very 
fat. It would be very hard for him 
to get into condition. The chances 
are that he will never fight Langford, 
though you can't tell. 



IS DfPEaED 

Two Harbors Football Team 

Reported Very Fast and 

Unusually Strong. 

Central Will Try Out Many 

New Men in Opening 

Game. 



BRIEF PERSONAL HISTORY 

or CONNIE MACK'S MEN 



t 



U. U. >^ U^ 1^ 1^ ^ -.1 ^ 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



■«• Itlnrs 

*■ NoKe 

% Kelly 

•#■ ^iolheiiii 

* O'Brien and De Vey 

ijf Johnson 

•)K- J«?roiilniu»i 

* MeClaran nnd Hoyle 
(•luKa uud HlKgrlDH. 

^ I.e IJue nnd Ityan. . . 

* M'aldrun 



f s^ A ^ "^ "A" 

T^s ^1% ^f\ 1^ 3^ 

LIXEIP. » 

Left end 

. .Left tackle 
. . Left Kuard 

Center 

.Right uruard 
. HiAirht tackle ^ 
. . . . KiKhl end ^ 
.Qunrterbnrk ^ 
. . . .Left half 

Fullback 

. . .ItiKht half 



* 






Following is a brief history of the 
men Connie Mack counts upon to de- 
feat the pennant-winning Cubs, there- 
by being the first American league 
team since 1906 to v/ln the world's 
championship: 

Harry DaviH, Firnt Batienian. 
Harry Davis, first baseman, was born 
July 18, 1873, In Philadelphia. He first 
played professional ball with Provi- 
dence in lis94, startinjf as a catcher. 
Providence, he played suc- 
with Paw tucket, R. I., New 
Pittsburg anJ jumped to the 
league at th.j time of its or- 
played star ball for 
1902. lt»04 and 1905. 



Quitting 
cesslvely 
York and 
American 
ganlzation. He 
Connie Mack in 



»)K) i <*»»»»» ) K)K) | C »JNHM^;'^ 



THE HARVETER 
SETS NEW RECORD 

Takes Quarter of Second 

Off Time Made at 

Pittsburg. 

Columbus, Ohio, Sept. 23. — To the 
track that for nine years held the 
stallion trotting championship becau.se 
of the 2:02 '4 mile by Croesus, there 
came back the title yesterday when 
The Harvester went a brilliant mile In 
2:01 fiat and thereby took a quarter 
of a second oft the time he made last 
week at Syracuse. 

Driver Geers, a moment after he had 
dismounted declared his intention :o 
make an attack next Thursday upon 
the record if the track can be made 
solid close to the rail. 

Shortly before 6 o'clock, the cham- 
pion was sent away rushing and went 
the first quarter in 29 Vi seconds. Over 
on the back stretch, one runner be- 
came a trailer. The second quarter 
was stepped in 30 seconds. In the third, 
there was but a slight slackening and 
the time for It was 30^4 seconds. A 
final quarter In 31 seconds made the 
mile a winning one as The Harvester 
had started to beat 2:01 1^. 

Bervaldo, Maj. Brino and Manuella 
won the regular events of the card. 
Bervaldo was favorite over all the 
other 2:12 trotters, but dropped the first 
heat to George Todd. May Day, the 
first choice in the 2:05 pace, was dis- 
tanced by Major Brino in the second 
heat. 

CATARRH 

A SYSTEMIC BLOOD DISEASE 

Catarrh is not merely an affection 
of the mucous membranes ; it is a 
deep-seated blood disease in which the 
entire circulation and greater part of 
the system are involved. It is more 
commonly manifested in the head, 
nose and throat, because of the sensi- 
tive nature of these membranes, and 
also because they are more easily 
reached by irritating influences from 
Jhe outside. The symptoms of Ca- 
tarrh, such as a tight feeling in the 
head, nose stopped up, throat clogged 
and dry, hacking cough, etc., show 
that the tiny blood vessels of the mu- 
cous membranes are badly congested 
and inflamed from the impurities in 
the circulation. To cure Catarrh per- 
manently the blood must be purified 
and the system cleansed of all un- 
healthy matter. Nothing equals 
3. S. S. for this purpose. It attacks 

the disease at its 
head, goes down 
to the bottom of 
the trouble and 
makes a complete 
and lasting cure 
by PURIFYING 
the blood. Then 
the inflamed 
membranes begrn 
to heal, the head is cleared, breathing 
becomes natural and easy, the throat 
is no longer dogged, and every un- 
pleasant symptom of the disease dis- 
appears. S. S. S. is the greatest of all 
blood purifiers, and for this reason is 
the most certain cure for Catarrh. 
Book on Catarrh and medical advice 
free to all who write. 
THt: bWIFX 6?£0jriQ (CO., Atlanta, Oa. 




! 



The game with Two Harbors tomor- 
row promises to be very interesting, for 
according to the reports from the Two 
Harbors lilgh school, the team Is ex- 
ceptionally strong the present season. 

The Central team is In very good con- 
dlthm for tl:e game, thougli the non 
appearance of Bondy and Nelson, two 
"D" inen, who were expected out, will 
probably weaken the team that will 
be sent into the first game of the 
season. 

With these men out, the strength of 
the line Is. at the present time, much 
in cloi.bt. 

Boden, who played with the sopho- 
more team last season. Is making a 
corking showing for end, and will very 
probably finish the game tomorrow at 
one of the flank positions. 

Johnson and Nolle look good for the 
tackle positions, and there is not much 
worry there. They are both heavy and 
can be relied upon to break up line 
plays. 

A^'aldron Is the heavle.'^t man In the 
tacit field and the best ground gainer. 
Le Due and Higgins are the fastest 
men on the team. Glass is probably the 
best defensive back In the squad. 

At quarterback McClaren is running 
the team like a veteran, Wagner is also 
showing well at tills position, his work 
of "Carrying the ball being especially 
classy. 

JACK BEGGED 



FOR FIGHTS 



Champion Was Formerly Glad 

to Fight for Fee 

Money. 

"Not so very many years ago. Jack 

Johnson, the present chajnpion of the 

world and probably the greatest fighter 

thai, we know of, hung around our club 

In St. Louis, begging to be put on in a 

preliminary. He didn't look good to 
any of us, and we never gave hlni the 
trial he almost begged for. Soon after 
this we began to hear of him from time 
to i.lme, and then slowly he began to 
work his way to the top of the heavy- 
weight division." 

The above statement was made yes- 
terday by Charles L. Qeraghty, the 
man nere with the Jeffries-Johnson 
fight pictures. He has followed John- 
son's career from It's earliest begin- 
ning, when the present champion was a 
rountabout negro, hanging around 
boxing clubs and begging to be allowed 
to light for "eatin' money." 

"Johnson looked like a big, powerful 
negro then," said Geraghty, "but for 
some uncountable reason he liad an 
awfully hard time getting on before 
clubs. He was very polite, one of the 
real typical southern negroes. He 
would take off his hat when he talked 
too you. 

"Like Battling Nelson, Johnson was 
a V'jry long time coming, and his path 
to the championship was Impeded by 
many obstacles No one knows how- 
great he Is, for it is a fact that John- 
son has never been extended. Burns 
gave him his greatest fight. Johnson 
will never be any better, and some 
man some day will come along and 
beat him." 



fi(;hters headed for 

head of the lakes. 

Jimmy Brady, a fast featherweight 
of Illinois, and Harry Cobb and Kid 
Parker, from Toronto and Saginaw, 
re.spect'lvel.v, are expected at the Head 
of the Lakes shortly, en route to Win- 
nip'ig, where the fight game is flourish- 
ing at the present time. 

Bradv will try to get a match with 
Constahtlne while here. Cobb and 
Parker will also try to get some 
matches at the Head of the Lakes. 

Jimmv iJarry, the fast and clever 
Duluth fighter." is ready to meet any of 
the boys of his class, and If a purse is 
offered by any club for a match be- 
tween Barry and any of the little 
strangers, the Duluth boxer will be on 
the job. 

Barry Is one of the cleverest boxers 
In "he Northwest, and he has also 
strongth and experience In his favoi. 
He Is ready to meet the best boys in 
his class. 

SAILOR JACK ANSWERS 
DICK SHEPPERD\S CHALLENGE 

Sailor Jack has announced that lie 
will accept the challenge of Dick 
S'hepperd. the great little wrestler 
from Pipestone. Minn., the boy who put 
up such a sensational struggle against 
the Sailor, last winter. The match be- 
tween Shepperd and the Sailor will be 
one of the first wrestled here this win- 
ter. The winner of that match will 
meot Otto Suttor, and the winner of 
that match will meet the wonder of all 
the little men, Young Miller of St. Paul. 

The Duluth boy is out for the world's 
welterweight championship, and with 
tiiat end in view, is seeking matches 
v.Mth the best men in his class. 

MINNEAPOLIS AND DULUTH 

IN GOLF COMPETITION. 



One week from tomorrow a golf leam 
wilt be selected by club car^taln In R. 
T. Goodell of the Northland Country 
club golf team to go to Minneapolis 
and meet a team selected from the 
plaj-ers of the Minlkahda club. The 
contest will be for a cup that was won 



EdTiard T. ColUnii, S<'coDd Uaiieinan. 

Edward T. Collins, second baseman, 
first saw light May 2, 1887, at Aiiller- 
ton, N. Y. He weighs 161 pounds and 
Is five feet ten inches in height. He 
signed with Philadelphia in 1907, com- 
ing from Columbia college, with no 
professional experience. He was first 
tried at short, then switched to second. 
He batted .364 and fielded .967 last 
year. 

Johu J. Barry, }«hortj«<op. 

John J. Barry, short itop, is a native 
of Meriden, Conn., where he was born 
April 26. 1887. He weighs 158 pounds 
and is five feet eight inches tall. He 
gained his early experience playing 
with amateur teams before he entered 
Holy Cross college, >.-here Mack se- 
cured him In 190S. He hit .215 last 
•ear and fielded .927. 

J. Krank Baker, Third Bn«ieiuan. 

J. Frank Baker, lliiid baseman, was 
born at Tiappe, Md.. in 1886. He weighs 
.75 pounds and Is nearly six feet tall. 
Baker played his flist professional ball 
In 1908 at Reading, Pa,, and went from 
here to I'hiladelphia the same year. 
He starred last season, hitting. 307 and 
fielding .920. 

Reubeu X. Oldr-lng, renter Fielder. 

Reuben N. Oldring, center helder, 
was born on Memorial day in Nen' 
York city In 1884. He learned to play 
ball on the East side lots of his native 
city and from there went to the semi- 
professional teams. He signed with 
the Hoboken club in 1905 and Avas later 
taken by Montgomery, where lie played 
at short. Connie Mack signed him 
after purchasing his release, keeping 
the deal secret. Ne*w York Highland- 
ers later purchased the player, but the 
national commission awarded him to 
the Athletics in 1906. 

Brineo Lord, Left Fielder. 

Brisco Lord, was born at I'pland. Pa., 
.Sept. 21, 1883, and has had a limited 
professional career. He was with ihe 
L'pland semi-professional team in 1903 
and the following year was signed by 
the Lancaster Tristatt? team. He was 
transferred to the Coatsvllle team In 
the same league and was signed by 
Connie Mack in 1905 and later released 
to New Orleans, whe -e Cleveland se- 
cured hlni. Connie Mack regained hlni 
in a trade with Cleveland early this 
year. He is a left fielder. 

Uauiel F. Murphy, Kisht Fielder. 

Daniel F. Murphy, right fielder, is a 
native of Philadelphia and is 35 years 
old. He weighs 175 :iounds and is 5 
feet 10 inches tall. H'i began his pro- 
fessional career at "VV'orcester. Mass.. 
in 1894 and played in New England 
until 3 809. He worked at second base 
for North Attleboro, :Mass., in 1S99. 
Norwich had him in 1900 and the New 
York Nationals tried lilm In 1901, but 
soon sent him back. H? joined the Ath- 
letics In 1902 and made six hits in his 
fir.-Jt game. He was shifted from second 
base to right field la.'-u season. 

Anion Slrunk, Utility Outfielder. 

Amos Strunk utlllt\' outfielder, was 
born In Philadelphia in 18S9. He is 6 
feet tall and weighs 165 pounds. He 
Joined the Athletics i -ninediately after 
leaving school and was sent to Minne- 
apolis, rejo'.nlng the I'hiladelphia team 
last spring. 

Bd^vard .S. Plauk, Pitcher. 

Edward S. Plank, pitcher, was born 
at Gettysburg, Pa., In 1875. After a 



two years ago by the Minneapolis 
players. 

At the present time the members of 
the Northland Country club are work- 
ing ha-rd in anticipation of winning 
the cup back. Either :lve or seven men 
will play on the team 



MONTE DALE AND 

NELSON ARE MATCHED. 



public school education he went to 
Gettysburg college. His pitching fur his 
varsity team attracted the attention of 
Connie Mack, who invited him to Phil- 
adelpiiia for a trial. He was signed 
after his first workout in 1901 and has 
been with Philadelphia since that time. 
He helped pitch the Athletics into their 
1902 and 1905 pennants. He is a left- 
hander- 
John Tl'. Coombfi, Pitcher. 

John W. Coombs came Into the world 
in 1882 at Portland, Me., and while 
there pitched four years for his varsity 
and semipro ball in the summer. He 
was signed by the Montpelier, Vt., team 
and the Athletics secured him from 
thtre In 1906. He won a twenty-four 
mning-gj^me that year from Boston. 
He is a right-hander and weigiis 190 
pounds and is 6 feet 1 inch in height. 
Jame;* H. Dy^ert, Pitcher. 

James H. Dygert, pitcher, was born 
in 1S83, at i:tlca, N. Y., and received his 
education at the Utica high school. He 
pitched for his school team and in 1904 
was signed by the Poughkeepsle, N. 
^ . team. Connie Mack secured him 
that fall and In 1905 farmed him to 
New Orleans. After leading the South- 
ern league pitchers he was recalled. 
He is a right-hand batter and throwdr 
ana uses the spit ball. 

t'harleM Albert Bender, Pitcher. 

Charles Albert Bender, pitcher, is a 
full-blooded Chippewa Indian. He v»-a9 
born at Brainerd, Minn., May 5, 188 i, 
and when 18 years old played first base 
at the Carlisle Indian school. He was 
then a substitute pitcher. He pitched 
for Dickinson college, Pennsylvania, in 
1902 and the following year for the 
Harrisburg Athletic club team and 
played with several teams in Harris- 
burg. The Athletics signed him In the 
fall of 1903. He was liandicapped by 
poor health for a couple of years. He 
recovered his full strength in 1905 and 
aided the Athletics to win the pennant 
that year. In the world's series with 
New York he was the onlv Philadel- 
phia pitcher to win a game and he shut 
the Giants out. He is a right-hander. 
Frank M. .\tkln». Pitcher. 

Frank M. Atkins-, left-handed pitch- 
er, was born at Paucon, Neb., Dec. 9, 
1888. He first won fame as pitcher for 
his high school team at Painesviile. 
Ills work there won him recognition 
and Akron, Ohio team signed him in 
1906 He worked successively wita 
Bay City, Augusta and Atlantf:. Macic 
securing him from the last named 
team. He weighs 160 pounds and 13 
5 feet ]0»4 inches tall. 

Harry B, Morgran, Pitcher. 

Harry B. Morgan, born ai I'lnieroy, 
Pa., Nov. 10, 1878, is six feet tall and 
weighs 180 pounds. His fir.-t profes-/ 
sional games were with the Martin 
Ferry team in West Virginia in 1901. 
From there he went to llion, N. Y., the 
same year. He was at Charleston. W. 
Va., In 1902; Fall River, Mass., 1903; 
Mfnneapolis. from 1905 to 1907; St. 
Louis In 1907: Boston Americans and 
Montreal, 1908; Boston again in 1909 
and was traded this year to the Ath- 
letics for Victor Schlitzer. 

Marry William KrauHe, Pitcher. 

Harry William Krause, southpaw 
pitcher, came Into the world 3ulv 27, 
1887, at San Francisco. He weighs 165 
pounds and is five feet eleven inches in 
helglit. He began his professional ca- 
reer with the San Jose (Cal.i team In 
1907. He also played with the St. 
Mary's college team before joining the 
Athletic forces in 1909. 

Ira ThuniaK, Catcher. 

Ira Thomas, c.itcher. was born at 
Ballston Spa. N. Y.. in 1881. He is six 
feet two inches In height and weighs 
198 pounils. He began to ijlay ball 
professionally in 1902 at Hartford, 
Conn. He has worked with teams at 
Newark, Providence, New York and 
Detroit American league teams until 
Mack secured him last year. 

Patrick J. l>lvtneMton, Calcber. 

Patrick J. Livingston, catcher, is 29 
years old. He weighs 193 pounds and 
is five feet eight Inches tall. He played 
with the Wheeling. W. Va., team. He 
was with Cincinnati In 1906; Indian- 
apolis, 1907-1908; Philadelphia, in l9o9- 
1910. 



Eagle, a small gunboat, and the Ill- 
fated Bennington. After'spending sev- 
eral thousand dollars on the latter gun 
boat in the effort to repair tlie dam- 
age caused by the terrible explosion 
which wiped out so many lives at San 
Diego several years ago, the depart- 
ment has concluded the ship cannot be 
repaired within a reasonable cost and 
st) the three vessels are to be offered 
for sale. 



Ave- 

who 

Nel- 



Kansas City. Sept. 23. — Battling Nel- 
.';on and Monte Dale were yesterday 
matched to fight ten rounds here on 
Oct. 10. This bout '«»rili be the firht 
battle of the year for the Grand 
nue Athletic club. 

Dale Is a husky youngster 
fought .several times in the West. 
Eon is pleased with h s opponent. 

Yen Master Elected. 

Frank Bergstrom was yesterday af- 
ternoon elected yell master of Central 
high school. The first yell practice. In 
preparation for the Two Harbors' game 
will be held this afternoon. 



Will Press Clothes Free. 

If you buy your clothes at the 3 
Winners they will keep them pressed 
and repaired two years free of charge. 



MINE RESCUE WORK 

IN ROCKY MOUNTAINS. 



W^ashlngton, Sept. 2; 
of the details for mln 
the Rocky mountain 
perfected by Dr. J. 
rector of the new bur 
his trip to the West 
tending over three ' 
visit Colorado, Utah 
Wyoming. While In 
Holmes will deliver a 
American Mining C( 
Angeles, Sept. 28. 



:. — Arrangements 

3 rescue work in 

region will be 

A. Holmes, di- 

eau of mines, oa 

ern country ex- 

veeks. He will 

, Montana and 

the West, Dr. 

n address at the 

)ngress In Los 



ILL-FATED BENNINGTON 

TO BE SOLD BY NAVY. 



Royal Lunch 

Our ppcclnltleH for tomorro^v (Sat- 
urday's) dinner: 

KOA.ST VE.\L, With DrenKinff 
tOK.VEU BEKF AND CAHHAGB3 

Try oar home-made pleK. 

KverytbiKK Honie-Made nt 

Royal I-uncti 

:iI4 WEST SlI'ERIOIl STREET. 



Washington, Sept. 

six weeks to wipe 
cellus off the naval 1 
that time she has b( 
bottom of the Atlanti 
Cape Hatteras. The j 
and sunk by the Ital 
arlo di Giorgio, but h 
cued by the collier L> 
ficial order declaring 
funct was Issued fro 
partment Monday. 

Three other vessels 
dead list: The Slrer 
chased for use In the 



23. — It retiulred 
the collier Mar- 
ist, although for 
en lying on the 
c, sixty miles off 
ship was rammed 
ian steamer Ris- 
?r crew was res- 
»onldas. The of- 
ihe Marcollus de- 
m the navy de- 

also went on the 
1, a yacht pur- 
Spanish war; the 



SORENSEN 

rn SHOES 

.50 




Our Shoes are 
so d to the con- 
Burner direct from 
AND th'3 factory, at 
wholesale prices. 
Ycu save $1 to $2 
on every pair, and 
we fit your feet 
rlfrht. 
s. t. sorenson. 

see: our wiimdows- 
317 W, SUPERIOR STREET. 



$3 



yOTEL 

STRICTLY FIRST CLASS 

New, modern and absolutely fire 
proof. 

Rates, 11.00 and Up. 

Three Cafes. 

Popular-Priced Lunch Dall/. 




Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 

Low Fare Summer Tours. 
Via WASHINGTON 

—TO- 
ATLANTIC CITY 
AND OTHER SEA SHORE 
RESORTS 

NEW YORK, BOSTON 

— AND— 

NEW ENGLAND POINTS 



Tickets on Sale Daily Until Sep- 
tember 30th. 

LONG RETURN LIMIT 
LIBERAL STOPOVER PRIVILEGES. 



For further particulars address 
R. C. H.4ASE, B. X. AV'STIX, 

N. W. P. A., G. P. A., 

St. Paul. Chicago. 



1 



C 





7 






' 






















- ' ^ 




i 






\ 






'I 
1 






i 






1 














•J, 



4= 



"^ 



— ^ 




"^j 



— »• ^ — "I 



t 



•*r- 




=f» 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



September 23, 1910. 



M^ojfin^iri 



Yon Need 
Not Look 



£very 
Stetson 
bears tha 
Stetson 





Far 

if you are look- 
ing for 

GOOD 
CLOTHES 

Our Rogers- 
Peet, Washing- 
ton and Michael 
Stern Suits and Overcoats fill the most exacting 
bill. They are reasonably priced, too — 




BANQUO 



^ 




**Regu!ars" in Town of Du- 

luth Wm Not Stay 

Downed. 



The "Insurgents" Must Keep 

on the Job Every 

Day. 



Chic and Jaunty 







Wilson Bros. 
Shirts. 



Fownes' 
Gloves. 



Cooper 
Underwear. 



Banister 
Shoes. 



In llie excltemeot of the general 
rriniaries the cub reporter did not for- 
get to cover lus »«sigument to watch 
the results obtained by t*ie regulars in 
the township of Dulutli, who were try- 
ing to get ten signatures to a petition 
calling an election to validate bonds 
which were issued several years ago 
for bridKes and roads, and which were 
invalidated by the cMstrlct and supreme 
courts?. 

The cub reporter was c«n the Job, but 
he dldnt want his "story? buried under 
tiie ma.ss of primary statistic*, so he 
held it until today. 

The regulars seem to la» getting It in 
the neck all over the country, and in 
tills state the victory in Jim Tawney u 
listrlct was not the only one that was 
v.-on by the Insurgents. The triumph 
of the progressives in tlie town of Du- 
luth was .sweeping, but the dispute is 
not settled. The regulars can circu- 
late a petition every da^ in the year, 
.'^o the tight is a part of the daily rou- 
tine of settlers in the town of Duluth 
and those Duluth folk wjio own coun- 
try homes there. The insurgents ex- 
pect to have a continual fight on their 
! ands for some time to come, as the 
invalidated bonds are as persistent as 
Banqiio's ghost. 






2 2 5-3 3 r West Superior Street, 



Duluth, Minn. 



rjgsaEXj 



I 







P.WNE LAUDS TARIFF LAW 



(Continued from page 1.) 



iff on that article. 

liKeni men generally 

tariff believed that 

would be downward 



Of course, Intel- 
familiar with the 
such a revision 
on most articles. 



AVoul Schedule Uail. 

"The matter of jirei'aration of a 
tariff bill is a most perplexing one. 



of what the bill 

platform as plain 

Chicago In iyO«. 

Witli a different 

country and with 

in every part of 

men, seeking the 

cost here and 



.^rchilec's and Engineers Prolil 
Th s Week on These 

Saturday 
Specials 

It may api^ear that 
our week end special of- 
ferinii's has favored car- 
penters principally, but 
thi> week we surely favor 
archill '- and enp^jneers. 
Tlu^c vahics are worth tlieir 
while to investigate, and 
hoKl j^ood icr Saturday only. 

Our No. 1070 Nine-piece 
Draughting Tools, in nior- 
roco leatlur cases — regular- 
ly $8.-.(/-Satur- ^J^ffft 
day special ^ jlet#" 

Our No. 1130 Eight-piece 
Set in hinged leailier case — 
rcgul: -1' =^7.r)0; ^Q ffff 
Satu' . ..ecial^0«03 

12-inch Triangular Boxwood 
Rules — any graduation de 
sired ; r. Liiilarly 6Uc; 
Saturday .■-pecial. 

6-inch Celluloid Triangles — 
regularly 45c—- 9tfS^ 

Saturday special . . . ^x^fL' 

Celluloid Irregular Curves 
from 40c to uOc — ^S/ft 

Saturday special... Ad 3^ 

24-inch Celluloid Edge T 

Squares — regularly $1.73 — 

Saturday 

special 

Black Waterproof Ink — 
regularly 25c; Sat- '€ Rg^ 
urday special iCJ^ 



Under the definition 
s^hould contain in a 
as that adopted at 
the task is not ea.«y. 
wage scale in every 
differences in wages 
each country, honest 
difference in labor 
abroad, will not agree In all their con- 
clusions. ,,^ 

"To reconcile these differences, 
among twelve men selected for the 
task, was a part of the labor we had 
bitore u.*^; and in the last analysis 
these diffcsences have to be settled by 
I Majority vote. The result of our 
deliberation vtu.s most satisfactory to 
me in general results, although there 
were other item.v, like tho-^e of the 
woolen schedule, which I was anxious 
to revise. It was a source of great 
di.sappointmenl to me, after two ex- 
haustive and extended hearings, that 
1 was not able to present any program 
that a majority of the committee 
would adopt for a revision of this 
scliedule. 

"t o:iiiiiU«ee Not lnflucu«ed." 
"The reason was not that the com- 
mittee v.;is unduly inlhience 1 by those 
iiiterosted, but that they cou:d not 
a.trree upon the labor cost of producing 
wool and woolen goods In this country 
and abroad v.-ith a reasonable profit to 
tlie producer. Of course, tliis left the 
wcolen schedule where it was in the 
LMngley act, with one or two small re- 
ductions in duties. 

"Some of the amendments proposed 
Viy the senate were good amendments 
and improved tlie bill, and when it got 
into conference, ."-o far as 1 was able. 
I endeavored to have such amendments 
agreed to. and nearly all of them were. 
"The law, as it was signed by the 
president, has resulted in a general re- 
vision downv.^ard, and no amount of 
special pleading, no mis-statement of 
facts, and no suppression of material 
facts, will ever make it appear other- 
wise. 

"The law has turned a deficit of $58,- 
000.000 into a surrilus of more than 
$1'2.00<>,0U0 in its first vtar's uperatio:i. 



It is a revenue producer. We put in- 
creased duties On wines, liquors and 
like luxuries. We have no apologies 
to make for it. These are the articles 
on which the revenues of the govern- 
ment should be raised as far as pos- 
sible 

CoNt of Living:. 

an easy thing to say that the 

tariff law has increased the 

living, but it is Impossible to 

It is almost impossible to find 

item on which the tariff was 



"It is 
present 
cost of 
prove it. 
a single 



MAY DISCUSS LFJi'S STATUE 

(Conti nued from page 1.) 

vice commander-in-chief, Charles B. 
Burrows, Rutherford, N- J-; junior vice 
comn.ander-in-chief, "VVtUlam James, 
Jack.sonvUle, Fla.; surgeon general, 
lohn U Smith, Spokane, Wash.; chap- 
:;un-in-chlef, Hev. Thomas Harwood, 
Albuquerque, N. M. 

String to Couve»4ioB Vote. 

The new commander-in-chief had an 
easy time of it In his election, but 
Rochester has a little string to it. The 
veterans decided that the encamp- 
ment can go to the New York state 
city on condition tliat satisfactory 
rates are received frqjn the railroads, 
otherwise the executive committee can 
select another city to which rasonable 
rates can be secured. 

Los Angeles, Denver and Springfield, 
111., also were after the encampment. 
May Be Minority Rei»«rrt. 

The committee on iesolution.s, with 



increased, on which the price has 
shown a similar Increase. On the 
other hand, on nearly every item where 
we reduced the tariff, or where we 
left it the same as under the old law, 
tliey liave maintained the old iirice 
and sometimes incieased it. We re- 
duced the tariff on lumber from |2 to 
$1.25 and lumber brings the same old 
price. We increased the duty on shin- 
gles from 30 to 50 cents, and the price 
of shingles has been lower ever since 
the act became a law. 

■'I could enumerate these items by 
the hour, showing that the price has 
no relation whatever to the changes 
in the tariff act. 

"The increase in price of articles 
is world-wide. No other country, dur- 
ing the last three or four years, has 
gone through a general tariff revision, 
and yet every country shows tiie same 
increase of the necessities of life." 



Why Don't You 

Give your son and daughter a sound 

practical business training at the 
I'uluth Business University? It is 
essential, no matter what their vo- 
cation in life may be. Now is the 
time to begin. Location, 118-120 
Fourth avenue west, Christie Bldg. 



Will .^love to Everett, WaHli. 

Cloquet, Minn., Sep-t. 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Mrs. Ed Beauchamp, 
who iias been in the millinery business 
in this city for a number of years, has 
disposed of her stock to Mrs. Paul La- 
vcie of Cloquet, and expects to leave 
soon for Everett, Wash. 




» 



3 W inner Overcoats 

Are just the same as the coats you see 
In the high rent stores marked $30 ard 
$n.'>. We only ask |20. That's the only 
difference. 



27c 



90c 




llBtiZO WEST SUPERIOR ST. DULUTH. MINN 



CIIICKEIII^G, 
FiSCMEl PIANOS 

iCuHy H'nyuieutM. 



Kovi?aFdJaFweil &Co- 



I'M K»nt Superiur Street. 
'I'koneMi Zen. 147S-X— Melrose 1752. 

W. J. Allen, manager; Fred It. Mann, 
expert piano tuner. 




STATUE OF GEN. i ROBERT E. 
LEE. . 

Whose Presence in the National 
Capital Has Aroused t'ne Fighting 
Spirit in Some Members of the 
G. A. R. 



Past Commander-in-Ch|et" Torrance in 
the chair, was in session until early 
this morning. There was a strong 
fighting minority in the committee, but 
the conservatives won and the commit- 
tee voted down all resolutions with 
reference to the placing of a statue of 
Gen. Robert E. Lee in the hall of fame 
of the national caiiilil at, Washington. 

Besides indorsing the McCumber 
pension bill pending in congre.«s the 
committee recommended tliat an 
am'jndment be made to the bill in- 
creasing from $12 to $15 a month the 
pensions of veterans 66 years of age: 
from. $15 to $20 a month for tho.se over 
70 and from $20 to $25 for those over 
75. 

It Is expected that a minority report 
will be jTesented. 



He Saved $10 



By buying his suit at the 3 Winners 
Clothing company, 115 East Superior 
street. 



DULUTH. SOUTH SHORE & 
ATLANTIC RAILROAD WILL 
BE MERGED WITH SOO LINE 
WHEN DEPOT IS READY 



3S3 W. Superior SI. 




313 W. Superior Sf. 



/Continued from page 1.) 

Canadian trMnk line. Tlierefore the 
gradual taking over of the South 
Shore, its operatloB. its management 
and ail the other details connected 
with its existence as a railroad, will 
not be so great a departure as the 
taking over of an outside road would 
be. 

The change, that has^been confirmed 
by The Herald, has long been looked 
for by railroad men who have been in 
touch" with the true isltuation. For 
tl;e pa.«t few years the- resignation of 
President W. F. Fitclv has been an 
annual rumor that has Interested rail- 
road men in these parts of tlie country. 
Nothing has ever materialized In con- 
nection with the oft-ruinyred dropping 
c ut of active railroad work by Mr. 
Fitch, and in the story of the taking 
over of the managemeitt cf the South 
Shore there is nothing even whispered 
rega.rc'ing what will tee done in the 
matter of the present ofticials of tl;e 
South Shore. Probably many of them 
will be retained. 

Not only will the trains of the South 
Shore operate into the .new Soo depot 
here, but it is .stated th«t the offices of 
the South Shore will be transferred to 
the nev.- depot. 

There is a federal law, that irohibits 
the consolidation of competing lines, 










9 



Here is a suit event that will add new interest to our al- 
ready large and charming display of this season's most fav- 
ored outer apparel for women. Our New York buyer was- 
unusually fortunate in securing th.2se suits, and to demon- 
strate the real value giving power of the ]Moe Store, we will 
hold an advance sale, and accordingly have marked them 
unusually low. 

There is not a suit in this group but would be a leader 
at $25 to $30 in most stores. They are well tailored, from 
mannish worstreds, cheviots and novelty suitings, and pos- 
sess that fit and snaj) which is a natural outcome of good ma- 
terial and perfect tailoring. 
Each suit lined with Skin- 
ner's famous satin. See 
these suits at 




Saving Opportunities in Dress Goods 

To the women who depend upon .\ices for the latest weaves in suit- 
ings will find here more labrics for autumn frocks, in the widest variety 
that we have ever shown, and at wonderful price reductions, for so early in 
the season. These prices merely hint at the values. 

II — There is nothing for all-around 
wear and utility that can com- 



I — We offer Crystal Shantung — 45 
inches wide — the newest thing in 
dress fabrics— in all ^f* | AS^ 
the popular colors. . . «P 1 •TTstJ 

IV — For 98c we are selliiijj this week 
a wonderful value in Taffeta 
silk — 35 inches wic'e — worth 
$1.25— at Moe's this Ql^f* 

V — For fancy silks you are asked to 
visit Moe's silk section. Wc are 
showing plaids and shepherd 
checks, suitable for waists and 
dresses both — our spe- ^O^ 
cial price is *^X/\^ 



pare with serge. This is the serge 
store of the West End. Every 
new shade is included in this 
varied assortment at a wide range 
of prices, per yard, ^A/^ 

$1.25 to ^tur%*» 

III — If your choice runs to novelty 
suiting, as panamas, plaids and 
the diagonal figured goods, you 
will find what you want here, 
from, per yard, 75^ 38C 



to. 



J 



$5 Black Silk Waists at $2.48 & $3.50 



An unusually beautiful collection of new and charming styles in exquis- 
itf^ black silk waists, that our New York buyer picked out for our wholesale 
department. We wish our retail patrons to benefit from this purchase and 
therefore hold this advance sale, at great price savings to you. 



Lot 1 I 

This lot in- ' 
eludes g r e a t I 
values in waists | 
with cl u s t e r 
tuck front and 
ba c k . Good; 
quality silk. 
Comes in all 
sizes. Their real 
selling price is ; 
$4.50 — Special 
price — 



\ Clean-Up of Spring 
» and Slimmer Hats 

Hats Frsm $4.50 to $12.50 to Close Ou! at tne Ridicdous Low Price of 93c 

We never carry stock over from season to sea- 
son, therefore the remaininjr spring and summer 
hats move, and move quickly — no matter what 
our loss is — for we need the room 
for nev/ Fall Millinery new in 
transit. So take your pick — 
at 







tJo/in J MocikSonsto 

2li-' Aye h' £ Superior St., Duluth. 



en t store 



Lot 2 

This is a 
charming a s - 
sortm cut of 
Black Taffeta 
Waists of ex- 
tra (juality silk. 
Tiie newest 
styles arc rep- 
resented in this 
a/sso r t m e n t . 
Have cluster 
tucks and but- 
ton trimmed — 
regular price 
.$5.00 — our spe- 
cial price — 





but It is not believed that this win in 
any way interfere, as the two roads 
can hardly b e called competin g lines. 

WILL HOLDJNQriRY NOW 

(Continued from page 1.) 




nial motion for a continuance ot the 
hearing imtil after the November elec- 
tionF. The reasons advanced were in 
tub«tance similar to the argument 
made by him yesterday when lie de- 
clared tl.at Senator Lorimer would be 
handicapped through a disinclination of 
legislator.s now under indictment to . 
ttstlfy before tlie committee. 

T'le Tribune's list of witnesses was | 
submitted and the committee began I 
consideration of method.^ of procedure. 
Ii<rai«onH Xot Sufficient. 

The committee's decLsion overruling 
Sen:it<)r borimer s plens for delay was 
announced by Senator Paynter ot Ken- 
tv.ckv, who said: 

••The committee has given due con- 
sideration to the presentation made f^n- 
a continuance of this hearing unill 
aflcr the November elections, and has 
not found the reasons contained there- 
in cif sufficient weight to warrant tlie 
delay. The petition is denied. ' 

No reference was made to the dcrt- 
nite time when the hearing would be- 
gin, but after submission of the names 
of the witnes.sos by the newspaper, a 
short conference resulted in the "xw- 
neuncement that the session would ;'.d- 
Journ as a public meeting until Mon- 
day morning to permit Senators Bulk- 
elej of Connecticut and Frazier of Ten- 



orrter 



At the Glass Block SSore. 




indows 



nessee, other men.bers of the investi- 
gating sub-coniinillL-e, to be present. 
Wants I.eistiilati>e Record. 

The commiilee then went into ex- 
ecutive session wiui Attorneys Au.o- 
trian and llariccy to determine upon 
the rules of practice thai would obtain 
nt the hearing. The committee has 
decided, it was announced, to a.^s'ic lur 
the official record of the Illinois legis- 
lature containing the 'j.^lloting diiriwy 
the period preceding and up to and in- 
cluding the election of Loriiner. 






IIVISTAreTLY RELIEVED 
or YOUR MONEY BACK 

DR. R. SCHIFFMANN'S 

STHMADO 

is Sold by All Druggists 
on a Positive Guarantee 

to give instant relief in every case of 
Asthma, no matter how violent the at- 
tacks or obstinate the case, or YOUR 
MONEY WILL BE REFUNDED by the 

Drjgi;ist of whom you bought the pack- 
ago, without any question. (6) 

R. Dchiffmann Co.. Proprietors, St. Paul, Mino. 



DIES SUDDENLY. 

Mrs Anna Hietman Passes Away at 
(loqiiet of Heart Failure. 

Clociuet, Minn., Sept. 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Mrs .A.n:ia Hietman died 
here Tuesday from he£ rt failure. Mrs. 
Hietman was 70 years old and had been 
in Cloquet about five weeks, coming 
here for the benefit of her health, and 
!-;he was thought to b? getting better 
when her death occurred quite sudden- 
ly. She was a guest at the home of 
her sister, Mr.«. Anthory Koch, and the 
latter, with her husband, accompanied 
tlie remains to Daveniiort, Iowa, where 
burial will take place. 

FLIES OVERI™ ALPS 

(Continued froni i>age 1.) 



death. Aviation experts had predicted 
freely that the only alternative to a 
succes.sful flight across the Alps was 
the death of ilie aviator. 

Signal fires aiong the Napoleon roact 
marked the v/ay as far as D'jmodo.ssola 
and tiie rest of tlie ccurse was indi- 
cated by Hags and buoys, anchored on 
Lake MaiTgiore. Tlie summit of the 
pass at Monscera was illunilnated witiv 
ox!iydrl»ii;e lights, and a captive bal- 
loon showed the finisii line at the aero- 
drome litre. 

I'ell Thirty I>et. 

As the airman was .<=een slowly de- 
scending a great crowd gathered. 
Slowly and gracefully he neartd the- 
surface and was only about thirty feet 
aV'ove the ground when a gust of wlnA 
caught and overturned the monoplane. 
It fell hea"vily, carrying the aviator 
beneath it. Chavez was jiinned under 
the motor. He had fainted on striking^ 
the ground and was bleeding profusely 
when released from the wreckage. Th«' 
macliine was ruined. 



Anx'rlcan Forced to Deaoeud. 

Brig. Hwlt/.erland, Sept. 23. — The 
American aviator, Mr. Weyniaiin, as- 
cended in his biplane at 1:10 o'clock 
this afternoon In an attempt to follow 
(7have/, In his (light across the Alps, 
but was forced to descend after being 
in the air four minutes. The oth.er avi- 
ators here are packing their thlnga 
preparatory to leaving, as the time 
limit for the flight expires tomorrow. 



and the jumble of locky gorges on this 
.«ide of the summit. The remaining 
distance to this city offers less diffl- 
cultv. but takes the ablator over Lake 
Maggiore and a succession of plains to 
the goal. 

Cam? of A'Ictory or Death. 
The distance from Hrig, Switzerland, 
to Milan is seventy-fl^e miles and the 
prize was for the aviator who should 
accomplish the first flight, starting 
from a table land S0(» feet above the 
^;ea level at the head of the Rhine 
vallev. In addition to reaching a 
heiglit that would bring him over the 
Slmplon summit, and in doing winch 
he must suffer severely from the col<i. 
the aviator was required to guide his 
frail craft over wide chasms, notably 
the gorge of Y.«ette, where a safe <ie- 
scent would be quite impossible, and 
an accident must mean almost certain 



Oh! 



That Awful 
6as 



Did you hear it? How embar* 
rassing. These stomach noisesmake 
you wish you could sink through 
the floor. You imagine everyone 
hears them. Keep a box of CAS- 
C A RETS in your purse or pocket 
and take a part of one after ealmg. 
It will relieve the stomach of gas. <iyg 

CASCAr<RTS lOc a ho« for a week's 
treaiment. Alldrucfflsts HlsKest sellcf 
Id the world — mlUioa boxes a moaCfc 






t__X 




■^n- 



I 

-^1 



I 



>:»i*« 



J,Wi ** ' t r i J^ ■ 



■^■.»— "l^l*^*** 




> 



mf 



■ 




16 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



September 23, 1910. 



COPPERS NERVOUS; 
UNDERTONE WEAK 

Market Regains Early De- 
cline But Closes at 



a Loss. 



rallies were 



i upened weak and 
rely nervous. Anial- 
' l>unch of slop-loss 
onlei-s at ti iat; and profession- 

als suiil on iLiJuiia that a readjustment 
Of coi.j)er prioeis w^ould t-ause a reduc- 
tl>>n In the quotations on the red nietai. 
The reduction in the prices «iuoted by 
Calunn-t & Hecia wa.-s the basis foi- tlie 
report that a reHdjii.-Jlineitt in electroly- 



tic i«rices w ■: 
close short-. 
raUif.l t'- ■ 
lower th,: 

It is . . : 
Hiade a setilei- 
Und that a di 
px.^iiile. Tl 
|:i.:.''i asked 
niarkct 

Tiie lo 
tureless, I'u 



made. Toward the 
d and the market 
ing or a fraction 

,i' Tuolumne has 

:t!; Norte. Butte 

in November is 

s stront? and was 

"'o of the local 



iull and fea- 
•'.lin u a.s the most active 
Btock. North Hutle .sold at $"J6.50. Ked 
Varrior at f.*.0>i'4. Shattuok at f24.5n, 
$l'4.j5 and ti'l.ST^-... Amazon at $-.37*2 
to 12.25. Calum.' ..>; "'irbin at -i^c. 47c 
Had 4*»e, Calun: .v .Sonora at $8.50, 
Keatiiijf at '^''■ 

Amalgam. 1 i at $61.37% to 




$t50.87>,:!. lol. ■;:',•', iff)0.87Vi and then at 
i61.J7Vs. Butte Baliaklava at $5.87^1 to 
|*).12»^, Calumet & Arizona at $57, 
(ireene at |tj.«>2Vi to $6.50 Butte Coali- 
tion at $18.25 to $18.50, Giroux at 
$t;.62U to $«.50V2 to $6.«2%, Superior & 
Pitl.sburg was $11 bid. North i5utte 
sold at $27 to $26.50 to $26.62»;4, Shat- 
tuck In the ea.st at $24.75, $24.87% to 
$24.50. Superior-Michigan waa the 
strongest slock on the board. It opened 
at $5S and went to $t)0. It was excep- 
tionally active. 

• * • 

Clo.=;lng quotations on the Duluth 
stock exchange today follow: 

LlMted Stock*— | Bid. | Asked. 



NIFTIEST 

FALL 
STYLES 

WICHERT & 
GARDINER'S 

For Women. 

KOWrRD & 
FOSTER'^ 

For Men 



."•J^t...> other 
i;iake.-< of na- 
tior.al repute 



SPECIAL! 




''fii 




yi 



AND 





American Saginaw .... 

Butte Coalition 

Butte Alex-Scott, pt pd 

Full pd 

Butte-Ballaklava 

Calumet & Arizona .... 
• 'actus Development .. 

< "opper Queen 

Cordova, pt pd 

Full pd 

Denn-Arizona 

Duluth & Moctezuma 
Clroux Con.solidated . 

Urrefne-Cananea 

Keweenaw 

Live Oak i^evelopment 

North Butte 

( )jibway 

Red Warrior 

Savanna, Pt pd 

Full pd 

Sliaitiuk-.;Vrizoiia .... 

Superior & I'ittsburs 

Warrior L>evelopment 

Zenith Lead & Zinc . . -I 
I iiIlMted Mttu'kM — 

.Amazon Montana . . 

Bla-'k Mountain .... 

Calumet & Montana 

Calumet & Corbln 

Calumet & Sonora. . . . 

(barman Consolidated 

Clii-'f Sonsolidated ... 

Cliff 

Duluth Toroda . . : 

Klenita l>evelopment 

Keatins Glod 

-N'ational 

No! th American 

Ilawhide Royal 

.-^an Antonio 

St. Marys 

.-iiMnmlt 

Tuolumne 

Vermilion Steel & Iron 



Total numl)ei 



of -sli 

• 




ires. 



S oine 
.so now 
Herald 

...n practically 
make — besides 
education: 



women sa\ e only a dollar or 

and then througli reading The 

adds. Others save somelliing 

every purchase they 

aoiuiring a buyer's 




FIRST SIGNS OF 
RAILROAD WAR 



Ihe 



ci^.^_^^||^^2s-^ 



Goplier, 



17 SECO.ND AVEMK \VE!<T. 



Northwestern Road May 

Change Time of its 

Chicago Train. 

With the inauguration of the through 
passenger service of the Soo between 

Duluth and Chicago there will be a 
change in the leaving time of the 
Northwestern train, says a report com- 
ing from reliable sources. 

The rivalry between the two roads is 
already being manifested. The North- 
western would like to know the time 
the Soo's tjhicago train will leave this 
olty. No aunounrement has been made 
by the Soo official.s. for the very reason 
that ihcv know the Northwestern of- 
ticials are anxious to get this piece of 
information. 

But when the Northwestern officials 
do find out the leaving time of tiie Soo, 
:i is said tiiat they will be ready to 
spring their new running time. 

With a city and division passenger 
agent liere, the Soo is going right after 
the passenger business from the start 
There is goiiig to l>e a lot of compe- 
tition between the Northwestern and 
Soo from tlie time the first Soo train 



lou can reason 

wwra it out for yourself 

MA/nW7 that you pay more 

W II W when you buy in 

W ■ BkSLJ the high-rent di-s- 

^^ •' trlcts. Somebody 

W^ has to pay the ad- 

ft^C^¥7 ditlonal expense 

I /■ W of doing business 

r^^'J^^^ii » •/ *"'i 't is none but 

f) /- ^ tkj^J ^^ 'i^x -m, 53- x;^ y^'U. It ^^ through 

- "~" '.I ii/- ■. _ ra^.r^««^^*« ^''^ ^^^ operating 

•''^^-<^2:^\v^/^^^ l^lSll i^ r expenses tliat we 

J^'r^ iUV^'^ 115, Vl V • are enabled to sell 

wr - ' ^^^!s^ SP^* ^^ cheap. 

J^^iO^-^/'^ BHBaM cre:dit 

;"!|^^'» Peninsular 
-"Mmmli M^ Prices 

'BM^^'^fi ,^^->^\ Everything considered, it is 

'*'"*S'''Si^^S3S^'^^') I'SS^ 1/ doubtful if tliere is a Ijettcr 

fv^ ll*l«^^i|^S«<ii a^R^ -'^t.jve on the market today 

1^^^^ %l ^^^kJ\ ^ " Peninsular. 

'^ "^^^ " ' ■ -•" "j^^ i r j^ - ^^^ ^'*^^*" ^^'^^ ^'"^^ ^ ^'"*^ ^'*^ 

l)tf,X''^ ^ ? "v$.W''"C^^^^^ V\ ^'"^ ^" '^^^ floor and they 

'^'W/vi ) ("^^^'^I^X^^Jss^v; 113 are shown principally in three 

^..4^4'ry;. ^^-^^2{^ji^^/ pattern.^ a.s follows: 

^^^^ \^^^^m>l Empire Peninsular 

_*2:ii^^P?^PV No. 713 $34.00 

{tk^vqr>>\^^>..r) (i^fv^Vjij^'f Empire Peninsular 

^>><^^iX^lS^^M-^^ No. 714 $38.00 

^ i>'i -'^B-^^ \>c>njr .^^\<V Empire Fennisular 

€i/ %: Y^ ^^"^ No. 715 $43.00 

^^ *^ VS Empire Peninsular 

No. 716 .$45.00 

ular No. 56 $48. GO 

jVii.mular No. 66 $54. OO 

Peninsular No. 86 $58.00 

Grand Peninsular No. 94 $53. OO 

Grand Peniitsular No. 95 $GO.OO 

Grand Peninsular No. 96 $65. OO 



This 
Rocker 

In Genuine Leather 

A very fine rocker of solid 
oak and genuine leather — 
^ery best guaranteed springs. 
L'su.. :; -ells for $15.00 or 
r.l6.tJ<), very e.xtra special 






! 



i 



1$2S-1S30-1832 W. 






LSON 

Superior St. 



^^- 



^?:'"^/ 



Y Oil II Do Better at Kelly s ! 



V- 






- 






Cut Down Your Coal Bill 

A cheap heating stove with its leaky joints, loose doors and poor construction not only wastjes fuel, 
but is a menace to your health. The Stewart Heater is no novelty, no experiment. For over seventy-five 
years it has been recognized as the best heater made. The Stewart heater has long been the most popular and 

widely used heater in the Northwest, where the rigorous climate demands quality, heat efficiency and long 
service. For simplicity of construction, beauty, quality and durability, no other heater is its equal. 

If you have suffered the annoyance and discomforts caus*ed by heaters with special freak construction 
[designed to overcome the deficiencies of cheapness], you'll better appreciate the simple, common sense 
construction of the Stewart Heater. The cold air is taken in at the center of the bottom of the stove and 
is heated so intensely that a match can be lighted by holding it twenty-four inches above the top. 



-« 



V\\^Vn\^" 



ICl/V. 



Hea 



i^i 



f^KsZM^fl^ 






A Stewart Base Burning Heater will circulate every ounce of air entirely through the 
stove and into a room size 12x15 feet with a 12-foot ceiling in 50 minutes, so that you can 
readily see that by circulating this air through the stove in this time, it makes warm to a 
comfortable and even degree all parts of the room. Another important point, a Stewart 
1 heater will give one-fourth more heat with one-fourth less fuel than any other heater of 
equal size. These few facts explain why there are more Stewart Stoves in use at tlie 
Head of the Lakes than all other makes combined. 

Stei/\^art Base Burner 

i - * 

! Come in and see this fine heater, has revolving firepot, k.rge magazine, du- 

plex grates, and full nickel trimmings. On sale here at $25.00. 



vf 



\^ 



?K 



»: 



ir 



^/^ 



YCtJ 



I 



-^^^ii^msLsm 



• ^ - 

The Heart of Dicluih, 



We'll take your old stove and allow you all 

it is worth as part payment on a Stewart. 

The balance can be paid at the rate of 

$1.00 Per 
Week 



Kelly s Tln-ee-Room 
Outfit, $6g.oo. 

Terms $1.50 Per Week. 



leaves for Chicago, and the fir.st faitit 
signs of the traffic fight are at hand. 



TICKET AGENT 



AT NEW DEPOT. 



Don Cole lia.s been made ticket agent 
of the new Soo depot. Fi>r the past 
.'•ix vears he has been assistant ticket 
agent at the Union depot, being right 
hand man to Fred Ober, the general 
ticket agent of the depot. Mr. Cole is 
considered one of the best handlers -.f 
passenger tickets in the Northwest, ard 
his promotion comes solely as a re- 
ward of merit. He will assume his 
new^ duties with the opening of the 
new' Soo depot for business. 

WILL testIraTlroad 

SIXTEEN HOUR LAW. 



Chicago, Sept. 23. — A suit has been 
t egun against the Chicago & Alton 
railroad by United States District At- 
torney Sims to test the validity of the 
federal law restraining employes in 
the train service of railroads from 
working more than sixteen hours con-* 
inuously, or from returning to work 
without having had ten hours of reiir 

The declaration in the suit -sets forth 
that on two occasions the Chicago & 
Alton company, kept the crew of a 
freight train running between Bloom- 
ington and Jollet, 111., on duty more 
than sixteen hours. The case is looKeJ 
upon as an important one because c,f 
the fact tliat the constitutionality of 
restrictions upon the rights of men of 
labor Avill be passed upon by the 
courts. 

NEWSBOYS TO SEE 
FIGHT PICTURES 

Special Performance at the 

Lyceum for Boys ¥/ho 

Sell Heralds. 

"Hey, come on, kids, we'se goin' to 
see der big fight!" 

And so they are, the newsboys of The 
Herald. 

Charles L. Geraghty, the owner of 
the films that are being sliown in Min- 
nesota, Iowa and Missouri, has not 
forgotten the fact that he was once a 
newsboy. Down in St. Louis he got 
his start in life by selling the papers of 
his native burg. Since he has drifted 
into bigger things he has never for one 
moment forgotten the little street 
merchants. 

Because he remembers the boys, and 
because he is interested in them and 
likes them, he is going to give a special 
performance of the fight pictures at 
9:30 tomorrow morning. The privilege 
tlie boys of The Herald will have is 
through the courtesy of Mr. Geraghty 
and Charles A. Marshall, tiie owner of 
the Lyceum theater. 

"The average boy ought to know 
how to liandle his fists," said Mr. 
Geraghty. 'I don't believe in boys 
fighting, any more than a minister or 
a fond parent. But there are times 
when a boy who is a regular American 
boy has to fight or be called a coward. 
It is good that a boy know how to 
fight. 

"When I was a kid, all the fighting 
1 ever knew was learned at the ex- 
pense of my facial features. And, at 
that, I never looked for trouble. I 



think boys wh* know how to box and 
handle their hands are healthier and 
happier and better boys for this knowl- 
edge. If I thought there was any- 
thing objectionable in the least about 
the Jeffries-.Iohnson fight pictures, you 
can take it from me that 1 would not 
invite the boys to be my guests. 

"Mayor Gaynor of New York city 
did the sensible act when he refused 
to stop the pictures from being shown 
\h New York. He stated that if the 
fight pictures v/ill teach the American 
Vioy how to dei^nd himself, he was in 
favor of the pletures. 

"The agitation against the pictures 
is foolish in the extreme. There is 
nothing In them that a woman could 
not view with the perfect assurance 
of not being offended In the least. For 
that reason, and because the newsboy 
is my friciid, I want the boys of The 
Herald to see t"he fight." 

Every newsboy of The Herald will 
be admitted to the fight pictures free 
at the special performance, and Mr. 
Geraghty is asgtired of one of the most 
enthusiastic and interested audiences 
of the week. 



SUPERIOR 



WILL SUE OWNER 

OF AUTOMOBILE. 



H. B. Corey, who was arraigned ia 
municipal court yesterday on a charge 



of speeding and whose case was set 
over until Sept. 29, will also be made 
the defendant in a personal Injury suit 
brought by Jack Hayden and William 
Civanaugh. 

Hayden and Cavanaugh were struck 
M'^ednesday night by Corey's machlno 
a1; Third street and Tower avenue. Cav- 
anaugh was badly Injured and had to 
be taken to the hospital. Hayden ee- 
cai)ed serious injury, it is said. 

Hayden said today, that in the event 
O!! tiie death of Cavanaugh, a man- 
slaughter charge would be pushed 
against Corey. Corey Is a well known 
Superior lumberman. Cavanaugh lias 
a good chance for recovery. 
♦^ 

Fast Game Expected. 

The Big Dulutii baseijall team will 
play the TurnbuU - Cameron - Degler 
team Sunday at Hislop park. The Big 
Liuluths stand high among the semi- 
pro teams In Duluth this year and the 
Turnbulls have cleaned up everything 
so far in Superior. The game Sunday 
i.-i expected to be a fast one. 

Local Cases Scheduled. 

Local cases for the adjourned Au- 
gust term of the state supreme court 
are sciieduled to come up Oct. 4 and 5- 
Among the personal injury suits that 
have been appealed Is that of Matt 
Cliarron vs. Northwestern Fuel com- 
pany, in which Charron was suing for 
$35,000. He was given a verdict in 
circuit court. There are several other 



personal Injury and civil cases to cwme 
up for settlement. 

PRESBYTERIANS ERECT 

NEW $4<i),000 EDIFICE. 



Work on the |40, 
ntie Presbyterian 
started tomorrow b 
plaise. The contrac 
pletion of the job i 
tractor Dauplaise a 
struction the new 
ing on Ogden aven 
way and Eleventh 
cost $10,000. 



JOO Hammond Ave- 
church will be 
y Contractor Dau- 
: calls for the com- 
n December. Con- 
Iso has under con- 
Jlty Bakery build- 
ue bet'^'een Broad- 
streets. It is to 



handed down recently in the supreme 
court, which is holding up i>avlng op- 
erations on Hugiiitt avenue and Bel- 
knap streets at tlie present time. 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY FOLEY 
RESIGNS FROM POSITION. 



PROPERTY 0W> 
CITY TO ST 



ERS WANT 
AND EXPENSE. 



Property owners <>ii Banks avenue are 
I trying to avoid paying assessments 
for improvements on that thoroughfare 
and have organized to attempt to show 
that the paving expense should come 
out of the city fund. The movement 
j Is the result of ai interpretation of 
the Green Bay pa .-ing r^ase decision. 



I>istrict Attorney W. R. Foley has 
resigned from j>ublic office and while 
Governor Da»-idson has as yet named 
no one to succeed Mr. Foley, it is prob- 
able that Assistant District Attorney 
Archie McKay will be selected. Mr. 
Foley will accept the retainer of th© 
Duluth Street Kail way company. 
- ■ - 

Railroads Restrained. 

Mandatory proceedings liave been 
started in superior court against the 
Eastern Railway of Minnesota, the Great 
Northern and Northern Pacific rail- 
roads to restrain tliem from doing any 
more filling along the Superior bay 
front and also requiring them to va- 
cate wli'^re they have filled at street 
end.s. The suit was brought as the 
result of a resolution taken by th© 
council several weeks ago. 



/^ 



QgslitiJ-Value-A|.j 



Saturday's 

Specials at 

Henricksen 's 



Dui-OTM. M'NN 

•TJnder the Chimei.' 



^%i£Ka£iuiMisii^ S2.00 Gives Choice of 

Ladies' $3.75 Jabot and 
Shirt Waist Sets 

All gold front— Dutch Collar Pins, Ctiff Links, Brooches. Bar 
Pins and Beauty Pins. Only a few dozen sets will be sold, 
so be early. 

Hawkes and Libbey Cut Glass at 
Reductions o/ 25, SSVs and 50% 

We are remodeling our store, and find that our beautiful 
stock of Cut Glass is in the way of the contractor and his 
men. We have no place to move it and will use the power 
of price to distribute it among ()ur friends and patrons. An- 
ticipate ypur Wedding and Christmas Cut Glass wants and 
buy noWkt 



rJCl^Y eChPAN^ 



332 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



Our Stcre is Now Open Saturday Aiternoons and Evenings. 



■^ 




» 



Second Avenue East and Superior Street. 



Duluth, Minn. 



=« 



Saturday Evening Specia l! 

None Sole Before 7:30-The Price 




^> 



Usually Sold at $5 or 90 cents 

These Dish Pans come in a nice, dark blue, mottled enamelware; 
the 21-quart size; measuring 19 inches across. You will notice they 
are of a substantial size and quality, and not the little enamelled tin 
affairs so often run at "specia'i sales." One to a customer and none 
by 'phone. 



Easy Payments on a Single Piece 
or Complete Outfit! 

Perhaps >ou don't always have all the cash when you want a 
bill of goods. Now there is where we can help you. It's our business 
and you are welcome to use our most liberal credit plan all the time. 
Open a partial payment account. It's a very convenient and easy way 
to get any ne<'ded furnishings for the home. 



« 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



1 



-^r 



1 



-rf 



mt^ 



^ 



T. ■ > 



•*u» 



JL_ 



T" 



H 





Since opening our new location at 131 West Su- 
perior street, we have been unable to handle the 
crowds that have continually thronged our store. 
From now on it is going to be our aim to hold a 
Clearing Sale on the last Saturday of each month. 
Since opening, the LEADER has always, and will, 
give you strictly up-to-the-minute dependable Ladies' 
Ready-to-wear Garments, all with the mark of quality. 
We want everybody within 100 miles of Duluth to be 
here Saturday, Sept. 24th, and get their share of the 
good things we have to offer. Low prices, courteous 
treatment, with better goods will be our watch-word. 
Don't miss the day and date. 



Ladies' Flannel Pel- 



Hand embroid- 
ered, heavy wfiglit. 
all sizes 



Night Robes 

Lace and em- 
broidery trim 
med.fine qua: 
itv of musHn 





Children's Petticoats 

Hobble Petticoats, 
fleeced, lace trim- 
med — selling price. 
only 

Heatherbloom Petti- 
coats — 

Embroidered > r 
Persian burden.', 
flounce .__ 




Ladies' and Masses' 
Sweater Gsats — 



Fancy weave, 
all colors and 
lengths — sale 
price 




Coats 



Seal Plush; 54-inch 
Skinner satin lined 





Furs 



i'ersian Lamb Coat; Leipsic 
dye; 51 inches long 




i Voiie Skiri 



Altman's Voile Skirts, 
trimmed or plaited — 



braided, 




Silk Waists- 

Net and messallne 
white and ecru — 



in cream, 




l?!iss8s and Juniors- 

The ideal Suit for school; 
all colors 



in 




Ladies' Gowns — 

Taffeta, Messalines, Rajah 
and Panama 




Oil Boiled Taffeta 

Waists taflorVd- 




Silk Kimonos — 

Japanese patterns, yoke and em- 
pire cffL-rt — 



Broadcloth Coats — 

52-inch; Skinner satin lined 

$12,50 and $18.50 



Ladies' Suiis 



Serge- 
cnls ani 



Broadcloths, 
fanc)- materials 



Diag- 




W'liite Fox Sets; large shawl, 
collar and muff 




131 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



-^5^ 



'^M^^ 




that no two mines are exactly alike 
as to their coal product. Good coal 
la nothing less than good coal, and 
our examination proves that the best 
la from tl^e Pennsylvania Coal Com- 
panji'B ' PITTSTON" mines. 

"PiTTSTON" anthraciit;, 

"Tlio Coal of Quality." 

PITTSBURGH COAL CO. 

Cor. Fourth Ave. W. and Supertor St, 
TclephoiiCB 2100. 



DECLINE IN 
DEATH RATE 

Now Lowest on Record, 
According to Census Bu- 
reau s Bulletin. 



High Death Rate Not Neces- 
sarily Found in Large 
Cities. 



Washington, Sept. 23. — The death 
rate In the death registration cities 
and states of the United States dorpped 
to 15 per 1,000 of provisionally estimat- 
ed population last year, according to 
the forthcoming United States census 
bureau's bulletin on mortality statis- 
tics for 1909, which has been submitted 
to Director Imrand by Dr. Cressy L.. 
Wilbur, chief statistician for vital sta- 
tistics. 

In 1908 the death rate in the census 
bureau's registration area was 15.4 per 
l.OoO and in the bureau's annual re- 
port for that year, issued last spring, 
it was stated that It is evident an era 
of low mortality has begun. 

The death rate for 1909 is, the bulle- 
tin state.g, lower than that for any 
previous year of registration and 
probably is the lowest that ever 
occurred in the history of the United 
States. 

It Is stated that the mortality was 
distributed with more than ordinary 
uniformity throughout the year 1909 
and no epidemics of other than a very 
local extent were found to have oc- 
curred. 

Lower In Rutland. 

It Is a fact of much interest, the bul- 
letin states, as showing the general 
prevalence In 1909 of extremely fa- 
vorable conditions for human life, that 
the death rate of England and Wales 
fur that year was 14.5 per 1,000 which 
was also the lowest on record for that 
country, while the rate of 14 for the 
city of London was even lower and 
demonstrates the fallacy of the belief 
that high death rates are necessarily 
found in large cities. 

The total number of deaths returned 
from the registration area for 1909 
was 732.538, an Increase of 40,964 over 
the number, 691,574, returned fur 1908 

Of the total number in 1909, there 
were 398. 6S7 deaths, or 54 4 per cent, 
among males, as compared with 64.3 
in 1908. 

The largest number of deaths re- 
turned for any month in 1909 was 
70,093 for March. With the great ma- 
jority of the registration states and 
cities It is the month having the 
largest number of deaths, while .Tune 
is the month of the lowest mortality. 

The provisionally estimate aggre- 



of Missouri mules down Pennsylvania 
avenue in Washlnprton if electe-l 
speaker of the next house to succeed 
Joe Cannon. He will toe several hun- 
dred dollars richer and thereby de- 
parts the humor, he fiays. 

Mr. Clark's prlvatp eecretary, Wal- 
lace Bassford, gave out ^to the press 
here today the following^ explanation: 
"It is not tlie desire of'Mr. Clark to 
do anything that would appear, freak- 
isli, and he has not been indulging in 
one of those bets of the class of the 
wager as to who would roll a peanut 
around the block. One day Mr. Clark 
was sitting at a table in the Cottage 
hotel In Bowling Green with Luke 
Emerson, the "Jack King" of Pike 
county, when the master pf the speak- 
ership came up. Emprson is a Repub- 
lican who always vt^ea for Clark. He 
said : ;, 

•' "Champ, when you are elected 
speaker I will make you a present of 
the finest .span of mules in the st.'xte 
if you will drive them down Pennsyl- 
vania avenue.' 

"Mr. Clark thanked him and said he 
would certainly agree to tlie terms. 
This was not to be sneered at by a 
comparatively poor man, for that team 
of mules would be worth at least $C0o 
cash, and while they are not usuallv 
considered proper for carriage pur- 
poses, those mules would look slicker 
and trot better than any team uf car- 
riage horses in Washington." 
• ■ 
Don't Drenk Domh. 
Severe strains on the vital organs, 
like strains on machinery, cause 
break-downs. You can't " over-tax 
stomach, liver, kidneys, bowels or 
nerves without sr-rlous danger to your- 
self. If you are weak or run down, 
or under strain of any kind, take Elec- 
tric Bitters, the matchless, tonic medi- 
cine. Mrs. J. E. Van de Sande of 
Kirkland, 111., write.*: "That I dia 
not break down, while enduring a I 
most severe strain, for three months, 
is due wholly to Electric Bitters." Use 
them and enjoy health and strength. 
Satisfaction positively guaranteed. 50c 
at al) drutrs;ists. 




WILLIAMSON <& MENDENHALL. 



The New Fa II Bos- 
tonian Shces — 
$3.50 and $4,00 



store Open Saturiiay Night 
Till 10:30. 



WILLIAMSON (8^ MENDENHALL. 



Just Think of This Selection. 

The % Winners are slicwlng seventy- 
four different styles of suits at $15. 
More than all other stores combined. 

WEST TO TALK OF 
CONSERVATION 



the 



gate population of 

area of the United States in 1909 is 
4S. 776. 893 or 55.3 per cent of the total 
estimated population of continental 
United States. 

The RefflBtratlon Area. 

The official death registration area 
is composed of those states and cities 
which require the registration of a 
death before the issuance of a burial 
permit and which have complied with 
other requirements Imposed by the 
census bureau as conditions precedenf 
to inclusion in this area whose death 
returns are annually collected, tabu- 
lated, analyzed, and presented in 
bulletin and report form by the census 
bureau. In 1909 the death registra- 
tion area Included the following states: 

California, Colorado, Connecticut, 
Indiana. Maine, Maryland, Massachu- 
setts, Michigan. New Hampshire, New- 
Jersey, New York, Ohio, Massachu- 
Rhode Island. South Dakota, Vermont, 
Washington and Wisconsin. 

In addition to these, returns of 
deaths were received from fifty-four 
cities in non-registration states. In 
which the registration under local or- 
dinances Is considered satisfactory. The 
District of Columbia, which is coter- 
minous with the city of Washington, 
is not Included In the list of separate 
registration cities. For most purposes 
it is treated as a city, but in the table 
shov.ing groups of registration states 
the District of Columbia is Included 
as a state area. 

IF ELECTED SPEAKER, 

Champ Clark Will Drive Mules 
Down Pennsylvania Avenue. 

Montgomery, Mo., Sept. i;3. — Con- 
gressman Cliamp Clark, minority lead- 
er, objects to the "funny" side of the 
story in Eastern newspapers to the 
effect that he is going to drive a team 



Governor Hay of Washington 

Issues Call for New 

Congress. 

Seattle, Wash., Sept. 23. — Governor 
M. F. Hay of Washington has sent to 
the governors of the Pacific coast and 
mountain states letters asking their 
views on the advisability of holding 

another conservation congress, at 
which there might be a freer discus- 
sion of conservation as viewed in the 
West than there was, according to 
I Governor Hay, at the recent St. Paul 
meeting. 

"I'ractically all the "VN^estern govern- 

! ors are in accord on the conservation 

j of natural resources,"' said Governor 

I Hay. "The so-called conservatioii con- 

1 gress at St. Paul expressed onlj- the 

I Eastern idea, which is the Pinchot idea 

registration | ^t conservation. There was no open 

■discussion of our side of the question. 

The West as well as the East wants to 

conserve our natural resources. We of 

the West desire to preserve from waste 

and to make proper use of things that 

belong to us." 



The Big Duluth 

Fall Suits and 
Overcoats 

Are Ready 



Including the L System make for young 
fellows, and Hirsh, Wickwire & Co. and Adler- 
Rochester Clothes for those who desire the 
more conservative styles. There's browns, blues 
and grays to your heart's content. Cravenettes 
and Overcoats with the new "Presto" convertable 
collar, a wide range to choose from in prices 
running from — 

$10, $15, $18, $2 0, 
$22.50 up to $40. 




-<-?-. fu- 



•^t 



-^ 



ASK PERMANENT 
TARIFF BOARD 



i. 



EiNDS KIDNEY OR 
BLADDER MISERY 

Kidneys Act Fine and Head- 

ache Vanishes After a 

Few Doses. 



Association Would Attack 

Commission to Treasury 

Department. 

Washington, Sept. 23. — Plans are an- 
nounced here of a campaign to be con- 
ducted by the National Tariff Commis- 
sion association to have congress enact 
legislation to make the tariff board a 
permanent body to be affiliated as a 
bureau with the treasury department. 

Henry R Towne of New "iork, treas- 
urer and a director of the National 
Tariff Commission association, after a 
conference with Chairman Emery and 
members of the tariff board, issued a 
statement indorsing the work of the 
board In its effort to secure reliable 
information upon which to base tariff 
schedules, and emphasising the desire 
of manufacturers to co-operate with 
the hoard in its work or to procure 
legislation which will assure Its con- 
tinuance. 

The National Tariff Commission as- 
sociation grew out of the tariff con- 
ference at Indianapolis In 1909. It is 
composed of delegates from all parts 
of the Unit ed States. 

WANTS TO FURNISH 
AN AERIAL NAVY 



And Your Sons, Also, 



should he dressed in Big Duluth 
Clothes for Fall and Winter, 

Here are the finest Boys' Clothes we've been 
.ible to secure from the very best mc-kers and, at 
prices remarkably low, when our high standard 
of value is considered. 

Boy^s Fall Suits^ Reefers 
and Overcoats at $2.45 
to $ J 6.50. 

Fall Headwear, Footwear and Furnishings 
that will complete the boys' outfit and make him 
the best dressed boy at any gatheriig. 




YOUR FALL HAT 

Don't spoil an otherwise good appearance by 
failure to don a new Fall Hat. 

Guyers' $3.50 and $4.00 

MaiIor/s__-_ $3.00 and $3.50 
Gordon $3 00 

Recognized Headquarters for John B. 
Stetson Hats, S3. 50 to $5.00. 




-s.^.; 



Fall 
Furnishings 

Come here and be 
sure of greatest variety, 
highest quahty, utmost 
style and beauty and 
best values. 



FALL SHIRTS. 

star, Wilson, E. & W. and 
Faultless Fall Shirts in all the 
new colorings — $1.50 to $2.50. 

FALL NECKWEAR. 

All the new shapes and shades 
— 50o to $1.50. 

FALL UNDERWEAR 

In Union and Two-Piece Suits, 
in every weight to please any 
man at 50e to $8.00. 

Fall Pajamas and Night 
Robes — 50c to $3.00. 



Our line of $1 
finest In the city. 



Shirts is the 



New Fall Jewelry, Wallung 
gticks, Fancy Handkerchiefs. 




M— ^ 






E RE^PAIRIFfG 



~BV 



NE:AI^LY« the SHOE SVRGEON 

10 FIRST AVEKUE WEST 

(Heimbach patent). No 



Home of the Twin Detachable Rubber Heel 

nails: no nail holes: preat cushio:i oTo-'t. 



iiW 



s* 



.^-^ 



Every Wsmaif 

ii Lbteiestec ai.d i»iicuM know 

about the woncierfnl 

MARVEL Whirling Spray 

I The Tif>w V» jiuiil Hyria^t. Jnjtf- 

tt.nan'i Suction, lieat—Sai. 
est— Mnat Convenient. 
ItCJconset InitcatSjr 



•^^^ 



Akk joor dni<»Ut for It. 
Ir he ri\nnot simply th« 
MAKVKr... accept no 

c'.lur. hut wmt itaiiip for 
lllintraie'l book— waiKj. If. prlves 
Cull pMtlculan and i1i.'-i>otuui» i:. 
T&luiit)le <•>!&< <les. MAK%ICI. « O. 



Far Sala »<• Hu WIrtk. OrusfilM. 



rnlr: 



— SILVERWARE 

■When you want silverware, come 
in and Fee us — we have one of the 
largest and best lines In the city. 

J. QRUESEN. 

Third Avenue West aod First St. 

Opposite Wolvin Building. 



Subscribe for The Herald 



If your kidneys are disordered or 
you suffer with backache or bladder 
misery a few^ doses of Pape's Diuretic 
now will effect a cure. 

Put an end to kidney trouble while 
it is only trouble — before It develops 
into Dropsy, Diabetes, Gravel or 
Bright's disease. 

The moment you suspect any kid- 
ney, bladder or urinary disorder, or 
feel a dull, constant Backache, or the 
urine is thick, cloudy, offensive or full 
of sediment, Irregular of passage or 
attended by a scalding sensation, be- 
gin taking Pape's Diuretic as directed, 
with the knowledge that there is no 
other medicine, at any price, made 
anywhere else In the world, which is 
so harmless or will effect so thorough 
and prompt a cure. 

Pape's Diuretic acts directly upon 
the kidneys, bladder and urinary sys- 
tem; cleans, heals and regulates these 
organs, ducts and glands and com- 
pletes the cure within a few days. 

Pains in the back, sides or loins, 
rheumatic twinges, Prostatic trouble, 
debilitating headache, nervousness, 
dizziness, weakness, bilious stomach, 
sleeplessness, inflamed or puffy eye- 
lids, worn-out feeling and many other 
symptoms caused by clogged. Inactive 
kidneys promptly vanish. Frequent, 
painful and uncontrollable urination 
due to a weak or Irritable bladder is 
overcome. 

Your physician, pharmacist, banker 
or any mercantile agency will Aouch 
for the responsibility of Pape, Thomp- 
son & Pape of Cincinnati, w'ho pre- 
pare Pape's Diuretic — 50 cent treat- 
ment — sold by every druggist in the 
world. 



John B. Ryan Offers Uncle 

Sam Reserve of 1,000 

Aeroplanes. 

"Wasaington, Sept. 23. — John Barry 
Ryan, son of Thomas F. Ryan, the New 
York multi-millionaire, spent yester- 
day In the war and navy departments 
and succeeded in enthusing the officials 
over tiie proposition to provide the 
army and navy with a tleet of airships 
tiiat would augment the powers of the 
twin services 

The attractive feature of Mr. Ryan's 
I proposition was its economical side; he 
did not ask a dollar of government 
money in return for the creation of 
a reserve of al>out 1,000 aeroplanes 
that miglit be called Immediately into 
service by the government In time of 
need. 

The idea Is to have an officer detailed 
from each branch to act with the 
aeronautical reserve, acting in an adv 
vlsory capacity and to assist in the 
organization of the reserve on military 
line.«. Plans for the campaign are to be 
mapped out and there will be maneu- 
vers and drills to prepare for actual 
warfare- Efforts will be made to de- 
velop aeroplanes of greater size than 
those now in use, so as to transport 
a corporal's guard and to carry suf- 
ficient ammunition for effective bomb 
work. IMr. Ryan's proposition appealed 
very strongly to all of the army and 
navy officers with whom he talked. 

HYENA IS EATING 

ITSELF TO DEATH. 



of physical exhaustion and keepers at 
tho zoo fear that it will be necessary 
to kiil the animal. Dementia is be- 
lieved to havt- atta-i-kcfl tlip hyena. 

3 Winner $10 Suits 

Will cost you $15 and $18 at the high 
stores. Try one; you can get your 
money back if you are not satitfied. 

TAFT INDEBTED TO HARL4N. 

President's First Federal Judgeship 
Secured Through Jurist. 

U'athlngton, Sept. 23. — Should Presi- 
dent Taft send to congress the name ot 
Justice Harlan for chief justice of the 
supreme court, a iiosslble move whicii 
has been widely discussed, he would re- 
pay a debt of gratitude of long stand- 
ing. 

Friends of the jurist and the pre.sl- 
dont lecal! that in 1892 when President 
Btnj&:nin Harrison was at a loss to 
find a suitable man for appointment 
to the United States circuit bench for 
tlie Sixth district, he sought advice 
from Justice Harlan. Without hesita- 
tion Justice Harlan advanced the name 
of William H. Taft, and Mr. Taft, who 
shortly before had resigned from the 
superior court of Cincinnati to become 
sollictor general, received the appoint- 
m<»nt. 



was turned back because he didn't have I He passed them Flips of paper on 



the amount of moiiej required by law, 
and also because it was claimed that 
li6 had perjured himself. Later he 
smuge'.ed himtelf to Michigan, where 
he was located by the goverlnment 
officials. Before he was apprehended 
he I'ad made his v.'ay to this city, 
where he was disco.cred working in 
the L'nlver.sal flour mill. 



•DEAF MITE" WAS 

ORDERING A MEAL. 



Efforts are being made by the police 
to locate an alleged deaf mute who 
played on the sympathies of several 
women in a local restaurant last even- 
ing to get money erough for a meal. 



wliich he had written that he could 
not talk or hear, and was suffering 
for want of food. AVhen one woman 
returned a few minutes later to get 
an article whicli she had dropped the 
"deaf mute" was ordering an elabo- 
rate meal and carrying on an animated 
conversation. 



Ireland Will .\ot Talk. 

Omaha, Neb., Sept. 23. — Archbishop 
Ireland of St. Paul, who is accompany- 
ing Cardinal Vannutelli, refused to re- 
ceive newspaper reporters at the resi- 
dence of Bishf'p Scannel unle.^s as- 
sured that he did not wish him to talk 
on the Rof^'sevelt-Storer dispute. 

"I have nothing to say on that sub- 
ject," he said. 



Washington, Sept. 23. — Persistently 
gnawing off Its left hind leg and 
drinking its own blood, a spotted 
hyena of the brooding, not the laugh- 
ing, variety, is -commuting propressive 
suicide at the national zoological gar- 
den. 

The animal, a gift to the Zoo from 
Adam Fcrepaugh in 1895, began the 
process of self destruction several days 
ago, and before its keepers discovered 
the cause of the injury, it had chewed 
the flesh from the paw to the middle 
Joint of tho leg. It is now in a state 



BOY BRAVES DEADLY 

CURRENT FOR MATE. 

Pittsburg, Pa., Sept. 23.— While an 
el'»ctric meat crusher was grinding oft 
the hand of Raymond Guilfoyle, aged 
15, Charles Tompus, aged 14. jumped 
on a butcher bench in the Diamond 
market yesterday and, tearing down the 
high voltage wires at the peril of his 
own life, broke the circuit and stopped 
the machinery. The wires swung about 
the floor, sputtering like a piece of 
fireworks, until electricians arrived. 
Tompus escaped injury. 

Guilfoyle was feeding meat into a 
giinder when his hand was caught and 
his screams caused the crowds In the 
market to flee The machine had to tie 
cut in pieces with a hack saw to re- 
lease the hoy's hand. 

ENGLISHMAN IS 

BEING DEPORTED. 



Try a Box of 
Guaranteed Hosiery 



•=»i*i 



-4»~.>-«»-^^i0<M I- 



Don't put it off any longer. 

Buy six pairs of genuine 
••HoleprooP' today and at once 
banish darning and darned 
hose for six months. 

"Holeproof" is the original 



guaranteed hosiery. It is soft, 
light-weight, stylish and coo!. 
No other even begins ti» com* 
pare with it. The trade-mark 
shown here ia your assurance 
of superior quality. 



^4 ^ 'P*^IM|5)ILJ^ 

foleprooniosieru 

FOR MEN women' AND CHILDREN^ 




fl.50 to f3.00 per bo» of six i>airs. 






25c to 50c per pair, 
gnaranteed 6 months. 

Three pairs of warranted pure silk Holeprooi' Hose, guaranteed 3 months 
only $2.0). 

You don't find hosiery value like this ererrwherci 

Drop in and see these buse today. ^fiQ 

FLO AN & LEVEROOS 



Frederick C. Pearce. the Enplishman 
ordered deported by the Federal gov- 
ernment, left Duluth yesterday in 
c large of Inspector Daly of the immi- 
gration department. He will be taken 
back to England. 

Pearce tried to get into the United 
States from Three Rivers. Que., but 




T- C 



orRcr 



w 



indows 



« 



At the Glass Block Store. 



% 




m^m 




w« 



18 



Friday, 



THE 
GREAT 



CAELE SiS^Y 
King of Mediums 







LOW 
FEE 



50c 



TODAY AND 
TOMORROW 



WITHOIT A!»KI>iCi A UIKSTIOX 

He teli.i you exactly what 
troubles, worries or perplexes you 
Tiow. and what will bring success 
<'alls you by name and reveals 
to you the "'Secret of SnceeMs" — 
How to charm. fascinate and 
control the one you de;sire, even 
though miles away — who and 
when you will marry, If ever 
V."hat Is the best to do in any se- 
rl.>u3 undertaklnff, in bu3ines?s, 
l>.v-». courtship, niarriaKe, heulth, 
jnliies. mining. ►»t<\ He tells it 
111; to yju. Mnkc-* uo f«li«e 

l»r<»ini<«e(i. does huneMt work, no 
oue leavcH dlM.iatlMfled — No 
charge in advance and no fee 
asked unless you set the truth, 
but you must come to him sin- 
cere and honivst or he cannot 
help you. Low Fee, 54) Cent** To- 
day. All business strictly con- 
:. iential. 

129 EAST FIRST STREET 

OpitOMite Vriuory. 
lliiurn: lO to S, Ually He Sunday. 



Great Bargains in 

OSTRICH 
PLUMES 




Ladies' Plumes will be in 
i^reat demaiil tliis fall. All the 
latest styles in Hats are graced 
with Ostrich Plumes. We 
qii'jte a few bargains for the 
cmiiig week : 
S2.00 French Flumes- 
special 99^ 

$3.00 French Plumes- 
special $1.45 

$4.00 French Plumes- 
special , . .$1.95 

$5.00 French Plumes- 
special .S2.45 

$6.00 French Plumes- 
special $3.95 



AFRICAN PLUME 



Wrrrl From 
' Farm (o Yon 



17/. East 
Superior St. 



FREE! 

Repairs for one year if 
you buy your umbrella 



at 



A. GrNGOLD'S 

UMBRELLA FACTORY 

125 EAST SrPKRiOU ST. 

(It pjiys to buy direct from 
the tna;5c-r.) 



_ 



ONE MORE CHANCE 



Only Oue More liecture at Free Bak- 
ing School in K. P. Ilall. 



Saturd ly at 2 o'clock Mrs. Brings 
«rlll give ii>r last lecture of practical 
baking. 

At Saturday'3 lecture she will Il- 
lustrate, bake and h^x\q lemon cake, 
cookies and nut biscuits. 

If you have not yet received your 
Cook's Book ask your grocer to de- 
Itvor your can of K C and bring the 
certificate found In the can to the 
lecture and secure the Cook's Book 
free. 




Complete 
line of 
Trusses. 

Mail or 

diTS 

promptly 
filled. 



UIIDTU'C RED CROSS 
ff in I n O DRUG STORE 

j;; \\ i>T .sii'i.Kiou sTRi:t:T. 



BURDEN NOT 
FOR SHIPPERS 

Commissioner Lane Says That 

Freight Rates Should Not 

Cover All Trouble. 

Suggests Need of Remodeling 

Railroad Methods in 

Management 



Chicago, Sept. 23. — Hope that the 
proposed increases In freight rates will 
be upset by the interstate commerce 
commission is felt among .shippers to- 
day "as a result of the declarations of 
Commissioner Lane at yesterday after- 
noon's hearing. 

When the hearing was resumed to- 
day tliere was evidence of increased ] 
interest along the lines indicated by i 
Commissioner I-Aine yesterday, when | 
he intimated thai the railroads could 
hardly expect the shippers to contrib- I 
uie the entire amount needed to make I 
ui> wliat they claimed is a discrepancy | 
iietween the incomes and expenses of ; 
the carriers. 

Kailroads must adjust their econom- I 
ical difllculties by some other means } 
than by asking shippers to contribute 
the funds therefor, in the opinion ex- 
pressed by Interstate Commerce Com- 
missioner Franklin K. Lane. 
BaNed on Tetitimony. 
As railroad ofticers in testi tying had 
:ti?reed that there were only two fac- 
tors in efficient railroad management — 
the amount of rates charged and the 
method of capitalization and financing 
— the elimination of the rate question 
oy the commissioner aroused consider- 
able interest among the railroad men 
and attorneys present. They sought 
to iearn if the commissioner thereby 
implied that there must be readjust- 
ment of the method of financing big 
carrier systems, but Mr Lane ignored 
their efforts and continued to ask the 
witness to whom he had directed his 
startling remarks, pointed questions 
on the amount and disposition of earn- 
ings of the railroad in question, the 
Chicago. Milwaukee & rft. Paul. 

Kollo^^ed Ii^niM' TeHtimuny. 
The witness, whose testimony evoked 
this display of the commissioner's 
judgment of the nterits of the rail- 
roads' present plea for higher rates, 
was William Ellis, commerce counsel 
for the St I'aul. 

Mr. Ellis had testified his company 
was suft'ering from too much busine-^s, 
that the increase had meant an in- 
crease in the unit of cost which grew 
faster than the unit of Income, tliereby 
threatening the yearly surplus of earn- 
ings above payment of dividends, cost 
of oi>eration and the maintenance. 
Commissioner Lane then said: 

"As the country develops there will 
be more and more freight delivered to 
you and as conditions are now, the 
rates constantlj- must be Increased, 
acroidlng to the argument of railroad 
jificials. 

"I regard It as a serious menace to 
tlie Western countrj' if the rates con- 
stantly are to be increased. We must 
work out this problem on lines other 
than by the proposed method of rals- 
the tariff. If not, there is no time 
when we can say the maximum has 
been reached " 

This unexpected development In the 
rate hearing came as a result of the 
In^iuirv into the St. Paul's profits, 
particularly from the Puget sound ex- 
tension acquired in recent years. Mr. 
IJlIis denied the commissioner's sug- 
gestion that the roads' optimism v/hen 
It built the trans-continental extension 
had turned to pessimism now. 

Proflt« From Extension. 
"If It had not been for that road, he 
said, "we would have had nothing 
from operation to aid to our surplus 
last year. That extension added about 
$i:,o'»u,oyo to the surplus, in addition to 
$2.r.S9.57;> from other sources. Our 
total surplus Is about |50,000.0(J0." . 

He then told the commissioners that 
expense cost was overtaking earnings., 
at'.d would continue so long as more 
traffic was hauled, as might be etx- 
pected. 

In answer to questions put to him. 
Mr. Ellis said that if the gross income 
ae.Kt vear were to be $79,000,000 from 
this year's figure of $64,000,000, the per- 
ceiiiage of profit would be less- 

"Uo vju mean to say the cost of 
doing the additional $15,000,000 In busi- 
ness would be equal to that sum?" was 
asked. 

•'I mo.-.n the percentage of profit 
would not be so great," said Ellis. 

Attorney H. C. Lust, representing 
th'5 Illinois Manufacturers' association, 
asked: 

"Mr. Ellis, you say your gross in- 
<-ome last year 'from other source-s" 
than operating was $9,000,000. What 
are those sources'.'" 

Fal<l 9«,000,000 Interext. 
"Chiefly the Puget Sound division," 
lie answKered. "The St. Paul owns all 
the stock and In 1910 received $6,000,-1 
inio interest on the bonds." 

"Wi at"' Interrupted Commissioner 
Lane again; "l>o you mean to say the 
Pugf't Sound brancli paid all its oper- 
ating expenses the first year and In ad- 
dition $6,000,000 interest on its capi- 
tallzatlori?" 

"Well, that was Interest for a year 
and a half. However," continued Mr. 
Ellis, "It also earned a surplus of 
aeaiiy $3,000.d00." 

"How was the Puget Sound division 
paid for"." asked Mr. Lane. 

"By a bond issue of $100,000,000 sold 
to slock holders." 

"And in addition to the surplus, a 
7 per cent dividend was paid on that 
sum last year?" 
"Ves." 

"A!.out $13,000,000 profit all told; 
that Is for each $7,000,000 or so you 
paid out you received In this space of 
time $1,000,000?" 

"That Is not quite correct. You sea 
the St Paul owns the surplus of $2,- 
JOd.oOO of the Puget Sound line in addi- 
tion." 

Attorney Frank Lyon for the com- 
mission interrupted to ask: 

"If that surplus were added to the 
earning.s of the St. Paul. It would more 
than make up for the added cost of 
labor?" 

"It would." 

Omitted From Report. 

"Then I would like to call the at- 
tention of the commission to the abso- 
lute failure of this company to include 
that sum in the surplus given In their 
latest report to the commission." 

"Now," said Commissioner Lane, re- 
suming, "we come to what I am be- 
ginning to call the 'mysterious cause' 
of the apparent increased cost of oper- 
ation. What is it?" 

"I'll tell you." was the reply. "Every 
resolution of congress or legislature 
has decreased the earning efficiency of 
the dollar expended upon labor. Eight- 
hour days, sixteen-hour telegraphers, 
limitations, resxrictions in regard to 
eisht-hour days — alt these have cut 
down a dollar's efficiency. I still say 
labor Is the big factor In increased 
cost." 

IsMued Stoclc at Par. 

Previously Mr. Ellis had admitted his 
company, in the last ten years, had 
sold several millions of dollars worth 
of stock to stof-kholders at par when 
it was quoted in the open market at 
from 240 down to 180, and that the 
slock since had paid 7 per cent divi- 
dends. He maintained this was good 
'ousiness policy, however. 




THE DULUTH HERALD. 



September 23, 1910. 



Read The 
HeraldVVants 








Columbia Clothing 




DULUTH, MINN.,— at Third Avenue West. 



SUPEIUOR, WIS.,— at Broadway. 



We beg to announce our readiness to show yon the 
new things for Fall igio. Ifs the greatest crop of 
good wearables for men and boys ever gathered and 
brought to the shores of Didiith. 



^-^ 



mm 



For Many Moons our buyers kept 

busy to prepare for this great day. 

For Many Weeks the makers of the 
good wearables we sell have manu- 
factured them to oiir order. 



For Many Days our force has un- 
packed, checked, marked and ..M>^ 
placed what the men and 
3oys of Duluth a,nd vicinity^^^ 
will now be in ne§d of. %||^^^;^^/>4 



All Cars Pass 

The Columbia Corner — 

Third Avenue West 



r.^ '* 



The Best Advertising Writer 
Is Our Price Marker — 

We've hecn in business for many years, but 
we are '*ne\v-fashioned'* enough to bcHeve that 
the price-marker holds the secret of making peo- 
ple seek a store again and again. 



We are sole purveyors in Duluth 
of these world-renowned wearables 



STEIN-BLOCH CLOTHES. 
KNAPP-FELT HATS, 
KNEIPP UNDERWEAR, 
EVERWEAR HOSIERY, 
HANAN SHOES, 



SINCERITY CLOTHES, 
BARKER COLLARS, 
COLUMBIA $1 SHIRTS, 
PENNANT PANTS, 
COLUMBIA $3.)50 SHOES. 




SAMPECK CLOTHES FOR BOYS AND YOUNG MEN. 

Chief Distributors, also, of 

GORDON HATS, GORDON FUR COATS, 

STETSON HATS, E. & W. COLLARS, 

STALEY UNDERWEAR, MANHATTAN SHIRTS, 

PARAGON TROUSERS, MUSSER WOOL HOSE. 

SOCIETY BRAND CLOTHES FOR YOUNG MEN. 





i" 



-«• 



, 







1 



1 



a 



the dock, striking his head and frac- 
turin»T his skull. 

The body was taken to the under- 
taking rooms of Flood & Horgan. Ef- 
forts to locate his mot'ner at the ad- 
dress given by him before his death 
proved fruitless. Unless his relatives 
are found he will be burled by the 
Lake (carriers' association. 



THE CITY RESTAURANT 

Will Be Ready for Business, 
Saturday, September 24. 

508 West Superior Street. 
The B«thel Building. 



LIFE IS QUIET 
I N FAR SAMOA 

Rev. C R. Patrick Returns 

and Will Be Stationed 

at Norfolk. 

Rev. C. R. Patrick, formerly pastor 
of the First Baptist church of this city 



is in the city after an absence of eight 
years, the last two of which have been 
si)ent In Samoa, where Mr. Patrick 
was the United States army chaplain. 

Going to Samoa Mr. Patrick and his 
family were In a shipwreck, which 
came very near ending the lives of 
all the passengers. 

"Nothing exciting has happened in 
Samoa for some time, and 1 don't think 
anything of very great moment will 
happen for some time to come," said 
Mr. Patrick today. "The country is 
quiet, the people are quiet, and life in 
Samoa Is not exciting, although I en- 
joyed the two years t spent there." 

This afternoon Mr. Patrick will leave 
for Bowling Green, Mo. Later he will 
probably be stationed at Norfolk, Va. 
While In Duluth Mr. Patrick was one 
of tlie best known and most active 
ministers In the city. 



DISCREDIT THE 
HOLDUP STORY 



The police secured Information this 
morning which leads them to discredit 
the holdup story told them by Mrs. 
Frank Columbo, who claimed that she 
had been beaten and robbed near the 
Point of Rocks at Fourteenth avenue 
west early yesterday morning by 
Saballno Padillo. 

Andrew Lundgren of Superior and 



Charles Cuday of 2713 West Second 
street, told the authorities that they 
saw Mrs. Columbo and Padillo together 
abo'jt the time mentioned. They said 
their actions were not such as to lead 
theiri to believe that the woman had 
been robbed by the man. They did not 
heair any one scream and did not see 
Padillo strike Mrs. Columbo. 

Padillo denied seeing the v.oman at 
all on the night she accused him of 
having held iir-r nr>^ 

RETURNS TO 

ELY B Y AUTO 

Jo.seph Mantel Will Complete 

Trip Never Made 

Before. 

still bent on pioneering, Joseph Man- 
tel of Ely, who made the first auto trip 
eve;' made from that city to Duluth two 
days ago, set out at noon today, accom- 
panied by Joseph Skala and Anton ■ 
Kotchevar, on the return trip. 

Coming to Duluth. Mantel traveled 
over what Is called the Pike river road, 
by way of Blwabik. Going home, he 



will follow the Vlrgi 
and go from Tower 
pects to reach his des 
8 and 9 o'clock this e' 

"Coming to Duluth 
road fairly good, exce 
between Tower and B 
not been completed, 
"The road Is cut throt 
surfacing. That was i 
we got over it all rlgh 
that a careful driver 
most any kind of cou 

"Many of my friend 
ances told me I was f< 



nia-Tower road, 
o Ely. He ex- 
tlnation between 
ening. 

we found the 
pt for a stretch 
iwabik that has 
said Mr. Mantel. 
igh. but it lacks 
>retty rough, but 
t, demonstrating 
can get over al- 
titry in an auto, 
s and acquaint- 
lolish to attempt 



I 

I the run down here, but they did the 
I same when I told them I was going 
to make a trip to Tower some time 
ago. They said it was impossible, but 
I did it, and without any trouble, at 
that. That was the first time au auto 
had covered the road between those 
towns. When I was going home from 
Tower I overtook two hunters wlio 
asked where I was bound. I told them, 
and they laughed at me, saying I could 
never get to Ely over that road When 
[ told them I had come from tliere 
and must get back they changed their 
minds." 




SAILOR DIES FROM INJURIES. 



John McNenomey, a sailor about 22 
years old, died last night at St. Mary's 
hospital from injuries received at the 
ore docks last Monday. He was at- 
tempting to jump from the steamer 
J. D. Morse to the dock, but fell on 



TOMORROW, SATURDAY! 

Overcoat Opportunity $ 

Any Top Coat Cravenette or Meqium Weight OvercMt 
in the House, choice <---„«- 



20 



$25.00, $30.00 and $35.00 Inclusive, Mostly $30.00 and $35.00 Garments. Hirsh, 

Wickwire & Co.'s and Kosenwald & Weil's. 

SALE IS FOR CASH— No Goods Charged Except at Regular Price. 



304 West 
Superior Street 



%b: 



.^ SS, Shwert d Ca 



304 West 
Superior Street 



JUr^ 



Fall Footwear 



I received several more ship- 
ments of Fall Shoes this week, in- 
cluding a lot of Harry H. Gray's 

and Wickert & Qardiner's. These 
Bell in the regular way for $4.00, 
$5.00 and $6.00. 

My price 



^3.48 



"My Way a Sa\ing Way to You." 



CLARK, 







THE ORIGINAL SAMPLE 
"=— SHOE MAN 



11 SECOND AVENUE WEST. 




atch 




he 




orner 




indows 



At the Glass Block Store. 



mmmm 



■I ■ ■■ ' I » 

» 

< ' 

i 



-^ f*- 



rl 







^^^ 






m ^ 


^^ 




^^ 


^„_ 












^ 






1 


» 




i 






r 


















f 








■ ' 










( 






1 

i 














1 




































i 


















1 
































































i 
















■ 




















■ 


1 




















































■ 










' 


































































































1 
























1 






















4- 






1 

1 








- 























































IT— ■ *" '*" 


^1 


! 
1 






T 




» 1 tv'- 


ill 








1 






^^ 
















_ 


^f 


^_ 






^ 


M 


^^H 


1 





Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



September 23, 191i}. 



NEWS OF THE NORTHWEST 



HOUSEHOLD 
ECONOMICS 

A New Department for the 
North Dakota Uni- 
versity. 

To Assist Young Women for 
Profession of Home- 
Making. 



rnlverslty, N. D.. Sept. 23. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Next week will see 
the Institution of a new department 
In the North Dakota university, a 
course of )>ouse)iold economics, con- 
ducted in such a manner as to be 
available to Juniors and seniors for 
credit. Two lecture periods a week. 
Just twice the time that was allowed 
to the several lectures along this line 
delivered during the closing weeks of 
the last term, are to be allowed to this 
branch of work. 

Prof. J. M. Gllette Is In charge of the 
work, and In staling the purposes of 
It. ho declares that it is not In any 
sense a course of lectures to fully pre- 
pare the young woman for the profes- 
sion of home-making, but that It Is 
only a beginning. An opportunity is 

flven In these lectures to obtain in- 
roductlon to a large field of knowl- 
edge. This course opens the way to 
a number of others vhKh will be es- 
tablished later, and which will have 
to do with kindred subjects, and the 
xjniverslty hopes that la time it will be 
enabled to offer to the young woman 
who expects to make a liome the oppor- 
tunity to become accjualnted with the 
best knowledge upon household et on- 
omlcs. 

Eleven lecturers have been engaged 
for the work that will be done. These 
are Ernest Kennedy of Minneapolis, on 
"Tlie Making of House plans;" Dr. E. 
F. Ladd of Fargo on "The Adulteration 
of Foods;" Mrs. C. B. Waldron of Fargo 
on "The I^ocatlon of the House and 
Beautifying of Grounds;" Prof. J. M. 



j Gllette 



on "The De^jelopment of the 
House" and "The Place of the Family 
in Modern History;' C. H. Crouch an 
"Healing and Lighting" and "Sanita- 
tion and Plumbing;" Mrs. F. L. McVey 
on "Floors and Floor Coverings;" Miss 
Daisy B. Treen on "Foods and Their 
Values," "Tlie Preparation and Preser- 
vation of Foods," Serving and Super- 
vision of Food." and "The Model 
Kitchen;" .Miss Cornelia B. White on 
"Home Nursing:" Prof. James E. Boyle 
on "The Cost of Living," and Frank L. 
McVey on "The Business of House- 
keeping." 

fe.\rs'for his life. 

Interpreter Would Be Safeguarded 
Against <an Italian. 

Grand Forks, N. D., Sept. 23. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Camella Costella, 
who acted as inlerpretor for the local 
authorities when Francisco Galato wa.< 
arraigned in justice court on a charge 
of a.ssault with Intent to kill, does not 

feel like taking chances at being 
made the object of vengeance at the 
hands of the defendant should he be 
convicted, and has asked the author- 
ities lo gain possession of a small 
note In the possession of Galato on 
which his name is written. Costel'.a 
believes that Galato. should he be con- 
victed, wt)uld commence a search for 
him upon being released. He also be- 
lieves that the prisoner would not be 
able to remember his name and would 
be unable to find him If the note he 
now has is destroyed. 



rail through the heel of his shoe just 
long enough to prick his heel. He 
had a splendid limp, but after the show 
he found his stocking soaked with 
blood and a very sore foot. Later he 
was troubled with great pain.s and on 
going to a physician found he was suf- 
fering from blood poisoning. He was 
sent to a hospital and liis foot v.'itl 
have to be amputated and possibly he 
may lose his life. 

The proceeds of the performance 
which were to have gone to a local 
charity will be turned over to Paulson 
to help In his fight with death. 



BRIDE DROWNED. 



Loses 



Former Minnesota ^^ onian 
Life at St. Cloud, Fla. 

Eau Claire, Wis., Sept. 23. — G. A. 
Wright, a farmer residing near the 
city, received a telegram Wednesday 
evening from St. Cloud, Fla.. stating 

that his son, William H. Wright, and 
wife were drowned there yesterday. 
Mr. Wright was married to Miss Es- 
tella House at her home at Stewart- 
ville. Minn., on August 1 this year. 
They had gone to Florida to spend the 
winter. 



MAY L^ LIFE. 

Amateur Actor in Securing "Limp*' 
Contracts Blood Poisoning. 

Bismarck. N. I>., Sept. 23. — The de- 
sire of Henry Paulson of Flasher to 
give a realistic reproduction of an old 
man with a halt in his step during an 
amateur performance last week may 
result fatally for the young man. 

To secure a natural '.Imp '..c put a 



e 



IT 



II 



ir 



ir 



X 



ASKIN est. MARINE COMPANY 



#122 

A WEEK 

BUYS ANY STYLE 



11 



10 




Q 



n 



That Tailored Suit! 



€j| Every garment in our Women's Department 
is strictly hand tailored. 

€}{ That assures you of a perfect-fitting, properly- 
made, Tailored Suit. 

€}j All of the novelty weaves, and all of the 
plainer styles are ready for your coming. 
I}J Splendid values, from $12 to $35. 



<f[ There are a lot of novelties here in Men's 
Fall Suits, and every pattern is different from 
anything we have had in the past. Men, come 
in and look over these " winners." Any price 
from $12 to $30. 



El 





No. 20 



3rd Ave. W. 



11 



IL 



31 



J 



CLOQUET PEOPLE 
WANT PASTO R BACK 

Methodists Ask Conference 

to Return Rev. C. H. 

Blake. 

Cloquet, Minn., Sept. 23. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — It is the request of 
the people in the Methodist Episcopal 
church in this city that at the close 

of the conference being held this week 
in Fergus Falls that Hev. C. H. Blake 
be returned to this city. At the busi- 
ness meeting of the church whicii 
closed up the financial affairs of the 
church for the year, It was found that 
the church Is In the best condition 



SEE H3W QUieKLY 

PQSUM ACTS. 



Rare Power to Heal Affected Skin Ex- 
plaiuK &>ucoe«ii of New Sklii Uemedy. 

"Xo one is asked to purchase poslam 
without first obtaining a sample pack- 
age, which will be sent by mail, free of 
charge, by the Emergency Laboratories, 
32 West Twenty-fifth street, New York 
City." ! i 

Even this free sample, when used to 
quickly clear the coinplexlon or spread 
on the face, hands or limbs to cure pim- 
ples, rashes, eruptions, or to cover a 
small eczema surface, will prove pos- 

lam's real and unusual merit. Its users 
have found that poslam not only fulfils 
bui exceeds the claims made for it. 
Take any case of eczema, acne, itch, 
salt rlieum, piles, scalp scale, etc., how- 
ever stubborn, and poslam will stop any 



the enormous weight of eighty-eight 
pounds, was captured early in the 
week, Willie dozens are being cauglit 
weighing twenty pounds or more. 
Fourteen tons of fish have been taken 
from the lake in this way and shipped 
to the east. 

Jamestown, N. D. — John Kuluskl, a 
Boh<nnian, wanted at Mandan on the 
charge of robbery of his pal in a room 
in a hotel, and who was arrested here, 
was taken back to Mandan Wednesday 
by the sheriff of Morton county. The 
negro from Mandan, who was held here 
for forgery, was given a year's sen- 
tence on his return to Mandan. The 
negro wae a prize fighter and a "'bad 
nigger" and was also a victim of co- 
caine. 

Grand Forks. N. D. — The H. M. 
Byllesby company, which owns the 
light and power plants at Fargo, Grand 
Forks and many other places in the 
vallsy, besides a laige siring of other 
plarts, is negotiating for the purchase 
of the A. B. Keerlin plant at Devils 
Lake and the L. M. Davis p'.ani at 
Minat. It is stated that the latter deal 
is almost concluded. 



itching as soon as applied, healing the i i 

Bkin rapidly and readilv. ("All other ; PFMIMQT TT A RPIPPQ 

treatments for skin troubles on man or / 4 1-«1X ll^O VJ l_«ra LJl\il_<l O 

animals fade into nolhingnes^ compared >- -, ^^ — ^ ^„- , ^-, .ru-u--nj-u-^-Lr. 




with poslam," says Mr. M. T. Grrattan, 
Preston, Minn.) 

Write direct to the Laboratories for 
the sample, but the trial packages of 
poslam at 50 cents and the jars at $2 
mav be purchased at all druggists, par- 
ticularlv the Lyceum pharmacy and W. 
A. Abbetts' in Duluth and tlie A. E. 
Holmberg Drug company, in Superior. 



REV. C. H. BLAKE. 



that has prevailed for years. Old 
church debts have been paid and there 
is money in the treasury to liquidate 
all its obligations. The pastor's sal- 
ary is all paid, and tliere is nothing 
due on church property improvements 
whicli have been considerable during 
the Jear. More improvements are con- 
templated and there Is money on hand 
to get them well started. Mr. Blake 
says that he feels the success of the 
year is due to the way in which the 
trustees of the church have worked 
with and stood by him. 



hotel was destroyed by fire at an early 
hour Tuesday morning. The loss Is 
$8,000, covered by insurance. 

TROUP OF DANCING 
GIRLS STRANDED 



Manager Leaves Them in 

Lurch at Menominee, 

Mich. 

Menominee, Mich., Sept. 23. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — "The Qirls From the 
Happy Land, ' a troup ol dancing girls 
that was one of the, attractions at the 
Menominee county ^ir, is stranded in 
this city. Tlie girls were deserted by 
their manager, A. L. Pearce. It is al- 
leged that the manager owed the girls 
more than $400. 

HAIL LOSSES HEAVY. 

Mutual Companies of North Dakota 
Are Hard Hit. 

Grand Forks, N. D., Sept. 23.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald. )-^Hail losses in the 
slate this year \v^ere exceptionally 
heavy according to the reports that are 
being made public by several of the 
insurance companies that operate here. 
In almost every instance the mutual 
companies have been obliged to assess 
to the full amount the policies that 
were carried. One company had a 
record of insuring 540,000 acres for 
|2,93:i,9:i4.51, and that is probably the 
largest amount carried by any of the 
mutual concerns. 



TO MAKE EXTENSIVE 
ROAD IMPROVEMENTS 

North Dakota Counties Vote 

Large Sums of 

Money. 

Dickinson, N. D., Sept. 23. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — l^or the purpose of 
c.Trrying on extensive improvement 
work on its roads during the comin;.? 
year, an appropriation of 115,000 has 
V>een made by Stark county to cover 
the cost. There has been a general 
demand over the entire county for bet- 
ter roads within the past two or three 
years, the rapid manner in which the 
ojuntry has been settling up necessi- 
tating better means of transportation 
to and from market. A number of big 
jobs have already been completed 
which have materially bettered the sit- 
uation. 

Billings. Adams, Hettinger, Oliver, 
Mercer and Dunn counties, as well as 
Morton, are all contemplating exten- 
sive road work during the next sea- 
son, and several have made provision 
in their aproprlation bills for such 
work. 



GRAZED BY BILLET. 



Eau Claire Capitalist Narrowly Es- 
capes Death in Residence. 

Eau Ciaire, Wis., Sept. 28. — As H. C. 
Putnam, one of Eau Claire's pioneers 
and a retired capitalist, was seated 
near a window of his residence 
Wednesday he was startled when 



Houghton — 'i ht' bodies of Alfred Wai- 
santin, 3& years of age, and Abram Buk- 
ka, 28 years of age. were found 
Wednesday morning on the .«econd level 
of N'o. 1 shaft of the Superior mine. 
The men had been killed by a fall of 
rock some time between 1 o'clock and 
6. No one witnessed the accident. Wai- 
.sanen was a married man living at At- 
lantic. Bukka was single and lived at 
Eal '.ic. 

Marquette — The West Branch Cedar 
conripany, which has been operating on 
a large scale near Ralph for several 
years, has decided to discontinue oper- 
ations and will sell its logging outfit 
The company owns 6,000 acres of land 
in Dickinson and Marquette counties, 
which will be held for future opera- 
tions. During the past season the com- 
pany has cut 3,000 cords of pulpwood, 
60,000 railroad ties, 750,000 feet of shin- 
gle timber, 1,500,000 feet of mixed tim- 
ber. 50,000 posts and 5,000 poles. 

Sault Ste. Marie — Married for fifty 
years, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Farr of 
Sault Ste. Marie have just celebrated 
the event. Half a century ago they 
were wedded in the ancient and his- 
torical Plumstead church about ten 
miles out of London. Since that time 
the city has grown so that Plumstead 
is now a portion of the great metropo- 
lis. 

Norway — Miss Sophia Johnson, 19 
years of age, was run over by a string 
of ore cars while crossing the North- 
western track at Norway the other aft- 
ernoon and had her right foot crushed 
so badly that amputation was neces- 
sary. The young woman was accom- 
panied by her mother. 

Bessemer — Gladstone is already a 
bidder for the 1912 tournament of the 
Upiier Peninsula Firemen's association, 
which next year will meet at Bessemtr. 
To furnish sinews of war, a ball will 
be given Thanksgiving night at the 
opera house. Gladstone has urged her 
clamis year after year in a half-hearted 
way, always coming In at the last min- 
ute Now the department means busi- 
ness and is making an early start. 

Ironwood — Although they had known 
that he was affilcted with an incurable 
malady, the word that Tom Brown. 
Ironwood's pioneer liveryman, had 
passed away at Riverside sanitarium, 
Milwaukee, proved a distinct shock to 
his many friends. 

Bessemer — Announcement is made of 
the marriage at Bessemer of Lydia N. 
L. Reid of this city and Howard R. Ra- 
ley of Denver, Colo. The ceremony 
took place at the home of William H. 
Rogers. It was performed by Rev. F. 
W. Schoenfeld and was witnessed by 
the relatives and a few close friends 
of the family. 

Saulte Ste. Marie — County Clerk Par- 
sille of Sault Ste. Marie has received 
a letter from George Arwine of Perry, 
N. y., who says that his brother, Frank, 
left Hornellsville, N. Y., in 1S87 or 
thereabouts for the Soo. That he 
readied his destination is known from 
the fact that a letter was received from 
him dated at that place. Later word 
reached the East that he had been 
drowned, and now after twenty years 
George Arwine is endeavoring to find 



this city when a bolt demolished the 
upper portion of the house and fol- 
lowed a chimney into the bedroom. 
It struck the bed on which Mrs. Dale 
and her cliHd were sleeping, followed 
the iron railing of the bed to the floor 
and burned a hole in the floor. Mrs. 
Dale and her child vere not even 
stunned by the electricity. 

New Richmond — Leslie Glover, gen- 
eral manager of the Willow River 
Lumber company, and son of John E. 
Glover, capitalist, railroad owner and 
lumberman of this cit;,', was severely 
burned in an accident on his steam 
launch. He was alone in the boat and 
evidently had difficulty in blowing 
mud from the boiler. He was found 
lying in Die boat with liis head, neck 
and shoulders on a hot steam pipe. 
Surgeons and nurses ivere summoned 
Irom St. Paul. His condition is serious. 

Kenosha — The Mungen livery stable 
was damaged to the extent of $2,000 
by a fire of unknown jrigin on Tues- 
day. Two liorses, valued at $400 were 
BO badly burned that \i was necessary 
lo kill them. Several firemen were 
burned in efforts to gel the Imprisoned 
horses out of the burring barn. 

.\ppleton — Alexander Conkey, Com- 
bined Locks, Republlcm nominee for 
clerk of the court of Outgamle county, 
is not a citizen of the United States, 
according to the ruling of Judge John 
Goodland, because he had not lived 
continually in the Ur.ited States for 
five years. 

Wausau — Frank Swan.<'on, 31, of 



County Medical society will study th» 
case. 

Kenosha — A large portion of th» 
docks of the plant of the North Shore 
Fuel & Supply company In Kenosha 
harbor collapsed on Monday and car- 
ried into the river the docks, 200 tons 
of coal and a large amount of wood. 
It is said that the loss to the cona^ 
pany will be from $3,000 to $5,000. 

Appleton — A son of Henry Bell was 
found on the river bank in an almost 
unconscious condition. He was cold 
and his heart had almost ceased beat- 
ing Physicians were not certain as 
to how \he bov was afflicted. 

Black River Falls — William Bellew, 
an Indian boy 16 years old, who had 
run away from the Indian school in 
Tomah, was killed on Monday by a 
train on the Omaha road near Millston. 
The body will be brought here for 
burlsul 

Appleton — Night Watchman Dennis 
Carroll was severely beaten while at- 
tempting to arrest two men. 

Pewaukee — Nicholas Schaeffer, an 
old resident of this county, was struck 
and instantly killed Wednesday after- 
noon at the passenger depot crossinjf 
by a Milwaukee road flyer. 

Chippewa Falls — Edwin Stern, 85 
years old, was run over by an auto- 
mobile and seriously liurt and Ijanlcl 
Huff, 64 years old, was knocked mortt 
tlian twenty feet by another machine 
and made unconscious. 

Wausau — Judge A. H. Reid, in cir- 
cuit c )urt in Merrill, sentenced Henry 



Wausau, is a subject of curiosity. His Schmidt, aged 50, of Tomahawk to one 
physician lias discovered tliat his heart year in state's prison for giving liquor 
is on the right side. The Marathon to a posted person. 



was stariiea wnen a 
bullet crashed through the window gome^proof of his brother's death in or 

COUlU ^^». *„ <./-...»,i».*^ nrtr\n£i-\' Ana fmm a ri^ncinn 



The police were notified but they 

find no clew in the case. It is thought 

the shot came across the river. 



WARD (OLNT\ , N. D.. FAIR 
TO OCCLR NEXT WEEK. 



Minot, N. D., Sept. 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The annual fair of the 
Ward County association will be held 
in this city next week, opening on 
Tue.sday and continuing till Thursday 
There are a number of big features 
arranged. The corn exhibit, as well 
as that of other farm products, will 
be exceptionally good, the farmers of 
Ward, Burke and Renville having tak- 
en deep interest in the event. 

H. L. Boiley and C. B. W^aldron have 
been Invited to deliver addresses be- 
fore the fair audiences, and both have 
consented to do so. 



der to secure money due from a pension. 
Munislng — Two years ago a tract of 
fin« hardwood south of Wetmore, Alger 
county, was burned over. On this land 
were destroyed many thousands of 
coids of furnace wood owned by the 
Cleveland-Cliffs Iron company. The TJp- 
per Michigan Potato company, in which 
a well-known Munislng man Is the 
moving spirit, secured the right from 
tho owners of the land to plant 100 
acres to potatoes. So thoroughly had 
tho fire done its worK that little was 
left except the stumps The potatoes 
were planted between the stumps and 
tho few which have so far been har- 
vested seem to justify the faith of the 
planter in an abundant yield. The 
potatoes are of exceptionally fine qual- 
ity. This week the real harvest of the 
crop will be commenced and a yield of 
from 12,000 to 15,000 bushels is confi- 
dently expected. 



PORT HOPE FARMER 
HAS HIS TROUBLES 

Desertion of His Wife the 

Last of Many Af- 

fl.ctions. 

Bemidji, Minn., Sept. 23 — (Special to 
Tise Herald) — Charles Fleshman of tlie 
town of Port Hope, near Tenstrike, who 
has applied to Judge of Probate Clark to 
send ills four minor cliildren to the 
slate school at Owalonna, seems to be 
tlie most unlucky man in the stale of 
Minnesota. 

Mr. Fleshman Is a prominent farmer, 
highly respected, was a member of 
tlie recent grand jury and despite the 
unpleasant tragic events which have 
interrupted his domestic happiness, 
lias won a lair degree of succes in the 
financial world. 

Here are some of the things he has 
liad liappen: , 

Wlien his daughter, because of her 
youth, refused to marry a man who 
had become enamoured of her, slie was 
shot and killed by her lover who then 
committed Buiclde. This was two 
years ago. 

Soon afterward another daughter, 
after a long illness, was left in a men- 
tally unsound condition. 

Last week, Lawrence Smith of Ten- 
.strlke was arrested and is now in the 
Beltrami county jail awaiting trial, 
having pleaded not guilty before Judge 
Stanton to tlie charge tl.at he is the 
father of the weak-minded girl's un- 
born child. 

On top of all this, when Mr. Flesh- 
man returned to Tenstrike, from Be- 
midji, where he had assisted in se- 
curing the arrest of Smith, he found, 
he says, tliat his wife had stripped his 
home of the furniture and had deserted 
him. 

It is because of the alleged action on 
the part of his wife that he appeals 
to the state to care for the four small 
children which lie has under his care 
and who, he admits, cannot be given 
the attentliin they should have. 



Devils Lake, N. D. — Practically all of 
the land required in the city of Devils 
Lake for right-of-way purposes by the 
Soo railroad has been obtained, deeds 
showing the transfer of thirty town 
lots at a price of approximately $50,000 
having just been recorded. The right- 
of-way In the rural districts has al- 
ready been ol>tained also, and In view 
of that fact there need be no delay in 
the construction work when it is taken 
up again next year. 

Bismarck, N. D. — The meeting of the 
Baptist ministers of the state, which 
opened here "Wednesday, Is well at- 
tended, about seventy-five ministers 
and representatives being present. 

Fargo, N. D. — When Mr. and Mrs. 
Begore, the couple arrested by tho 
police for fighting at their home, were 
in police court they were sentenced to 
serve two days' imprisonment in the 
jail, but they begged so hard to be al- 
lowed to go on a promise never to 
quarrel again and on account of their 
children that Judge Miller commuted 
the sentence to a fine of $2 each, which 
they paid and were freed. 

Mobridge, S. D. — A homesteader, a 
Scandinavian from Minnesota, named 
Andrew Enquist, who was a passenger 
on the Milwaukee westbound Iso. 3, 
lost a foot beneath the car wheels 
here Wednesday morning. Enquist 
was off the train when the bell rang 
as a signal for starting, and he hur- 
ried to get aboard when he slipped 
and fell, the car wheel passing over 
ills foot. 

Aberdeen, S. D. — Workmen are busy 
seining out Big Stone lake for the carp 
and the buffalo, which are being 
shipped out to New York city In great 
quantities. They are now seining with 
a seine 2,500 feet across near Foster, 
and some astounding catciies are being 
made. One carp, which had reached 



Minot, S. U., liuiel Btiruit. 

Minot, N. D., Sept. 23. — The Veadome 



At Fountains & Elsewhere 
Ask for 

"HO RUCK'S" 

The Original and Genuine 

MALTED MILK 

The Food-drink for All Ages. I 

At restaurants, hotels, and fountains. 

Delicious, invigorating and sustainmg. 

Keep it on your sideboard at home. 

Don't travel without it. 

A quick lunch prepared in a minute, 

Take no imitation. Just say "HORLICK'S." 

in No Combine or Trust 



Rush City — C. M. Hanson, a farmer 
70 years of age, living two miles west 
of town, was found dead in the road 
near Rush lake late Tuesday night. He 
had been to Rush Point to vole, after- 
wa-rd going fishing in the lake, staying 
out until 9 o'clock in the evening, then 
starting for his home. 

Montgomery — Mrs. C. L. May and 
Miss Mollie Crook of this city have 
brought in claims against this city In 
th.> amount of $3,000 and $2,000. re- 
spectively, for alleged injuries received 
Aug. 21. The M-omen were driving in 
th'j evening when their horse became 
frightened and the occupants of the 
buggy were thrown into a ditch. 

Winona — The annual fall meeting of 
th'=> Winona presbytery will be held at 
Kasson Oct. 10 and 11. Rev. R. M. 
Williams of this city will speak on mis- 
sions. Prominent Presbyterian workers 
from other fields are expected to make 
addresses. ,, , 

Fergus Falls — The city council has 
adopted a resolution declaring the 
city's intention to rebuild the electric 
light dam which was washed out a 
year ago on Sept. 24. The resolution 
authorizes the Electric Light & Water 
commission to begin work, taking 
such steps as are necessary for recon- 
struction. ^ ,_, ^, 

Hastings — The body of an unidenti- 
fied man was discovered near the Mil- 
waukee track about a mile above the 
St Croix crossing. He had the appear- 
ar'ce of a laborer about 36 years old, 
w*th sandy complexion and mustache, 
ard wore a dark striped suit, light cap, 
dark shirt marked "G. M.' and laven- 
der stockings. 

Bt Cloud — Jumping through a car 
Window while the train was running 
at high speed, a former inmate of the 
state reformatory escaped from an of- 
ficer who was bringing him back from 
North Dakota for having broken his 
parole, and is hiding in the thick 
woods between Annandale and Buffalo, 
with several feet of chain attached to 
a handcuff on his wrist. The escape 
occurred early near Maple Lake, twen- 
ty miles south. 

Winona — Fish car No. 4 of the gov- 
ernment fisheries bureau visited Wi- 
nona with a hundred cans of West 
Virginia trout fry to be planted In 
XN'lnona county streams. The car left 
for Mosidosh, 111., where it will be re- 
stocked and sent to other localities. 



[WISCONSIN BRIEFS 



Appleton — In circuit court here 
V/ednesday morning, Jude John Good- 
land granted a divorce to Ole Frel- 
sad from Cecilia Freistad, 72 and 79 
years old, respectively. The couple had 
"lived together nearly a half century. 
Freistad accuses his wife of cruel and 
inhuman treatment. The Freistads 
are residents of Crandon. 

Kenosha — Mrs. W. F. Dale and her 
infant child had a peculiar experience 
with lightning in the Dale home near 



Harry 
Mitchen 




■«pi 



»- 'Wfe.:^.' 





I will take 400 patterns from my regular $25 
and $30 lin<i of new Fall and Winter Suitings and 
Overcoatings and place them on saLe. 

SUIT OR OVERCOAT 

» Made to Order 



-♦ 





This Offer Consists of— 

Patterns in Black and Blue 

Serges, Cheviots, Un- 
finishicd Worsteds, etc., 
to order 



85 



70 



Patterns in new Brown, 
Gray and Fancy Mixed 

Worsteds — made to 

order 



100 



Patterns in all the new 
Brown shades, Cheviots, 
Cassimeres and Imported 
Scotches — made to order 




00 



Patterns in Black, Blue, Brown and Gray 

Kerseys and IMeltons, 
Fancy Cher^iots, Overcoat- 
ings, etc. — Overcoat made 
to order 



75 



Patterns in all the new Blue 
and Eilack stripe effects now 
being worn by the swellest dress- 
ers — Suit made to order 




DAmAiriknr '^^'^^^ offer is for tomorrow only, 
II61II6I1IU61 so get your order in early — My 
guarantee of absolute satisfaction or no pay goes 
with every order. 

Harry Mitchell 

123 West Superior Street. 




indows 



■ 



















■^■■1^ 


^■■^B 




i 










— 














* 

I 




' 


' 


1 












1 




1 














.1 I. 3 











-i 




r-- 



'f 



p 



t 



LEGISLATIVE NOMINEES 



While all the returns on the nomi- 
nees for the legislature throughout the 
Btate are not complete, the following 
Is a fairly accuiate list of those who 
were successful at the primary elec- 
tion: 

Kimt IMiitrirt — Senator — F. A. Dux- 
bury, R. Caledimia. Uepresentatived — 
C. S. Traak. R., Caledonia; F. L. Far- 
ley, r> , Spring GroA'e. 

Second — Senators — George D. French, 
R., St. Charles; M. J. McGrath, D, 
Winoua; V. E. Thompson, P., Winona. 
Rei)re.sentati\fs, three — J. C. Henry, R., 
l^fwiston: Frank Gartsi<le, R., Wi- 
nona; A. P. I..-verri. II., Winona; John 
llt'.zkor, I', \V:n._in;i; C. V. Schuler, D., 
Winona! 

Tkird — Senators — L. O. Cooke. R., 
Kellogg; James A. Carley, D., Plain- 
view. Representatives — William Fore- 
man. R.. Wabasha; S. Nygren, D., L«ake 
City. 

F^ourth — Senator — A. T. Stebblns, R.. 
Rochester. Representatives, two — 
Kerry Con' v !:.. Rochester; Henry 
Hoffman, 1 lester. 

Fif«h — .s.: s. A. Nelson. R.. 

Lanp.«bi.! .). ^tepreseiitatives — J. O. 
Rustu'l, K., VVhalen; Thomas Frank- 
son. K.. Spring \'alley. 

Sistk — S«nntor — H. G. Palmer, R., 
Austin "ook. R. Grand Meadow; 

F. <:. .J ;ie. R., Austin. 

Srventb — Senator — F. J. Theo, R., 
Hayfi»>!d. Representative — Flnley Mc- 
Martin. R., We.st Concord. 

KlHrkth — Senator — Sam A. Rask. R.. 
Blooming Prairie; Thomas E. Cash- 
man, D.. Owatonna. Repre.-^entatives — 
F. D. S-' ' I ■•■ f . EUendale; J. H. 
Heale> >nna; L. Virtue D. 

Owat >i...... ■ 

Mnth — Seruitor — R. X. Anderson, R.. 
Manche-^ter T' i ". Xelson, D., Hay- 
ward. Re itlves— -Uvle Hlnion. 
R-. Gen^v H. Dunn. R., Albert 
Lea; T lo, P., Albert Lea; L. P 
Lawsni.. -neva. 

Tenib — Senator — John J. Moonan, D. 
Wawra. Representatives — D. J. Mur- 
phy, 1)., Waseca; J. S. Root. D., New 
Richland; E. Sydlerud. R., New Rich- 
land; John W, Jopke, R. 

Uleveuth — Senator — Benjamin Tay- 
lor, R., Maiikato; S. D. Works, D.. Gar- 
den City; William Hall. R.. Mapleton: 
O. T. Severs, >n. R. Mankato; Hans Jor- 
genson. D.. ManUato. or C. F. Hergz- 
berg. l».. Good Thunder; F. L. Kellv. 
D.. Madella; W. S. Hughes, D., Lake 
Crystal. 

Tweliiii — -. uator — F. E. Putnam. R., 
Blue Ect:;h. a. a. Johnson. P.. Win- 
nebago. Representatives — W. L Hard- 
ing. K.. Winnebago Citv; J. Muir. D. 
Verona; Jolm Filber. D.. Minnesota 
Lake; I. P. Wood, P., Delavan. 

Thirtpeutb — Senator — J. E. Haycraft. 
R.. .Madeila. Representatives — Waton- 
wan. Joseph Davles, R.. St. James- H 
W. Hlslet l» Uutterrteld; Martin A R 
•Alien, I: raoni; 11. A. Saggan, D., 

Ceylon. 

Koarteeuth — Senator — A. C. Olson 
R.. Jack.^ori; T. J. Knox, D., Jackson! 
Representatives — Jackson, H. C. Set- 
ter. R.. Jackson, or J. S. Woolstoncroft 
R.. Heron Lake; Henry Untiedt, D 
Sioux Valley; Cottonwood. Ellas War- 
ner, R.. Lamberton, or E. D. Moores 
R.. Uindom; John L. Sammon, D.! 
Westbroiik. 

Fifteenth— {<tnator—S. B. Bedford. 
R.. Lushmore; .V. J. Schaeffer, D \d- 
r^an. Representatives — Herman Nel- 
son, R., s!ay:on; Albert Hector, p 
\\ orthing t ■• 

~s. B. Duea. R., 
NeNon. D.. Luverne 
ilarrison White, Lu- 
rawford. P.. Beaver 



sixteenth — - 

Ruthtor 
RepreS' 
verne; \\ . u 
Creek. 



■•»*'vonfeenth--^enato^— O. A. Lende. 
K., Marsha. 1. Representative— Lincoln. 
C W. .Miles R., Lake Benton. or 
^^^^i.*/-' Laurit.sen, K.. Tyler; Lyon, K. 
T NNhumg R.. Ra.Iaton: Yellow Medi- 
cine. J. N. Johnson. li., Canby 

EI«ci.t..eotl! — Senator— O. G. Dale R 
^^:' .Soglund. p.. Watson! 

S^' ' ;. --^^<: 1"i Parle. A. J. 

Peterson. R.. Daw.^on; Chlpi)ewa, J A 
Hoagiun.i. R., Montevideo; I J Melt- 
ing, n.. Montevideo. ' ' 

Mneternth — Senator — Frank Clague 
R.. Lamberton. Representative — Red- 
wood. .\. o. Gimmestad. R., Redwood 
Falls; James R. Keefe, D.. Redwood 
Fails; Brown, Albert Pfaender. D., New 
L'lm. 



Twentieth — .- 



-H. N. Benson, 



mcr, R., Faribault; George D. Reed, R., 
Faribault. 

Tvi-enty-nlnth — Senator — A. J. Rock- 
ne. R., Zumbrota; C. C. Holter, P., Red 
Wing. Representative — George H. Vox- 
land, P., Kenyon; J Starz, R., Mlnnea- 
ta; O. L. Benson, R., Cannon Falls; 
Frank Boothroyd, R., Welch township; 
C. A. Sargent, P., Red Wing; A. V. An- 
derson, P., Goodhue. 

Thirtieth — Senator — Albert Schaller, 
D., Hastings; M. W. Brown. R.. Lake- 
vllle. Representative — Joseph Peter.s, 
D., Empire; W. H. Wescott, R., Eagan; 
Fred Maltby. I'., Inver Grove; P. H. 
Feeley. D.. Farmlngton; G. L. Lytle, R., 
South St. Paul. 

Thlrty-flrst — Senator — George H. Sul- 
livan, R., SiilUvater; M. L. Hiiliard. P.. 
St. Paul Park. Representative — A. An- 
derson, R., Lakeland; O. O. rtegwe, R., 
St. Paul Park; C. P. Peterson, P., Still- 
water; Chris Christensen, P. O., Lake- 
land. 

Thlrty-»eeond — Senator — ^\'ictor L. 
Johnson. R., Center City. Representa- 
tive — Henry Rines, R.. Mora: H. P. 
Webb., R., Sandstone; J. T. Midler, D., 
Pine City; A. W. Piper, P., Pine City; 
C. W. Mobeck, D., Center City. 

TbIrt)->«hlr<I — Senator — W. W. Dunn, 
R. ; Charles E. Nyberg, D. Representa- 
tive — J. A. A. Burnijuist, R.: E. J. Fuchs, 
R.; Adolph Lando, P. O.; John Geary, D. 

Thirty-fourth — Senator — James Hand- 
lan, D. ; Dr. Curl Wirth, R. Represen- 
tative— T. J. Green, R.- R. J. Clarke, D.; 
John Hanggi. D.; H. W. McDonald, D.; 
Andrew Holm, R.; H. Q. Norton, R. 

Thirty-fifth — Senator — Peter v an 
Hoven, D.; V. J. Hawkins, R. Repre- 
sentatives — Oscar F. Christensen. R.; 
John P. Jelinek, R.; J. J. Hurley, D.; 
Frank J. Erskine. P.; G. H. Kennedy. 
P. O. ; J. W. Gross, D. 

Thirty-sixth — Senator — James D- 
Denegre, R. Representatives — Cal E. 
Stone, R.; John D. O'Brien, D. ; John 
lioss, R. 

Thirty-seventh — Senator — J. M. Hack- 
ney, R., St. Paul. Representatives, 
two— C. N. Orr, R., St. Paul; E. G. 
Perry. R., St. Paul. 

Tblrty-elRhth — Senator — J. W. Shade- 
wald, R., Minneapolis; John McGowan, 
D., Minneapolis. Representatives — M. J. 
Brahney, R.; J. D. O'Brien, R.; E. F. 
Sahler, D.; M. J. Sullivan, D. 

Thirty-ninth — Senator — James T. El- 
well, R.; Frank Plachy, D. Represen- 
tatives — W. F. Kunze, R. ; F. L. Palmer, 
R.; Julius School, D. 

Fortieth — Senator — W. S. Dwinnel, 
R. i:epresentatives — D. S. Fisher, R.; 
Charles R. Fowler, R. 

Korty-ftmt — Senator — George P. 
Wilson, R.; Alonzo Philips, D.. Repre- 
sentatives — Thomas Kneeland, R. ; 
John G. Lennon, R.; M. D. Washburn. 
IL; John T. Nash, IX.: Timothy J. Sul- 
livan, D.; F. W. Lauber, D. ; E. S. Chris- 
ton. D. 

Forty-second — Senator — H. M. Olson, 
R. • S. R. Tollefsen. P. Representative — 
William A. Campbell. R. ; Ernest Lun- 
dean. R. ; A. S. Marskoe. P.; Henry A. 
Richardson. P. 

Forty-third — Senator — Carl L. Wal- 
lace. R. ; A. T. Ankeny, R. Representa- 
tive — W. I. Nolan, R.; L. A. Lydiard. 
R.- W. F. Nelson, D. ; W. A." Thomas, 
D. ; M. D. Webster. P.; Lewis J. Van 
Fos.-en, P. 

Forty-fourth — Senator — Thomas ?I. 
Girling. R. ; Joiin W. Pauly. D. liepre- 
sentative — Alex McNeil, R. ; George M. 
Nve. R. ; M. D. Corcoran, D.; Peter 
Weingart, D.; George W. Higins, P.; 
Louis Nvhalen, P.; E. A. Edmunds, D, 
St. Paul"; William F. Tobin, D., St. 
Paul. 

Forty-flfth — Senator — C. J. Swanson, 
R., Fridlev; William A. Rice, P., St. 
Francis. Representative — Frank White. 
R. Elk River; G. G. Goodwin. R.. Cam- 
bridge; R. C. Dunn, R., Princeton; 
Rufus T. Morton. P., Brickton; O. G. 
Tolin, P. O.. Isanti; Louis Hermanson, 
p.. Anoka. 

Fortv-slxth — Senator — George C 
Carpenter, R., Buffalo; W. F. Lude- 
mann, D.. Buffalo; A. B. Morse, P., 
Waverly. Representative — J. F. Lee. 
R.. Annandale; August Hafften. R., 
Buffalo; H. J. Aldrich, P., Monticello. 

Forty-seventh — Senator — J. D. Sulli- 
van, D.. irt. Cloud; .A. C. Cooper, R., 
St. Cloud. Representative — O. F. Doyle, 
R.. St. Cloud; L. Wlsniewski. D., Foley. 

Forty-elsffcth — Senator — Ole P. Erlck- 
son. R.. Brainerd; Charles D. Johnsoji, 



R.. St. Peter, iiepresentative — Ole Pe- ' D.. Brainerd. Representative — L. D 
terson. R.. New Ulm; John Havemeler ! Brown. R.. Little Falls; C. AV. Bouck, 
D.. Courtlanl. R.. Royalton; G. F. Imoghlin. D., Little 

Twenty-hrsi — .-^fnator — A. \ Poeh- Falls; John Schmilke, D., Buckman. 
ter, D.. Henderson; J. W Stark, R Gib- I Forty-ninth — Senator — James P. 



bon. Reriresentative — George McKen- 
Ble. R.. Gaylord. 

Twenty - second — Senator — Frank 
Murray, R. " ' Island. Representa- 
tive — Renv J.; Holniberg. R., 
Renville; Fia;.tv Hopkins. R., Fairfax. 

Twenty-third — Senator — .\. W. 
Wright. R., Litchfield; E. P. Peterson, 
!>., Litchfield. Representative — John A. 
Sampson. R.. Litchfield; Patrick Casey, 
D.. Litchfield. 

T>venty-four«h — Senator — C. R. Don- 
aldson, r» . - irt. Representative — • 
L. A. Hill. . . iiencoe; G. W. Brown, 
R.. Glencje. 

Twenty-flfth — Senator — Charles H. 
Klein. R.. Chaska; J. J. Farrel. R.. Car- 
ver. Re5>resentative — Dr. H. L. Dless- 
ner, R., Waconia; J. W. Craven, D., Nor- 
wood. 

Twrenty-slxth — Sen.itor — Julius A 
CoUer. !>.. Shakopee. Representative — 
P. J. Welter. 1>., Newmarket; Michael 
Kash. D., Cedar Lake; A. B. Suel. D.. 
Prior Lake; J. J. Moriarity, D., Bell 
Plalne; J H. Diers, R.. Blakely. 

T\>ent> -seventh— Senator — Harry P. 
Weis. I'., Le Sueur. Representative — 
Herman Myer, P., Le Sueur; M. .A. Os- 
trander. R.. Kasota: R. C. Van Lehe, R., 
John .Spense, D., Montgomery; llary 
Schwartz, D. Montgomery. 

Twenty-eighth — Senator — W. F. Shil- 
ling. R., Dundas: F. L. Glotzbach, D., 
Faribault. Representative — F. L. Klem- 



i 11 r Men, \\ oniru, Uoys, 
ttiris and Little Tots. 

NATURE'S OWN LAST FOR THE 
WHOLE FAMILY. 

THE BEST 

SCHOOL SHOE 





Boys*— $2.00, $2.50 and $3.00 
!Vllsse8*-$1.75> $2.00 and $2.50 
Chi ldreii2s-$1 .25. $1.50 and $1 
mtif Tefs'-^Qc, 75c aad $1.0 

WQ f SHOE 
« QL L. STORE 

218W. SaperlorSt. 

\mrnrTTr 






Boyle. R., Eveleth; B. N. Wheeler, P., 
Duluth. Representative — John A. 
Heal v. R.. Hibbing; C. T. Knight, R.. 
Chlsholm; Charles J. Johnson, P.. Du- 
luth; Frank Mattson, P., Eveleth. 

Fiftieth — Senator — T. M. Pugh, R., 
Dniuth: Ray E. Hunt, P.. Duluth: Rep- 
resentative — Ray T. Lewis, R.. Duluth; 
Anton Borgen, R.. Duluth; E. R. Ribe- 
nack. D., Duluth; Thomas Didball. P.. 
Dtiluth; Fred Joiuison, P.. Tower. 

FMfty-ftrst — Senator — George R. Lay- 
bourn. R., Duluth; H. W. Cheadle. D., 
Duluth. Representative — St. Louis 

countv, C. A. Congdon. R.. Duluth; C. 
C Bartholomew. P.. E>uluth; Lake and 
Cook. B. F. Fowler. R.. Two Harbors; 
Jame.^ M. Burwlck, P.. Two Harbors. 

Fifty-second— Senator — D. M. Gunn. 
R.. Grand Rapids: C. D. Viebach. P., 
Aitkin. Representative — C. H. W'arner. 
R. Aitkin; T. M. Ferguson. R., Barker: 
A. B. Clair. D.. Grand Rapids; Gust 
Ravmond. P.. Aitkin: Charles E. Taylor, 
P. O.. Big Falls. 

Fifty-third — Senator — James John- 
ston, R.. Bertha: L. M. Davis. D., Long 
Prairie. Representative — L. H. Rice, 
R.. Park Rapids; J. B. Ressler, D., 
Park Rapids: Frank L. Latta D.. Wa- 
dena; Dr. W. T. Stone. R.. Park Rapids. 
Fifty-fourth — Senator — J. J. Alimann. 
D.. Torah. Representative — S. B. Wlm- 
mer, D., Albany; August M. Utecht, D., 
Richmond. „ 

Fifty-Fifth — Senator — L. O. Thorpe, 
R., Willmar; Victor E. Lawson, P., 
Willmar. Representative — C. E. John- 
son, R., Atwater. 

Fifty-sixth — Senator — T. J. McElll- 
gott, R. Appleton; R. G. Farrlngton. 
' L)., Ortonvllle; S. J. Froshaug, P.. Ben- 
i -on. Representative — Knute Knutson, 
R., Swift Falls; Homer Sigler, D., Ap- 
pleton. 

Fifty-seventh — Senator — Edward 
' liustad, R.. Wheaton. Representative 
' — L. C Spooner. R.. Morris; J. E. Peter- 
i son, R., Barrett; James Adlard. D.. 
I Browns Valley. 

! Flfty-elKhtii — Senator — C. J. Gunder- 
' son R., Alexandria. Representative — 
Iver J. Lee, R., Starbuck; John R. Ser- 
rln. D., Glenwood; E. B. Lobeck. P., 
Alexandria; A, J. Anderson. R., Alex- 
andria. ^ „.. , , 

Flftv-nlnth — Senator — C. J. Wright, 
R., Fergus Falls; Ole O. Sageng. P. O.. 
Dalton; S. G. Wallace. P. O. Repre- 
sentative — J. T. Johnson, R.. Amor; C. 
L. Alexander, R., Pelican Rapids; Alex 
Nelson, R.. Perham; R. J. Llndberg. R.. 
Henning; H. Polgase. P. O.; N. E. 
Thermodson, P. O.; Knute Underwood. 
P.. Underwood; George A. Poulson. P., 
Henning. ^ 

Sixtieth — Senator — C. S. Marden R., 
Barnesville; M. Kuhn. D., Detroit. Rep- 
resentative — S. N. Lee. Ft., Park town- 
ship; Knute Wefald, D., Hawley; P. S. 
<:osgrove. R- Detroit; David Harg, P., 
I r>etrolt; J. W. Noffsinger, P.. Campbell; 
I Moyle Edwards, R., Breckenridge. 
' Sixty-first — Senator — Albert Berg^^ R., 
Spooner; Earl Geil, P. O.. BemidjI. Rep- 
resentative — A. L. Thompson, R., Mah- 
nomen; G. L. Sulerud, P.. Halstead; 
Iver Krohn, R., Shevlin; Dr. C. G. For- 
est. P.. Bagley; J. H. Grant. P. O., Be- 
midjI. 

Sixty-second — Senator — A. D. Steph- 
ens, R., Crookston; Gustav J. De Mar, 
P., Fertile; H. C. Larum, P. O.. Climax. 
Representative — John Holten. R., Fer- 
tile; K. S. Akers. R.; Otto Koeppe, P. 
«>.. Crookston; Thomas VoUern, P., 
Mentor. 

Sixty-third — Senator — B. E. Sund- 

berg. R.. Kennedy. Representative — ■ 

' G. H. Mattson, R.. Roseau; Donald 

Robertson. R., Argyle: Frank A. Hen- 

lin, D., Stephen. 

I » ■ 

For the Growing Boy, 

3 Winners $10 suits are just the thing. 
We show you twenty-six different 
styles at this price and every one is 
pure wool. 



A store must be advertised regularly 
n as sure a schedule aa is followed 
in opening and closing Its doors. In 
fact the advertising should be the key 
and interpretation always, to all 
people, of what the store Is — what It 
offers. 



Fn<!ay, 



THE DULUTH H* 



DEFECTIVEPAGE 




TAe Globe Invites You Tomorrow to a Very Rxtraofdinary Special 
Opening Sale that Promises to Eclipse any Sale Ever Held in Duluth. 



O 
O 

o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o